1884 numbers of the Bay state monthlyBe the first and subjects of first 10 volumes and List of por.

The Granite monthly, a New Hampshire magazine, devoted to literature, history, and state progress (Volume 53) online

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He was appointed in 1890 a member of
the New York rapid transit commission
which created the great subway system
in that city and was also a member
of the famous Committee of Seventy
which secured the non-partisan election
of William L. Strong as mayor. He
had been vice-president of the Union
League Club since 1889. Since retiring
from active business in 1911, Mr. Lang-
don had made his home in Portsmouth,
with a beautiful summer place at Fox
Point, Newington, and had taken a deep
interest in the affairs of the locality, es-
pecially the Portsmouth hospital and
ChiUren's Home. Mr. Langdon married
Edith Eustis Pugh and after her death,
Elizabeth Langdon Elwyn, by whom he
is survived.



DANIEL R. COLE.

Daniel Reed Cole was born in Gilsum,
August 20, 1835, the son of Asa and
Sarah (Pitt) Cole, and died in Keene,
Sept. 20. He had resided in Keene since
1858 and had held many positions of trust,
including service on the board of as-
sessors and supervisors, in the city coun-
cil and legislature and for 20 years as
county commissioner. He w T as president
of the Cheshire County Savings Bank
and vice-president of the Citizens' Na-



tional Bank of Keene and had been for
many years the head of the firm of
D. R. & F. A. Cole, grain dealers. He
was a leader in the Republican party
councils and affiliated with the Uni-
tarian church. He is survived by a son,
daughter and grandson, all of Keene.



ALFRED H. BROWN.

Alfred Herman Brown was born in
New Ipswich July 14, 1838, the son of
Herman and Sophronia (Prescott)
Brown, and died October 4 in Canter-
bury, where he had resided as proprietor
of a general store since 1861. He was
appointed postmaster, March 28, 1862,
and held the office, with the exception




The late Alfred H. Brown

of a few r years, until his death. He was
a Republican in politics and a member of
the Legislature in 1876-7. He also was
town clerk for many years and promi-
nent in such local activities as the Ly-
ceum Village Improvement Society,
town fair and library. He is survived
by one son, Fred H. Brown of Con-
cord, three daughters. Miss Josephine M.
Brown of Canterbury, Mrs. Mary P.
Cody of Newton Highlands, Mass., and
Mrs. Alice M. Perkins of Loudon, and
by seven grandchildren.



NEW HAMPSHIRE NECROLOGY



549



JOHN T. BUSIEL.

John Tilton Busiel, second son of John
W. and Julia M. (Tilton) Busiel, was
born October 12, 1847, in that part of
the town of Gilford now included in the
city of Laconia, where he died October
7. The late Governor Charles A. Bus-
iel and Frank E. Busiel were his broth-
ers. He graduated from Phillips Exeter
Academy in 1864 and from Harvard
College in 1868, being a member of the
Institute of 1770, Hasty Pudding Club,
Alpha Delta Phi, Delta Kappa Epsilon,
Med. Fac, etc. He was third marshal
of his class, editor of the Harvard Advo-
cate and a member of Phi Beta Kappa
with a Commencement Day thesis.
After his graduation he became a hosiery
manufacturer in Laconia and so continued
until his death, taking a leading part
in the affairs of the town and city as
selectman, member of the legislature and
constitutional convention, trustee of the
city library, hospital and Congregational
church, etc. He was for many years
president of the People's National Bank
and the Laconia Savings Bank. A
daughter. Miss Helen J. Busiel survives
him.



LEONARD WELLINGTON.

Leonard Wellington, born in Walpole,
September 12, 1841, the son of Wil-
liam and Achsah (Kidder) Wellington.



died October 15 in Keene, where he had
studied and practiced law since 1866.
He attended Mt. Caesar Seminary at
Swanzey, the academy at Bernardston,
Mass., Kimball Union Academy and the
Albany, N. Y., law school. He had
served as solicitor of Cheshire county
and as member of the Keene board of
health and was a member of the Con-
gregational church and Masonic frater-
nity. He is survived by his wife, who
was Harriet Lyon Chandler, and by two
sons and four grandchildren.



CHARLES E. QUIMBY, M. D.

Dr. Charles Elihu Quimby was born
in New Ipswich, June 21, 1853, the son
of Prof. Elihu Thayer Quimby, who was
the head of the department of mathe-
matics at Dartmouth College from 1864
to 1878. The younger Quimby graduated
from Dartmouth in the class of 1874, re-
ceived his medical degree from the
University of the City of New York
in 1878 and after one }-ear in Somers-
worth began the practice of his
profession in New York City and so
continued until his death on November 7.
He was connected with the medical
faculty of the University of the City
of New York continuously from 1889
and was the author of many important
contributions to medical journals and
encyclopedias.



WHY SHOULD A NEW HAMPSHIRE MAN OR WOMAN
READ THE GREAT NEW HAMPSHIRE DAILY—.

THE MANCHESTER UNION?

BECAUSE:

It carries LATER news of the world than any Boston paper can.
It is printed two hours later.

It carries all the news of the world supplied by the Associated Press.

It has what no other paper has — a corps of local correspondents all
over New Hampshire and is the ONLY NEWSPAPER that prints
New Hampshire news.

It has an Editorial page as good as any paper and deals with New
Hampshire as well as all other problems of public interest.

It supports and encourages every movement to help develop New
Hampshire.

It is one of the best STATE newspapers in the United States.

It is YOUR OWN paper, published in YOUR interest.

SUBSCRIBE NOW!

Address— CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT,

MANCHESTER UNION AND LEADER,

MANCHESTER, N. H.

RATE, by mail, $6.00 per year.



THE FLAG AT HALF-MAST
Armistice Day, 1921.

By Samuel C. Worthen

Flag of our Fathers, sadly wave

In this sweet autumn breeze !
In memory of our sacred dead

Who sleep beyond the seas.

In rhythm with each fluttering fold

Hearts throb with grief and pain.

Still longing for the loved and lost
Who'll ne'er return again.

Hearts, mourn ! — but may the day ne'er come,
While these rock-bound hills shall stand.

When sons of ours shall not dare to die
For love of their Native Land !






Online Library1884 numbers of the Bay state monthlyBe the first and subjects of first 10 volumes and List of porThe Granite monthly, a New Hampshire magazine, devoted to literature, history, and state progress (Volume 53) → online text (page 57 of 57)