A. B. (Alexander Beaufort) Meek.

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SONGS AND POEMS OF THE SOUTH.



80NCIS AND POEMS



OF



THE SOUTH.



BY A B. MEEJC, .. -\ .V



AUTHOR OF

THE RED EAGLE," - ROMANTIC PASSAGES is SOUTHWESTERN- HISTORY," etc.
SECOND



IVC O B I L E :

S. H. GOETZEL & CO., 33 DAUPHIN STREET.

NEW YORK : 117 FULTON STREET.

1857.



j*"* f, j^itsrod aeyonling^o Act of Congress, in the year 1857, by
S. H. GOETZEL & COMPANY,

In the Clerk s Office of the District Court for the Southern District of New York.



F RENCH & WHEAT,

Printers and Stereotypers

No. 18 Ann Street Nev York



PREFACE.



THE Poetry of a country should be a faithful expression of its phy
sical and moral characteristics. The imagery, at least, should be
drawn from the indigenous objects of the region, and the sentiments
be such as naturally arise under the influence of its climate, its in
stitutions, habits of life, and social condition. Verse, so fashioned
and colored, is as much the genuine product and growth of a Land,
as its trees or flowers. It partakes of the raciness of the soil, the
purity of the atmosphere, the brilliancy of its skies, its mountain
pictures, and its broad sweeps of level and undulating territory.
The Scenery infuses itself into the Song ; and the feelings and fan
cies are modulated by the circumstances amid which they had their
birth.

These opinions have formed the poetic Faith of the writer of the
present volume. He has not attempted to sing in a mere spirit of
iraitativeness, or in the tropes and metaphors of foreign Art and Pre
cedent. Gazing upon the delightful Land about him the Land of
his birth and affections he has endeavored to depict its beauties,
to weave its illustrative objects into the tissues of his imagination,
and to give utterance to the thoughts and emotions congenial to a
mind impressed by such associations, and loving at once the Patriotic
and the Beautiful.

For this reason, the writer has felt warranted in styling the COE
tents of the present volume, "Soxes AND POEMS OF THE SOUTH."
If they possess any merit, it is in their fidelity to the principles just
declared. But the writer is still well aware of their deficiency, even
in that respect. They are but feeble and desultory attempts in the



845206



VI PREFACE.

expanded field of his Philosophy, doing but ill-proportioned justice,
even in the simplest aspects, to either the Country or the Cause he
would vindicate. Not a Poet, by profession or ambition, he has
written only at long intervals, or at the instigation of trivial or tran
sient causes. The diversified, and somewhat epigrammatic, character
of his writings will evince this. The present volume is composed
of occasional effusions, through many years of life. Though thus
necessarily individual in their origin and specialties, they become,
however, from their multiplicity, general in their adaptations, and
give voice to the experiences of many an enthusiastic and imaginative
nature. They are marked by varying degrees of ability, and fre
quent alternations of taste and sentiment. Still it is hoped that
they will strike sympathetic chords in appreciative bosoms, and tend
to show the richness of the section of the Union, to which they re
fer, in poetic elements and attributes, which more gifted capacities
may hereafter develope, and wreathe into the garlands of a graceful
and becoming literature.

The author submits this volume to the public, with a painful sense
of its faults and deficiencies, and with the sole wish that its sins and
short-comings may be visited upon his head, and not upon the fair
portion of our country, whose adaptability for poetic illustration, he
has so imperfectly attempted to portray.

It may be well to add that the pieces in this collection are but a
meagre selection from the writings of the author, and that most of
them have heretofore been published, and have received the verdict
of periodical criticism. Some of them have been widely circulated
over fictitious names, and one of them (the ode entitled " Balak-
lava") was attributed, by some error of the press, to a distinguished
foreign author Alexander Smith. It is but due to all parties that
the fugitives should be reclaimed, and " held to service" by their
proper owner.



INDEX.



SONGS OF THE SOUTH:

Page

COME TO THE SOUTH, - - -

THE MOCKING BIRD, - - - -3

THE MEXICAN SEA, - - - - 5

GIRL OF THE SUNNY SOUTH, - - - 7

- - - - 13



THE FIELDS OF MEXICO, - - -



THE LAND THAT WE LIVE IN,

THE SEA: IN CALM AND STORM, - - - - 15

MAGNOLIA GROVE, - - - -17

THE HEART AND BIRD, - - -

NOT AGAIN, - - - - 21

THE ROSE OF ALABAMA, - - - 23

- 25



BEAUTY, SONG, AND LOVE, -

,



THE GOLDEN BOWL IS BROKEN, - - - - 27



THE BELLE OF MOBILE, - - -" ""- - " 29

LOOK NOT ON THE WINE, - - - 31

A VALENTINE, - - - - 33

AT THE BAR DINNER, - 36



viii INDEX.

SONGS OF THE SOUTH, Continued:

Page.
OH, COME BACK SOON,- - - - 39

DIRGE FOR HENRY CLAY, - 41

ODE IN MEMORY OF WEBSTER, - - - 43
THE SWAN, - - - - 45

DO I LOVE THEE ? - - -__ 47
CHOCTAW MELODIES:

A Mother s Dirge, - - -_ 49

Atala s Lament, - - - - - - -51

OH, DO NOT CEASE TO LOVE ME, - 55

THE HOMES OF ALABAMA, - - - - - - 57

THE MOTHERS OF THE SOUTH, ** - - - 60

ANACREONTIC, - - - - Q%

THE QUEEN OF MAY, - . - - - - G4

THE ROSE OF LOVE, - - - - (J6

A TROUBADOUR SONG, - - - - - -67

BE HUSHED THE HARP, - -___ gg



POEMS OF THE SOUTH:

THE ARTS IDEAL, - - - - 73

THE NEW GENESIS, - - - - g()

THE STONE MOUNTAIN, - - - 84

BALAKLAVA, - - - -_g9

NATURE S LESSON, - - - - 94

THE DEATH OF JACKSON, - - - 9g

THE DOUBLE DREAM, - - - J02



INDEX.

POEMS OF THE SOUTH, Continued:

DEATH OF RICHARD HENRY WILD,- - - - - 107

TO A FAIR VIRGINIAN, - - - - -

TWO YEARS AGO, MEDORA, - - - - - -113

MY MOTHER, - - - -

A SOLDIER S LOVE-DREAM, - - - 118

191
A MONODY,

124

OLYMPIC SPORTS,

THE DUTCHESS OF DEVONSHIRE, - - - -

WHY WEEP FOR THE YOUNG? - - - 132

THE FATED CITY, - - - -

THE ROSE OF CHARLESTON, - - - 138

i .in

THE LIGHTNING-SLAIN, -

144
TO A YOUNG LADY,

147
CARMEN SECULARS, -

BIRD OF THE SOUTH, - - - - - * - 152

MY MOTHER S GRAVE, - - - - - 1J4 -

LE BON TEMPS VIENDRA, - - - 157

THE NATAL STAR, - - - -

TO EGERIA, - - - - 161

ELEGY ON A MOCKING BIRD, - - - 163



A VALENTINE, - - - ~^^~ nt . f ~

TO A DARK-EYED GEORGIAN, - - - - -

TO ANGELINE: WITH A BIBLE, - - - 171

- 175



TO VIRGINIA, - - - - 173



FLORENCE, -

LOVE S EMBLEMS, - - - - 176



X INDEX.

POEMS OF THE SOUTH, Continued:

Page.
TO A BEAUTIFUL STRANGER, - 178

THE CAPITOL BY MOONLIGHT, - - - 183

ALBUM LEAVES, - - - - 189

IRELAND, - - -___ 198

THREE SONNETS, - - _._ 200

A PORTRAIT, - - - - 202

LOVE S LESSON, - - - __ 205

REQUITED LOVE, - - - _ 207

AT PARTING, - - .._ 209

TO MARY, . - -...__ 210

A LADY S VALENTINE, - .___ 212

EPITAPHS, - - - - - _ - _ 214

THE DAY OF FREEDOM, 217

ADAMS PROPHECY, - - -._ 222

NATIONAL ANTHEM, - - ..- 228

LAND OF THE SOUTH, -*.._ 243

THE NUPTIAL FETE, "- . V ". . . . . 2 49

BRIDAL SONG, - -... 258

LOVE S METAPHORS, - - -,_ 270
FAREWELL. - - . - _ 280



Pase 66, line 9. - - - - For are read art.

67, "14. For Than read Then.

74, 7. - - - For it read that.

86, " 5. For come read came.

" 128, 3. - - - - For heart read art.

181. " 7- For When read Where.

185, 17. - - - - Add noir, at the end.

- 191, 7. - - - Transpose only before in.

205, " 6. - - - - For smiled read united.

218, " 7, Transpose With and What in next line.

" 232, last line. - - - For this read the.

241. line 3 from bottom. For need read new.

254, "3. For lover read lored.

254. "13. For art read are.






X INDEX.

POEMS OF THE SOUTH, Continued:

Page.

TO A BEAUTIFUL STRANGER, - 178

THE CAPITOL BY MOONLIGHT, - - - 183

ALBUM LEAVES, - - - - 189

IRELAND, - - - __ IQg



SONGS OF THE SOUTH.






GEN. MIRABEAff B. LAMAR,

EX-PRESIDENT OF TEXAS,

THE SOLDIER, STATESMAN AND POET:



WHICH HE HAS SO KINDLY APPROVED,
ARE AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED.



SONGS OF TH*E SOUTH.



COME TO THE SOUTH.

Oh, come to the South, sweet, beautiful one,
Tis the clime of the heart, tis the shrine of the sun ;
Where the sky ever shines with a passionate glow,
And flowers spread their treasures of crimson and snow ;
Where the breeze, o er bright waters, wafts incense along,
And gay birds are glancing in beauty and song ;
Where summer smiles ever o er mountain and plain,
And the best gifts of Eden, unshadowed, remain.

Oh, come to the South,
The shrine of the sun ;

And dwell in its bowers,
Sweet, beautiful one.



Is BONOS OF THE SOUTH.

Oh, come to the South, and I ll build thee a home,
Where winter shall never intrusively come,
The queen-like catalpa, the myrtle and pine,
The gold-fruited orange, the ruby-gemmed vine,
Shall bloom round thy dwelling, and shade thee at noon.
While birds of all music keep amorous tune ;
By the gush of glad fountains we ll rest us at eve,
No trouble to vex us, no sorrows to grieve.

Oh, come to the South, &c.



Oh, come to the South, tis the home of the heart
No sky like its own can deep passion impart ;
The glow of its summer is felt in the soul,
And love keepeth ever his fervent control.
Oh, here would thy beauty most brilliantly beam,
And life pass away like some delicate dream ;
Each wish of thy heart should realized be,
And this beautiful land seem an Eden to thee.

Then, come to the South,
The shrine of the sun ;

And dwell in its bowers,
Sweet, beautiful one.



THE MOCKING BIRD.

From the vale, what music ringing,

Fills the bosom of the night ;
On the sense, entranced, flinging
Spells of witchery and delight !
O er magnolia, lime and cedar,

From yon locust-top, it swells,
Like the chant of serenader,
Or the rhymes of silver bells !
Listen ! dearest, listen to it !

Sweeter sounds were never heard !
Tis the song of that wild poet
Mime and minstrel MocMng-Bird.

See him., swinging in his glory,

On yon topmost bending limb !
Carolling his amorous story,

Like, some wild crusader s hymn !
Now it faints in tones delicious

As the first low vow of love !



SONGS OF THE SOUTH.

Now it bursts in swells capricious,
All the moonlit vale above !
Listen ! dearest, &c.

Why is t thus, this sylvan Petrarch

Pours all night his serenade ?
Tis for some proud woodland Laura,

His sad sonnets all are made !
But he changes now his measure

Gladness bubbling from his mouth
Jest, and gibe, and mimic pleasure

Winged Anacreon of the South !
Listen ! dearest, &c.

Bird of music, wit and gladness,

Troubadour of sunny climes,
Disenchanter of all sadness,

Would thine art were in my rhymes.
O er the heart that s beating by me,

I would weave a spell divine ;
Is there aught she could deny me,

Drinking in such strains as thine ?
Listen ! dearest, &c.



THE MEXICAN SEA.

Oh ! come to the sycamore, maiden, with me !
The stars are awake on the Mexican Sea,
The breath of the orange, the myrtle and lime,
Gives sweets to the sky of this delicate clime,
The song of the mocking-bird rings from the trees,
And coolness and beauty are out on the breeze :
Then come to the sycamore, maiden, with me,
And watch the stars float on the Mexican Sea !

Oh ! come to the sycamore, maid, and I ll tell
A story was breathed by a coral-lipped shell ;
It told of a knight of this passionate land,
Who long sought the boon of a fair lady s hand.
The lady was cruel ; his visions all o er,
He wandered, one night, to this broad sycamore ;
In its shadow he stood as I now with thee,
And watched the stars weep o er the Mexican Sea !

The lady was fair as the sky of her clime ;
Her voice had the tune of its sweet waters chime ;
The light of her brow, the magnolia had given ;
The violet smiled in her eyes happy heaven ;



SONGS OF THE SOUTH.

Her blushes were caught from the roses of dawn ;
The grace of her motion, the glide of the swan ;
But none of these charms for that lover could be,
And he slept in despair neath the Mexican Sea !

Then under the sycamore, here by the sea,
That thou art that lady, I d whisper to thee,
And I the bold knight, whobut start, not my love
The stars are now holding their nuptials above !
Why not mid the sweets of this silver-rimmed night,
Make the heart of thy lover as happy and bright ?
Ah, yes ! tis enough ! our Eden shall be
The sycamore shade by the Mexican Sea !



GIKL OF THE SUNNY SOUTH.

Girl of the sunny South,

Bright, round thy rosy mouth,
Dimples and smiles are ever at play :

Sweet in thy fountain eyes,

Mirrored, the azure skies
Tell us of angels and heaven alway !

Sunbeams, in golden twine,

Over some pearly shrine,
Emblem thy curls placed carefully by :

Never the lily meek

Blushed with so pure a cheek,
Tinged by the rays of an evening sky.

Sweet is thy laughing tone

As the low music blown
Out of an ocean shell by the sea-maids ;

Soft, over heart and soul,

Steals it with deep control,
Leading them rapt through Love s sunny glades !



SONGS OF THE SOUTH.

Ne er did, on mountain lake ;

Swan the wild mirror break,
Gliding in motion so graceful as thine,

Lark on the summer sky,

Breeze mid the bending rye,
Fountain through flowers, are not so divine !

Bright as thy native clime,

Decked in its vernal time,
Girl of the South, in all things you seem !

Ever thus sweetly shine,

Cinctured by light divine,
Poetry s sunniest, fondest dream !






THE FIELDS OF MEXICO.

The American Maiden s Song to her Lover.

Would st thou have me love thee, dearest,

With a woman s proudest heart,
Which shall ever hold thee nearest,

Shrined within its inmost part ?
Listen then ! thy country s calling
On her sons to meet her foe !

Leave these groves of rose and myrtle !

Drop the dreamy harp of love !
Like young Korner, scorn the turtle,
While the eagle screams above 1
Haste ! where Freedom s sons are falling
On the fields of Mexico !

Dost thou pause ? Let dotards dally

Do thou for thy country fight !
Xeath her starry emblem, rally

" God ! our Country ! and her Right !"
Listen now ! her trumpet s calling
On her sons to meet her foe !

Woman s heart is soft and tender,
But tis proud and faithful too !



10 SONGS OF THE SOUTH.

Shall she be her land s defender !

Lover ! Soldier ! up and do !
Haste away ! where men are falling
On the fields of Mexico !

Seize thy father s ancient falchion,

Which once flashed as freedom s star !
Till sweet Peace, the bow and halcyon,-

Stilled the stormy strife of war !
Listen now ! thy country s calling
On her sons to meet her foe !

Sweet is love in moonlit bowers !
Sweet the altar and the flame !
Sweet is spring-time with her flowers !

Sweeter far the patriot s name !
Haste ! then haste ! brave hearts are falling
On the fields of Mexico !

Wreaths of fame and smiles of beauty

Will repay the warrior s deeds !
Shall a quibble sully duty,

When an outraged country pleads ?
Hark ! then hark ! her trump is calling
On her sons to meet her foe !



SONGS OF THE SOUTH. 11

Now our loved and trophied banner

Floats where Cortez eagles flew !
Shall the hordes of Santa Anna

Stain its field of starry blue ?
Haste ! thy brethren now are falling
On the fields of Mexico !

Should the God who rules above thee,

Doom thee to a soldier s grave,
Hearts will break ! but Fame will love thee,

Canonized among the brave !
Listen then ! thy country s calling
On her sons to meet her foe !
Rather would I view thee lying

On the last red field of life,
Mid thy country s heroes dying,

Than to be a dastard s wife !
Haste then, love ! where men are falling
On the fields of Mexico !

But my heart grows now a prophet,

And beholds afar thy brow,
With young glory s star above it,

Safe returned, before me bow !



J J SONGS OF THE SOUTH.

Listen then ! thy country s calling
On her sons to meet her foe !
Leave these groves of rose and myrtle !
Drop the the dreamy harp of love !
Like young Korner, scorn the turtle,
When the eagle screams above !
Haste ! where Freedom s sons are falling
On the fields of Mexico !



THE LAND THAT WE LIVE IN !

Oh ! bright is the land that we live in,
And soft blow the breezes around
The stare make a palace of heaven,
And flowers enamel the ground !
The orange and chestnut are flinging

Their odors divine on the gale,
And the mocking-bird s melody s ringing
From bowers that circle the vale !

Then here s to the land that we live in !

The land of the locust and lime !

And a song for the sweet stars of heaven,

That brighten this beautiful clime !

But dearer by far to the minstrel,

Than all the sweet wealth of this land,

Are the maidens who dwell in its bowers,
By mountain, savanna, and strand !

And all its rich trophies were given,
As tributes of beauty to these ;

And these are the stars of our heaven,



14 SONGS OF THE SOUTH.

The flowers that gladden the breeze.

Then here s to the land that we live in !

The land of the locust and lime !

And a song for the sweet stars of heaven,

That brighten this beautiful clime !

Twas hymned by a bard ; that the planets

Once, charmed from their passionate home,
Assumed the fair features of women,
And dwelt in the vallies of Eome !
But sure, if a land e er presented
Temptation to angels, tis ours,
And the vision of song was invented
From forms in these soft, sunny bowers !
Then here s to the land that we live in !

The land of the locust and lime !
And a song for the sweet stars of heaven,
That brighten this beautiful clime !



THE SEA IN CALM AND STORM.

In sunny cove and crescent dell,
The bright green waters sink and swell ;
The dimpled waves lapse on the strand,
And, rippling, kiss the diamond sand ;
Far out, the wild gull on the wave,
Her snowy bosom stoops to lave ;
Soft glides the breeze, and all the sea
Lies lulled in sweet tranquility !

But now away, the waves are stirred,
And, shrieking, darts the wild sea-bird ;
The snow-caps on the billows verge,
Are tossed in fury by the surge ;
The storm is up, and o er the deep
His angry pinions rushing sweep ;
The breakers crash along the shore,
And echo back the thunder s roar !

An hour agone, upon the sea,
A gallant ship swung merrily ;
The morning breeze, in odors sweet,
Just dallied with her canvass sheet ;



16 SONGS OF THE] SOUTH.

Light hearts leaned o er her pictured side,
To watch the cleft waves round her glide ;
And song and laugh rose on the breeze,
To bless the Sabbath of the seas !

But now the storm ! the mighty storm !
Bursts round that vessel s fragile form !
Her shivering spars are snapped in twain ;
Her hulk drives madly o er the main ;
God help her crew ! their gurgling cry
Peals faintly through the thundering sky ;
She s dashed upon the craggy shore,
And sinks amid the breakers roar !

Tis thus the sea ! the bright blue sea !
The home of high hearts, bold and free !
Smiles in her beauty, like a bride,
To greet the tall ship s graceful glide ;
But lashed to fury by the storm,
What mountain waves her breast deform !
Man s proudest strength quails at her nod,
The image of an angry God !



MAGNOLIA GROVE.

When busy day s rude cares are done,
And on the sea descends the sun ;
When hues of crimson, green and gold,
Thro twilight s heaven like waves are rolled,
And sky and sea and bird and flower
Feel the soft influence of the hour :
How sweet amid thy bowers to rove,
With one we love, Magnolia Grove !

The tall trees robed in spring-time s green,
Like monarchs, stand amid the scene !
While broad white flowers their brows begem,
Each like a jeweled diadem !
Below the honey-suckle shines,
Mid rich festoons of glittering vines,
And paroquets, gay babblers, move
Through all thine aisles, Magnolia Grove !

The blue Bay sweetly spreads before,
And laves, like love, that beauteous shore ;
Each rippling wave, with gentlest speech,
Makes music on the sandy beach ;



18 HONGS OF THE SOUTH.

While in the deep, mid clearer skies,
The halcyon scene, reflected, lies :
Could fancy s Edens brighter prove
Than thy fair bowers, Magnolia Grove ?

Bright memories, too, to thee belong,
And through thy bowers, at twilight throng.
Here roved the dark-eyed Choctaw maid,
And wove her lover s wampum braid ;
Here came the laughing girls of France,
And sunny Spain, with love-lit glance ;
Till, last of all, with hearts more true,
Came eyes that gleam in Saxon blue :
What rapturous scenes of joy and love,
Hast thou beheld, Magnolia Grove !

I, too, have loved at eve to stray
Along the margin of that Bay,
With one beloved, or to recline
On some enameled, flowery shrine ;
With tales of love to please her ear,
Or list the red bird warbling near :
Tis past ! but yet where er I rove,
I ll dream of thee, Magnolia Grove !



THE HEART AND BIRD.

There is a white bird of the sea,

Beneath our Southern sky,
That ever soaring seems to be,

Where tossing breezes fly ;
No eye has ever seen him rest ;
No fowler knows his secret nest ;
Yet far away in starry isles,

That gem the dimpled wave,
Where blue-eyed summer ever smiles,

And pearls the waters pave ;
O er snowy shells, bright flowers above,
He keeps his hidden nest of love !

My heart is like that Southern bird ;

Its pinions cannot rest
Amid these scenes where naught is heard

But idle song and jest ;
It sports around with fluttering wing ;
It seems a gay unthoughted thing :



20 SONGS OF THE SOUTH.

But far away it has a shrine,
Hid from the vulgar gaze,

Where nature s brighest beauties shine
Around an angel face :

There, like that restless ocean-dove,

It keeps its hidden nest of love !

Yes, dearest, though afar from me,

Thou art my only joy,
A green isle in life s sunniest sea,

Far from this wild annoy.
Oh, would my weary heart could fly,
To greet thy blue beloved eye !
Then bowered in bliss, from care remote,

Our lives, in peace and pride,
Like yon sun-tinted barque, should float

Adown the future s tide !
Bird of the ocean soar above !
Mine is a sweeter nest of love !



NOT AGAIN.

Not again, not again
Can my heart its dream renew !
Brighter forms may meet my view ;
Sweeter voices wander by,
With a dreamier melody ;
Spirits beckon through the trees,
White robes flashing on the breeze ;
But they lure and tempt in vain ;
My sad heart will wear its chain
Not again !

Not again, not again !
Wine that on the sand is poured
To the cup may be restored :
Fragrance, on the wild breeze shed,
Bless the floweret whence it sped ;
Music seek the broken lute,
Long forgotten, longer mute :
But the heart once quelTd by pain,
Can its early bliss attain

Not again !



22 OX(JS OF THK SOI TH.

Not again, not again !
Tempt me then no more, sweet girl,
To imbibe the liquid pearl !
Though your face might win a saint
From his temple s dim restraint,
Yet my heart, while owning this,
Turns insensate from the bliss ;
In its gloom it must remain,
Doomed to smile in beauty s train
Not again !

Not again, not again !
For, in bright and trusting youth,
Wounded was my bosom s truth :
O er my heart was thrown a spell
Stronger than weak words can tell ;
And a face, as angel s bright,
Darkened Hope s devoted light :
Joy to me since then is vain,
I can trust Love s syren strain
Not again !



THE ROSE OF ALABAMA.

I loved, in boyhood s happy time,
When life was like a minstrel s rhyme,
And cloudless as my native clime,
The Rose of Alabama.
Oh ; lovely rose !

The sweetest flower earth knows,
Is the Rose of Alabama !

One pleasant, balmy night in June,
When swung, in silvery clouds, the moon,
My heart awoke love s vesper tune,

For Rose of Alabama !

She caught the strain, and to the bower,
Impelled by love and music s power,
Stole like an angel, at that hour,

The Rose of Alabama !

Beside me there her form she placed,
My ami stole gently round her waist,
And earth seemed with new beauty graced,
Bv Rose of Alabama }



24 SONGS OF THE SOUTH.

The breeze and streamlet ceased their tone ;
Like winged gems the fire-flies shone ;
The flowers gazed envious on my own

Sweet Kose of Alabama !

Tis vain our mutual vows to tell
One strain upon my plaintive shell,
And then I bade a sad farewell

To Rose of Alabama !

Long years have passed ; by fortune driven,
I wander neath a stranger heaven ;
But, ah ! love s ties are not yet riven

From Eose of Alabama !

Hope smiles upon my pilgrim way,
Ere long my feet shall homeward stray,
And time bring round my nuptial day

With Rose of Alabama !

Then, shrine-like, in my native land,
Love s Eden ! shall my cottage stand,
With happiness on every hand !

Sweet Rose of Alabama !



BEAUTY, SONG AND LOVE.

Long, in sorrow s gloomy night,


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