Agassiz Association. Wilson Ornithological Chapter.

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the normal position just as soon as the apparent danger had passed. In
conclusion, it may be well enough to add that our flock of poultry for
that season was composed chiefly of Plymouth Rocks, that fact alone
accounting, perhaps, for the successful decoying of this wild representa-
tive of the fields among them, the close resemblance between them being
quite marked, and certainly very deceptive in the case of half-grown
pullets.

Benj. T. CiAULT, Gh'n Ellyu, III.



76 Bulletin N'o. 2j.

AN ELUSIVE PAIR OF SCREECH OWLS.



For four years I have tried to get eggs from a pair of the Screech Owls
which nest in the Connecticut River meadows, half-a-mile from here.
They have been unusually sensitive over ray intrusions, I think, and
have escaped with only slight sacrifice until this year.

The woods back from the river are full of hollow maple trees, many
of which are ideal nesting places for the little Scops. On April 26,
1894, the water being about fifteen feet above summer level, I was row-
ing through the woods after Crow's nests, and noticed an almost perfect
Owl's hole, in the under side of a sloping limb of a soft maple, about ten
feet above the water. To test it I bumped the boat rather sharply
against the trunk, and instantly, as if I had touched a spring on a jack-
in-the-box, a beautiful grey Scops appeared, seated in the mouth of the
hole, with ear tufts erect, snapping beak, and eyes like full moons. I, of
course, started up the tree, and had climbed hardly half way when "grey
ears " left the hole, and was quickly followed by a mate of the red phase.
The first flew off out of sight, but the red one, the mother I fancy,
perched on a limb about twenty feet away. She (?) showed tio ear tufts.
About two feet down in the hole were two blind, white little owlets, two
freshly killed "deer mice," and three eggs, one pipped. On holding this
to my ear I could plainly hear the chick squeaking inside.

I had no opportunity to watch the brood, and hoped for better luck
next year, but that fall honey bees claimed the hole, and filled it with
comb. In 1895, with that hole of course out of the question, I searched
every other place I could find, but did not locate the pair until on June 2
I found three grey youngsters sitting outside a hole I had overlooked.
The mother was near by, and grew very angry when I shook down one
of her little ones from a sapling to which he had fluttered.

Next year, April, 7, 1896, I found a red bird in a very shallow hole in
the verticle trunk of a maple, not 1000 feet from the old bee-tree. I
hammered on the trunk without flushing her, and after climbing the
fifteen feet up from the water to the hole, put my fingers under her and
counted the three eggs. I believe she did wink one eye, but she made
no attempt to grip my fingers, nor snapped her bill as I have had them
do in the roosting holes. Nevertheless, she deserted the eggs, and my
brother took them on April 11, cold, and showing only a slight trace of
incubation. On the 25th a hole had been dug three inches deep in the
rotten wood lining of the nest, probably by squirrels or mice. The next



JUiUrtiii Ao. 2j. 77

winter the hole was used by both squirrels and owls, as I found the signs
of both on the ice beneath it.

In 1897 I lost the birds entirely, but think it possible that they raised
a brood in the 1895 tree.

This year my brother found a grey bird roosting within 200 feet of
this (1895) hole. He was sitting up in the mouth of the hollow limb so
that his head and horns showed from below, but dropped back when the
tree was thumped. On April 12 I visited all the old holes, first hammer-
ing the trunks, and then climbing, and repeated the experience of 1896
to the letter, finding a red bird which would not flush nor wake up at all,
in the same shallow hole. I left her two fresh eggs till the 23d, but she
again deserted.

The 1895 hole was the last one visited — at 7 p. m. Though we rowed
up quietly the bird must have flown before we reached the tree, for none
flushed. On climbing up I found the limb so rotton that I decided to
destroy it. Imagine my surprise when on opening the hole I found six
eggs, still warm. The embryos were well formed. (It had been an
early season, with all the first nesters ahead of time.) No bird came
about, though I was in the tree for ten minutes. She may have left the
nest for a few minutes of exercise at twilight.

Is it the usual rule for an owl to desert her nest as promptly as one of
these did ?

Henry R. Buck, W^ethersfield, Conn.



EDITORIAL.



Our fellow member, Lieut. John W. Daniel, Jr., whose expected trip
to Puerto Rico was interrupted by the peace protocol, now expects to be
ordered to Cienfuegos, Cuba, and he promises to acquaint us with his
experiences and researches while there. The present circumstances will
give an added interest to any thing that the unfortunate island may give us.

We again find ourselves in the midst of a period of stagnation so far
as field study of the birds is concerned. It is so for some of us, at least.
The question naturally arises. What can be done until the birds return
again ? There is always one thing that can be done which should
become our most pleasant and profitable duty ; and that is to review the
note-book of the past season, comparing it with previous ones with a



yS Bulletin No. 23.

view to correlating the facts gathered by much hard work and incon-
venience, as well as pleasure. I take it for granted that all of us have
in mind, in all our study, the advancement of our favorite science by
this field work. With that in our mind, it becomes our privilege to place
the facts learned where they will do the most good. Just as we are able
to come closer to the truth according to the material at our disposal, in
the same measure will those who have begun the investigation of some
special topic be able to give us the truth. If, then, your note-book is to
accomplish the purpose for which it was kept, day after day and week
after week, parts of it, at least, must find their way into the hands of our
committee-men. Will you not, each one, make it your pleasure to send
at once such facts as you may have learned, to the appropriate com-
mittee ? Let it be your immediate pleasure.

But the winter season need not be a time for dullness in bird study to
many of us. There is, in the winter months, almost as much that is
interesting among the birds as at other times. How many of us are
really acquainted with our local winter bird fauna, and with the winter
habits of the birds ? Is there not ample room here for a great deal that
is new and of great interest ? I sincerely hope that the good work that
was begun last winter in the way of making censuses, censo-horizons
and horizons of the winter birds may continue with renewed energy and
interest. I firmly believe that it is a work worthy of our best efforts :
a work that will yield greater results for the same effort than any other
field work. Let us fill the January issue with December records, making
the month a memorable one in our experience.



CHANGES OF ADDRESS.



It is of the utmost importance that all changes of address should be
promptly reported to the editor. Otherwise we shall not be able to keep
in touch with each other. Please do not belittle this matter.

Mr. Walton I. Mitchell changes his address to 1953 Stout St., Denver,
Colorado.



ERRATA.



The article entitled "Some Belated Remarks Upon the Nesting of
Junco," should read " Some Belated Remarks Upon the Roosting of
Junco."



.79
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.



Ayncrt'cayi ArcJucolofiisl . Vol. II, part lo.

American Monthly Microscopical Joiirnal. Vol. XIX, Nos. 9, 10, ir.

Birds cind all Nature. Vol. IV, Nos. 4 and 5.

Book Rei'icics. Vol. VI, Nos. 4 and 5.

Bulletins A^os. gj^ aud g4, Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station.

Cohnnbus .^fedical Journal. Vol. XXI, No. 8.

F.astman Journal. Vol. I. No. 2.

Fern Bulletin. Vol. VI, No. 4.

Journal of Applied Microscopy, Vol. I, No. 9.

Afuseuni. Vol. IV, No. 12. Vol. V, No. i.

Sportsman' s Mai^azine. Vol. II, No. 11.

Su,if^^esti7'e 'Jlierapeutics. Vol. I, No. 5.

In the October number of the American Geologist, the leading article
is by our Secretary, Mr. William L. Dawson ; being a geological dis-
cussion of " Glacial Phenomena in Okanogan County, Washington." It
will be remembered that Mr. Dawson has also published a " List of the
Birds of Okanogan County, Washington," in the Auk, April, 1897. The
whole scientific work was done during a residence of about fourteen
months, in addition to the arduous duties of a pastorate m Chelan and
the surrounding region. It is an admirable illustration of what can be
done in anv new field if the heart and will are in the work.



INDEX TO VOLUME V.



Adams, Stephen J. Swallow In-
vestigations, 42.
Ammodramus savannarum pas-

serinus, 62.
Ampelis cedrorum, 63.
Anas americana, 67.

boschas, 67.

discors, 67.
Ardea herodias, 3.
Asio accipitrinus, 61.

wilsonianus, 62.
Aythya affinis, 67.

americana, 67.

marila nearctica, 67.

vallisneria, 67.

Barlow, Chester. Appropria-
tion of the Yellow-billed Mag-
pie's Nest by the Desert Spar-
row Hawk, 40.

Bartsch, Paul. An Early Morn-
ing Ramble in the Will-be Po-
tomac Park, I. An Afternoon
Amongst Old Scenes, 63.

Baskett, James Newton. Notice
of his "At You-AH's House," 60.

Bausch, Edward. Notice of his
"Manipulation of the Micro-
scope," 47.

Bittern, American, 36, 37, 42, 51.
Least, 42.

Blackbird, Red-winged, 3, 23, 26,

37. 39. 51-
Bluebird, 20, 23, 26, 31, 38, 44,

51, 62, 70, 72.

Rocky Mountain, 12.
Western, 12.
Bobolink, 37, 49, 51, 64.
Bob-white, 9, 10, 18, 37, 49, 51,

61, ^2, 70.
Branta canadensis, 68.
Bubo virginianus, 62.
Buck, Henry R. An Elusive Pair

of Screech Owls, 76.
Bunting, Indigo, 38, 51.



Bunting, Painted, 59.

Burdick, G. Merton. Notes from
Wisconsin, 24. Short Notes,
26. Chimney Swift Nesting in
a Barn, 69.

Burns, Frank L. Notes on Some
of the Rarer Birds of Chester
County, Penna., 3. A-field in
a Storm, 10. Bird Censuses,
Berwyn, Penna., 19. Local
Names, 23. Some Remarks on
the Birds of Chester County,
Penna., 68. Hooded Warbler,
70.

Cardinal, 9, 10, 17, 19, 20, 21, 23,

24, 38, 49, 51, 55, 62.
Catbird, 3, 38, 51,
Cathartes aura, 62.
Chaetura pelagica, 70.
Charitonetta albeola, 68.
Chase, V. H. Bird Censuses,

Wady Petra, Illinois, 21.
Chat, Yellow-breasted, 37, 49, 62.
Chen cserulescens, 68.
Chickadee, 6, 7, 9, 10, 19, 23, 21.
25. 38, 64.

Mountain, 39.
Chondestes grammacus, 62.
Chordeiles virginianus, 62.
Cistothorus palustris, 62.
Clark, Josephine A. Notice of

her "Bird Tablet for Field

Use," 58.
Colaptes auratus '-cafer, 4.
Cope, Francis R., Jr. Notice of
• his "The Summer Birds of

Susquehanna County, Pennsyl-
vania, 58.
Corvus ossifragus, 4, 40.
Cowbird, 23. 37, 51, 55.
Creeper, Brown, 19, 21, 23.
Crossbill, American, 10, 19.
Crow, American, 3, 10. 17, 18,

19, 20, 21, 22, 23. 37, 39. 51. 7^'-



Bulletin No. 2j.



8i



Crow, Fish, 4, 40.
Cuckoo,. Yellow-billed, 24.

Dafila acuta, 67.

Daniel, John W., Jr. A Few Be-
lated Remarks upon the Nest-
ing [Roosting] of Junco, 65.

Dawson, W. L. Committee on
Geographical Distribution, 28.
All Day with the Birds, 35.
Certain Birds on the Increase,
49. A Puzzled Goldfinch, 52.
July Nesting, 54. General
Notes, 56.

Dendroica caerulea, 5.
tigrina, 5.

Dershimer, Mrs. T. D. The Pa-
rula Warbler and its Nest, 33.

Dickcissel, 64.

Dipper, American, 38.

Dove, Mourning, 18, 22, 35, 37,

39. 51. 64.
Duck, American Scaup, 67.
Baldpate, 67.
Buffle-head, 68.
Canvas-back, 67.
Lesser Scaup, 67.
Mallard, 8, 9, 18, 67.
Pintail, 67.
Red-head, 22, 41, 67.
Ruddy, 68.
Shoveller, 22, 41.

Eagle, Bald, 4, 9, 17, 18, 24, 26,

36, 37-

Golden, 11, 18, 39, 41.
Ectopistes migratorius, 61.
Empidonax virescens, 62.
Erismatura rubida, 68.

FaLCO SPARVERIUS DESERTICOLUS,

40.

Finch, House, 11.
Purple, ig.
Flicker, 3, 6, 7, 8, 9, 19, 21, 23,

27. 37. 39. 44. 51. 64.
Hybird, 4.
Red-shafted, 38.
Flycatcher, Alder, 37.



Flycatcher, Crested, 37, 55.
Green-crested, 37, 62.
Least, 37.

Gault, Benj. T. Some "Bird

Ways." 73.
Gnatcatcher, Blue-gray, 38.
Goldfinch, American, 3, 6, 7, 9,
10, 19, 20, 23, 37, 51, 52, 56.
Goose, Blue, 68.

Canada, 22, 68.
Goshawk, Western, 39.
Grackle, Bronzed, 6, 7, 18, 19,

23, 26, 31, 37, 44, 51, 64.
Purple, 20, 23, 25, 39.
Rusty, 23.
Gray, Russell. Bird Horizons,

Philadelphia, Pa., 23. Notes

from Philadelphia, Pa., 25.

Two Curious English Sparrow's

Nests, 25. Bird Censo-hori-

zons, Philadelphia, Pa., 39.

Notes from Philadelphia, Pa.,

40.
Grosbeak, Rose-breasted, 38, 51.
Grouse, Ruffed, 9, 18, 22.
Gull, American Herring, 8, 9, 17,

18, 22.

HaLI/EETUS leucocephalus, 4.
Hawk, American Rough-legged,
9, x8, 24, 39. 41-

Broad-winged, 11, 37

Cooper's, 3, 12, 24, 37.

Desert Sparrow, 40, 41..

Marsh, 39, 51.

Pigeon, 6, 7, 9, 17', 18.

Red-shouldered, 9, 17, 18,

22, 37- 39. 51-
Red-tailed, 18, 22, 37, 39,

51, 64.
Sharp-shinned, 8, 9, 18, 37.
Sparrow, 7, 18, 22, 37, 39,

51-
Helminthophila celata, 4.

chrysoptera, 70.

peregrina, 5.
Hen, Prairie, 21, 75.
Heron, Great Blue, 3, 24, 37, 51.



82



Bulletin No. 2-



Heron, Green, 37, 51.

Hine, James S. Notice of his
" Ohio Butterflies," 47.

Hornaday, William T. Notice
of his " The Destruction of Our
Common Birds and Mammals,"

44-
Hummingbird, Ruby-throated, 37,
51, 56.

Jacobs, J. Warren. Notice of
his "Gleanings from Nature,
No. I," 46.

Jay, Blue, 6, 7, g, 10, 19, 21, 23,
37. 51- 63, 64.

Long-crested, 12, 38.
Woodhouse's, 38.

Jones, Lynds. The Bird Census,
Oberlin, Ohio, 5. The Lorain
County, Ohio, Bird Fauna for
1897-8, 17. Bird Horizons,
Lorain County, Ohio, 21. Our
Committees for 1898, 26. Lo-
rain County Notes, 41. Birds
From the Car Window, 50.
Summer Bird Study, 53.
Changes in the Avifauna of
Lorain County, Ohio, 61. An-
seres Which Visit the Oberlin
Water-works Reservoir, 66.

Junco, Pink-sided, 12.
Red-backed, 38.
Slate-colored, 4. 6, 8, 9, 19,

20, 21, 23, 25, 39, 65, 66.

Kingbird, 37, 73.
Kingfisher, Belted, 25, 37, 51, 59,
Kinglet, Golden-crowned, 7, 9, 19.
Killdeer, 22, 31, 37, 44, 61.

Lark, Desert Horned, 11, 39.

Horned, 6, 8, 9, 17, 19, 64.
Prairie Horned, 10, 18, 19,

21, 22, 23, 37, 51.
Ruddy Horned, 11.

Linnet, Pine, 26.

Longspur, Lapland, 19.

Lucas, Frederic A. Notice of

his "The Tongues of Birds,"

47-



Magpie, American, 39.

Yellow-billed, 40, 41.

Mallard, 8, 9, 18, 67.

Martin, Purple, 36, 38, 43, 51.

Meadowlark, 17, 19, 20, 21, 22,
23, 26, 31, 37, 39, 44, 51, 72.

Malanerpes carolinus, 62.

Meleagris gallopavo, 61.

Merganser americanus, 67.
American, 67.

Mitchell, Walton I. Some Win-
ter Birdsof San Miguel County,
New Mexico, 11. Bird Censo-
horizons, Parvenir, New Mexi-
co, 38.

Nature Study Publishing Com-
pany. Notice of their "Charts
of North American Birds," 59.
Nighthawk, 36, 37, 62, 70.
Nonpareil, 59.
Nuthatch, Pigmy, 39.
Red-breasted, 5.
Slender-billed, 12, 39.
White-breasted, 6, 7, 9, 10,
19, 20, 21, 23, 38.

Oriole, Baltimore, 37, 49, 51, 62,

Orchard, 37, 49, 62.
Osprey, American, 4.
Oven-bird, 38.
Owl, American Barn, 4.

Barred, 22, 37, 61, 64.

Great Horned, 26, 62.

Long-eared, 62.

Screech, 10, 18, 19, 37.

Short-eared, 22, 39, 41, 51,
61, 76.

Spotted, 12.

Pandion hali^.tus carolinensis,

4-
Pewee, Wood, 37, 51, 55.
Phalarope, Wilson's, 40.
Phoebe, 37, 55.
Pigeon, Passenger, 61.
Pintail, 67.
Pipit, American, 38, 39.

Rail, King, 74.



Jhillrtiii No. 2J



83



Rail, Sora, 37, 64.
Virginia, 37.
Yellow, 64.
Rallus elegans, 74.
Raven, Mexican, 11.
Redpoll, 25.
Redstart, 38, 63.
Roadrunner, 39.
Roberts, Miss E. D. Note on the

Goldfinch, 56.
Robin, 3, ig, 23, 25, 26, 31, 35,

38, 39, 40, 44, 51, 55, 72. 74-
Western, 39.

Sandpiper, Bartramian, 37, 64.
Solitary, 37.

Spotted,. II, 37, 51, 55, 61
Sapsucker, Yellow-bellied, 20, 37.
Seiurus noveboracensis, 46.

noveboracensis notabilis,
46.
Shrike, Loggerhead, 38.
Migrant, 51.
Northern, 10, 19.
Shufeldt, R. W. Notice of his
" Taxidermal Methods in the
Leyden Museum, Holland," 47.
Sialis sialis, 62.
Sitta canadensis, 5.
Snowflake, 19.

Sparrow, Chipping, 23, 24, 35, 38,
51. 55, 56, 64.

English, 6, 7, 9, 11, 20, 25,

40, 43, 56.
Field, 23, 38, 51, 55, 65.
Fox, 23, 25.

Grasshopper, 38, 51, 62,
Lark, 62.

Lincoln's, 35, 38, 42, 65.
Savanna, 39, 64.
Song, I, 2, 7, 8, 9, II, 18,

19, 20, 21, 23, 38, 39, 51,

55
Swamp, 2, 38, 39.
Tree, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 19, 20,

21, 23.
Vesper, 37, 39, 51, 55.
White-crowned, 25, 38.
White-throated, 38, 39.
Strix pratincola, 4.



Strong, R. M. President's Ad-
dress, 12. The Flicker Report,
44. Bank Swallow Habits, 50.
General Notes, North Green-
field, Wisconsin, 70. 1898
Elections, 71.
Swallow, Bank, 38, 50, 64.

Barn, 38, 42, 43, 51, 64.
Cliff, 38, 51. 55, 64.
Rough-winged, 36, 38, 42.

51. 56, 64-
Tree, 36, 38, 43, 51, 64.
Swift, Chimney, 37, 51, 56, 69, 70.
Syrnium nebulosum, 61.

Tanager, Scarlet, 38, 49, 51, 62.
Teal, Blue-winged, 67.
Tern, Black, 42.

Common, 36, 37.
Thrasher, Brown, 38, 51.
Thrush, Go! ien-crowned, 2, 63.

Gray-cheeked, 36, 38, 42.

Grinnell's Water, 46, 64.

Louisiana Water, 38.

Olive-backed, 38, 42.

Water, 3, 38, 46. ^

Wilson's, 38, 42, 63.

Wood, 38, 51, 55.
Titlark, 39.
Titmouse, Tufted, 9, 19, 23, 38,

63-
Towhee, 23, 38, 51.

Canon, 39.
Turdus fuscescens, 63.
Turkey, Wild, 61.
Tympanuchus americanus, 75.
Tyrannus tyrannus, 73.

ViREO SOLITARIl'S, 4.

Blue-headed, 4, 38.
Red-eyed, 38, 51, 63.
Warbling, 38, 55, 63.
Vulture, Turkey, 22, 37, 62.

Warbler, Bay-breasted, 37.

Black and White, 38, 42.
Blackburnian, 38.
Black-poll, 3.
Black-throated Blue, 38.
I>lack-throated Green, 3, 38.



84



Bulleiiii No.



Warbler, Blue-winged, 38.

Canadian, 38.

Cape May, 5.

Cerulean, 5, 38.

Connecticut, 2.

Golden-winged, 70.

Hooded, 70.

Magnolia, 38.

Mourning, 36, 38.

Myrtle, 3.

Nashville, 38.

Orange-crowned, 4.

Palm, 38.

Parula, 33, 34, 42.

Pine, 41.

Tennessee, 5, 38.

Wilson's, 38.

Yellow, 26, 38, 51.
Waxwing,. Cedar, 3, 19, 21, 23,

25, 37, 55, 63.
Wayne, Arthur T. Short Notes,

26.
Whippoorwill, 24, 37, 70.
Wilson, Sidney S. The Bird
Census, Saint Joseph, Missouri,
9. Chimney Swifts, 69.



Woodcock, American, 37, 61.
Woodpecker, Cabani's, 38.

Downy, 6, 7, 9, 10, 18, 20,
21, 23, 37, 64.

Hairy, 7, 9, 10, 18, 21, 22,

37-
Red-bellied, 9, 19, 23, 37,

62.
Red-headed, 37, 51, 64.
Worcester, Dean C. and Frank
S. Bourns, M. D. Notice of
their "Contributions to Philip-
pine Ornithology," 31.
Wren, Berwick's 41, 42.
Carolina, 39.
House, 2, 38, 43, 51.
Long-billed' Marsh, 38, 51,

62, 64.
Winter, 19, 38.

Yellow-legs, Greater, 41.
Yellow-throat, Maryland, i, 2, 24,
38, 51, 65.

ZONOTRICHIA ALBICOLLIS, 2.



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