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FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING,
408 S 4:12 MAIN STBEET, . . . U OHCESTEB, Mass.

ALWAYS IN STOCK OF FIRST CLASS READY MADE



WARE, PRATT & CO.

FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING,
IN STBEET, . . . U OBCES2

ALWAYS IN STOCK OF FIRST CLASS READY MADE

ure. Together with a Large Assortment of Common Clothing- at Lc
Boys' Clothing of all the l.at st and Most Desirable Styles. Largo and
of Cloths, Cassimeres and Tailoring Goods, at Wholesale and Retail.
CUSTOM WORK FOR MEN AND BOYS, Superior in both Style and Workmanship.
Furnishing Goods in Great Vaiiety. Scarce and Desirable Goods can be found here.



Of their own Manufacture. Together with a Large Assortment of Common Clothing- at Lowest Prices.

Headquarters for Boys' Clothing of all the Lat st and Most Desirable Styles. Largo and Choice

Varieties of Cloths, Cassimeres and Tailoring Goods, at Wholesale and Retail.



TERMS:-ONE PRICE AND NO DEVIATION.



TnszL-re i^^Uh. CH AS . E. GRANT^ ComrcLcle,

Agent for the Largest Dividend-Pay htg
Also representing the

0'id und Sidiubk Shth B<jm^anwS, ymm^ti und Jlmetimn.

JIU ^niiti h^noiuii/y ^djuiied und f)r'Owp,Uij fiaid af ihh ^ffm.
S5^ J\IcLiTh Stree.t', o\re,v CtttzeTis ^ank, Worceste?^.

47>M71IN:?'FREE'F, .... W0r(CES1'ER,v]M)qgg.

bent^bush;

HATS, FURS AND



387 Washington Street, .... BOSTON, Mass.



4y cnuista»

FEB me




AD VERTISEMENTS.



Centrally Located, direct Street to the Depot.

35, 37 &. 39 Mechanic St., Worcester, Mass.



JOSEPH Silll, Proprietoi.

Building and Furniture New Convenient for Permanent
and Transient Boarders.

PF^ICES TREASONABLE.

CITY DYE HOUSE,

(Layard Place, rear Quinsigamond Bank,)

241 Main Street, Worcester, Mass.

LADIES' AND GENTLEMAN'S

GAEIlifS DIED 01 OIlillD

WITH NEATNESS AND DISPATCH.

We make a Specialty of Dyeing, Cleansing and Curling
Feathers.

JOHIi STA.RKIE, Proprietor.



I3IMENSE SUCCESS OF

THE GREAT

REVOLUTIONARY DRAMA,

By C. H. WEBBER.

The finest, most dramatic, and truly beautiful Play ever
produced by Grand Army Dramatic Corps. Every Charac-
ter an acting Character, and one which does credit to the
Performer. 'For terms and further particulars, Address,

C. H. WEBBER, Salem, Mass.



DOANE & GREENOUGH,

AND BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURERS,
No. IIG STATE ST., Boston, 3Iass.



pOLMEg' B0^¥0N m^\i^W-

Go to this Gallery for FIRST-CLASS Work at
BOSTON PRICES.

This is the only place in the City where FIRST-CLASS Card
Photographs can be procured at the low price of



FRANCIS DOANE,



W. S. GREENOUGH.



Comrade JAMES M. ODIE,

DEALER IN

WATCHES, CLOCKS, JEWELRY & DIAMONDS.

Also, a Fine Assortment of Revolvers.



Fine WATCH Repairing a Specialty. Also,
Jewelry Repairing. All Work Warranted.



|1,50 Per Doz. Each Picture Warrar^ted.

as perfect after five years as on the day taken. Small Pic-
tures "copied and finished in Color or Ink by the finest
Artists, and warranted, or no charge.

Call and Examine Specimens, whether a Sitting
is desired or not.

C. D. HOLMES,

405 MAIN STI\EET, ■Worcester, Mass.
MR. T. F. HANLON,

Artist, is now associated with this Gallery, where he will
be pleased to see his friends



4» %. Oiaffiiaij

CARPET CLEANER



-AND-



GENEl^TIIi pea^E CLEANING,

No. Ji Central Street,

WORCESTER, - MASS.



Q. A. S, %mm MLaifeiEi fOiff BsiltSli4 iiffiLgadlSs^?




This ig a new article designed to mark the grave,
and to serve also as the ilag holder.



BUBIEE & CO., 23 Exchange Street,



If required, the word Post is placed above the

letters, G. A. R., and the number of Post below.

PRICE: Lots of 25, 75c. each. Lots of

,50, 60c. each. Lots of 100, 50c. each.

■\Ve have a Large assortment of Boquet Holders

at very low prices to tlie G A. R.

BOSTON, Mass.



AD VERTISEMENTS.



FIRST NATIONAL



rinr



F '



OF WORCESTER, MASS.
Office, No. 410 Main Street.



DIRECTORS:



R. C. Taylor, Wurnostcr. Hiram Fobes, Worcester.



T. W. Wi'llingtoii,
Ilartky \' illiams,
W. II. Dexter,
C. B. Pratt,
C. S. Turner,



n, P>. Fay,

John D. Lovell, "

George Draper, Milford.
TIiDinas Rice, Elirowsbiiry.
D. G. Rawson, Boston.



.1. A. Norcross, Worcc(?tcr.



Hartley Williams, Treasurer.

Chas. B. Pratt, President.



R. James Tatman, Secretary



Ten Eyck &Co.

AUBURN. N. Y.

EMPLOY AGENTS on the most liberal terms
to solicit orders for their celebrated

India Ink and Oil

PORTRAITS.



A GENTEEL AND PROFITABLE
BUSINESS,

Special Terms to Members of Grand Army
Posts.



C. A. KEYES.

Importer and Dealer in German Flower Seeds.

Bouquets, Wreaths, Crosses, etc., made to order,

for $1.00 and upwards. Vegetables and

Flowering Plants at Low Prices.

YERBENAS AHD PAIISIES A SPECIALT7.



Greenhouse cor Highland and No. Ashland Sts.

Office, Bay State Drug Store,

281 MAIN ST., 'WORCESTER, MASS.



PAPERS



Write for Circular conlaining fitll information
and state that you sara this notice in the G. A. R.

Almanac.



THE LATEST AND MOST FASHIONABLE

Styles of Paper, at Low Prices.

From New York and Boston.

Elegant Line of Visiting Cards, Comic Business Cards,

Card and Pebble Board, Colored Papers for Fancy

Work, Fine Stationery. Also,

Fine Writing Paper, four cents per quire.

All Goods sold lower for same quality than at any other
House in the City. Call and see.

FRANKLIN HILL,

545 Main St., Franklin Sq., Cor Allen Court,
WOKCESTEK, JIA.SS.



M. A. BOYDEN,

AND SURVEYOE.

406 MAIN STREET,

WORCESTER.



AD VER TISEMENTS.



SAFETIT! ECONOM:r a COMFORT/!!
WEST'S PATENT ITOIT-EXPLOSIVE,




No. 1 Prica $20.00.




Price $16.00.



OIL TANK, PRESSED GALVANIZED IRON.
Water Wicks Indispensable.

This is the Choapest, the Latest and the Best; the most Elaborate and Conven-
ient, the most Powerful, and most Economical.

The testimonials are numerous, and from persons well calculated to judge.
Send for circulars at once, as this is the best article ever placed before the people.

The ingenious and invaluable device of thn Water Wicks, in combination with
the Oil Wicks, not only makes explosion absolutely impossible, but also generates
an intensely hot vapor with the flume ; thereby the combu.stion i.s rendered perfectly
complete. An entire freedom from smell, soot and all other impurities, since the
carbon and volatile gases that escape by all other nictbods, are by this arrangement
alone, held and utilized. The heat value of the tlame is thus greatly enhanced, its
action being concentrated and surpri.-ingly effectual. There can be no explosion, as
the Water Tank is between the oil and the flame. It is also odorless; the food can-
not taste or smell of the oil, since the gas is all consumed.




PRICE LIST OF LAMPS AND FIXTURES.



1 Burner, 5 inch wick $2 50

2 " with Stand, 10 inch wick.. 4.50

3 " " l.T " .. 5.50

4 " " 20 " .. 6..50
No. 1, Steamer 3.00

" 2. " 2.00

" 1. Oven 4.00

" 2- " 3.00

TESTIMONIALS.



No. 3. Oven 2.00

Tea Kettle 75

" Copper Bottom 1.00

No. 1, Steak Broiler 1.00

" 2, " " 75

Flat Iron Heater 75

3 Burner Lamp with Heater 7.00

Heater without Lamp 2.(10



Dear Sir: Having thoroughly tested the Non-Explosive Lamp Stove, sold by C. S. West, of this city,
we And that not in any particular have the claims regarding its merits been exaggerated. Its use may be
recommended with confidence for safety, economy and comfort. THUS. A. CL.IRKE.

I have used West's Patent Oil Stove three seasons, side by side with the most celebrated, of other makes, and
recommend it as far superior to any of which I know. In baking qualities it is incomparably in advance of all
others. L. A. BOSWOTH, Athol.

SEND FOR CIRCULAR, CONTAINING TESTIMONIALS.



138 3IAIN STRBBT,



WORCESTEIt, Mass,



AD VERTISEMENTS.



DENHOLM & McKAY,

401 & 403 MAIN STREET, WORCESTER, MASS,

Dealers in all kinds of

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC M GOOOS,

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.

We are Headquarters for

SHAWLS, CLOAKS, SACKS,

DRESS GOODS, MOURNING GOODS, WHITE GOODS, LACES,

HANDKERCHIEFS, HOSIERY, GLOVES, HOUSEKEEPING

GOODS, NOTIONS, DRESS TRIMMINGS, RIBBONS, Etc.

ONE PRICE FOR ALL, AT THE

BOSTON STORE,

Cor. Main and Mechanic Streets, Worcester, Mass.

S. P. LEIGHTON & CO.,

Importers and Manufacturers of

MILITARY GOODS,

Gold and Silver Laces, Braids, Cords, Fringes, Tassels, Buttons, Embroideries, Swords,
Belts, Sashes, Knots, Epaulettes, Gloves, Straps, Hats and Caps.

glltK 7IND ISajSIiFIMG V-hM^ W^ BANNERS.

22 WEST STREET. - - - BOSTON

mimikh lAii lAieie, i. l i.

Constantly on hand, a full assortment. Price $1.50 each. We also make a very handsome

iR4iP 4RM1 Mi®^,

in Gold and Silver, from $25.00 to $50.00. Also Corps Badges, Military, Masonic and
Odd Fellows Badges and Jewels, Presentation Jewels of ail kinds.

Guild & Delano, - Jewelers,

^33 'WcLsTvLTtgtorL Street, Bostort.



^ND AHj^



OF THE REPUBLIC



ALMANAC



FOR 1879.



CONTENTS.



A Nurse's Stort,
A Recollection of Gettysburg,
Battle Cry of Freedom (song),
Clara Harlowe Barton, .
Corporal Simpson's Story,
Eclipses in 1879,
He did His Duty Well,
In the Prison Cell (song) ,
Jottings from the Battle Field, .
Just Before the Battle (song),
Kingdom Coming (bong),
Marching Through Georgia (song),
Margaret Fuller on Women,
Morning and Evening Stars,
Movements and Engagements,
Mrs. Eliza Potter,



PA UK

34



My Boy Ben, . . . , .

My Boy,

Nem's from the Front,

Noble Women of the War,

Our Youngest Soldier,

Patriotism, .....

Phil Sheridan Riding to THE Front,

Rates of Postage, ....

Regimental Events, ....

Thanksgiving, ....

The Cooper Shop, ....

The Grand Review,

The Late Gen. Phil Kearney,

The Season.«, .....

When Johnny Comes Marching Home (song)



PAGE
49

57
SG
64
41
45
60
8
38
53
37
33
48














Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1878,

BY HENRY N. EVANS,

in the office of the Librarian at Washington, D. C.






*




NOVES, SNOW 4 COMPANY,

PRINTERS,

WORCESTER, MASS.







...i..



n.



'i(r aECElVEE




PRE FACE.



We take pleasure in placing before the public a work which must prove of value to every
one interested in the stirring events through which our Country passed, during the period
from 1861 to 1S65, inclusive, and it is our aim to present (as far as may be) a complete
Chronological Record of the Engagements participated in by the Union forces, together with
such reminiscences of Army Life as shall help to keep alive the love of Country in every
American heart.

Fourteen years have passed since the close of the great struggle, and yet we have not a
HOME for the Veterans in the old Bay State, who were among the first to respond to the call
of " To arms ! to arms ! " Among our numbers there are many who are unable to gain a
livelihood by reason of wounds and disease contracted on the Battle Fields. Once more we
appeal to the public to aid us in securing a permanent Home for those who gave the best
days of their lives that our Country might stand undivided under the Oi-D Flag.

We most earnestly and respectfully ask the generous co-operation of the public to assist
us in this our good purpose, by purchasing a copy of the Grand Army Almanac.

Worcester, Mass., Nov. 1878. • " H. N. E.



_L



GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.



ECLIPSES IN THE YEAR ]879.



Ill the year 1879 there will be three Eclipses : two of the Sun and one of the Moon.

I. An Annular Eclipse of the Sun, January 22. Invisible. Visible to portions of South
America and Africa.

II. An Annular Eclipse of the Sun, July 19. Invisible. Visible to Africa, and to small
portions of Europe and Asia.

III. A Partial Eclipse of the Moon, December 28. Invisible. Visible, more or less, to
the world generally, except to South America and a portion of North America.



MORNING AND EVENING STARS.



Mercury will be Morning Star about January 16, May 15, September 9, and December 28;
and Evening Star about March 29, July 27, and November 20.

Venus will be Evening Star till September 23; then Morning Star for the rest of the year.

Jupiter will be Evening Star till February 8 ; then Morning Star till August .31 ; and Evening
Star again the rest of the year.



THE SEASONS.



Vernal Equinox (Spring begins), March 20, 6 h. 26m. A. Summer Solstice (Summer begins),
June 21, 2 h. 35 m. A. Autumnal Equinox (Autumn begins), September 23, 5 h. 9 m. M. Winter
Solstice (Winter begins), December 21, 11 h. 18m. A. (Given in Washington time.)



RATES OF POSTAGE.



Postal Cards, costing 1 cent each, can be purchased at any Post Office, and sent to any part
of the United States or Dominion of Canada.

Letters to any part of the United States or Dominion of Canada, 3 cents for each ^
ounce or part thereof.

Local or Drop Letters, 2 cents for each \ ounce, at all letter-carrier offices ; at other offices
1 cent.

Valuable Letters may be registered on application at the office of mailing, and the payment
of a registration fee of 10 cents, in addition to postage, on domestic letters. Fees on foreign letters,
variable.

Newspapers and Periodicals, mailed from a known office of publication or news agency,
and addressed to regular subscribers or news agents, issued weekly and oftener, two cents a pound
or fraction thereof; less frequently, three cents a pound or fraction thereof. One copy of a news-
paper to each actual subscriber within the County where the same is wholly or partially printed and
published, free, except at letter-carrier offices.

Transient Newspapers and Periodicals, Pamphlets, Proof Sheets, Books, Blanks and all
mailable printed matter except circulars, and regular newspapers as above specified, 1 cent for
every 2 ounces or part thereof.

Articles of Merchandise, Unsealed Circulars, Books, Manuscripts, Corrected Proof Sheets,
Seeds, Cuttings, Bulbs, Roots, and other mailable matter, one cent for each ounce or part thereof.
— Newspaper, Magazine and Music Manuscripts are subject to letter postage.

All Packages of mail matter not charged with letter postage must be so arranged that the
same can be conveniently examined by the Postmasters ; if not, letter postage will be charged.

No Package will be forwarded by mail which weighs over 4 pounds.

All Postal Matter, for delivery within the United States and Canada, must be prepaid.

Letters to Great Britain or Ireland, or the Continent of Europe, 5 cents for each ^ ounce.
Prepayment optional. Double rates if unpaid.

Money Order Post Offices are established in all the large cities and towns, at which orders
can be obtained upon any other office at the following rates of commission :

On orders not exceeding $15, 10 cents; over $15, not exceeding $30, 15 cents; over $30, not
exceeding $40, 20 cents ; over $40 not exceeding $50, 25 cents. When a larger sum than fifty
dollars is required, additional orders to make it up must be obtained.



GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.

,s, MONTH. January, 1879.



31 DAYS.



MOON'S PHASES.



Full Moon. . . .
Third Quarter.
New Moon . . .
First Quarter.



D.

8

15



H. M.

7 4 morn.

6 18 morn.

7 7 morn.
7 o morn.



NEW YORK.



H. M.

652

6 6

6 4S



morn,
morn,
morn,
morn.



WASHINGTON. CHARLESTON.



H. M.

6 40 morn.

5 54 morn.

6 43 morn.
6 36 morn.



6 28 morn.

5 42 morn.

6 31 morn.
6 24 morn.



CHICAGO.



H. M.

5 58 morn.
512 morn.

6 I morn.
5 5 4 morn.



3
4
5
6

7
8

9
10
II
12
13
14
15
i6

17
18

19

20

21

23

24
25
26

27
2S
29
30
31



Wed

Thur

Fri

Sat

8nn

Mon

Tues

Wed

Thur

Fri

Sat

Sun

Mon

Tues

Wed

Thur

Fri

Sat

Sun

Mon

Tues

Wed

Thur

Fri

Sat

Sun

Mon

Tues

Wed

Thur

P"ri



CALENDAR FOR
Boston ; New Eng-
land, New York
Slate, Michigan,
Wisconsin, Iowa
and Oregon.



H.M. H.M



H. M.

o 58



4 41
4 42
4 43
4 44
4 45
4 46
4 47
448

28 4. 50
4 52
4 53
4 54
4 55

254 56

25 4 5^1

24 4 59|

23'5

23:5

225

2i|5
5
5
5
5



5 10
5 n
5 i.T



3 3

4 7

% 9
6 8
rises.

5 2

6 15

7 29

8 43

9 56
II 10
morn.

25

1 41

2 56

4 9

5 15

6 8
sets.

5 23

6 31

7 V

8 41

, 9 43

8 10 44

9 II 46
morn.

48

1 51



Calendar for

New York City; Phil
adelphia, Connec
ticut, NewJersey,
Pennsylva'a.Ohio
Indiana & Illinois



-3

25
25
25
25
25
25
24
24
244



J9

19

18

17

16

15

1515

145

125
11I5



4 3

5 8

6 2
sets.

5 27

6 35

7 39
842
9 43

10 43
" 43
morn.

44

1 46



A quaker said to a gunner, "Friend, I counsel no blood-
shed ; but if It be thy design to hit the little man in the
blue jacket, point thine engine three inches lower."



Movements and Er\gagen:\ents



Jaiixiary 1S61.

2.3d. — The Confederates siezed the United
States arsenal at Augusta, Georgia.

30th. — The revenue cutters, Cass, at Mobile,
and McLelland, at New Orleans, surrendered to
the Confederate authorities.

tTanuary 1862.

1st. — Mason and Slidell left Fort Warren for
England in the British steamer Rinaldo.

4th. — Gen. Milroy defeated the confederates at
Huntersville, Va., and captured $80,000 worth of
stores.

7th. — Confederates defeated at Romney.
8th. — Gen. Palmer defeated the Confederates
at Silver Creek, Mo. Union loss, 4 killed and 18
wounded.

10th. — Col. Garfield defeated the Confederates
under Humphrey Marshall at Prestonburg, Kv.

11th. — The Brunside expedition sailed from
Fortress Monroe. Naval engagement on the Mis-
sissippi between the Union steamers Essex and
St. Louis, and four Confederate boats; the latter
were compelled to seek protection under the
batteries at Columbus.

Simeon Cameron resigned his position as Sec-
retary of War, and E. M. Stanton was appointed
in his place.

19th.— Battle of Mill Spring, Ky. This battle
was fought between 3,000 Union troops under
Gen. Schoep and Confederates under Gen. Zolli-
coffer. The enemy were defeated and Gen. Zolli-
coffer killed. Union loss, 39 killed and 127
wounded.

tTanuary 1S63.
1st. — Gen. Sullivan defeated the Confederates
under Van Dorn, at Hunt's Cross Roads, near
Lexington, Tenn. The Union garrison and the



GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.



January 1803.— Continued.

steamer Harriet Lane captured at Galveston,
Texas.

The Westfield destroyed to keep it from falling
into the hands of the enemy. Commodore Ren-
shaw perished with his vessel.

3d. — Since the hard battle of Dec. 31, fighting
had been going on between the two armies at
Murfrcesboro. On the night of Jan. 3, the rebels
commenced their retreat. The following is the
official statement of the Union loss at the battle
of Stone river: killed, 1,997, wounded 6,425, and
3,550 missing.

The Federal army withdrew from before Vicks-
burg. The Union loss in the second attack on
Vicksburg was about 600 killed, 1,500 wounded,
and 1,000 missing.

10th.— Battle of Arkansas Post. The attack
was commenced Saturday night by the Mississippi
squadron under Admiral Porter. On the follow-
ing day, the land forces under Gen. McClernand
joined in the fight, and before night all the fortifi-
cations were taken. About 7,000 prisoners and a
large quantity of ammunition was captured. The
Union loss was about 200 killed and wounded.

20th. — The Morning Light and Velocity, block-
ading Sabine City, Texas, were both captured by
the Confederates.

22d. — Third attack on Vicksburg. After the
the capture of Arkansas Post, Gen. McClernand
returned to Vicksburg and resumed the siege of
that place.

28th. — Gen. Burnside relieved of the command
of the army of the Potomac, and Gen, Hooker
appointed in his place.

31st. — The Confederate General Pryor made
an attack on the Union troops, under Gen. Peck,
at Blackwater, Va. The Confederates were
repulsed.

tTanuary 1805.

8th. — Gen. Butler removed from the command
of the army of the James, and succeeded by Gen.
Ord.

11th. — Beverly, Va., was attacked by a Con-
federate force under Gen. Rosser. The town and
a large portion of the force defending it were
captured.

16th. — Fort Fisher, near Washington, North
Carolina, captured with all its equipments.



20th. — Confederates evacuate Corinth.
27th. — Confederate incendiaries set fire to the
city of Savannah.

February 1801.

1st. — Texas Convention passed an ordinance
of secession by a vote of 166 to 7, to be submitted
to the people.

The Louisiana authorities seized the Mint and
Custom House at New Orleans.

8th. — The United States arsenal at Little Rock
surrendered to Arkansas.

9th. — Jefferson Davis and A. H. Stevens were
elected Provisional President and Vice-President
of the Southern Confederacy.

13th. — The electoral vote counted. Abraham
Lincoln received 180 votes; Stephen A. Douglas,
12; John C. Breckenridge, 72 ; and John Bell, 30.

19th. — Fort Kearney, Kansas, seized by the
Confederates.

23d. — Gen. Twiggs surrendered Government
property in Texas, valued at $1,200,000, to the
Confederacy.

February 1802.

3d. — The Federal government decided that the
crews of the captured privateers were to be con-
sidered as prisoners of war.

6th. — Commodore Foote with 7 gunboats at-
tacked Fort Henry on the Tennessee river. The
Confederate commander. General Tilghman, made
an unconditional surrender.

8th. — Gen. Burnside captured six forts on
Roanoke Island, taking about 3,000 small arms
and destroying all the Confederate fleet except
two vessels. Union loss was 50 killed and 212
wounded. 2,500 prisoners and a large quantify
of ammunition were captured.

10th. — Elizabeth City, N. C. surrendered to
Gen. Burnside. The Federal gunboats ascended
the Tennessee river as far as Florence, Ala.,
captured three and destroying six Confederate
boats.

13th. — Gen. Curtis took possession of Spring-
field, Mo.

14th. — Com. Foote attacked Fort Donelson
with the gunboats, but was compelled to withdraw.

15th. — The attack on Fort Donelson renewed
by the land forces under Gen. Grant, numbering
40,000.

Bowling Green evacuated by the Confederates,



GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.



February, 1879.



2d MONTH.



28 DAYS.



MOON'S PHASES.


KOSTON.


NEW YORK.


WASHINGTON.


CHAKLE.STON.


CHICAGO.


Full Moon


I).
6

20


H. M.

8 58 eve.

2 ID eve.

11 19 eve.


H. M.

S 46 eve.

I 58 eve.

II 7 eve.


H. M.

8 34 eve.

I 46 eve.

10 55 eve.


H. M.

8 22 eve.

I 34 eve.

ID 43 eve.


H. M.

7 52 eve.

I 4 eve.

ID 13 eve.


Third Quarter

New Moon









c


2


CD




^^


M-











>>


>^




(C






Q


Q




I


Sat




2


Sun




3


Mon




4


Tues






Wed




6


Thur




7


Fri




8


Sat







Sun




10


Mon




II


Tues




12


Wed




n


Thur




14


Fri




IS


Sat




16


Sun




17


Mon




18


Tues




iq


Wed




20


Thur




21


Fri




-,-.


Sat




2^


Sun




24


Mon




'S


Tues




26


Wed




27


Thur




28


Fri





CALENDAR FOR

Boston ; New Eng-
land, New Yjrk
State, Michigan,
Wisconsin, Iowa
& Oregon.



H.M.lH.M.
14

IS

17
18

19



H'S

1315
125
lolS



59,-

58I5

55:5



54
52

51
6 49
6 48

46

45

43

42

4015

3915

37I5



H. M.

2 54

3 53

4 48

5 35

6 15
rises.

6 25

7 40

8 56
ID 13



o 44



3 «

4 5

4 52

5 30

6 o
sets.

6 28

7 30

8 32

9 33

10 36

11 38
morn,
o 40



CALENDAR FOR

New York City; Phil
adelphia, Connec
ticut, New Jersey
Pennsylva'a,Ohio
Indiana & Illinois



H.M.

7 10



05

59 5 30
5S 5 31



7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

6 44

6 43
41
40

38

37



H.M

5 18

s 19

5 20
5 21

5 23
5 24



5 32
5 34
5 35
5 36
5 37
5 38
5 39
5 41
5 42
S 43
5 44
5 45
5 46
5 48
5 49
35 5 50



H. M.

2 48

3 47

4 41

5 29

6 10
rises.
627

7 41

8 56

10 II

11 26
morn.

42

1 55
I

59
46

25
57
sets.

6 29

7 30

8 31-

9 31

10 32

11 29
morn,
o 34



An Irish fire-eater, previous to a trial in which he was
the defendant, was informed by his counsel that if there
were any of the jury to whom he objected he might legally
challenge them. "Faith, and so I will," replied he; "if
they do not acquit me, I will challenge every man of
them.



Fchrufiry 18(i2. — Continued.

IGth. — Gen Buckner made an unconditional
surrender of Fort Donelson and the troops under
his command. Between 12,000 and 15,000 pris-
oners, 40 cannon, and a large amount of stores


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