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LIBRARY

OF THE

PHILADELPHIA

MUSEUM

OF ART




2-3






Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation



http://www.archive.org/details/philadelphiadire1823phil



J -^



THE



Philadelphia Index,



OR



9

tor



is«?a



For Corrections and Removals,
see yellow paper.



^5

T -^ i ■

WITH OTHER USEFUL INFORMATION.
f

<**. - BY ROBERT DESILVER.



Ushed and for sale by the Editor, 110 Walnat street, and b]
the principal Booksellers of the City.

Price to Subscribers^ Si. oO



THE



Philadelphia Index,



OR



9

FOB



1823:



CONTAINING THE

Names, "Professions, and Hesi&ence,

OF ALL THE

HEADS OF FAMILIES AND PERSONS IN BUSINESS

OF THE

CITY AND SUBURBS,

WITH OTHER TSEFUL INFORMATION.

H
■ ■ 1

BY ROBERT DESILVER.



"tiblished and for sale by the Editor, 110 Wain at street, and by
the principal Booksellers of the City.

Price to Stibscribers^ $1.50



3>



TO THE PUBLIC.



The Editor tenders his thanks to those Citizens who
have patronized this Directory, and assures them that
every exertion has been made to render it complete.

The Directory commences with the "Annual Jldver-
titer" and the arrangement of the names is very much
improved. The reader is requested to make himself ac-
quainted with "Directions to the Reader" as soon as pos-
sible, as it will make every part clearly understood. A
complete list of streets, &c. and public places follow the
names.

The additional matter, after the names, consists of the
Constitutions of the United States and Pennsylvania —
Members of Congress — Government of the United States
and Pennsylvania — Ministers and Consuls — Post Office
Establishment — Courts of the United States and Pennsyl-
vania — and a List of Public Institutions and Societies,
alphabetically arranged, besides a variety of other useful
information, particularized in the "List of Contents"

Notwithstanding*all the attention given to this Direc-
tory, some errors no doubt exist; for which the clemency
of the public is solicited. Every well informed person
must be impressed with the impossibility of blinking for-
ward a work of this kind entirely free of errors. Tha
taking of the names was commenced in August, 18£2, and
it is hoped no person who may have changed his residence
since that date, without giving notice thereof to the Edi-
tor, will censure him, as communications appeared in dif-
ferent Newspapers requesting such to send him their ad-
dresses for correction, the frequency of removals render-
ing it impossible for the Editor, without such notice, to
make a correct return.

The mammoth task of taking all the names of families
and persons in business, residing in the City and Liberties
of Philadelphia, requires a deal of perseverance and inge-
nuity to obtain the necessary information ; as some per-
sons entirely refuse to answer our queries, others must be



IV TO THE PUBLIC.

waited upon at some suitable hour, some houses are closed,
many surnames of different orthography sounding alike,
and the information obtained being often vague and incor-
rect. Many cannot spell their names ; some cannot speak
English ; a number are so fearful of being found that they
give wrong names, thinking us collectors of taxes or mili-
tia fines, while others, in reply to our questions, tell us to
"find out by our learning-." Much of the information to
be had from servants only, with other difficulties, to say
nothing of the expense before the receipt of a dollar on
account of the book. Some persons complain of the price,
but when they are informed that the price of the New
York Directory, containing much less matter, is considera-
bly higher, it is hoped there will be no further complaint —
to those who think we are not paid enough we tender our
thanks.

If no Directory was published for two years, there
would be no calculating the value of time lost in searching
out the residence of individuals, which we hope will be
obviated by the present publication.

If the Editor is sufficiently encouraged, he will repeat
the publication of the Directory annually; and as by expe-
rience, it is now reduced to a certainty, Philadelphia can-
not support a competition in this business, he thinks it not
unreasonable respectfully to solicit his fellow citizens for
their undivided patronage so long as he gives satisfaction,
which he will endeavour to do. He makes this seemingly
unreasonable request, as a divided patronage would pro-
bably oblige him to relinquish his intention to continue
the work.

The Editor also begs leave to apologise for the late ap-
pearance of the Directory for the present year, arising
from circumstances not within his control; he intends
that it shall in future appear in January of each year.

ROBERT DESILVER,

110 Walnut Street, Philadelphia.

February 28, 1823.



MANUFACTURED BY

GRIEVE, GRELLIER, Sf MORGAN,

MILL WALL, POPLAR, LONDON;

Warranted genuine and unadulterated as originally and
first imported by Slater Sf Co. to Philadelphia, in 1818.



The Roman Cement is impenetrable to Water, or any mois-
ture, and is decidedly the best article hitherto discovered for the
composition of Stucco, and the embellishment of the exterior of
Buildings, as it not only will resist the weather in the most ex-
posed situations, but become as hard, handsome, and durable as
Portland Stone.

Walls in damp situations, and arches of vaults covered with this
Cement, will effectually exclude Water, or any other moisture.
For the building- of Tanks, Cisterns, Vats, &c. &c. it is unequalled,
and is an admirable composition, used as Mortar, in setting Brick
or Stone Work in any aquatic erection, which it unites into one
solid mass, and withstands the action of the sea.



Birections for using the Cement in Brick or Stone Work.

Mix it with water to the consistency of thick paste, and use it
immediately, the Bricks or Stones being previously well soaked in
water ; mix no more at a time than can be used in fifteen minutes,
as, after it has once set, it will be unfit for use again. A rod o:
brick work will require about 68 bushels.

For Stuccoing.

Well rake out the jeints of the walls, and having made them i s
wet as you can, lay on the Stucco, prepared of equal parts of Ct -
ment and clean sharp River Sand, wetted to the consistency <. '

B



mortar, observing to lay on the whole coat at once, at least three
quarters of an inch thick, and to hand- float it to a surface as ex-
peditiously as possible, as much working the Cement injures its
hardening quality. A yard surface of Stuccoing will require
about three quarters of a bushel of Cement. Joints may be drawn
on the Stucco, in imitation of regular Masonry, and when dry,
may be coloured with a wash prepared as follows": — In each gallon
of water, dissolve four ounces of green Copperas, adding as much
fresh Lime and Cement as will produce the colour required ; or a
richer colour may be obtained, by using Umber and Ochre instead
of Cement, adding a small proportion of Linseed Oil and Tar,
which readily unites with water by means of the lime.



XZP Be careful not to Stucco new work till the building is

settled.



ARTIFICIAL STONE.



Equal quantities of Cement and clean rough Sand, mixed as
above directed for Stuccoing, and being cast in convenient wood
moulds, will form a very beautiful and durable Artificial Stone, for
Window Sills, Coping, Stringing, Courses, Imposts, Key Stones,
and Profile Chimney pieces. The Cement is of great use for
pointing Tiles, setting Chimney pots, &c. A course of Bricks
being laid in Cement, and Stuccoed over, will form a very hard
durable floor.



The Cement should be kept from air or damp, and exposed as
little as possible in its manufactured state; it is carefully packed in
sound Casks, containing five bushels each, and a constant supply
will regularly be kept on sale, by the single Cask or larger quan-
tity, by A. Slater, agent to the manufacturers, No. 306, Arch
street.



Also, for sale, by

J. S. LEWIS & J. BACON, Dock-street.







&m®L£®mM?mii& w®mm&%



IN THE UPPER PART OF THE



STATE HOUSE, C HE SNUT- STREET,



Open throughout the day; illuminated every Even-.

ing. Admittance 25 cents*

This Museum is the oldest and largest esta-
blishment in the United States, and contains im-
mense collections from the Animal and Mineral
kingdoms of nature, from all parts of the world.



These are all beautifully arranged so as to enable
the visitor to study the objects with the greatest
advantage. The collection of Implements and
Ornaments of our Aboriginal tribes is very ex-
tensive and interesting, and the Cabinet of Anti-
quities, and Artificial Curios ties is not less wor-
thy of attention. In addition to the ordinary at-
tractions of a Museum, there is in this a very large
collection of the Portraits of American Statesmen
and Warriors of the Revolution, and of the most
distinguished scientific men of Europe and Ame-
rica.



The Proprietor, C. W. Peale, desirous of se-
curing the Museum permanently in this city, ob-
tained an act of Incorporation, by which the sta-
bility of the Institution is insured, while, by the di-
vision of the property into 500 shares, of a nomi-
nal value, he is enabled to do every justice to his
family. The act of Incorporation secures the use
of the Museum in perpetuity to the city, and au-
thorizes the Stockholders to appoint annually five
trustees, who meet quarterly to regulate the busi-
ness of the Institution, and declare the dividends
to be made of the net profit. Nothing can be
removed from the Institution under a penalty and
forfeiture of double the value of the thing re-
moved; hence donations may be made, with a
certainty on the part of the donors, that the arti-
cles placed in the Museum will always remain for
the public good.




JAMES PETERS,

GOLD AND SILVER THIMBLE AND
PENCIL CASE MANUFACTURER,

No. 65, ARCH-STREET,
Between Second <Jf Tliird streets,



Has constantly on hand the above articles of as
good quality and on as low terms as can be obtain-
ed. Also, Silver Spoons, Spectacles, Jewellery,
&c. wholesale and retail.

Orders will be thankfully received and punc-
tually attended to.

B3




George IMItg,



AT HTS



W3m£&!L Sff£(Bil22&ISS



JVb. 171, CHESNUTSTREET,

OFFERS FOR SALE,

Grand and Square German Pianos, superior quality, witfc

Turkish Music.
Grand and Square English Pianos, superior quality.
Elegant English and French Harps.
Flutes, Fifes, Clarionets, Guitars, Bassoons, French Horna,

Trumpets, and Flageolets.
Extra fine Violins, and low priced Violins, by the dozen.
Violin iiows ; Italan French and German Violin Strings;

Violin Basses, Harp and Guitar Strings, &c.

ICT'G W receives regularly from England, Fra ™ e .>
and Germany, the newest .Music, and is daily making addi-
tions to his nwn publications.

Country Merchants supplied with all kinds oj Instru-
ments and Music on liberal terms.




*V^J - 1^'



LEATHER MANUFACTURER,

HAS FOR SALE AT HIS STORE,

A&. 35, Xorth Third Street, Philadelphia,

Fourth door below Mr, Elliot's tavern, sign of the Harp and

Eagle,

A large Assortment of

MOROCCO LEATHER,
Suitable for Shoemakers, Hatters, Bookbinders, Coachiriakers
Saddlers, Pocket-Book. Bellows and Trunk Manufacturers, kc.

ALSO,

CHAMOIS AND BUCK SKINS,

Suitable for Glovers, Shirts and Drawers, Coach makers, Printer^

Suspender .Manufacturers, and Silver Platers.

WHITE LEATHER,

For Saddlers. Apothecaries, and suitable ior Shoe Linings, fee
He also manufactures, and keeps constantly for sale,

A GENERAL ASSORTMENT OF

PARCHMENT AND VELLUM,

Suitable for Scriveners, Printers. Bookbinders. Goldbeaters, and
for Drum Heads.

ALSO,

Sumac and bark tanned Sheep, Bier, and Calf Skins,
For Bookbinders, Shoe Binding-, ^hoe Lining-, Aprons, Suspend-
er. Sacidlers, Pocket Book, Bellows and Card Manufactu-
rers, &c.

ALSO, FOR SALE AS ABOVE,

Materials and Ppola ur buo.^iucers. Box. Bookbinder and
Trunk Board-. Sneathiog- Paper, ccc &€■

IC^DELR bKLNS BOUGHT.



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Improved Patent Riding and Binding*

BOOK-SELLER, BOOKBINDER AND

STATIONER.

No. 110, Walnut-street, Philadelphia,

Has obtained letters patent from the United States
for a new mode oj Book- binding.

Banks, public offices and traders, will find it to
their advantage to possess themselves of his pa-
tent bound books, which he flatters himself from
their general use in public offices and institutions
of the United States, and counting houses of mer-
chants and others, the binding being preserved
clean and sound, to give general satisfaction.

Books Ruled and Bound to any Pattern,

at the shortest notice, of superior materials, and
at such prices as will give his store a decided pre-
ference.

N. B. A handsome assortment of Masonic
Books, Certificates, Aprons, &c. &c.

Blank Books and Stationary, on liberal terras.^



PATENT RULING AND BINDING.

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL STATIONER AND BINDER,

253, MARKET- STREET,

PHILADELPHIA,

RESPECTFULLY acquaints his friends and the public, that
he has enlarged his book-binding establishment, and now carries
on the business, in all its various branches, on an, extensive scale.
Any order for

BLANK BOOKS

Supplied on short notice, and at a reasonable rate, ruled and
bound in any style that may be suggested. — He feels confident in
stating that, in point of execution and materials, his work will not
shrink from a comparison with that issued from any bindery in the
city. The liberal patronage he has heretofore received, and now
enjoys, is the best evidence of his customers' approbation. Like-
wise, all kinds of

FANCY AND FLAIN BINDING,
Done with neatness and durability.
*^* Orders from a distance, promptly attended to.

ON HAND, A GENERAL ASSORTMENT OF

IMPERIAL, SUPER-ROYAL, ROYAL, MEDIUM, DEMI, POST AND CAP,

WRITING PAPER.

BLANK BOOKS of all sizes and bindings.— .PRINTING
PAPER of different qualities and sizes. — CARTRIDGE and
WRAPPING do. do.— American and English MARBLE and
COLOURED PAPER.— QUILLS.— Fancy and common INK
STANDS.— Elegantly CUT GLASS INKS and SANDS —
Brookman and Langdon's superior ARTIST's PENCILS, war-
ranted genuine. — German and English SLATES and PENCILS.
LEAP PENCILS, a great variety. — Ladies' and Gentlemen's
fancy and common POCKET BOOKS.— American, French and
Spanish PLAYING CARDS. — Elegant American and French
embossed and plain VISITING CARDS—BLANK CARDS, all
sizes.

A general supply of SCHOOL and MISCELLANEOUS
BOOKS.— SCHOOL BIBLES, and TESTAMENTS, correctly
stereotyped and well bound, very cheap, by the large or small
quantity.

*** COUNTRY MERCHANTS, in particular, will find it
much to their advantage by applying, as the above goods will be
eokl at the most reasonable prices.



SB®©I& SONPIP



9

#b. 151, SOUTH FIFTH STREET,



EIGHTH DOOR ABOVE SPRUCE STREET.

Theological, Historical, Medical, and Law-
B©oks. Also, Novels and Romances, and Clas-
sical Books, all as cheap as can be procured in
the city.

The advertiser generally attends the public
sale of Books, and will receive orders with care
and be grateful for favors.



JONES AND HARRISON.

Dyers and Scourers.,

JVb. 102J ARCHSTREET,
FOUR DOORS ABOVE FIFTH,

Beg leave to inform the citizens generally that
they Dye, Restore, and Refold Enghsh, India,
French, and Italian Goods of every description,
and they hope, by strict attention, to give gene-
ral satisfaction, having been brought up regularly
to the Dying Business.

N. B. Articles for mourning at the shortest
notice.




TURNING,



IN IVORY, WOOD, AND METALS,



Ao. 63, Walnut^ below Dock street.

Silversmith's and Jeweller's turning done with
care, neatness, and dispatch. Graining Balls for
Morocco dressers. Billiard Balls, Ivory and
Ebony Screen-handles, Pencil Rulers, Rulers for
Counting-houses, Teachers, &c. Tooth-powder,
Lip-salve, and other boxes. With a vanet) of
articles in the above line, by

R. B. JOHNSON*




JVb. 16, South Sixth-street near Market-street ',

PHILADELPHIA,

MANUFACTURERS OF

Plated Saddlery,

AND

<£oadj anti ^arneg£ furniture \

HAVE ALWAYS FOR SALE,

A large Assortment of the following Articles, of the best
and most fashionable Patterns — viz.
Plated Bridle Bits, Stirrup Irons, Spurs, Bridle Buckles
and Slides, Martingale Hooks, Stirrup Slides, Cantlo
Mouldings, Fancy Saddle Heads, Saddle Nails, Bridle Or-
naments, Morocco Slipper Stirrups, Saddler's Tacks — •
Plated and Brass Coach and Gig Harness Furniture— Do,
Dash and Body Handles, Stump and Full Plate Joints,
Gig and Coach-Bands — Do. do. Mouldings, Curtain
Knobs, Coach Door Hinges, Venetian Blind Locks, Glass
String Rollers, Coach Steps, Coach and Gig Springs.

Also, an Assortment of
Girth and Straining Webs, Saddle Trees, Plushes, Sec*

C



IMPROVE D

Venetian Blind

Afc 104, \ORTH- FIFTH STREET,

PHILADELPHIA;

WHERE are made all kinds of* Shades for
Windows, Venetian Blinds, Parlour Spring
Blinds, Spring Curtains, Rolling Curtains, &c.
of the best materials and fitted up in the neatest
and most convenient manner

By

JOHN Y ATM AN.

N. B. The articles are all Warranted.




lK«e*itti->»iimunBni



BUSH HILL, PHILADELPHIA.

IFAREIIOUSE, Xo. 34- XORTII THIRD

STREET,

PHILADELPHIA.

The S&bseriber respectfully infohQ8 the public that lie
continues to Manufacture

FATEXT FLOOR CLOTHS,

On a more extensive and much improved plan; by wTiicli means
urnish Cloths for Rooms an! 1 ! Entries at the- shortest no-
tice — wa: ranted from 12 to Mi months seasoned, and lit fur imme-
diate use or Exportation. Viz.

Cloths to fit Octagons and Recesses, with Border?, in two weeks.
Ditto ditto, without Borders, in 24 hours.

Ah Cloths not exceeding 21 feet by 60, will be without seam or
joining-, and made to a n dimensions

in: also offers for saxe, as aeove,
JJIERIC.LY CJIMJfdTING $ OIL CLOT!

Ingrained and Venetian Carpeting, from American wool.
Hearth Rug?, Carpet Binding- and Baize, do. do.



Oil Cloth made on Baize, for covering Piano3, Sideboards and

Tables.
Common do. (on Muslin wove for the express purpose) by the

yard, piece, or case.
Improved Stage and Carriage Curtain Oil Cloth, equal to leather.
Linen and Silk do. for travelling Coats, &c.
Hat Covers, Nurses and Children's Aprons.
Prepared Canvass for Portrait, Historical, and Panorama Paint-
ings.
Prepared Silk for the Cure of Rheumatism.
Water-Proof Leather for Coachmakers' use, &c.
Carpenter's Measuring Tape, &c. &c.

*** Orders from any part of the United States or West-Indies
sent tnrough an Agent, or addressed to the Manufacturer, with re-
ference for payment, shall be promptly attended to.

ISAAC MACAULEY.



(BIRDI&BtB ^aMBUSi! 1




No. 139, NORTH SIXTH-STREET,
PHILADELPHIA.



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EXPLANATION.

Look at the top for the century, then to the right for the inter- |

► veningyear; iu a line with it under the century is the dominical |

[ letter for the 5 ear. £

!. For bissextile, or leap years, 'use the letter on a line with flic $

i blank-above that year, until the first of February.

Look fcr the mouth, and in a line with it under the given domi- |

, nicai letter, is the day of the Week on which that month begins: |

I then find the corresponding day at the top of the days of the week, 5

\ and that column will be the days of the week for that month. \

C 2 •



LIST OF
PHYSICIANS, MIDWIFES, XURSES,Vc.



PHYSICIANS.

Aitken, W. 415 Mulberry
Alberti, Geo. F. 154 N. 5i.
Allen, C. 597 Sassafras
Atkins, D. 19 South 7th j
Atlee Edwin, A. 180 Sassa-
fras .
Atlee E. jun. 137 Vine
Bache Franklin, 163 Spruce
Barnes J. 79 Mulberry
Barton W. P. C. 303 Ches-

nut
Barton J. R. 204 Chesnut
Benczet Anthony, S. Third
Bell J. 138 South Fourth
Bond J. 120 Mulberry
Burden J'ise R. 95 S. Third
Burgin G., S. E. cor. Third

and Mulberry
Clark J. Y. 167 Mulberry
Chapman N. 9 York Build-
ings. Walnut ab. 7th street
Coates B H., N. W. corner

Front and Walnut
Cohoun S. 6 Sansom street
Condie D. F. 99 S. Fifth
Connell T. 87 Mulberry
Conover S. F. 141 S. Fifth
Coxe J K.8 York Buildings
Currie W., N. W„ cor. Pine

and Front
Dewees Wm. P. 6 York

Buildings
Duffieid Wm. B. 198 Spruce
Ebcrle J., S. W. cor. Sixth

ar;d Sassafras
Ellis B. 72 N. 9tu



Durkee J. Chesnut ab. 8th,

North side
Etnlen J. cor. 7th & Mul-
berry
Flagler G. 208 S. Fifth
Froeland 280 N. Second
Fox S. M. 37 Chesnut

Gallagher D., S. Fifth corn.

Library
Gebhard L. P. 118 Sassafras
Gibson W. Chesnut ab. 7th

South side
Green J., N.E. cor. Wood

and Fifth
Griffith R., E. S. 8th below

Walnut
Griffiths E. 37 N. Fifth ab.

Cherry
•rriffitts S.P. 82 S. Front
Hall T. M. 2 N. Eleventh
Harlan R., S. Third opposite

Dock
Harris T. 210 S. Third
Hartshorn J., S E. corner

Spruce and Seventh
Hays J., M. E. cor. Sansom

and Eighth streets
Heberton J. C. 1 1 5 S. Fifth
flcwson Thomas T. 132

Chesnut
Heylin J. cor. 9th & Vine
Hodge H. L. 181 Wainut
Horner Wm. E. 1 83 Chesnut
Howell E. Y., N. I Oth



LIST OF PHYSICIAN, $c.



Jackson ft cor. Walnut Sf 7th
James Thomas C. 7 York

Buildings
Janney B. S. 312 N. Third
K Lp H 290 S. Second
Karsten J. 266 V . Second
Knight A. 136 N. Front
Laroche R. i47 Pine
Lawrence J., V O S. Fifth
Mc Clellan G 155 Walnut
Mc C-jlley J., S. Front
Matlock, Second ab. ■• rch
Mathieu J. 5 2 Walnut
Mease J*mes 192 Chesnut
Meigs C. D. 128 Mulberry
Miller P. 181 Mulberry
Mitchell K- 119 S Fifth
Monges J. R. 13 Sanson*
Moore J. 62 S. Seventh
Moore J. W. 61 Spruce
Nancrede J. G. 151 S. 1 0th
Nan- rede N., N.W. cor. of

Fifth and Powel
Otto J. C. 139 Mulberry
Parke J. I Rittenhouse Place
Parrish J. 109 Mulberry



Paul J. M. cor. Fifth and

North street
Perkin J. 159 X. Second
Phillips M. cor. 9th Sc Vine
Physick P. S„ S 4th below

Spruce
Price W. 36 N. Ninth
Poval R. 115 S. Ninth
Randolph J. F. 7 4 S. Fifth
Rees B. R. South Front
Rosseau J. R cor. Pine & 6th
Rush James, 15 1 Chesnut
Sargent T. 144 Sassafras
Sharpless J. H. 1 1 N. 4th
Schaffer C. I 37 Sassafras
Schott G. 60 S. Seventh
Shaw W. 237 Mulberry
Skerrett D. C. 154 S. Ninth
Stewart J. 106 S. Eighth
Thomas J. 163 Sassafras
Tucker \. 143 S. Fourth
Unler G. 4, 4 N. Front
Wood G. B. 85 Mulberry
Whilldin J. G. cor. Fourth

and Waii.ut
Underwood J., N. Ninth



MIDWIVES.



Carlley R. 55 Shippen.
Cu mining's Abigail, cor. Ba-
ker s ct. & Callowhill St.
Eager Mrs. Frank. r. n. Queen



Helm bold K. I. 3 Quarry
Worrell 88 Union
[lose Ann, b* Wood