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The county of Highland: a history of Highland County, Ohio, from the ... online

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after him and he deserves the compliment, as he is one of the repre-
sentativef farmers of the prosperous township of Salem. Of his five
children, three were lost in infancy, the living ones being Lillie M.,.



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442 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

wife of Fred Granger, of Hillsboro, and Clarence P., who is at home.
The family are members of the Christian church.

Adna P. Pushee, after an active life in the construction and traffic
departments of various railroads, is now living a life of retirement
on his farm near Leesburg, Ohio. He was brought in touch with
the tra'nsportation business when a boy, on account of the fact that
hisi father was in the express business in the east during the incip-
iency of the vast railway systems of the country. The family is of
excellent New England stock and was represented by ancestors in
the revolutionary war. The eastern home was in Grafton county,
Xew Hampshire, where Adna P. Pushee was bom in 1834, and in
early youth obtained employment as a mail carrier. Later he as-
sisted his father on a mail route and was thus engaged until 1852,
when he joined the tide of Western emigration and in due time
arrived at Chillicothe, Ohio. At that time the Marietta & Cincin-
nati railroad was building and young Pushee worked for several
years in different capacities for the contractors. Eventually he was
given a job as fireman and from that in a few months was promoted
to the position of engineeT, being one of the first) to have charge of
an engine on that line. He was engineer of the first passenger train
that ran from Chillicothe to Marietta and remained for several years
with the company in the same capacity. Subsequently he was made
foreman of the engine-house, and later general foreman of the
machine shops and finally promoted to the position of master
mechanic. After a short retention of this place, he returned to his
original task in the cab of a locomotive, which he again resigned to
take charge of a gang of men in the service of contractors. He
worked on the first line of railroad constructed through Highland
county, which is now part of one of the great transportation systems
of the country. In 1866 he left Ohio to become superintendent of
steam shovels on the old Indianapolis, Cincinnati & Lafayette rail-
road, with headquarters at St. Paul, Ind. He was engaged for some
time subsequently in the construction department of what is now the
^*Big Four" railroad, working first on the main line and later on the
present Whitewater Valley division. Abandoning railroad employ-
ment temporarily, he became sui>erintendent of construction for a
while on tlie Whitewater canal, and later was in chaise of difficult
work near Harrison, Ohio, for a hydraulic company, which he car-
ried out with entire success. In 1871 he returned to his old love,
the railroad busine!=s, and was employed by the Marietta & Cincin-
nati railroad company in the responsible position of lost-car and
freight agent, doing similar work at the same time for the Baltimore
& Ohio and Ohio & Mississippi lines. He had charge of these im-
portant trusts until 1876, when he resigned and retired to his country
place near Leesburg, where he has since looked after his farming



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 443

interests. He has a large and well improved farm which he manages
by modem methods and keeps abreast of all the improvements relat-
ing to agriculture. He has never been an office-seeker, but held the
position of land appraiser, to which he was elected in 1890 and filled
to the entire satisfaction of his constituents. In 1861, he was mar-
ried to Martha A. Ladd, who died in 1879. To this union were bom
Minnie, Walter and Xellie, the latter deceased. October 5, 1880,
Mr. Pushee was imited in marriage with Hannah E., daughter of
John> Cox, one of the early settlers and prominent men of his com-
nmmity.

Hon. Henry H. Redkey, of Concord township, former county com-
missioner and representative in the Ohio legislature, is one of the
notable men of the country who are descended from pioneer settlers.
His grandfather, Adam Redkey, a native of Pennsylvania, and resid-
ing after marriage in Washington county, of that state, came to Ohio
with his wife and children in 1808 and settled on the north bank of
Rattlesnake creek, in Paint township, near the site of Xew Peters-
burg. Adam Redkey was a soldier of the Revolutionary war, and
would have been one of the conspicuous men of the early days of set-
tlement, but w^hile making a trip to Pennsylvania soon after he had
purchased land, he took the fever and died, leaving his wife and six
children to the foilunes of life in the wilderness. These children,
Joshua, Jacob, Adam,, John, George arid Nancy, all now deceased,
became farmers and prominent in their day, and their descend-
ants are to be found among many of the best families of the town-
ship. John Redkey, bom in 1707 in Washington county. Pa., was
reared from boyhood in Highland county, and in early mknhood mar-
ried Anna Hdatt, wdth whom he went to housekeeping near Rains^
boro. Four childi*en w^ere born to them — William, George, Xancy
and AJvira — all now deceased. After the death of this wife, John
Redkey removed to the vicinity of Marshall, and married Rachel
Edenfield, a native of Delaware, whose parens, Samuel and Jane
Edenfield, came to Marshall tow^nship in 1818. In 1850 he moved
to Concord township, to a farm of 160 acres, then w^ild land, now
occupied by H. H. Redkey. He served several terms as township
trustee, was quite successful as a farmer and stock raiser, but died at
the age of fifty-six years, his wife surviving him to the age of sixty-
six. Both are buried at Wesley Chapel cemetery. Two children
were born to them, the subject of this sketch, and S. E. Redkey, now
in the real estate and insurance business at Cincinnati, Ohio.
Henry H. Redkey was bom at the home in Marshall township
March 1, 1830, and was educated in the district schools of that town-
ship and Concord. When the war of the rebellion came on, he
enlisted as a soldier August 10, 1862, in Captain Barrett's company,
and was mustered in at Camp Dennison, as a private in Company I



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444 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

of the Eighty-ninth regiment, Ohio volunteer infantry. His first
service was in Kentucky and West Virginia, and then in the vicinity
of i^ashville and Gallatin, Tenn., until the summer of 1863, when he
was with his regiment in the famous TuUahoi^fa campaign and took
part in the battle of Hoover's Gap. Following this he accompanied
the army in the Chattanooga campaign, and participated in the battle
of Chickamauga, Septeml>er 19-20, 1863, the greatest of the war in
the west. The Eighty-ninth was among the regiments that lost
heavily in captured, and Private Redkey was almiong the prisoners,
and he continued in this unfortunate plight during the remainder
of the war. He was confined two months at Richmond, Ya., then at
Danville until May, 1864:, and after that at the notorious prison pen
at Andersonville, Ga., suffering greatly from hunger and disease,
until April 28, 1865. Thence he was taken to Jacksonville, Fla,,
and then the war. came to an end, and he came into the hands of the
United States troops, and was transferred by boat to Annapolis, Md.,
and thence to Camp Chase, Columbus, where he was honorably dis-
charged June 8, 1865. When he reached home he weighed but
seventy-five pounds, so severe had been his deprivations and suffer-
ing, and it was a year before he could undertake any work. Since
then he has been engaged in fanning and stock raising, meeting with
much success and winning recognition as one of the most notable
breeders of Shorthorn cattle in the county. He is the owner of 226
acres of land, in a high state of cultivation. His public life has
been one of honor and valuable service to the public. For twelve
years he filled the office of coimty commissioner, and in 1895 he was
elected representative of Highland county in the Ohio legislature, a
place of honor that he occupied for two terms. He is a member of
the Grand Army post at Sugartree Ridge, and is a prominent Repub-
lican and earnest member of the Methodist church. In early man-
hood he married Sarah E., daughter of Josiah Y. and Rebecca E.
Steen, and they have five children: Cora E., widow of Frank
Heatherington, late of Hillsboro; Edwin S., who married Agnes
Cochrane and liveB on part of the homestead ; INTellie B., Harry S.,
a law student at Hillsboro, and Mary L.

Joshua Gatch Redkey, one of the most prominent and progressive
farmers of Paint township and influentially identified with the edu-
cational and agricultural interests of Highland county, comes of a
widely distributed and strongly connected family. As far back as
1808 Adam and Mary (Davis) Redkey came to Ohio with their
seven children and settled on the west bank of Rattlesnake creek, in
Paint township. The father bought land and made one payment,
but on his way to Pennsylvania in 1810 to secure money to complete
the purchase he was stricken with fever and died. His five sons,
whose names were Joshua, John, Jacob, Adam and George, all



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 445

became land owners and citizens of influence, whose descendants are
intermarried with the strongest families of Paint township. They
had been reared as Methodists and eventually became identified with
the Abolitionists, Adam being in later years one of the conductors
of the underground railroad. Joshua Kedkey left a son named
Daniel, who was born in Paint township September 19, 1819, and
married Mary, daughter of John Glaze, who settled in Brush Creek
township about the year 1811. Daniel Eedkey lived in Marshall
township from 1844 until 1874, and became the owner there of about
230 acres of land. Later he purchased from James Carothers a
farm in Paint township of 195 acres, where he spent the remainder
of his* days. He was prominent in connection with township affairs,
active in Methodist church circles and a stockholder in the female
college at Hillsboro. He died January 17, 1878, as the result of an
injury received from a falling scaffold while engaged in building a
bam. The two children resulting from his union with Mary Glaze
are Martha, now the widow of Joel Brown of Paint township, and
Joshua Gatch Redkey. The latter was bom in Marehall township,
Highland county, Ohio, February 3rd, 1856, grew up on the farm
and received his education in the district schools. He was nineteen
years old when the change of residence was made to Paint township
and he carried on the business of the farm in conjunction with his
father until the latter's death. Since that event he has had super-
vision of the 425 acres of land left by his father, which he has man-
aged with great skill and energy and much improved in every way.
He ranks as one of the most enterprising of Paint township's suc-
cessful farmers, paying especial attention to the breeding of Poland-
China swine, the polled Durham cattle and other fine stock. In
former years Mr. Redkey wrote a good deal for the agricultural
papers, and he has always been an advocate of higher education,
especially among the agricultural classes. He was one of the organ-
izers of Paint Township Farmers' institute, of which he was presi-
dent three years and is now vice-president. He has also long been
conspicuous in connection with the Knights of Pythias, being the
author of the first by-laws written for the lodge at Rainsboro, is a
charter member of lodge No. 458 at Rainsboro and has instituted or
assisted in instituting nine different lodges of the Knights of Pythias.
From 1894 until 1898 he was representative to the grand lodge of
this fraternity, has served as district and county deputy and for seven
years was keeper of records and seals. He was also president of the
township school board for a number of years. February 11, 1881,
Mr. Redkey was married to Amanda, daughter of Davis H. Lucas,
a member of one of the oldest and most substantial of Marshall town-
ship families. She died April 5, 1902. The household now con-
sists of his aged mother, who has been an invalid for six years, and



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446 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

two children, Clarence E. and Stanley R Mr. Redkey is a member
of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which he has been recording
steward for fourteen consecutive years.

William J. Kedkey, for over thirty years a merchant at Eains-
boro, is not only of pioneer descent himself, but is connected by
blood or marriage with nearly all the old families who settled and
made Paint township. His great grandfather, Adam Redkey, moved
in from Pennsylvania as early as 180G, bringing with him his wife
and their children, Joshua, John, George, Adam, Xancy, Sarah, and
Jacob. The father bought land near where Centerfield now is, and
after making one payment on the purchase price, he set out to 'go to
Pennsylvania and obtain money for the second. On his way he was
attacked by fever and died, leaving his widow with this large family
of almost helpless children to provide for. She gave up the farm
upon which her husband had settled, but later purchased the place
upon which James W. Roads subsequently lived. Jacob Redkey,
who was about eight years old when the family came to Paint town-
ship, married IMary, daughter of Basil Lucas, from which union
sprang a numerous progeny which has strictly obeyed the Biblical
injunction to ^^multiply and replenish the earth." The family long
since recovered its hold upon the soil lost by the sudden death of
Adam Redkey and through its connections with the Spargurs,
Lucases, Roads and others, permeates the whole industrial and social
life of Paint township and exercises a strong influence upon its
affairs. Jacob Redkey bought a farm near Rainsboro, where he
lived the remainder of his days, and during his prime was one of the
leading men of the county, being major of the Home Guards and
at one time a candidate for state representative. His three children,
now all dead, were Marv^ A., Basil and John L. Redkey, the latter
inheriting the home farm and living thereon from childhood imtil
the termination of his career. He married Rebecca Pedrick, a
native of Xew Jersey and daughter of William Pedrick, by whom
he had three children: William J., Alonzo of Missouri and Louisa,
wife of Walker Baker, of Rainsboro. Mrs. Redkey died October 18,
1859, aged forty-three, and a few years later her husband married
Xancy Sinclair, a native of Highland county, and daughter of Demp-
sey Sinclair. The children by this marriage were Dempsey, Ada,
wife of Henry Mason of Rainsboro, and Effie, deceased. John L.
Redkey was a good citizen, held several township offices, served
against raider Morgan and died in the seventy-eighth year of his age.
His widow still lives on the old homestead near the village of Rains-
boro. William J. Redkey, oldest of his father's children by the first
marriage, was bom on the home place in Paint township, Highland
county, Ohio, June 11, 1845. He worked on the farm until full



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 447

grown and attended the district school, where he had for a school-
mate a bright lad named Joseph Benson Foraker, since known to
fame as governor and senator of Ohio. The latter's first Sunday
school teacher was the father of William J. Redkey, and the two
boys often listened together to the scriptural instruction in the neigh-
borhood church. Mr. Kedkey married Xancy C, daughter of Chris-
tian and Ester Cameron, of Pike county, and located in the village
of Rainsboro where he has since resided. In March, 1871, he estaV
lished a general merchandise store, and in 1878 erected the conven-
ient and handsome building which has since constituted his business
quarters. In addition to his mercantile transactions, Mr. Kedkey
controls 215 acres of land near Rainsboro and looks closely after the
details connected with the cultivation and management. Of his six
children, John X., Joseph A, and Eroma are dead; the li^?ng being
C. L. Redkey, a farmer by occupation; F. D. Redkey, of Rainsboro;
and Ester, at home. Mr. Redkey is a member of the United Brethren
church and has served two tenns as treasurer of the township.

Carey W. Rhoten, one of the leading citizens of White Oak town-
ship, and cashier of the newly established White Oak Valley bank,
Is a grandson of Josiah Rhoten, one of the pioneers of Brown county.
Josiah Rhoten was bom about 1790, in Mason county, Ky., married
Mary Prine, of the same county, in early manhood, and moved with
his wife to a home in the forests of Brown county, settling near .the
site of Carlisle, Jackson township. There he bought a farm of two
hundred acres, which he redeemed from nature, and reared a family
of nine children: Thomas, Hannah, Jane, Prine, deceased; Chris-
topher and William (residing in Bro^^^l county), Huston and Cath-
erine, deceased ; and Kenneth, living in Illinois. Josiah Rhoten
was a man held in high esteem, was a faithful worker in the Meth-
odist church, and lived to the age of seventy-five years. 'His son,
William, father of the subject of this sketch, was bom in Jackson
township, Bro^vn county, June 19, 1819. He occupied himself as
a cooper in early manhood, but after his marriage to Thyrza Pindell
he went to farming on the place where he yet lives, in Brown county.
First buying 150 acres he has increased his holdings to over 600
acres, and has been a very successful stock breeder, as well as farmer.
For many years he has been a member of the Christian Union church,
and he was one of the principal promoters of the Ash Ridge church,
in which he has occupied the position of deacon for a long time. His
wife died in 1901, at the age of seventy-six years. Xine children
were bom to them : Jane, deceased ; Rachel, living in West Virginia ;
Carey W., the subject of this sketch; Michael, and Ethan J., of
Brown county ; Xancy, of Clermont county ; Chilton A. and Mary,
of Brown county, and Melinda, of Adams county. Carey W. Rhoten



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448 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

was bom December 1, 1849, on the home farm near Fincastle, in
Eagle township, Brown county, and was reared there and educated
in the district school and the Georgetown high school. After com-
pleting his education he taught school with much success for twenty
years. In early manhood he was married to America Roberts, a
native of Whiteoak township, and daughter of William and Amelia
Roberts. They began housekeeping on the farm now owned by
A. Roberts, in White Oak township, and two years later bought the
farm of 142 acres where they now live. Two children have been
bom to them: William G., a physician at Mowrystown, and Ira Q.,
of the Farmers and Traders bank, of Hillsboro. Mr. Rhoten has
well earned a high standing among the prosperous and reliable people
of Highland county. Steadily winning success through industry and
' business tact, he has increased his land holdings to three hundred and
seventy-five acres. In addition to the ordinary work of the farm,
he has been quite fortunate in rearing Aberdeen Angus cattle and
other valuable stock, and he has been an extensive dealer in live
stock. He is one of those principally to be credited with the estab-
lishment of the new White Oak Valley bank. In politics he is a
Democrat, and he has served one term as the township assessor. His
religious affiliation is with the Christian church.

William G. Rhoten, M. D., of MowrystowTi, notable among the
young professional men of the county, was bom in White Oak towTi-
ship, on the farm now owned by A. K Roberts, September 30, 1874.
Dr. Rhoten is a son of Carey W. Rhoten and his wife, America B.
Roberts, and has already been mentioned in tlie preceding sketch of
his father. Ho was reared at the farm home, attending the district
school, and continued his literary studies at the Xorthwestem Ohio
university at Ada, and at the Hillsboro college, after which he was
engaged m teaching school for two terms. It was not his purpose,
however, to adopt the profession of a teacher, and he soon gave his
attention to the study of medicine, reading for about four years in
the office of Drs. Glenn & Xelson of Hillsboro. This work he fol-
lowed up with four courses of lectures at the University of Cincin-
nati, and when he had been granted his degree and diploma he
opened his office at Mowrystown and began his practice, which has
since continued with flattering success. At present he is township
physician. The ability he has shown thus early in his career gives
promise of an honorable and distinguished life work in his profes-
son that shall be creditable to the pioneer family which he represents,
and the county in which he lives. He is a member of the Christian
church, and held in high esteem for sterling traits of character. The
wife of Dr. Rhoten is Maud C, daughter of William and Sarah



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 449

Edwards, of Highland county, and they have one child, Walter
Glenn Khoten.

Daniel Roades, a highly successful farmer of Clay township, well
known through the county, is a grandson of George Roades, bom in
Virginia in 1791, who married in his native state and came to Ohio
in the early days, not long after the close of the second war with
England. He settled first in Paint township, but in a year or two
removed to Liberty township, and bought a hundred acres of the
Byrd survey. His industry and good management were rewarded
with success, and he became one of the well-to-do men of his time.
He lived to the age of ninety years and his wife to past eighty. Ten
children were bom to them, of whom Ephraim is yet living at the old
homestead, Eli in Clay to^vnship and George in Liberty. Henry V.,
one of the sons deceased, and father of the subject of this sketch, was
bom in Virginia in 1816, was reared and educated in Highland
county, and in early manhood was quite successful as a teacher of
mathematics in the county schools. He married Sarah Moberly,
daughter of the prominent pioneer settler, Rezin Moberly, and made
his home on the old Evans place on Clear Creek, and not long^ after-
ward in Clay township, where he first bought a hundred acres. He
also prospered in business, being a man of great resource and -adapta-
bility, and was noted as one of the most successful farmers of the
county. He was a life-long member of the Methodist church and a
valued member of society. Fourteen children were bom to Henry
and Sarah Roades, of whom Anna J. is living in Liberty township,
William, Daniel, Minerva, and Sarah E. in Clay township,
George W., the eldest is deceased, also John, Mary S., Alcinda and
Albert, and the others died young. Daniel Roades was bom at the
home in Clay township, October 16, 1850, was educated in the dis-
trict school, and on reaching manhood married Mary E., daughter
of Isaac and Mary A. Reedy. They began their married life on the
farm where they now live, and there have reared five children : Mel-
vina, wife of James K Masten ; Cora M. ; Esta, wife of Walter
Mock, all of Clay township; Henry V., of Brush Creek township,
aaid Lizzie M., at home. Mr. Roades has prospered as a farmer,
formerly owning over five hundred acres, part of which he has now
put in the hands of children. In addition to agriculture he has
carried on a business in fertilizers, and dealt quite extensively in
stock and grain. His farm is well supplied with all varieties of live
stock, and he is in every way a progressive farmer and capable busi-
ness man. In relation to the public he has rendered valuable serv-
ices as township trustee and school director; he is deacon and
treasurer of the Church of Christ, and a member of the Odd Fel-
H-29



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450 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

lows lodge at Buford and the Republican party. These are indica-
tion of the successful life he has lived since he began clearing away
the forest from his land, and laying the foundations of one of the
best equipped farms in the county.

William Roads, now living a retired life on his country estate near
Highland, Ohio, comes of a family long represented and favorably
known in Highland coimty. The original settlers were from Vir-
ginia, came during the early years of the nineteenth century and
selected for their locations that part of the county now included in
Brush and Paint townships. From this beginning the descendants
multiplied until now they are found well represented in various por-
tions of Highland and other counties. The parents of the subject



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