Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal Company.

Annual report of the President and Directors of the Albemarle & Chesapeake Canal Company .. [serial] (Volume 1866) online

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I




Collection of jRoctii Carolintana



SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT



OF THE



PRESIDENT AND DIRECTORS



OP THE



Jlkmarle m)i Chesapeake Canal €a.



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPT. 30, 1,S66.



MARSHALL PARKS.

SJSCRJET^JiY AJfn TJtEASUMKM,

B. F. TEBAULT.

JtlJtMCTOItS^

M. COURTKIGHT. of Peun. i B. T. SIMMONS, of N. C

HEN'Y A. RICHMOND, of N. Y. i' D. D. FEREBEE. of N. C.

AND'W D. WHITE, of N. Y. j THOS. J. JARVIS, of N. C.

L. H. CHANDLER, of Va. I LEWIS THOMPSON, of N <-

T. y WEBB, of Va.



/

NORFOLK, VA.:

WOKFOLK PRINTING HOUSE COMPAJiTY, PRINT.

1866.



Digitized by the Internet' Archive

in 2009 with funding from

Ensuring Democracy through Digital Access (NC-LSTA)



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofpr1866albe



R E P O R T .



To the. Stockholders of the

Albemarle mid Chesapeake Oa^ial Company :
At the date of our last annual report the Canal was in naviga-
ble condition. There were, however, indications of an extensive leak
through the lock floor, wliich had been repaired the previous year.
This leak continued to increase to such an extent as to endanger the
whole structure, and great difficulty was experienced in opening the
gates. After a careful survey it was determined to erect dams and
pump out the water, as the most effectual means to make the neces-
sary repairs. The services of a civil engineer having previously
been obtained, he was instructed to make arrangements to prepare
the necessary materials to accomplish the work in the shortest possible
time.

It was not until the 16th day of November that the lock was
closed. Every effort was made to hasten the repairs of the locks.
The dams, both in Canal and River, were erected, powerful steam
pumps procured, and every eflbrt made to hasten the work on the
locks and restore the navigation. Labor, except for the mechanical
branches, was difficult to obtain, and had to be procured from New
York at considerable expense. In fact, every effort was made to
hasten the work without regard to the expense. On the 24th January,
the navigation was again resumed, and has continued since without
interruption.

The lock has worked well, and there is no indication of the former
leak. The foundation, floor and masonry are in good condition, and
with the exception of the gates, which are much decayed and re-
quire renewal, it is believed no further expenditures, at this point,
will be required for many years.

BUSINESS OF THE YEAR.

The Eastern portion of North Carolina, wliere this Canal must look
for its trade, is slowly recovering from the eSects of the late war.



4

The change in the labor system has rendered a large number of
plantations unproductive, and consequently there is less corn, wheat,
peas, &c., shipped than formerly.

The earnings of the Canal for the fiscal year ending September
30th, 1866, are as follows :

From Tolls North, $31,259 34

" South, 10,087 20

$41,346 54

" Towing North, 5,060 26

" South, 4,181 49

9,241 75

" wharfage, sale of coal, old material, &c., 5,085 68

tolla from U. S. Gov't for July, Aug. & Oct. '65, 1,705 50



MOTIVE POWER.



57,379 47



The motive power of the Company, at the date of our last report,
consisted of the new steam tug "Coinjock," constructed especially in
regard to the limited business at that time, and, for repairs of
Canal, the little despatch boat Fannie. On the 1 1th day of Nov.,
1865, the Coinjock exploded her boiler, killing all on board, and was
totally lost. The prospects for business were at that time so Mattering
that the Board of Directors authorized the purchase of additional
steamers, and the steam tugs Chowan and S. C. Brooks were subse-
quently purchased. The large number of steamers engaged in the
navigation at this time, and the limited number of sailing vessels,
have greatly reduced the tonnage requiring towing, and consequently,
the revenue derived from this Source falls greatly below what was an-
ticipated. It is believed, however, the increased exports of wood,
lumber, &c., to Northern ports, Avill induce shipments in vessels re-
quiring towing, which will hereafter give employment to a large num-
ber of steam tugs, and it may become necessary to increase our mo-
tive power by one or two additional tugs during the ensuing year.

The number of vessels passing the locks the past year were as fol-
lows, vi/ : Steamers 1,062, schooners 746, sloops, 302, barges'256,
boats 921, lighters 338, rafts 18. Total, 3,643.

In 1865 the number was 2,617 — showing an increase over that
▼ear of 1,026 of all classes. ^

1



FREIGHT DEPOT, DOCKS AND WHARF.

The want of a suitable dock and wharf for the steam tugs and
other boats of the Company has long been felt, and efforts have been
made from time to time, to purchase suitable property for that pur-
pose, without success. In December 1865 a lease was made with
the City of Norfolk for the property known as the "Railroad Ferry
Depot,'" for a term of ten years, on favorable terms. The spacious
building has been repaired, the dock cleaned out and a wharf, twenty-
four feet wide and three hundred feet long, constructed. The offices
of the Company have been removed to this building, and arrange-
ments made to receive and forward goods through the Canal with
greater punctuality and dispatch. Parties now ordering goods have
no longer the trouble to hunt up vessels, but may send their freight
to the depot, where it will be received daily and forwarded to its des-
tination.

The want of a central position for business has long been felt, and
it is believed that when the facilities for receiving and forwarding
goods are known, it will be duly appreciated by shippers.

Arrangements are now being made with the several lines of steam-
ships from Boston, New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore, to receive
and forward freight to and from North Carolina with dispatch.

TRANSPORTATION.

The facilities for transportation through the Canal have been con-
siderably increased since our last report. At that time there were
very few steamers, barges and sailing vessels running regularly, and
we were, to a great extent, dependent upon transient vessels to do the
freiorhtino;.

The want of capital, however, has induced an inferior class of boats
to be employed, many of them unfit for the navigation. The estab-
lishment of a permanent line of steamers to the principal ports of
North Carolina, would facilitate our intercourse with those places and
increase our trade, and, it is believed, would lartjelv remunerate the
Company for the capital expended.

We have not had any steamers to either Newbern or Washington
untii lately, and consequently the trade to those places has been lost
to the Canal. The small steamship Betde, owned by parties in New-
bern, has lately commenced making regular trips to that town, and
Mr. W. L. Oswald has also established the propeller steamer L. G.
Cannon on the line to Washington.



6

It is to be hoped these gentlemen will be encouraged in their new
enterprise, and that er-e long other steamers may be added to their
lines.

The trade of the Roanoke, wliich in former years consisted of corn,
wheat, cotton, stave:?, : hingles &c., has very much changed ; we
have now very little Corn arriving, and the principal articles are
shingles,' staves and cotton The folio v/ing steamers and barges are
now employed on this navigation through the Canal, viz ; Steamers
Pocosin, Orient, Cotton Plant, Fairy, Roanoke, I. D. Coleman, Cur-
rituck, Hackensack and Barges

The trade of the Chowan River and tributaries continues to in-
crease. The following steamers and barges are engaged in that trade
viz : Stern wheel steamer ''Wawenock," Maria, propeller "Our
Flag," and Emma, and tugs Kate, Bertie and others.

The want of a regular line of steamers to the several towns and
.counties of Eastern North Carolina is still felt, and the President at
our last Annual Meeting, recommended to the tStuckhulders Lhe estab-
lishment of regular steamers to the following places, viz : Newbern,
Washington, Hyde County, Tyrrell County, Elizabeth City, Hertford,
Chowan River, Roanoke River, Cashie River and Currituck County.

During the past year we haN'^e had regular lines only to Williams-
ton, Elizabeth City, and, for a short time, to the Chowan. If evidence
were wanting of the future success of established lines to the places
mentioned above, it may be found in the success of those lines. For
several months the amount of freight offering was quite light and the
boats did not pay expenses. They were, however continued, and though
not well adapted to the trade, each suceessive trip has increased the
amount of freight and passengers, and their oAvners are encouraged to
continue them on their respective routes, and it is likely their place*
will be supplied during the ensuing year with larger, faster and more
commodious boats.

The want of suitable steamers to transport freight atui passengers
from Newbern, Washington, and other places on Pamlico Sound, has
lost to us all the trade of that section. It is true, we have had occa-
sional steamers from those places, but no regular lines have been es-
tablished, and experience has taught us that without regularity, w«
cannot command the business of those plac«s.

It is believed that an Iron Propeller Steamer, capable of transport-
ing about 500 bales cotton, or 2000 bbls. cargo, would find profitabl*
employment from each of those ports. Cotton could be taken to Nor-



folk at low rates, and bj a through arrangement with the Boston,
New York and Philadelphia and Baltimore steamers could be put down
in those cities in a shorter time and at less expense than by any other
route. The saving of insurance alone, (avoiding the risk around Hat-
teras) would be a considerable item.

THROUaH BUSINESS.

With a view to give shippers in North Carolina the benefit of the
great markets of the country, the President entered into an arrange-
ment with the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal Company, and also
through them with the Delaware and Raritan Canal Company for pro-
ducts of North Carolina coming through the Albemarle and Chesa-
peake Canal, to pass through their respective canals at half rates of
toll. Thus, a vessel may load in any of the rivers of North Carolina
and go via canals, to Philadelphia, Wilmington, Del., New York, Al-
bany, &c., without going to sea. Many have availed themselves of
this arrangement and quite a large quantity of shingles, lumber, na-
val stores, &c,, &«., haye been sent forward in this manner.

Barges to be towed by steam tugs, are now being constructed for
the transportation of kindling wood, and it is believed that large quan-
tities of that article will be shipped direct to Philadelphia and New
York by this inland route during the ensuing year.

CAPACITY OF THE CANAL.

The large number of steamers passing through the Canal to distant
ports in the South, have demonstrated the capacity and importance of
your Canal. During the past year many steamers from New York,
Philadelphia, Wilmington, Del., and Baltimore have availed them-
selves of this navigation,^ thereby avoiding Cape Hatteras and the
dangerous coast of North Carolina Many of these steam.ers came by
sea to Norfolk, being too large to pass the Chesapeake and Delaware
or Delaware and Raritan Canals — the largest and most profitable
works of the kind in this country,

A comparison of the locks of the several Canals along the Atlantic
coast, may not be without interest :

Tre Delaware and Raritan Canal — 43 miles long, connecting Philadelphia
with New York ; Locks 210 feet long, 23 feet 6 inches wide, 6 feet deep.

('hesapeake and Delaware Canal — 14 miles long, connects Chesapeake Bay
with Delaware River, (Baltimore and Philadelphia) ; Locks 810 feet long, 24 feet
wide, 9 feet deep. Water supplied principally by steam pumps.



8

Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal — 45 miles long, (including 30 miles im-
proved River Navigation) connects Chesapeake Bay with Albemarle, Currituck
and Pamlico Sounds ; Lock 230 feet long, 40 feet wide, built for 10 feet depth,
now navigable for steamers from 6 to 7 feet 6 inches draft. Supplied by water
from Atlantic Ocean.

Dismal Swamp Canal — 29 miles long, unites Chesapeake Bay with Albemarle
Sound ; Locks 94 feet long, 17 feet wide, 5 feet deep. Supplied by water from
Lake Drummond.

COMPARATIVE SIZE OF LOCKS.

Length. Width .
Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal Locks. . . . 220 40

Chesapeake and Delaware " " . . . 210 24

Delaware and Raritan « « ... 210 23

Dismal Swamp " " . . . .94 17

The table annexed gives the name and tonnage of the principal
steamers that have passed through the Canal :

The steamships General Burnside and Vineland were of the greatest
capacity, measuring 380 82-95 tons old measurement, or about 540 tons
new. They were of about equal size, viz : 158 feet long, 22 feet beam,
lower hohl 10 feet deep, between decks 7 feet, total 17 feet deep, car-
ried 400 tons on 6 feet 6 inches water. The largest and most costly
steamer on the bay — the Thomas Kelso, draws loaded less than 6 feet.
The Augusta and Savannah side-wheel steamers belonging to the U.
S. Government, were the largest side-wheel steamers that have passed
through this Canal, and were estimated to carry over 1200 bales cot-
ton each. The Julia St. Clair, a new and large iron stern wheel
steamer, lately passed through, will carry 900 bales cotton on 3 feet
water. The iron barge Enterprize, the first boat built to navigate
this Canal, belonging to parties living on the Roanoke, 110 feet long,
23 feet beam and 7 feet hold, brought 1005 bales cotton on one occa-
sion from the Roanoke with a draft of less than 5 feet water. A boat
of similar construction, of the length and width of our lock, would
carry over 5000 bales cotton on 5 feet water



9



LIST OF STEAMERS
Navigating the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal.



Alice,


. s. w.


40


Hack en sack.


p.


140


Arrow, . i


p.


30


Heliotrope, .


. s. w.


160


Argo,


.'^ p.


160


Halilax, .


s. w.


100


Ambition,


50


I. D. Coleman,


p.


120


A.Oldham, .


p.


66


lolus,


s. w.


163


Alida,


s. w.


180


Joseph W. Hall,


p.


160


Alpha,


p.


65


J.N. Seymour, .


' s. \v.


123


Adriatic, . ' .


p.


68


Jenny Lind, .


. 8. W.


140


Bettie,


. s. w.


140


James Guy,


8. W.


180


B?rtie. .


p.


40


James Murray.


P.


70


C. P. Smith, .


. s- w.


150


Kate,


1*.


83


Chowan,


p.


50


L. G. Cannon,


P.


160'


Currituck,


p.


too


Lock wood.


s. w.


180


Clinton, .


s. w.


40


M. DeForest,


. 8 W.


20


Croatan,


p.


45


Miu'.iie Brandt. .


8. W.


313


Cotton Plant,


s. w.


loo


Mary Augusta,


. s. w.


301


Coinjock,


p.


30


Mary Ella,


8. W.


200


Charles Haughton,


s. w.


220


Maria,


. s. w.


120


Calypso,


. s. w.


10


r^Iatlauo,


8. W.


306


Ceres.


s. w.


320


Mystic,


. S\ w.


154


Columbine, .


. s. w.


150


Nangatuck, iron-cls.


id. . p.




C. S. Wright, .


S. "W.


80


North Shore, .


. s. w.


103


DoUie,


p.


15


Nurtli Slate,


8. W.


106


Dewitt Clinton, .


p.


95


Orlando,


P.;


42


DeriA,

D. Sl^tetson.


. !5. W.


200


Orient,


8. W.


262


p.


60


Our Flag,


P.


110


Ella May, .


. «. w.


148


Port iloval,


8. W.


150


Emma Fries,


p.


10


Port DePosit,


. 8. W.


45


Ella,


. s. w.


291


Pioneer, .


P.


350


EmUv,


.8. W.


120


Philadelphia,


P.


198


E. B. Lane, .


p.


40


Reliel',


P.


90


Ecliiise, .


p.


120


Eoanokc,


P.


110


Emma,


p.


120


Rotary, .


P.


lOS


Emma Dunn,


p.


110


Rufus Ingals,


P.


68


Edwin Forrest.


p.


50


Scorpio,


8. W.


247


Falcon,


s. w.


120


Sea Bird,


. 8. W.


220


Favorite,


. s. w.


150


Susie,


P.


.~,


Fanny Siahr,


8. W.


306


Standish,


P.


lOJ


Fanny,


. s. w.


160


S. Seymour,


V.


15;;


Fairy,


s. w.


40


Sylvian Shore,


. 8. W.


217


Fannie,


p.


10


S. C. Brooks,


P.


80


Flora Temple,


s. w.


47


T. B. Goodsall,


P.


51


Fawn,


p.


76


Two Boys,


B. W.


102


Foster,


s. w.


250


Trumpeter, .


. S. W.


157


Governor Worth,


. s. w


99


T. F. Secor,


6. W.


209


George, .


s. w.


75


Three Brothers,


. 8. W.


60


Gazelle,


. p.


76


Undine, .


8. W.


110


Gen. Hooker,


s. w.


130


U. S. Grant, .


. ' . P.


38


Gen. Burnside,


, s. w.


380


Union,


S W.


150


Gen. Be'rry,


; S. W.


144


Vineland,


P.


480


Gen. Jessup,


p.


220


Wawenock.


8. W.


135


Gen. McClellan, .


p.


137


Washington Irving


, . . 8 W.


160


Helen,


. s. w.


200


W. W. Frazier, .


6. W.


129


Harry Carroll,


s. w.


183


Z. B. Vance, .


. 8. W.


180


Hertford,


. 8. W.


80









10



STATEMENT

()f Affairs of the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal Company^
September ZOtk 1866. •



Anthorized capital



$1,500,000 00



LIABILITIES.

Stock paid up arid held by State of North Carolina,
County of Currituck, North Carolina,
'• to individuals, - - -
Total stock paid up,
First mortgage bonds issued and sold,

•' " " issued January 1, 1866, to retire

past due coupons on above bonds.
Total Bonds issued,
Due bills for fractional amounts due on past due cou
pons, payable in bonds, - - - .

Due for past due coupons prior to January 1, 1864, not

yet presented, - - .-
Duo for past due coupons on $320,000, amount of bonds
issued, on Ist July, 1866,

Total due on past due coupons,
Bills payable, - -

Other liabilities due on open account,

Total Liabilities,



350,000 00

44,000 00

494,100 00

258,000 00

68,000 00

2,490 00

9,345 00

11. -110 00

28,214 83
5,066 01



$888,100 00
$326,000 00

$23,245 00

33.280 8S
$1,270,625 8a



ASSETS.



Mrst mortgage bonds,
Ourrituck county bonds,
Hash,

Total assets,



74,000 00

9,300 00

980 75



$84,280 7«



Note.— The Mortg*ee is for $400,000, of which $326,000 have been dlspoeed of, leaving on hand,

"itated, $74,000.



11



STATEMENT

Of the Receipts and Disbursements of the Albemarle and Chesapeake
Canal Company, for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1866.



Bj balance as per statement September 30, 1866, - - $ 9,759 08

Bj tolls and receipts from other sources, - - 57,379 47

By bills receivable, " - - - - - 4,715 4S

DISBURSEMENTS.

To paid discount on notes, - - - - $ 1,242 21

To payment on repairs of Lock, - - - 29,4(15 60

To repairs of depot building, rent .and construction of

wliarf, . - - . 4,848 30

To cost of running tow boats, repairs, wages, cost of

fuel and subsistence, - - - . 11,134 15

To repairs of Canal, including working of dredge, pile

driver, wages, fuel and subsistence, - - 8,829 30

To U. S. Revenue tax on receipts of Canal, - 641 33

To salary of President, $3,000, Treasurer, $l!200, Col-
lector, ,$1,000, Lock-tenders, $540, bridge-keepers.
$300, ligbtliouse keeper. $180, stationery and
printing, $278 45 - - - . " - 5,498 45

To loss on $459 08 Southern currency, - - 413 98

Balance, - '- - . 10,280 76



$71,853 98 $71,853 9R



Balance, - - llPi280^7fi

▼iz : — Currituck county bonds, - _..*<) 300 90

Paid $450 08 Southern funds. - - _ - - " 45 10

In bank and on hand. - - . ' . . 9jj5 (>(;



$10,280 78



„ , „ B. P. TEBAULT,

Norfolk Va., Rn]>t. 30. 180(5. Treasurer.



12



RECEIPTS OF TOLLS AND TONNAGE

On the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal, for the fiscal year ending
September 30iA, 1866'



MONTH.



1865— October ...

November,,

December, .
I.sfi6 — January, . . .

February, . .

March,

April

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,



Inw'd Tolls



2,476 55
2,015 27
1,868 52
1,420 85
3,041 88
2,591 55
4,366 13
3,635 57
2,262 58
2.581 77
2,755 28
2,243 39



31,259 34



Out'd Tolls



,452 02
,428 64
349 66
750 68
200 07
982 23
332 35
593 90
395 73
426 51
44137
734 04



I0,b87 20



Towing In-
ward.



Tow'g Out-
ward.



297 45
260 40
497 20
705 66
786 00
930 80
395 80
375 65
553 40
257 90



5,060 26



120 90
140 50
775 75'
577 10
615 40
473 90
423 00
408 04
323 45
32:3 45



Total Toll*

and

Tonnage.

3,928 57
3,443 91
2,636 53
2,512 43
5,514 90
4,856 54
7,099 88
5,' 34 17
3,477 11
.3,791 97
4,('73 50
3,558 78



4,181 49 50,588 29



Receipts as given above. ....

Tolls from U. S. Government for July, Aug and Oct., 1865.



$50,588 39
1,705 50



Norfolk, Va., Sept. 30tb, 1865.



13



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15



REPORT

Of the number and class of vessels passing through the Albemarle
and Chesapeake Canal for the year ending Sept. 30, 1866.



MONTH.



1865— October

November, .

December,..
1866 — January, . . .

February, . .

March,

April,

May,

June,

July

August,

September, .



Steam's


Sch'ers.


Sloops.


Barges.


1()5


74


16


1
16 '■


81


30


13


20


69


42


6


15


(i6


9&


ii


24


77


57


31


23 I


107


56


43


25 1


105


74


.35


22 •


93


86


28


26


72


63


. 30


21


92


81


37


19


100


.80


36


22


93


60


16


23


; 1,062


736


302


256

1



Total.



51
36
19
23
45
37
67
58
72

ia5

169
109



338



18



3,638



In 1865,

Increase over year 1 865, .

Norfolk. Va., Sept. 30, 1866.



9,617
l.Olfi



Office of the Albemarle k Chesapeake Canal Co., \
Norfolk, Va., October 25, 1866. /

At a meeting of the Stockholders of this Company, held at their
office in the City of Norfolk, the above Report was submitted and or-


1

Online LibraryAlbemarle and Chesapeake Canal CompanyAnnual report of the President and Directors of the Albemarle & Chesapeake Canal Company .. [serial] (Volume 1866) → online text (page 1 of 2)