A. R. (Augustus Robert) Buckland.

John Horden, missionary bishop; a life on the shores of Hudson's Bay online

. (page 5 of 5)
Online LibraryA. R. (Augustus Robert) BucklandJohn Horden, missionary bishop; a life on the shores of Hudson's Bay → online text (page 5 of 5)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


flocks. One of his last long journeys was to Whale
Kiver. The account of his visit offers a striking
illustration of the change which the acceptance of
the gospel makes in the native life. He was eagerly
welcomed, and at once plunged into work. Here is
the list of the Sunday engagements : —

The first service was at 6.30 in the morning ; that
was for the Indians. All were present, some being
men whom he had not seen for years. Service over,
there was breakfast. After breakfast, the first
business was a service for the Eskimo. Now they
were not reluctant. "You see before you," wrote
Horden, "a goodly number of clean, intelligent-
looking people, short and stout ; you see that they



132 JOHN HORDEN

have boo^s in their hands, and notice that they
readily find out the places required ; they sing very
nicely." This is not by any means the popular view
of the Eskimo, and the change which has brought
this about must be a very real one.

The Eskimo dismissed, it was time for dinner ; and
dinner over, a second Indian service was held. This
must have been rather a group of services than one
service, for the bishop married four couples and
baptized twelve children. In scattered communities
of this kind, people must be ready for services of
such a nature just as the opportunity may occur.
But it is possible that these Indian brides were not
troubled by the necessity of preparing elaborate
trousseaux, so that merely a few hours' notice of
the ceremony would not occasion them any great
alarm.

These services over, the bishop had a little leisure
— time indeed for a short walk in the fresh air ; a
welcome release after breathing an atmosphere which,
in his own patient way, he merely describes as " a
little close." After the walk, tea ; not a very



A BUSY DAY 133

sumptuous repast for a bishop, but welcome enough.
On the table were tea, preserved milk, sugar, bread,
and, instead of butter, marrow fat.

After tea came yet another service, this time in
English. These English services, the mention of
which so often occurs in Horden's letters, are a
useful reminder of one side of missionary work too
rarely remembered. In the desolate, sparsely-peopled
lands of the Hudson's Bay Territory, and in many
other parts of the world, there are English-speaking
people who owe their only opportunities of joining
in divine service to the missionaries. Perhaps only
those who have been for months at a time cut off
from all such advantages caft understand the joy of
once more realising the pleasure of common worship,
though no more than "two or three are gathered
together " in the name of Christ.

After the English service came " a little con-
versation," and then bed. At six the next morning
Horden was again at work, taking a final service
before bidding good-bye to the people whose faces
he could never hope to see again.



CHAPTEE XII

CLOSING SCENES

Translational "Work — A Sudden Blow — " He has been Yery,
Very Good " — Death — Memorials.

N the autumn of that year Horden was
busy upon his translations, when he
was struck down with rheumatism.
He described the attack thus, in a

letter to myself, dated from his " sick chamber," just

a week before his death : —

" My translational work I divided into two por-
tions; in the morning of almost every day I was
engaged on the revision of my Cree New Testament,
while every afternoon my much valued Indian

134




STRUCK DOWN 135

assistant sat with me in my study, when we carefully
examined all my last winter's translations from
Joshua to Esther. This is now all but completed,
and will, I hope, be entirely so long before this letter
leaves Moose.

" I continued on my New Testament work until
November 21, when my pen dropped from my hand,
and I have not since touched it. I had completed
the Gospels of St. Matthew and St. Mark, and eleven
chapters of St. Luke. On the preceding day I had
felt perfectly well ; I had preached at the English
service from Malachi iii. 14, 17. I had taken my
large class at the Indian school, and had then
preaehed at the Indian service from Jeremiah
xxiii. 5, on a greater deliverance than that from
Egypt.

" On Monday I arose quite well and strong before
it was light, and at a quarter past seven sat down to
write, beginning the twelfth chapter of St. Luke. I
worked on steadily for a quarter of an hour, when I
received what seemed to me a terrible blow on the
lower part of my back. I thought it a stroke of



136 JOHN HORDEN

rheumatism, and supposed its effects would pass off
in the course of a few minutes, but in this I was
disappointed : blow succeeded blow, until I could
scarcely move.

" I sat up, however, until after prayers and break-
fast, when I was conducted to my bed-chamber,
and put to bed. Almost directly an automatic
torture-machine of the finest temper and of the
most exquisite sensitiveness established itself near
my left hip, and, at my every movement, set
to work with horrible intensity and regularity.
What I suffered it is impossible to describe, and,
even if I could describe it, it would not be under-
stood by those who have not passed through a
similar ordeal.

" Rheumatism and myself had been companions
for many years, as was to be expected from the
great exposure to which I have been subjected,
in my summer and winter journeys through the
mighty diocese of Moosonee, with the thermome-
ter varying from 100 degrees in the shade to 50
degrees below zero. I had suffered in back, legs.



PAIN AND PEA CE 137

feet ; I had been so bad occasionally that I could not
walk down over the stairs, and when assaulted by
my unpleasant companion out of doors I have been
often obliged to exercise my strongest force of will
to prevent myself from being thrown down in the
snowy road.

" All these things I did not mind much ; I could
bear pain ; and they did not interfere materi-
ally with my work, and as long as that could go
on I was content. But it was a different thing
now. With increased pain came inability to work,
and for a week I lay almost unfit for anything. I
seemed for a while to make progress towards re-
covery, and, three weeks after the attack, was able
to walk from my bedroom to my study with a little
assistance ; then a relapse occurred, and I scarcely
have been out of bed since, and when I shall again
God alone knows.

"But He has been very, very good; He has
kept me in peace ; He has kept me in fairly good
bodily health, and endued me with as much cheer-
fulness as I ever had possessed. Our young medical



1 38 JOHN HORDEN

man has been indefatigable in his efforts for my
recovery; he has rubbed and kneaded me; he has
mustard-plastered and blistered me, until the whole
ot my left leg bears testimony to the constancy of
his attentions. I was to have gone to Winnipeg
in the coming summer, and then to have returned
finally to England after my long service. At present
I see no probability of my being able to take that
journey, as, before arriving at the railroad, there is
more than a fortnight's hard work up one large
river, which is impeded by many rapids and falls,
necessitating frequent porteraging, which is utterly
beyond my present powers. I suppose I shall be
obliged to return home by the annual ship, but I
dread this much, as there is no accommodation on
board, and especially for one in my condition. I
know that every effort will be made, were I obliged
to return home this way, to make me as comfortable
as circutnstances permit for I meet with nothing but
the greatest kindness from everyone connected with
the Hudson's Bay Company. I need not trouble
myself much about this ; I can trust all to the hand



THE END 139

of God; He will provide that which He deems
sufficient for my case."



This letter was never finished. The following
postscript was appended by Mrs. Eroughton : —

Jan. 24:th. — " Since the above was written, my
dear father, the Bishop of Moosonee, has passed
away; he died quite unexpectedly on the morning
of January 12th, C. S. Broughton."



In a subsequent letter, Mr., now Bishop, Newnham
described the bishop's end. Early in January he
had felt better, but in the second week of the
month signs of weakness began to show themselves,
and the doctor grew anxious. On the night of
Januiby 11th, all save the doctor went to bed,
hoping to find the patient better in the morning.
The doctor sat up till one a.m., and returned at five.
By eight o'clock the bishop was so weak that his
daughter and son-in-law^ were called- in to the room ;
but almost before they reached him he had passed
away, from failure of the heart's action.



I40 JOHN HORDEN

As he lay in his coffin, the people, young and
old, came to take one last look at him that had
dwelt in the place for forty years. The final
scene of all is thus described by a young Indian,
whom the bishop had for some years been teaching : —

" Saturday, Jan. 21st. — We had the funeral. The
coffin was closed in the presence of four clergy. It
was a lovely afternoon, almost spring-like, when
the beautiful Burial Service was read, and the first
Bishop of Moosonee's body was committed to the
grave before his bereaved people. The whole adult
population went to the church and to the grave.
There he was laid amongst his flock, as he had said
he wished to be. While still lying in the church,
young and old came to take the last farewell of the
face they loved so well, and who went in and out
of their homes, over forty years, as a missionary,
pastor, friend, and bishop."

Horden's grave is beside that of a daughter and
a grandson.



''FAITHFUL UNTO DEATH'' 141

So ended a work of forty-two years in a land
of many hardships, yet also of many triumphs.
Horden's successor found the diocese fully organised
— one native clergyman, and twenty-six native lay
teachers at work, and nearly 3600 baptized native
Christians; the Bible in the hands of the people,
and other literature also. And the work, under
God, was mainly Horden's.

In the Cathedral of Exeter, the town of Horden's
birth, a monument has been raised to the memory of
their townsman. Another is found in the wall
of the school under whose roof he first resolved to
be a missionary. A simple statement of the main
facts of his life is there followed by this short text,
which aptly describes his career —



THE END.



PRINTED BY MOKKISON AND GIBB LIMITED, EDINBURGH



GIFT BOOKS FOR YOUNO
PEOPLE



FOR BOYS

At 2s. 6d. net

A Series of Standard Books by well-known authors.

With Illustrations. Handsomely bound in

Cloth Boards, Coloured Jackets



BOY WHO SAILED WITH BLAKE
CHARLEY LAUREL
CUBBY HOLE YARNS
DESPERATE ADVENTURE, A
MEDLAND BOYS, THE
DOG CRUSOE, THE
GORILLA HUNTERS, THE
MARTIN RATTLER
QUEST OF THE "WILD SWAN"
TOM BROWN'S SCHOOLDAYS



A VTHOJR

W. H. G. Kingston
W. H. G. Kingston
A. L. Haydon
A. L. Haydon
A. L. Haydon
R. M. Ballantynk
R. M. Ballantynk
R. M. Ballantynk
A. L. Haydon
Thos. Hughes



Other Titles will be added later



57 AND 59 LUDGATE HILL, LONDON, E.G. 4



GIFT BOOKS FOR YOUNG
PEOPLE



FOR GIRLS

At 2b. 6d. net



A Series of Standard Books by well-known authors.

With Illustrations. Handsomely bound in

Cloth Boards, Coloured Jackets



TITLE

ANDERSEN'S FAIRY TALES
CAT'S LIFE STORY, A
HIGH SCHOOL GIRL, A
INTO STORMY WATERS
LITTLE WOMEN
GOOD WIVES
MINISTERING CHILDREN
M0NK8BURY COLLEGE
PILGRIM'S PROGRESS, THE



A UTUOR

Hans Andersen
S. Louise Patteson
Mrs. Henry Clarke
Mrs. Henry Clarke
Louisa M. Alcott
Louisa M. Alcott
M. L. Charlksworth
Sarah Doudney
John Bunyan



Other Titles will be added later



57 AND 59 LUDQATE HILL, LONDON, E.G. 4




•OURTEEN DAY USE

RETURN TO DESK FROM WHICH BORROWED



^



This book is due on the last date stamped below, or
on the date to which renewed.
:|ft Renewed books are subject to immediate recall.



jg5^ar'56HSr




MAR 4 1956 |i


















































i






T r» 01 1 nn^ 'k^ General Library



I



YB 291




973929 BVl^lO



THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA UBRARY





1 2 3 5

Online LibraryA. R. (Augustus Robert) BucklandJohn Horden, missionary bishop; a life on the shores of Hudson's Bay → online text (page 5 of 5)