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f., health (good or bad), sickness,
iceakness.

validus, a, um [valeo, to be well],
adj., strong, healthy, effective.

vallum, i, n., stockade, rampart,
wall.

Vandali, drum, pi. m., Vandals, a
confederacy of German peoples
that invaded Italy in the fifth cen-
tury A. D.

varie [varius], adv., variously.

varius, a, um, adj., diverse, various.

Varro, onis, m.,

1. M. (Terentius) Varro, a legate
of Pompey in Spain, where he was
defeated by Caesar.

2. P. (C.) Terentius Varro, consul
219 and 216 B.C.

Varronianus, I, consul 363 a,d.

Varus, I, m., Q. Varus, one of the
leaders of the Pompeian party at
the battle of Thapsus.

vas, vasis (pi. vasa, orum), n., a
vessel, dish.

vastitas, atis [vasto], f., devasta-
tion.

vasto, are, avi, atus, to lay waste,
devastate, destroy.

Vatia, ae, m., P. Servilius Vatia,
sumamed Isauricus, consul 79 B.C.



VOCABULARY



239



Vecta, ae, f., an island off the south-
ern coast of England, now the Isle
of Wight.

vehementer [vehemens, earnest],
adv., earnestly, seriously, severely ;
exceedingly.

vehiculum, I [vehS], n., a vehicle,
carriage.

veho, ere, vexi, vectus, to bear,
carry, convey ; in pass, with navi
or equ5, to sail, ride.

ex— evehS, ere, vexi, vectus,
to lift, raise, elevate.

in— in veho, ere, vexi, vectus,
to carry in or to ; in pass., ride into,
sail into.

re — revehS, ere, vexi, vectus,
to carry back, bring back, return.

Veientani, Srum, pi. m., the inhabi-
tants of Veil.

Veientes, ium, pi. m., the people of
Veil.

Veii, orum, pi. m., Veil, a powerful
town in Etruria, about twelve miles
from Rome.

vel [old. imperative of volo], adv.
and conj., even; or, or else; vel
. . . vel, either . . . or.

venditiS, 5nis [vendS], f., an auction
sale, auction.

vendo, ere, didl, ditus [contr. from
venumdS] , to sell.

venenum, i, n., poison.

venerabilis, e [veneror], adj., ven-
erable, reverend.

veneratiS, Snis [veneror], f., ven-
eration, reverence.

veneror, ari, atus sum, to worship,
revere, respect, honor.

Venetia, ae, f., a district at the head
of the Adriatic Sea.

venia, ae, f., favor, grace, kind-
ness.

veniS, ire, veni, ventus, to come,
go.



con — conveniS, ire, veni, ven-
tus, to come together, assemble ; be
agreed upon, be suitable.

ex — eveniS, ire, veni, ventus,
to turn out, come to pass.

in — inveniS, ire, veni, ventus,
to come upon, find, discover.

inter — interveniS , ire , veni ,
ventus, to come upon, appear, in-
tervene.

per — perveniS, ire, veni, ven-
tus, to come to, reach; penetrate,
attain to.

prae — praeveniS, ire, veni,
ventus, to come before, get start of,
anticipate, outstrip.

sub — subveniS, ire, veni, ven-
tus, to come to help, aid, assist.

super — supervenio, ire, veni,
ventus, to come to the rescue, ar-
rive; surpass.
venter, tris, m., the stomach; appe-
tite.
Ventidius, I, m., see Bassus.
verberS, are, avi, atus [verber,

lash], to whip, scourge, beat.
vere [verus, true], adv., truly,

really.
vereor, eri, itus sum, to fear, dread,

respect.
Vergilianus, a, um, adj., Vergilian ;
Vergilianus versus, a verse from
the Aeneid of Vergil.
Verona, ae, f., an important town in

Cisalpine Gaul.
*verto, ere, i, versus, to turn,
change ; in pass., turn about, return.

ab— averto, ere, i, versus, to
turn away or aside, avert, divert.

con — converts, ere, i, versus,
to turn round, change ; turn, direct ;
divert, misuse.

ex — everts, ere, i, versus, to
overturn, destroy, ruin.

re— revertor, i, reverti or (less



240



VOCABULARY



often) reversus sum, to return;

revert, recur.
versus, us [verto], m., a line,

verse.
verum [verus, true], adv., truly,

certainly ; but.
Verus, I, m., see Antoninus.
Vespasianus, I, m., (T. Flavins)

Vespasidnus, Roman emperor 70-79

A.D.

vespera, ae, f., evening.

vespillo, onis, m., a corpse bearer.

Vestalis, e, adj., pertaining to the
goddess Vesta.

vester, tra, trum, pron. adj., your,
yours ; Vestra (as title of emperor) ,
"Your Serene Highness."

vestis, is, f., clothing, garments; a
robe.

veto, are, ui, itus, not allow, forbid.

Vetranio, onis, m., a commander of
the legions in Illyria who was pro-
claimed emperor hy the troops.

Vettius, I, m., T. Vettius, a leader of
the Marsi in the Marsic war.

Veturia, ae, f., the mother of Cori-
olanus.

Veturius, I, m., T. Veturius, consul
321 B.C.

Vetus, eris, m., consul with Valens,

<*; a.d.
vetus, eris, adj., old, aged; of a

former time, ancient.
via, ae, f., a way, road, journey;

passage.
(Vibulanus, I), m., C. Fabius (Vibu-

lanus) consul for the third time 479

B.C. His praenomen is generally

given as Kaeso.
vicesimus, a, una [viginti], num.

adj., twentieth.
vicinus, a, urn [vicus], adj., near,

neighboring .
vicissim [vicis, alternation], adv.,

in turn.



Victoall, orum, pi. m., a West Gothic
people.

victor, oris [vinco], m., a conqueror ;
as adj., victorious.

victSria, ae [vinco], f., victory.

Victorinus, i, m., one of the Thirty
Tyrants.

victrix, icis [vinco], f., a victress, a
female conqueror; as adj., victori-
ous.

vicus, I, m., a town, village.

vided, ere, vidi, visus, to see, per-
ceive, understand ; in pass., seem.

in— invideo, ere, vidi, visus,
to look askance at, envy.

viginti, indecl. num. adj., twenty.

vilis, e, adj., cheap, common, worth-
less.

vilissime, see viliter.

viliter [vilis], adv., sup. vilissime;
at a low price, cheaply.

villa, ae, f., a country house, farm,
villa.

Viminacium, i, n., a town in Upper
Moesia.

Viminalis, e [vimen, an osier], adj.,
of osiers ; as subst., Viminalis, is,
m. (sc. collis), the Viminal Hill,
one of the seven hills of Rome.

vinciS, ire, vinxi, vinctus, to bind,
fetter.

vinco, ere, vici, victus, to conquer,
defeat ; surpass : intrans., pre-
vail.

con— convincS, ere, vici, vic-
tus, to overcome ; convict, refute ;
expose.

de — devinco, ere, vici, victus,
to conquer completely, subdue.

Vindelici, orum, pi. m., a people
dwelling in the Roman province of
Vindelicia, south of the Danube.

vindico, are, avi, atus [vis-f-
dico], to claim; liberate; avenge,
take vengeance on.



VOCABULARY



241



vinea, ae, f., a plantation of vines,

vineyard; vine.
vir, virl, m.,a man; hero; husband.
vires, see vis.
virga, ae, f., a rod.
Virgmius, I, ra.,

1. L. (7\) Virginias, consul 479

B.C.

2. (L.) Virginias, father of Vir-
ginia, a maiden whose attempted
enslavement by Appius Claudius led
to the overthrow of the decemvirs ;
consul 449 B.C.

virg5, inis, f., a young girl, maiden,

virgin.
Viriathus, i, m., a celebrated Lusita-

nian chief who maintained a sepa-
rate command against the Romans

for several years,
viridis, e, adj., green, fresh, new.
Viridomarus, I, m., a leader of the

Gauls who was slain by Marcellus.
viritim [vir], adv., man by man,

separately, individually.
virtus, utis [vir], f., manliness,

valor; goodness; virtue.
vis, gen. and dat. wanting, ace. vim,

abl. vi, f., strength, force ; hostile

force, violence ; quantity, number;

pi. vires, energy, vigor, resources;

vim facere, to use violence.
Viscellinus, I, m., Sp. Cassias (Vis-

cellinus), the first master of the

horse at Rome,
vita, ae [vivo], f., life, conduct.
Vitellius, i, m.,

1. (A.) Vitellius, Roman emperor,
69 A.D.

2. (L.) Vitellius, brother of (1).
vitio, are, avi, atus [vitium], to

make faulty, taint, corrupt, defile,
dishonor.
vitiosus, a, um [vitium], ad]., full
of faults, faulty ; wicked, depraved.



vitium, i, n., a fault, vice.
vivo, ere; vixi, — , to live.
vivus, a, um [vivo], adj., living,

alive.
vix, adv., with difficulty, hardly,

scarcely.
voco, are, avi, atus [vox], to call,

summon; rouse; name.
ex — evoco, are, avi, atus, to

call out, summon.
pro — prSvoco, are, avi, atus,

to challenge.
re — revoco, are, avi, atus, to

recall, recover.
volo, velle, volui, — , to be willing,

icish.
magis — mal5, malle, malui,

— , to wish, rather, prefer.
ne— nolo, nolle, nolui, — , to be

unwilling, not to wish, not to want.
Volsci, orum, pi. m., an ancient

tribe living in the south of Latium.
Volumnia, ae, f., the wife of Corio-

lanus.
voluntarius, a, um [voluntas],

adj., of free will, voluntary.
voluntas, atis [vol5], f., will, desire,

inclination.
Volusianus, i, m., son of the em-
peror Gallus. His father conferred

the title of Caesar upon him in 251

a.d. and Augustus in 252 a.d.
voracitas, atis, f., greediness, rav-

enousness.
vox, vocis, f., voice, -sound, tone;

cry, call; saying, speech.
vulnero, are, avi, atus [vulnus,],

to wound, hurt, injure.
vulnus, eris, n., a wound ; blow, mis-
fortune.
VulsS, onis, m., L. Mdnlius Vulso,

consul 256 B.C.
vultus, us, m., the expression of the

face, features, countenance.



HAZ. EUTROPIUS



16



242



REFERENCES



Xerxes, is, m., a king of the Persians
2£ _ 1Q , who was conquered hy Alexander

Xanthippus, I, m., a Lacedaemonian Severus.
who commanded the Carthaginians z -

against the Romans under Regulus. I Zenobia, ae, f., queen of Palmyra.



REFERENCES TO HARKNESS' NEW LATIN
GRAMMARS (1898)



P. 7.


N. 1. 600, II. 1


P. 15.


N. 1. 463.


P. 27.


N. 1. 628.




2. 417.




2. 426, 3.




2. 440, 3.




3. 489.


P. 16.


N. 1. 487.


P. 28.


N. 1. 628.




4. 444.


P. 17.


N. 1. 479, 3.




2. 473, 1.




5. 590.




2. 468.


P. 29.


N. 1. 434.




6. 598.




3. 591, 1.




2. 426, 3.


P. 8.


N. 1. 483.




4. 425, 4, n.




3. 485, 3.




2. 429.


P. 18.


N. 1. 564, 1.


P. 30.


N. 1. 630.




3. 485, 2.




2. 456, 2.


P. 31.


N. 1. 425, 2.




4. 238.




3. 238 ; 588. II.


P. 32.


N. 1. 488, 2.


P. 9.


N. 1. 442.




4. 473, 3.




2. 440, 2.




2. 425, 4.


P. 19.


N. 1. 411.




3. 475.


P. 10.


N. 1. 428, 2.


P. 20.


N. 1. 652.




4. 473, 3.




2. 646.




2. 476.


P. 33.


N. 1. 483.




3. 568.




3. 475.




2. 639.




4. 564, II.




4. 629.


P. 34.


N. 1. 476.


P. 11.


N. 1. 462.




5. 480.




2. 429.




2. 418.


P. 21.


N. 1. 646.


P. 35.


N. 1. 603, 2.


P. 12.


N. 1. 507, 4.




2. 643.




2. 642.




2. 570; 550.


P. 22.


N. 1. 462, 3.


P. 36.


N. 1. 643.




3. 440, 2.




2. 568.




2. 417.




4. 628.


P. 23.


N. 1. 440, 3.


P. 37.


N. 1. 567.


P. 13.


N. 1. 638, 3.




2. 434.




2. 433.




2. 579.




3. 485, 2.




3. 489.


P. 14.


N. 1. 440, 3.


P. 25.


N. 1. 426, 1.




4. 485, 2.




2. 598.




2. 135.


P. 38


N. 1. 636, 1.




3. 238.




3. 448, 1.




2. 531.




4. 428, 2.




4. 643, 3.




3. 480.



REFERENCES



243



P. 39.


N. 1. 564, III.




4.


434.


P. 71. N. 1.


427.




2. 425, 4, n.




5.


426, 6.


2.


450.




3. 447.


P. 57.


N. 1.


568, 7.


P. 72. N. 1.


442, 1.


P. 40.


N. 1. 439.
2. 440, 2.




2.


628.


P. 73. N. 1.


426, 4.




3. 628.


P. 58.


N. 1.


630.


P. 74. N. 1.


630.








2.


417.


2.


469,2.


P. 41.


N. 1. 467.





3.


426, 1.


P. 75. N. 1.


626.


P. 42.


N. 1. 479, 3.




4.


473, 2.


2.


588,11




2. 639.




5.


570.


2.


471.




3. 440, 2.


P. 59.


N. 1.


621.


P. 77. N. 1.


591, 1.


P. 43.


N. 1. 475, 3.




2.


392.


P. 78. N. 1.


508, 3.


P. 44.


N. 1. 588, II.


P. 60.


N. 1.


591, 1.


2.


468,3.


P. 45.


N. 1. 598.




2.


647.


P. 79. N. 1.


479, 1.




2. 600, II.




3.


579.


P. 80. N. 1.


486, 1.




3. 426, 3.




4.


477.


P. 81. N. 1.


430.


P. 46.


N. 1. 533.


P. 61.


N. 1.


488, 2.


P. 83. N. 1.


425, 2.




2. 567.




2.
3.


420,2.
498.


P. 84. N. 1.


475.


P. 47.


N. 1. 462.




P. 85. N. 1.


622.




2. 425, 2.


P. 62.


N. 1.


426,3.


P. 86. N. 1.


447.




3. 430.




2.


426, 1.


2.


440,3.




4. 444.




3.


458, 3.








5. 570.








P. 87. N. 1.


477.




P. 63.


N. 1.


425, 4, N.


2.


456, 3.


P. 48.


N. 1. 638, 3.

2. 571, 3.

3. 475.




2.


468, 3.


P. 89. N. 1.


434.




P. 64.


N. 1.


598.


P. 90. N. J.


458, 3.




4. 463.




2.


429.


P. 91. N. 1.


450.




5. 649, II.


P. 65.


N. 1.


488, 2.


P. 92. N. 1.


592,1.


P. 49.


N. 1. 442.




2.


434.


P. 93. N. 1.


591, 1.




2. 533.




3.


471.


2.


598.


P. 50.


N. 1. 462. 3.


P. 66.


N. 1.


473, 2.


P. 94. N. 1.


476, 1.




2. 418.


P. 67.


N. 1.


591, 1.


P. 95. N. 1.


584.


P. 51.


N. 1. 434.


P. 68.


N. 1.


440,3.


P. 96. N. 1.


479, 2.


P. 52.


N. 1. 442.




2.


434.


2.


238.


P. 54.


N. 1. 626.


P. 69.


N. 1.


579.


P. 98. N. 1.


430, 1.


P. 55.


N. 1. 440, 2.




2.


480.


P. 99. N. 1.


481.




2. 444.




3.


175, 4.


2.


591, 1.


P. 56.


N. 1. 440, 3.




4.


448, 1.


3.


579.




2. 427.


P. 70.


N. 1.


477.


P. 100. N. 1.


434.




3. 588, II.




2.


598, 1.


P. 101. N. 1.


456,3.




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General Library

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Online Library4th cent EutropiusEutropius → online text (page 22 of 22)