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" I said you were a traitor, and as a traitor you shall die '

Diiraas. Vol Twenty-seven



THE WORKS OF

ALEXANDRE DUMAS

IN THIRTY VOLUMES

THE SON
OF MONTE CRISTO

VOLUME ONE



ILLUSTRATED WITH A FRONTISPIECE
IN PHOTOGRAVURE




NEW YORK
P. F. COLLIER & SON



Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2010



http://www.archive.org/details/worloofalexandre27duma



CONTENTS



I. A MARRIAGE CONTRACT AND ITS END .... 8

II. A CALM BRIDE 8

III. A FAMILY TRAGEDY 13

IV. A PECULIAR TRIAL 16

V. THE RESULT OF THE CATASTROPHE .... 20

VI. BENEDETTO, THE MURDERER 23

■ VII. A MIRACLE 29

VIII. THE SENTENCE OF DEATH 35

IX. THE EDITORIAL ROOMS 43

X. PONTOON NO. 2 50

XI. THE DEAD LIVE 55

XII. THE CONFESSION 59

XIII. FORGIVENESS 72

XIV. THE RAT-KING 78

XV. IN THE BAGNIO 88

XVI. THE ESCAPE 94

XVII. IN THE MOUNTAIN PASS OF OLIOLLES ... 98

XVIIL THE MOTHER 107

XIX. ON THE SEA Ill

XX. MONTE-CRISTO 116

XXI. WITH THE PANDURS 127

XXIL THE QUEEN OF FLOWERS 132

XXIIL GREEN, WHITE AND RED 138

XXIV. A FIGHT IN THE STREETS 160

XXV. THE MASKS FALL 152

XXVI. LOVE OF COUNTRY 156

XXVII. SHADOWS OF THE PAST 160

Vol. 27 — I



2 CONTENTS

XXVIII. THE CONSPIRATORS . c 164

XXIX. FATHER AND SON 168

XXX. IN THE WELL 178

XXXI. SPERO 186

XXXII. ECARTE 194

XXXIII. forward! 198

XXXIV. SERGEANT COUCOU 204

XXXV. MISS CLARY 207

XXXVI. A MOTHER 215

XXXVII. THE RING 218

XXXVIII. "SEARCH FOR THE WIFE!" 226

XXXIX. DEPEND ONLY ON YOURSELF 233

XL. THE SACRIFICE 240

XLI. HOW AND WHERE COUCOU TOOK LEAVE . . 249

XLII. IN THE spider's WEB 263

XLIIL MANUELITA 273

XLIV. THE HUMORS OF A LADY-MILLIONNAIRE . . 291

XLV. MALDAR 305

XLVI. MISS clary's SECRET ........ 310

XLVII. AN AMERICAN WAGER 314

XLVIIL THE WEDDING BREAKFAST 325

XLix. maldar's farewell 331

L. THE HOLY SIGNAL 336

LI. UARGLA 340

LII. CAPTAIN JOLIETTE 342

LIIL THE LION IN CONFLICT WITH THE LION . . 345

LIV. MEDJE 352

LV. "do NOT DIE, CAPTAIN !" 363

LVI. THE FLIGHT 368

LVII. AT THE FOOT OF THE KIOBEH 370

liVIII. MONTE-CRISTO BECOMES EDMOND DANTES . 374

LIX. EDMOND DANTES 377

LX. SECRETS 381



THE SON OF MONTE-CRISTO



CHAPTEK I

A MARRIAGE CONTRACT AND ITS END

IN THE month of July of the year 182^, a man created
a gi*eat sensation in Paris, and even attracted the
attention of the lions of society. Where he came
from — who he was — what was his past life — none knew;
and the mystery surrounding him only tended to make
the hero of the season more interesting.

The Count of Monte- Cristo, from Italy — from Malta —
no one knew whence — had unlimited credit with the
banking house of Danglars, one of the largest in Paris;
owned the finest mansion — a superb villa — at Auteuil,
and the handsomest turnout on the road, which he pre-
sented to a banker's wife, without letting any one know
his reason for doing so; all this was sufficient to make
him the central point around which revolved the social
gossip of the day. But, besides this, the handsome
stranger makes his appearance at the theatres in the
company of a lady in Grecian dress, whose transcendent
beauty and countless diamonds awake alike admiration
and cupidity. Like moths around the flame, society
flutters about the legendary count, and it is principally
the golden youth who find in him their centre of attrac-

(3)



4 THE SON OF MONTE-CRISTO

tion. Among tlie latter were more especially Albert
Morcerf, the son of a general, Debray, a young and
talented attache at the Foreign Office, Beauchamp,
and Chateau- Kenaud, who served as the asteroids of
the new star in the Parisian sky.

Sometimes they were joined at those famous dinners
which only a Monte-Cristo understood how to give, by
a Count Andrea Cavalcanti, who at first appeared there
with his father, Major Cavalcanti. Although he was a
stranger, he was received in society through his ac-
quaintance with Monte-Cristo and with Baron Danglars,
in whose banking house he had a large sum on deposit.

The young count, a perfect Apollo, with classically-
cut features, did not fail to produce an impression upon
Eugenie, a proud, black-eyed brunette, the only daugh-
ter of the millionnaire Danglars; and as the millions of
the father, in conjunction with the peculiar beauty of the
daughter, began to interest the count, it was not long
before they thought of marriage. Danglars, who had
been a heavy loser in certain speculations of which the
public was ignorant, hoped to rehabilitate himself with
the millions of his prospective son-in-law, and therefore
there was nothing to prevent the marriage of the proud
Eugenie and the handsome Andrea.

One July evening, representatives of the high finan-
cial society, and a few members of the aristocracy, were
invited to Danglars' house to witness the signing of the
marriage contract of the only daughter of the house with
the Italian, Count Andrea Cavalcanti, of the princely
house of Cavalcanti. At five o'clock, when the guests
arrived, they found all the rooms in the mansion bril-
liant with wax- lights.



THE SON OF MONTE-CRISTO 5

The bride was simply yet tastefully attired: a wliite
satin dress trimmed with lace of the same color; a single
white rose, which was half hidden in her raven black
hair, formed the only ornament of the young lady, whose
jewels, it was well known, represented a fortune. The
young count was surrounded by representatives of the
gilded youth, who give the tone in the Jockey Club, and
are the recognized authorities for all Europe in questions
of taste, fashion, and sport.

Baron Danglars was the centre of a group of bankers,
to whom he developed his celebrated projects which had
increased his millions, taking good care, however, not to
mention his losses. Madame Danglars, the handsome
mother of the pretty Eugenie, was surrounded by a
circle of young and old cavaliers, who paid court to
her with the greatest ceremony, and whose adorations
were accepted by the lady as a tribute due her, although
it could not be denied that she favored the young
attache Debray.

The lawyers were already there, yet the ceremony
appeared to be purposely delayed, as if they were wait-
ing for the arrival of a missing guest. And this was
indeed the case.

When the footman announced the Count of Monte-
Cristo a stir was created among the guests. The star of
the evening was overwhelmed with questions, which he
paid no attention to, but quietly busied himself with the
three representatives of the Danglars family.

The way he observed the young Count Cavalcanti
was very strange, though very few noticed it, as the
Count of Monte- Cristo was relating a robbery which had
been committed in his house, in which one of the thieves



6 THE SON OF MONTE-CRISTO

had been murdered, most probably by his own comrade.
No one noticed the pallor of Count Cavalcanti, as they
were too much interested in Monte- Cristo's story. When
he had finished, the ceremony was proceeded with.

The marriage contract between Mademoiselle Eugenie
and Count Andrea Cavalcanti was read, the millions men-
tioned therein causing a sensation even among the cream
of the financial and aristocratic world, and the signing of
the paper was next in order. This circumstance recalled
to Madame Danglars the absence of a friend of the
house, the procureur du roi Villefort, and she asked
Monte- Cristo whether he knew where he was.

"I am indirectly the cause of the absence of the pro-
cureur du roi," said the count, as if to apologize. "The
man who was murdered in my house was recognized as
a former galley-slave named Caderousse, and a letter was
found in his pocket which bore a remarkable address."

Every one crowded around the count, while the young
bridegroom slowly walked toward a neighboring room.

"Could you tell us the address?" asked Madame
Danglars.

"Certainly," replied the count. "You will all laugh
over it. It was none other than that of the hero of our
reunion to-night — Count Andrea Cavalcanti."

The surprised guests turned around as if to exact
an explanation from the latter. He had, however, already
left the room. The servants were searching all over the
house for him, when a new commotion was heard.

The dazed servants returned from their search, and
behind them appeared a detective accompanied by sev-
eral policemen.

"I am looking for a man named Andrea Cavalcanti,"



THE SON OF MONTE-CRISTO 7

said the detective, in the well- known monotonous way
which never fails to make an impression even upon
those who are not principals.

"By what right?" asked Danglars, who could not
suppress his uneasiness.

"Andrea Cavalcanti is charged with having murdered
the galley-slave Caderousse, with whom he was formerly
chained in the galleys."

Like lightning from a clear sky this announcement
fell upon the aristocratic assembly. Madame Danglars
fainted, the policemen searched the house, but could
not find the culprit, the guests ran here and there like
a flock of sheep surprised by a fox, the servants stood
motionless with dazed faces, consternation and confusion
reigned supreme.



THE SON OF MONTE-CRISTO



CHAPTER 11



A CALM BRIDE



NO ONE among all the company in Danglars' house
possessed their self-possession so much as jt^st the
one who was the least expected to do so.

Two days after the catastrophe, when Eugenie's most
intimate friend, the music teacher, Louise d'Armilly,
came to condole with her, the proud daughter of the
banker repulsed her with a disdainful laugh. ^

"I am not made for marriage," she said; "at first I
was engaged to Monsieur de Morcerf, whose father shot
himself a few days ago, in a lit -of remorse at having ac-
quired his wealth by dishonorable means; then I was to
be married to Prince Cavalcanti, to add to the millions
which my father possesses, or which he perhaps does not
call his own, the imaginary wealth of a — jail-bird."

"What should be done now?" asked her modest
friend in an anxious tone.

"Fate shows my path," answered Eugenie, firmly.
"I am not intended to become the slave of a hypo-
critical and egotistical man. You are aware that my in-
clination pushes me toward the stage, where my voice,
my beauty, and my independent spirit will assure me
Buccess. The time has now arrived when I must decide:



THE SON OF MONTE-CRISTO 9

here, the scandal and contempt of tlie crowd; there, ap-
plause, fame, and honor, I foresaw it all, though I did
not think it would come in such a shameful way. I
have fifty thousand francs pin-money, and my jewels
are worth as much more. Order a carriage; I have
passports for both of us; in an hour we depart for
Belgium. ' '

Louise listened to her friend speechless with astonish-
ment; although she knew the firmness of her character,
she was not prepared for so much independence.

"But we two girls alone," she hesitatingly said,
"cannot — "

"I have looked out for that, too," replied Eugenie,
calmly; "the passport is made out in the name of Mon-
sieur Leon d'Armilly and sister; while you go for the
carriage I will pack the trunks, and change myself into
Monsieur Leon d'Armilly."

Louise mechanically left the room to order the car-
riage to come to Danglars' house. When she came back
an elegant young man stood near the trunks, whom no
one would have recognized at the first glance as the
proud and courted beauty, Eugenie Danglars. With
great difficulty the two girls carried the trunk through
a side door of the house and deposited it at the next
street corner. There the coachman awaited them, and in
a quarter of an hour they had left Paris.

Let us now return to Prince Cavalcanti, alias Bene-
detto, the hero of the interrupted party at the banker
Danglars' house.

With that cunning peculiar to criminals who scent
danger from afar, he had made his exit at the right
time. After he had pocketed the diamonds which



10 THE SON OF MONTE-CRISTO

formed a part of Eugenie's trousseau^ and whicli were
exposed in tlie parlor, he scaled the window, slipped an
overcoat over his dress, and made his way out of the
house. In thirty minutes he reached an out-of-the-
way suburb of Paris, Without losing a minute of his
precious time, he took a carriage, and left the city
under the pretence of having to catch a friend, who
had departed for the chase on the previous day. The
big tip he gave the driver spurred the latter on, and at
the end of an hour Benedetto found himself at Loures,
where he discharged his driver, saying that he would
spend the night there.

Benedetto now formed a decisive plan. He did not
remain in Loures, but went on foot to Chapelle-en-Serval,
a mile distant, where he arrived covered with dirt and
dust, and entered the nearest inn, telling the host that
he had fallen from his horse. "If you could get me a
coach or a horse, so that I could return to Compiegne,
I would be very grateful to you."

The host really had a horse at his disposal, and in a
quarter of an hour Benedetto, accompanied by the host's
son, was on the road to Compiegne, which he reached
about midnight. After he had discharged the boy at the
market-place of the little city, he went to the inn called
the Bell and Bottle, which he had patronized in former
times, and to which he was admitted now.

After Benedetto had eaten a hearty supper, he in-
quired if he could get a room on the ground floor, but
was forced to accept one on the first story, as the other
had been taken by a young man who had just arrived
with his sister.

The hunted culprit was so tired out by his exertiona



THE SON OF MONTE-CRISTO 11

ttidt ne fell into a deep sleep, and did not wake up early
next morning, as lie had intended, but at nine o'clock.
Struck by an indescribable fear, he quickly dressed him-
self and peered through the window blinds. He recoiled
in terror, for his first glance had fallen upon two police-
men who leaned against the doors with their guns in
their hands. His first thoughts were that he was fol-
lowed and was lost. He quickly collected himself, sup-
pressed his excitement, and seizing a piece of paper,
scribbled these words on it with a lead pencil:

"1 have no money, but do not desire to owe any-
thing. The inclosed diamond pin will fully pay for my
bill. I was ashamed to acknowledge this, and therefore
left at five o'clock."

After he had attached the pin to the paper, he opened
the door and crawled up the chimney with the agility of
a chimney-sweep. Here, however, the difficulty was to
continue his way without being perceived by any one.
He therefore returned and entered another chimney, in-
tending to wait there until all danger was over. He
already began to think himself saved, when he lost his
balance and crashed with a loud noise through the open-
ing and into a room which was occupied, as was betrayed
by a sudden scream.

A young man and a lady were in the room. The lat-
ter had uttered the cry, while the former pulled vigor-
ously at the bell- rope.

"Eescue me — hide me!" were the first words the vil-
lain spoke. He was about to say more, but the words
stuck in his throat, for he had recognized the young
man as Eugenie Danglars.

"Andrea, the murderer!" exclaimed the two women.



12 THE SON OF MONTE-CBISTO

"Have mercy! rescue me!" implored Benedetto.

"It is too late," replied Eugenie, "the door is being
opened. ' '

At the same moment, the policemen, followed by the
whole inn staff, entered the room. Benedetto saw he
was lost. He pulled out a dagger, as if he wished to
attack his captors, but desisted when he saw it would
be fruitless.

"Kill yourself!" exclaimed Eugenie, with the accent
of a tragedy queen.

"Bah!" replied Benedetto, "it is too early yet; the
whole thing is a misunderstanding, and I have friends."

With great coolness he held out his hands to the
policemen, who put handcuffs on them.

"Give my regards to your father. Mademoiselle Dan-
glars, and do not be ashamed. You are my bride, and
we ought to have been man and wife to-day," said Bene-
detto, sarcastically, as he left the room with the police-
men, leaving Eugenie exposed to the curious and con-
temptuous glances of the waiters.



THE SON OF MONTE-CRISTO 13



CHAPTER III

A FAMILY TRAGEDY

THE procureur du roi, Villefort, was one of tlie most
respected and influential men in Paris, and his
reputation as district- attorney was spotless. Mar-
ried the second time to a handsome and refined lady,
Monsieur de Villefort spent his leisure time in the society
of his wife, a grown daughter by his first marriage, named
Valentine, his little son, Edouard, presented to him by his
second wife, and his old father, i'^oirtier de Villefort, in
an elegant mansion in the Faubourg St. Honore. The
only grief he had was the condition of his father, who
had been stricken with paralysis, which had not only
robbed him of the use of his limbs, but of his speech
too. The old man could only make himself understood
by his beloved grandchild Valentine, and by a faithful
servant named Barrois, by the rising and falling of his
eyelids.

In the house of this immensely respected man, certain
things had happened within a few months which attracted
general attention, though no one could explain them.
The parents of the deceased Madame de Villefort, who
liad been staying at their son-in-law's house on a visit,
had died suddenly one after the other, the doctors being



14 THE SON OF MONTE-CRISTO

unable to assign any other cause for tlieir deaths than
apoplexy. These facts would not have caused any talk,
since the two persons who had died were both very old,
had they not been followed almost immediately by the
deaths of the old servant of Monsieur Noirtier and of
Valentine, the blooming daughter of the procureur du
roi, and the bride of a young officer named Mor-
rel, under circumstances which looked very much like
poisoning.

It was a terrible time for Monsieur de Villefort, who
saw himself obliged, in his official capacity, to investi-
gate his own household. After long observation, he had
a terrible suspicion, which was confirmed by a hun-
dred little things, that his own wife was the four-times
murderess !

The reasons which actuated her to commit these terri-
ble crimes were very clear. Valentine, the step- daughter,
possessed a large fortune which she had inherited from
her dead mother; she was the sole heiress of the grand-
parents who had died so suddenly; upon the death of
Valentine all her wealth would revert to Monsieur de
Villefort, and his sole heir would be his son.

Villefort, the husband, struggled terribly with Ville-
fort, the district- attorney; he tried to ward off the guilt
from his wife, but his efforts were fruitless. It was the
same day on which the sensational case of Prince Caval-
canti, alias Benedetto, was before the Court of Special
Sessions, and Monsieur de Villefort was forced to attend
the sitting in his official capacity as district- attorney.
Before he went he sent for his wife, who wished to at-
tend the trial of a case which caused great excitement
all over Paris.



THE SON OF MONTE-CRISTO 15

Madame de Yillefort came to his room fully dressed
for the street, being under the impression that her hus-
band would ask her to accompany him to the court-
house. She trembled, however, when she noticed his
face, which was torn by conflicting passions.

"Where do you get the poison from, madame, which
you are in the habit of using?" asked the procureur
du roi, in a tone of command.

Madame de Yillefort turned deathly pale.

"I do not understand what you mean," she stam-
mered.

"I mean," said the man of the law, "where do you
keep the poison with which you murdered my parents-
in-law, Barrois, and my daughter, Valentine ?' '

Stunned by this terrible charge Madame de Villefort
fell to the floor; she no longer dared to deny the accusa-
tion, and was oppressed by a feeling of deep despair.

"Every crime, madame," continued the procureur du
roi, "has its penalty; yours will be the scaffold. This
expiation, however, would be as terrible for me as for
you. Fate has left you to pay for your deeds by your
own hand. You have, perhaps, still a few drops of poi-
son left, which will save both you and me the scandal of
a public hanging. I am going to the court-house, and
I hope that when I return you will have expiated your
crimes."

With a cry, the unhappy woman became unconscious,
while Monsieur de Yillefort, hardly able to collect his
thoughts, left the room and rode to attend the Cavalcanti*
Benedetto case.



x6 THE SON OF MONTE-CRISTO



CHAPTEE IV



A PECULIAR TRIAL



ALL Paris was excited over the case of tlie handsome
Andrea Cavalcanti, who was to descend from the
heights of society into the depths of the criminal
world. The lion of the day was to change himself into
a common convict.

Large sums of money were paid for seats in the court-
house, and long before the proceedings began every seat
in the room was occupied by representatives of the most
aristocratic families.

After the usual preliminaries, the judge, the jury, and
the district- attorney took their places. Upon an order
from the judge the policemen brought in the prisoner.
Instead of a man borne down by shame, Cavalcanti
showed himself to the crowd dressed in a ball suit,
his face beaming with good humor.

The complaint was read without making the slightest
impression upon the prisoner, who sat on his seat with
the same ease and grace as he did, but a few days before,
in the famous restaurant The Grolden House.

"Prisoner," said the judge, "stand up and answer
the questions I shall put to you. What is your full
name?"



THE SON OF MONTE-CEISTO 17

"I am very sorry," replied Andrea, witliout tlie slight-
est embarrassment, ' ' that I am unable to answer the ques-
tion just now; you can continue, however, and later on
I will take an opportunity to give you information about
the matter."

The people were dazed at the audacity of the pris-
oner.

"How old are you?" continued the judge.

"I was born on the night between the 27th and the
28th of September, 1807, at Auteuil, near Paris."

"What is your business?"

"I never bothered about the usual trades of the gen-
eral run of people. I was first a counterfeiter, then a.
thief, and afterward committed my first murder."

A storm of anger ran through the assembly, even the
judge and the jury could not suppress their loathing at
the unheard-of cynicism of the prisoner.

' ' Are you going to give your name now ?' ' asked
the judge.

"I am not able to give you my own name, but
I know that of my father."

"Name it, then."

"My father is a district- attorney," continued the pris
oner with great calmness, glancing at Monsieur de Ville-
fort, who turned deathly pale.

"District-attorney?" exclaimed the judge, greatly as-
tonished. "And iiis name is?"

"His name is Monsieur de Villefort, and he is sitting
in front of you."

"You are fooling with the court," said the judge
angrily. "I warn you for the last time and command
you to tell the truth."



i8 THE SON OF MONTE-CRISTO

"I am speaking tlie trutli," replied the prisoner, "and
can prove it. Listen, and tlien judge. I was born on
tlie first floor of the house No. 28 Eue de la Fontaine,
at Auteuil, on the night of the 27th to the 28th of
September, 1807. My father, Monsieur de Yillefort, told
my mother I was dead, wrapped me in a napkin marked
H. 15, put me in a small box and buried me alive in the
garden of the house. At the same moment he received
a thrust in the side with a knife held by a person who
was concealed, and he sank to the ground unconscious.
The man who attacked my father dug out the box
which had been buried, and which he supposed contained
money, and thereby saved my life. He brought me to
the foundling asylum, where I was inscribed as No. 37.
Three months later I was taken from the asylum by the
sister-in-law of the man, who was a Corsican, and brought
me to Corsica, where I was brought up, and in spite
of the care of my foster-parents acquired vices which
steeped me in crime."

"And who was your mother?" asked the judge.

"My mother thought I was dead; I am a child of
sin: I do not know my mother and do not wish to know
her."

A cry rang through the court-room at this point; a
lady had fainted, and was carried out of the hall by
several bystanders.

At this cry the procureur du roi arose, and showed
his ghastly face to the crowd.

"How are you going to prove these astounding reve-
lations?" asked the judge of the prisoner.

With a malicious look the latter pointed to Monsieur


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