1867-1869 Republican Congressional Committee.

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, x_epublished by the Union Republican State Central Committee of California. ]

ELEGANT EXTRACTS



FROM



REBEL WRITERS.



. i.



Published bg^lhe Union Bepublioan Congressional Committee, Washington, D. C.



PEACE DEMOCRAT HATRED OF SOLDIERS.

" If I could have my way 1 would place
iJeff. Davis in Congress, where he richly
belongs. Then I would go to Concord, take
all the miserable battle flags from the State
House, and inalte a bonfire of them in the
State House yard. [Great applause.]
Then I would go all through the North
and destroy all the monuments and grave-
stones erected to the memory of soldiers.
In short, I would put out of sight every-
thing which reminds us that we ever had
a war with our Southern brethern.

" I do not know that I would hang one-
legged and one-armed soldiers, but I would
pray to God to get them out of the way as
soon as possible." Henry Clay Dan, in
a speech at Manchester, N. H., February,
1868.



JUDGE



DEMOCRATS AND



MILLER ON WAR
SAUSAGE.

" There is no difference between a "War
Democrat and an Abolitionist. They are
both links of tne same sausage, made from
the sain' dog."-r Judge Miller in the Na~
tioiidl Democratic Convention of 1864, which
no minuted McCiellan.

OFFICIAL REPORT OP THE BUTCHER FORREST,
DELEGATE TO THE NEW YORK DEMOCRATIC
CONVENTION OF 1868.
" 1 desire to acknowledge the prompt and
energetic action of Brigadier General
Chalmers, commanding tie forces around
Fort Pillow. His faithful execution of all
movements necessary to the successful
accomplishment of the objects of the
expedition entitles him to special mention.
He has reason to be proud of the conduct
of the officers and men of his command for
their gallantry and courage in assaulting
and carrying the enemy's works without
the assistance of artillery or bayonets."
Extract from Gen. JV. B. Forrest's Report
of the Fort Pillow massacred R. R.
p. 601.



:



SEYMOUR'S SPEECH TO THE CHILDREN MUR-

DERERS AND ORPHAN ASYLUM BURNERS
IN NEW YORK CITY, JULY, 1863.

"MY FRIENDS: I have comedown here
from the quiet of the country to see what
was the difficulty, to learn what all this
trouble was concerning the draft. Let me
issure you that I am your friend. [Up-
roarious cheering.] You have been my
friends [cries of * Yes,' ' Yes/ * That's so/
' We are, and will be again ']. and now I
assure you, my fellow citizens, that I am
here to show you a test of my friendship.
[Cheers. 1 I WISH TO INFORM YOU THAT I
HAVE SENT MY ADJUTANT GENERAL TO
WASHINGTON TO CONFER WITH THE AUTHORI-

TIES THERE, AND TO HAVE THIS DRAFT
SUSPENDED A.\D STOPPED. [VociferOUg

cheers. 'I I ask you as good citizens to
wait for his return, and I assure" you that
I will do all that I can to see that there is
no inequality and no wrong done, to any
one. I wish you to take good care of all
property as good citizens, and see that
every person is safe. The safe keeping of
property and persons rests with you, and I
charge you to disturb neither. It is your
dury to maintain the good order of the city,
and I k?ww you will do it. I wish you now
to separate as good citizens, and you can
assemble again whenever , you wish to do so.
I ask you to leave all to me now and I will
see to your rights. Wait until my
Adjutant returns from Washington and
you shall be satisfied. Listen to me and see
that there is no harm done to either persons
or property, but retire peaceably."

DEMOCRATS AFRAID OF UNION SOLDIERS.

In the Soldiers' and Sailors' Convention,
which met at New York on the 7th of Julv\
1868,

" General McQuade, of New York, moved
that the Secretary be instructed, in making
up the record of thu^onveation, to omit
all military titles of tne delegates, so that
all might appear there simply as soldiers.



[2]



" Private Hildredtb, of Illinois, opposed
the motion, on the ground thaV4ie Radicals
would use such action by the Convention as
going to show that the Conservative soldiers
are afraid to let it be known that officers
took part in the proceedings. At his request
General McQuade withdrew his resolution."

A COPPERHEAD ON THE WAR.

Sanford E. Church, one of the candidates
voted for by the Democratic Convention,
that nominated Seymour and Blair, in "a
speech during the McClellan campaign,
said :

" It is an unlawful and unconstitutional
war ; it is a wicked war; it is a crime against
God and humanity. They have no more
right to call upon the white men of the
North or the Treasury of the North to fight
such battles, any more than they have a
right, without cause, to make war upon
Brazil and Cuba, because the institutions of
those countries do not please their Puritani-
cal notions/' ,.,Y > >Y

J' JlLHifi

THE DEMOCRATI8 PLATFORM.
lfi I iliflf - V"

WASHINGTON, June 30, 1868.
Colonel James O. Broadhead:

DEAR COLONEL : In reply to your inquiries
I beg leave to say that I leave you to
determine on consultation with rny friends
from Missouri, whether my name shall be
presented to the Democratic Convention,
and to submit the following, as what I
consider the real and only issue in this

M

The reconstruction policy of the Radicals
\vill be complete before the next election ;
the States so long excluded will have been
admitted; negro suffrage established and
the carpet-baggers installed in their seats in
both branches of Congress. There is no
possibility of changing the political charac-
ter of the Senate, even if the Democrats
should elect their President and a major ty
of the popular branch of Congress. We
cannot, therefore, undo the Radical plan of
reconstruction by Congressional action ; the
Senate will continue to bar its repeal Must
we submit to it ? How can it be overthrown ?
It can only be overthrown by the authority
of the Executive, who is sworn in to main-
tain the Constitution, and who will fail to
do his duty if he allows the Constitution to
perish under a series of Congressional
enactments whioh are in palpable violation
of its fundamental principles.

If the President e^fed by the Democracy



enforces or permits others to enforce these
reconstruction acts, the Radicals, by the
accession of twenty spurious Senators and
fifty Representatives, will control both
branches of Congress, and his Administra-
tion will be as powerless as the present one
of Mr. Johnson:-

There is but one way to restore the
Government and Constitution, and that is
fur the President elect to declare these acts,
null and void, compel the army to ulsdo its
usurpations at the South, disperse the
carpet bag State Governments, allow the
*'hite people to reorganize their own
G( vernments an $ elect Senators and Repre-
sentatives. The House of Representatives
will contain a majority of Democrats from
the North, and they will admit the Repre-
sentatives elected by the white people of the
South, and with the co-operation of the
President it will not be difficult to compel
the Senate to submit once more to the
obligations of the Constitution. It will not
be able to withstand the public judgment,
if distictly invoked and clearly expressed on
this fundamental issue, and it is the sure
way to avoid all future strife to put the issue
plainly to the country.

I repeat that this is the real and only
question which .we should allow to control
us: Miall we submit to the usurpations by
which the Government has been overthrown,
or shall we exert ourselves for its full and
complete restoration ? It is idle to talk of
bonds, greenbacks, gold, the public faith,
and the public credit. What can a Demo-
cratic President do in regard to any of these,
with a Congress in both branches controlled
by the carpet-baggers and their allies ? He-
will be powerless to stop the supplies by
which idle negroes are organized into
political clubs by which an army is
maintained to protect these vagabonds in
their outrages upon the ballot. These, and
things like these, eat up the revenue and
resources of the Government and destroy
its credit make the difference between i
gold and greenbacks. We must restore the
Constitution before we can restore the
finances, and 'to do this we must have a
President who will excute the will of the
people by trampling into dust the usurpation
of Congress, known as the reconstruction
acts. I wish to stand before the Convention
upon this issue, but itis one which embraces
everything else that is of value in its large
and comprehensive results. It is the one !
thing that includes all that is worth a
contest, and without it there is nothing



[3]



that gives dignity, honor, or value to the
struggle. Your friend,

FRANK P. BLAIR.

THE FEROCITY OF A REBEL PABSON.
" It is now victory or unconditional sub-
mission ; submission, not to the Conservative
and Christian people of the North, but to a
party of infidel fanatics, with an army of
needy and greedy soldiers at their backs.
Who shall be able to restrain them in their
hour of victory? When that moment
approaches, when the danger seems to be
over and the spoils are ready to be divided,
pvery outlaw will rush to fill their ranks,
every adventurer will rush to swell their
legions, and they will sweep down upon the
South like the hosts of Attilla. And shall
you find in defeat that mercy you did not
find in victory ? You may slumber now ;
you may lie upon your befls of ease and
dream that, when it is all over you will be
welcomed back to all the privileges and
immunities of greasy citizens, but how
terrible will be your disappointment! You
will have an ignoble home, overrun by
hordes of insolent slaves and rapacious
soldiers. You will wear the badge of a
conquered race, Pariahs among your fellow-
creatures, yourselves degraded, your delicate
wives and gentle children thrust down to
menial service, insulted, perhaps dishonored.
Think you that these victorious hordes,
made up in the large part of the sweepings
of Europe, will leave you anything? As
well might the lamb expect mercy fr >m the
wolf." Bishop Elliot's sermon, preached
at Savannah, Ga., November, 1863. jR.tf.8,
M.

REBEL RELIGION.

. " There can be no question that Southern
troops are unsurpassed in valor and patriot-
ism by any body of soldiers in the world.
They have everything to make them so.
Your enemies strive for conquest and
plunder. Your cause is the cause of right,
ef justice, of great principles. Your
enemies are grasping at shadows, pursuing
phantoms, urged on by the wildest fanati-
cism/' Petersburg, Va., Evan. Tract So-
ciety, Tract No. 214. 1L R. 8, p. 26.

TOUT" BEAUREGARD WANTS WAR TO THE
KNIFE.

" We will yet have to come to proclaiming
this war ' a war to the knife/ when no
quarter will be asked or granted. I believe
it is the only thing which will prevent
recruiting at the North." General Beaure-



gard's letter to General Martin, August 3,
1862. R. R. 8, p. 36.

JUDGE WOODWARD FOR REVOLUTION.

' If I were the President's counselor,
which I am not, I would advise him, if you
prefer articles of impeachment, to demur
both to your jurisdiction and that of the
Senate, and to issue a proclamtaion giving
you and all the world notice that while he
held himself impeachable for misdemeanors
in office before the Constitutional tribunal,
he never would subject the office he holds
in trust for the people to the irregular,
unconstitutional, fragmentary bodies who
proposed to strip him of it. Such a pro-
clamation, with the army and navy in hand
to sustain it. would meet a popular response
that would make an end to impeachment
and impeachers." Speech of Judge G. W.
Woodward in the House of Representatives,
February 24 ? 1868, BOKSTO



FERNANDO WOOD'S PATRIOTISM.

" No more victims for slaughter pens
not a man not a dollar." Fernando Wood,
at Syracuse, August 17, 1864

THE RADICAL KILLERS.

" Let clubs be composed of Democrats and
as ready to fight as to vote; let them be
drilled in the manual of arms ; be as con-
versant with the service of military tactics
as Democratic principles. They may be
required to display that knowledge, and if
nigger or Radical killing should be in order,
they will be as ready for that business as to
listen to the inaugural of a Democratic
President on the 4th of March, 1869."
Brick Pomeroy in the La Crosse Democrat,
December, 1867.

SOCIAL AFFECTIONS.

" Southern brethern ! If I thought I had
a twenty-fifth cousin who was as white-
livered as you are, I would kill him and set
him up in my barn-yard to make sheep own
their lambs." General Jenkins to a Peace
Democrat at Hagerstown, July, 1863.

BLOODHOUNDS FOR UNION MEN.

"We, the undersigned, will pay five
dollars per pair for fifty pairs of well-bred
hounds, and fifty dollars for one pair of
thorough bred bloodhounds that will take
the track of a man. The purpose for which
these dogs are wanted is to chase thf*
infernal, cowardly Lincoln bush-whacker,
of East Tennessee and Kentucky to thei *.
dens and capture them. The said hound
must be delivered at Captain Hamme







[*]



livery stable by the 10th of December next,

where a mustering officer will be present

to muster and inspect them

"F. N. MCNAIRY,
" H. H. HARRIS.
"Camp Crinfort, Camobell county, Ten-

rpi5 ^ ee " Nashville Courier, November,

1861.

BLACK FLAG.

' We are for displaying the black flag.
We should ask no quarter at the hand of
the Yankee invaders, and our motto should
be an entire extermination of every one
who has set foot on our sacred soil. Let
that flag, then, float over every hill-top and
valley throughout the whole South, and as
the breeze fans its folds, let it tell to the
Hessian scoundrels the welcome they will
have on Southern soil death, death to each,
one and all." Lynchburq Republican, Jan-
uary, 1862. R. R. 4, p. 10.

RETURN TO SLAVERY.

4< The time must come when the party in
pow r er in Washington will be overthrown,
and the Southern States again entitled to
full and exclusive control over their respec-
tive populations, which will enable them to
derive some system of legislation by which
the negroes could be made to discharge the
incumbent duties of a laboring ciass. A
hope much encouraged by the apparent tone,
of Democrats in the North." Letter from
Jumes At. Mason to Graham, published in
Richmond papers in 1866.

NATI.'NAL ROBBERY THE TRUE DEMOCRATIC
DOCTRINE.

" It, is Repudiation ! and to this the Demo-
cratic party is. Already pledge^, and no man can
afier tins year, be elecu-d to Coniiresss or to the
Presidency who is not pledged for Repudiation
This is true Democratic doc rine, and you win
do n a endorse it will be ground to powdei
Under the wheel of Repudiation." Brick
Pomeroy, in the La Crosse Democrat, September
1867.

THE "LOST CAUSE" TO TBIUMPH.

u Our fallen heroes. I do not believe they
have fallen in vain. The cause for which Jack
son and Stuart fc 11 cannot be in vain, but m
some tb m will yet triumph. 1 propose th
'Losi C.iiise, 1 for which our heme* fell. ' Wade
lit uniAon at the Alumni Supper at Washi/wion
June 18, 1868.



REBEL CHIVALRY.

; No drill is needed fora hunter to ^et behind
a tree and hit his mark, and if every man will
shoot. only when he is sure to Mil an enemy he
ill do good service. If the men have no shot
guns, let them t-ike axes and spades and
)bstruct the roads and riveis, under the direction
if their officers. Be 'of good heartland let our
ighteons cause make us strong." General A. G.
Blanchards Order of February 19, 1862. R. 4,
>2.

STATE RIGHTS FOR REBELS.

'I do claim to be one of the 'true men of
Virginia.' During the war I have tried to do my
duty m seeking tne real interests of Virginia, and
since the surrender I have not bowed the knee
to Baal. I never mean to acknowledge higl er
allegiance than I owe to my State." Gtnera I
James A. Walker at the Alumni Supper at
Washington College, Juue 18, 1868.

THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE TRAMPLED
UNDER FOOT.

"The difficu'ty and the remedr it is not in
the election of Republican Presidents. 'No. Not
in the rion-exen>ption of the Fugitive SI >ve BilJ.
No. But it lies back of all these. Ir, is found in
that ATHEISTIC BLACK REPUBLICAN DOCTRINE o*

THK DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE I UNTIL
THAT IS TRAMPLED UNDER FOOT THERE CAN BE NO

PEACE." Address of D. Smythe, of South
Carolina.

SOUTHERN " DESPLSE " GENERALLY.

" Words are too weak, too feeble to convey
even the slightest idea of fet-'ling which our
refined, elegant, high-toned and chivalrous
people feel or look upon such an offcast, de-
g' nerate set. It would be some solace to us
when we lo-^e our husbands, fathers, sons and
friends, to know they were fighting an enemy
civilized or refined to any degree. But, oh 1
the thought is killing, is too painful to see our
men -the choicest, most refined specimens of
God s work desi roved and ven forced to take
up arms against the offscouriug->, outcast dregs
of creation; for every man the North lo-es is a
blessing, a G d-send to humanity and society.
Yet, I pray to live just to raise my son and
daughter to despise the. whole rce, and our boy
mu-t shoot them dowq as he would the most
ferocious wi d beast whenever ihey cross his
path. So extreme H rnv ois^ust, that if I on
thought my ch'ldreu would ever countenance,
not a Yankee, but a No therrier, for they are
the same, I could and would plui ge a dagger
into their hearts and laugb to see their life's
blood oozing. The? mut*t notice them only to
murder and poison." Letter from Mississippi.
/?. /?. 7, p. 57



Bacon & Company, Printers, San Francisco.





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