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BR 764 .R4 1888
British Weekly.
The religious census of
London




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THE RELIGIOUS CENSUS OF LONDON.



m)c '^gritifilr WitMxy' 6xtras.



AN EDINBURGH ELEVEN.
By J. M. BARRIE ("GAVIN OGILVY").

CONTAINING

Lord Rosebery, Professors Masson, Blackie. Calderwood, Tait,

Eraser, ChrystaJ, Sellar, Mr. Joseph Thomson, Mr.

R. L. Stevenson, and Rev. Dr. W. C. Smith.

Fcap. %vo, \s.; cloth, \s. 6d.

THE SECOND ADVENT:

Will it be before the Millennium?

Affirmative, by Negative, by

Rev. Canon Faussett, D.D. Rev. Prof. Joseph Agar Beet.

Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Guinness. Rev. Prin. T. C. Edwards, D.D.

Rev. Prof. Godet, D.D. Rev. Prin. Brown, D.D.

Second Edition, completing Tenth Thousand. Fcap. 8vo, is. ;
cloth, IS. 6d.

BOOKS WHICH HAVE INFLUENCED ME.

By R. Louis Stevenson, John Ruskin, W. E. Gladstone, H. Rider
Hao^gard, \V. T. Stead, W. Besant, P. G. Hamerton, Professor
J. S. Blackie, Ven. Archdeacon Farrar, Dr. W. C. Smith, Dr.
Marcus Dods, and Dr. Joseph Parker.



(Qihtx gi^nnts fxam i^t ** §nli.^I; Wittily.*'

TEMPTED LONDON.— YOUNG MEN. Crown 8vo, cloth,

3S. 6d.

A SON OF THE MORNING. By SARAH DOUDNEY. With

Frontispiece. 3s. 6d.

WHEN A MAN'S SINGLE. By J. M. Barrie (" Gavin
Ogilvv "). Buckram, gilt top. Crown 8vo. Price 6s.

AULD LICHT IDYLLS. By the same Author. Bound in

buckram, gilt top. Crown 8vo. 6s.
A TREATISE ON CHRISTIAN BAPTISM. By JoSEPH

Agar Beet. Crown 8vo, canvas, is.



London: HODDER & STOUGHTON, 27, Paternoster Row.



THE

RELIGIOUS CENSUS



OF



LONDON.



Reprmted fro7n ''THE BRITISH WEEKLY'S



HODDER AND STOUGHTON,
27, PATERNOSTER ROW.

MDCCCLXXXVIII.
[All rights res)i>-ved.]



Printed by Hazell, Watson & Viney, Ld., London and Aylesbury.



INTRODUCTION.



'nr^HE following book contains the results of a religious
census of London, taken in two parts at the instance
of the proprietors of The British Weekly. The first part
contains the results of an enumeration of the worshippers at
the two principal services in the churches and chapels of
London. While similar enumerations have been made for all
the greater cities of the empire, the enormous labour and
cost involved in satisfactorily dealing with the problem in
London had hitherto proved an insuperable barrier. Some
fifteen hundred places, contained within a very wide area,
had to be dealt with, and the number of persons employed
amounted to several thousands. Thanks to the labours of
the general superintendent, Major Colquhoun, of Lyons, who
had previously superintended a similar, but much smaller,
work in Glasgow ; the superintendents of districts, many of
them well known in the Christian world ; the sub-superinten-
dents, and enumerators ; who in the vast majority of cases
did their work with the utmost efficiency, the labour has now
been accomplished. The day— the 24th of October, 1886—



vi INTRODUCTION.



was bright, though cold, and there is every reason to believe
that, there was fully an average attendance. Of course in
many cases allowance had to be made for various facts. The
census does not take account of extra services, and exceptional
circumstances in the case of separate churches increased or
diminished the attendance for the day. For example, in the
Church of England many harvest festivals were held, and
in the case of several Nonconformist churches anniversary
services were conducted. Sometimes, in various cases of
course, the regular ministers were absent. I had hoped to
indicate these circumstances more precisely than has been
found possible ; but I believe implicit reliance may be placed
on the accuracy of the figures. They were published by
instalments. The enumeration was made by actual counting,
official estimates being in no case accepted when unconfirmed,
and challenge of specific figures was invited. On due cause
shown the matter was investigated, and in a few cases, very
small in proportion to the whole number, corrections were
made. I have to acknowledge with gratitude the generosity
with which the enterprise was commented on by the religious
press generally, and I print a few representative letters
received from eminent public men. I do not think it advis-
able to reproduce the articles in which I drew what appeared
to me fair inferences from the figures, as the object of this
publication is to place the facts before readers and allow them



INTRODUCTION. vii



to draw their own conclusions. I may, however, say that the
object of the census was in no way sectarian or poHtical, and
that many prominent members of all churches took part in it.

From the Right Hon, W. E. Gladstone, M.P.

As one of the public, Mr Gladstone feels much indebted to the
Editor, especially in the present very defective state of our information,
for the religious census of London.

A numerical comparison with the results obtained in the other great
towns would be interesting.

So, of course, would be a comparison with corresponding parts
abroad ; but this, Mr. Gladstone supposes, would be difficult of
attainment.

It occurs to him that perhaps in the United States there might be a
disposition to follow the example so well set here.

With Mr. Gladstone's compliments.

December iSth, 1886.

From the Bishop of Wakefield (then Bishop of Bedford).
Stainforth House, Upper Clapton, London, E.

December 17 fh, 1886.

Sir,— We all owe you a great debt of gratitude for the census of
attendance at public worship, which you have made with so much
pains, and with such an evident desire to be strictly accurate. Such
a laborious work could not be carried out without some errors or
omissions ; but these seem to me comparatively few, and will, I have
no doubt, be corrected when the result of your labour appears in a
final form. I think the result is distinctly encouraging, and I heartily
sympathise with your hopeful deduction from the statistics you have
collected, I have never myself taken a desponding view, but have
believed what you press upon us— namely, that the evangelisation of
London is not an impossiblity. Thank God, there are evident signs «.f
a more friendly attitude towards religion. But the achievement we hope



viii INTR OD UCTION,



and pray and labour for is only to be attained by the most earnest and
zealous and self-denying exertions of Christian people. If there is
much to make us sad and anxious, you have, at least, shown us much
to stimulate and encourage.

Wm. Walsham Bedford.

(Bishop Suffragan for East London.)

From the Ven. Archdeacon Farrar, D.D., F.R.S.

December 20tJi, 1886.

Dr. Farrar has read with great interest the results of the religious
census, and the candid and valuable comments made upon them. He
is much obliged to the Editor for the copy of last week's issue, and
congratulates him on having been able to carry out so arduous an
inquiry. The Editor has rendered a valuable service to the whole
religious community.

From the Rev. Dr. Thain Davidson.

II, St. Mary's Road, Canonbury, N.

December 20th, 1886.

Dear Sir, — In reply to your note, permit me to express my belief
that while these statistics are not so satisfactory as one might have
hoped for, their publication will do good by drawing more earnest
attention to the practical irreligiousness (I would not use the word
heathe?iis7?t) existing in the Metropolis — an irreligiousness due, I am
persuaded, to indifference, and consisting only in very small degree
of avowed infidelity.

There are two remarks I feel inclined to make upon the religious
census just taken. In the first place, these figures must not be held to
represent the total influence of Christianity in the midst of us.

As one who for twenty-five years has been labouring in London, I
am bound to say that I perceive a very great difference in the attitude
of the humbler classes towards religion, even amongst those who rarely
or never enter our churches.

The cynical contempt or malevolent hate which a minister of the



INTRODUCTION. ix



Gospel would meet with in certain districts some years ago, is now
exchanged for a respectful bearing ; and working men are beginning to
see that they have no better friends than those who are endeavouring
to disseminate the principles of our holy faith.

In the second place, may I venture the opinion in regard to the
aggregate numbers, as shown by your returns, to be found on a given
Sunday within the various places of worship, that they represent
nearly all the moral, and to a large extent also the intellectual, force
of the Metropolis.

If we put these two considerations together, on each of which a great
deal might be said, we shall have little difficulty in coming to the con-
clusion that, for all that pessimists allege, London is a city dominated
by Christianity.

Yours faithfully,

J. Thain Davidson.

From Mr. G. Howell, M.P.

Hampden House, Ellingham Road,

Shepherd's Bush, London, \V.

December iSt/i, 1886.

Dear Sir,— I thank you for the copy of The British Weekly, with
condensed census of the attendances at churches and chapels in the
Metropolis. Taking it as a whole, the figures are not discouraging,
but I fear that the absentees are more numerous than you assume.

But even were not this the case, there is another aspect of the
question which deserves a thought— namely, that the absentees are
men in a larger proportion than women. Men will and do attend
and in some congregations they form a fair proportion to the whole
but not usually. They are not attracted by ?nere scholarship, but by
healthy, manly teaching. Men could be named who will draw large
assemblies of men, and hold them to their duties ; but they are the
exception rather than the rule.

In my opinion, the thing wanted in our ministers of all denominations
is intense human sympathy ; the more intense, if real, the better. This



INTR OD UCTION.



phase of Christian worship and preaching has developed immensely
of late years, and hence there is a growth of religious communities
throughout London. There are signs that it is further developing —
broadly and healthfully. The more closely Christian ministers follow
in the footsteps of Christ, and His followers during His stay, the more
surely will Christianity spread.

The social fabric of society has broken down. Political economy
has not yet shown how the masses of the people are to be im-
proved, their condition ameliorated, and their health and happiness
secured. What is true in economical science can be hallowed by the
application to it of the precepts of Christianity, as a living force and
vital principle. The very failure of political and social expediencies
throws the people back upon Christian doctrines and religious truth.
Wisely enforced, these cannot fail them, and they will appeal to
their consciences with all the greater force because of the failures
alluded to.

The facts you have elicited and published are of great value, and
I thank you for them.

Yours faithfully,

George Howell.



The enormous extent of the work prevented a census being-
taken of the mission halls on the same day. That census was
taken on the last Sunday of November, 1887. In this case
the returns were furnished by the parties in charge of the
halls. The result was a very keen discussion on how far
mission halls were successful. I think it advisable in this
case also to leave out all controversial matters, and to confine
this publication simply to a record of facts, procured at great
labour and expense, and as accurate as they can be made.



INTRODUCTION. xi



They will, no doubt, long be the basis of all discussion on
the religious condition of London, and will afford a valuable
test of the progress made by Christian churches.

I have to acknowledge the very valuable assistance of
the late Mr. George J. Stevenson, M.A., in preparing this
volume for the press. Mr. Stevenson's acquaintance with the
religious condition of London was perhaps unrivalled, and his
accuracy is universally known.

The Editor of ''The British Weekly."

27, Paternoster Row,
London, E.G., i



The Census includes morning and evening attendance in what is
known as " Smaller London." The population of " Smaller London "
in 1881 amounted to 3,816,483. It is estimated at the present at about
4,100,000. It includes 29 Registration Districts: Kensington, Fulham,
Chelsea, St. George Hanover Square, Westm^inster, Marylebone, Hamp-
stead, St. Pancras, Islington, Hackney, St. Giles, Strand, Holborn,
London City, Shoreditch, Bethnal Green, VVhitechapel, St. George-in-
the-East, Stepney, Mile-end, and Poplar in Middlesex ; St. Saviour
Southwark, St. Clave Southwark, Lambeth, Wandsworth, and Camber-
well in Surrey ; and Greenwich, Lewisham, and Woolwich in Kent.

The fact that in many churches and chapels services of a special
character were lield on the day when our census was taken has to
some extent affected the attendance at those places, as well as at others
in the locality ; and it may be well to state that an asterisk (*) affixed
to figures indicates that on Census Sunday Anniversary Services or
a Harvest Festival were held ; and in a few cases services were held
in schoolrooms. It should also be stated, that in many places, both
churches and chapels, considerable numbers of school-children formed
part of the counted congregation, whilst in many other places a separate
service was held in schoolrooms for the children, who did not come
under the notice of the enumerators. In many Roman Catholic
churches services were held at the hours of seven, eight, nine, and
ten o'clock, attended by persons who could not attend services at later
hours. These persons would treble the number of those present at
High Mass, and evening service; only those two services were counted.



CENSUS



OF



MORNING AND EVENING ATTENDANCES

IN THE

CHURCHES AND CHAPELS OF LONDON,
Stmday, Octobe?' 2/\th, 1886.



CITY OF LONDON.

Church of England —

St. Botolph, Aldgate

St. Botolph, Bishopsgate Without (Rev. IV. Rogers)
St. Bartholomew, Moor-lane {Rev. W. Dcnion) .
St. Botolph, Aldersgate {Rev. S. F. Jo?ies) .
St. Giles, Cripplegate Without (Rev. P. P. Gilbert)
St. Thomas, Charterhouse, Goswell-road

{Rev. H. Swaiin.)
St. Bartholomew-the-Great, West Smithfield
{Rev. W. Pankridge.)
St. Sepulchre, Holborn Viaduct {Rev. J. Jackson)
Holy Trinity, Gough-square {Rev. W. C. Heatoii)
St. Andrew, Holborn Viaduct {Rev. H. G. S. Bhint)
St. Dunstan-in-the-West, Fleet-street {Rev. W. Martin)
Temple Church {Rev. Dr. Vaiighan) .
All Hallows, Lombard-street {Rev. C. Mackenzie)
All Hallows, Barking {Rev. A. J. Mason)
All Hallows-the-Great and Less {Rev. J. R. Stock)
Christ Church, Newgate-street ....

{Rev T. D. Cox Moise.)
St. Alban, Wood-street, Cheapside {Rev. W. A. Carter)
St. Alphage, London-wall {Rev. R. IW Bush)
St. Andrew-by-ye-Wardrobe . . . . .

{Rev. Peixival Clement Si?iitli.)
SS. Ann and Agnes {Rev. J. IV. Reynolds) . .
SS. Augustine and Faith, Old Change . .
{Rev. IV. H. Mihian.)



M.


E.


531


201


266


324


100


. 84


134


• 115


4&8


. 251


441


621


67


105


162


. 279


140


160


452


480


189


246


676


*ay]\


67


46


134


140


59


48


851


69


105


31


11


68


140


*iyi


42


22


32


35



THE RELIGIOUS CENSUS OF LONDON.



Church of England {co?iii7tued) — M.

SS. Benet and Peter, St. Paul's Wharf .... 36

{Rev. H. C. SJuittleworth:)
St. Catherine Coleman, Fenchurch.street ... 84

{Rt Rev. T. E. Wilkinson?^
St. Clement, Eastcheap (^^z/. ^K/. //rt//) ... 98
St. Dunstan-in-the-East {Rev. J. L. Ross) ... 37
St. George, Botolph-lane {Rev. M. McColl). . . *ioi
St. Edmund, King and Martyr, Lombard-street . .129

{Rev. W. Beiiham?)
St. James, Garlickhithe, Garlick-hill {Rev. G. L. Gibbs) 85
St. Lawrence Jewry, 34, Gresham-street ... 97

{Rev. M. IValroiid.)
St. Magnus the Martyr {Rev. A. I. McCatil) . . 70

St. Martin, Ludgate-hill {Rev. Dr. J. T. White) . . 20
St. Mary Aldermary, Bow-lane {Rev. Dr. L. B. White) 99
St. Mary-at-Hill {Rev. A. Trower) .... 47
St. Mary-le-Bow, Cheapside {Rev. M. H. Vine) . . 30
St. Mary Magdalene, Knightrider-street . . .52

{RezK E. Hoskitis.)
St. Michael, Cornhill {Rev. W. Hunt) . . . .283
St. Michael Bassishaw, Basinghall-street ... 30

{Rev. J. B. McCmd)
St. Michael, Wood-street, Cheapside {Rev. H. Hirscli) 37
St. Mildred, Bread-street {Rev. C. Engstrovi) . . 27
St. Nicholas, Cole Abbey {Rev. H. C. Shnttleworth) . 124
St. Olave, Hart-street {Rev. A. Povah) . . .119

St. Olave, Old Jewry {Rev. P. Dowe) .... 14
St. Paul's Cathedral {Rev. Robert Gregory') . . . 1662
St. Peter, Cornhill {Rev. R. Whittingto7i) ... 98
St. Swithin, London-stone, Cannon-street ... 20

{Rev. E. Alfree.)
St. Vedast, Foster-lane {Rev. Dr. W. S. Si7ftpsoji) . 1 50
All Hallows, London-wall (Rev. C. Lucy') ... 47
St. Andrew Undershaft, Leadenhall-street . . .111

{Bishop How.)
St. Ethelburga, Bishopsgate-street . . . . *iii

{Rev. J. M Rodwell.)
St. Helen, Bishopsgate (i?^7Ay. B. Deane) ... 40
St. Katherine Cree, Leadenhall-street . . . . iiS

{Rev. Dr. Whitteniore.)
St. Margaret, Lothbury (AVt/. A.J. Ingrajn) . • *I30

St. Peter-le-Poer, Old Broad-street .... 60

{Rev. J. H. Coward.)

St. Stephen, Coleman-street (y?^z/y. ^^. Prrt//) . . 146 . 114

N.B. — Six important City Churches were closed on Census Sunday, so were

not taken; they were — St. Bride'?, Fleet-street; The Rolls Chapel;

St. Margaret Patens; St. Mary Woolnoth ; St. Michael, Paternoster

Royal ; and St. Stephen's, Walbrook.



CITY OF LONDON.



M.


E.


*25I

1325
84


' 324
. 2415

• 274


72
146


. 67
. 130


*3o8
210


. 418
. 220



Congregational—

Bishopsgate Chapel (/^ev. T. Grear)

City Temple, Holborn Viaduct {Rev. Dr./. Parker)

Ebenezer (Welsh) Church, Bartlett's-passage

{Rev. O. Evans.)
Fetter Lane Chapel ( Vacant) ....
Cannon-street Hotel (Weigh House Church)
{Rev. A. Sanderson.)
Silver-street, Falcon-square {Rev. A. H. Storrow)
Finsbury Chapel {Rev. T. Ketich) ....

Independent-
Haberdashers' Hall, Staining-lane ( F^;76'/^j'j . . 22 . 12

Baptist —

Finsbury, Eldon-street {Rev. W. Rees) . . . 23 . 88

Calvinistic Methodist-
New Jevvin Chapel, Fann-street ....

Moravian-
Moravian Chapel, Fettev-lane {Rev. J. A. Porter).

Friends-
Devonshire House, 12, Bishopsgate-street

French Protestant-
French Protestant Church {Rev. G. G. Daugai's) .

Dutch Roman Catholic—

Dutch Church, Austin Friars {Rev. A. D. Scheltama)

Roman Catholic —

St. Mary, Moorfields (Rev. Thomas F. N'orris) .
St. Etheldreda, Ely-place {Rev. Williajji Lockhart)
St. Peter (Italian Church) Hatton-wall

{Rev. Joseph Peter Bannin.)

Jews —

Synagogue, St. James-place, Aldgate .... 650 . 550

{Rev. Dr. Hermann Adler.)
German Synagogue, New Broad Street ( Vaca?it) . .150. 70
Hambro' Synagogue, Church Row, Fenchurch-street . 90 . 90

{Rev. Samuel Marcus Gollanez.)
New Synagogue, Great St. Helen's {Rev. Isaac Cohen) 294 . 387
Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue, St. Mary Axe . 165 . 252

{Rev. David Peza.)

Hospitals —

St. Bartholomew-the-Less {Rev. W. Ostle) . . . 175 . 107

Undenominational —

Finsbury Chapel, South-place {Dr. Andrezu WL'son) . 350 . —



116


. 601


41


. 19


41


. 46


67


73


65





310 .

226
620


340
120

697



THE RELIGIOUS CENSUS OF LONDON.



ST. GILES-IN-THE-FIELDS.

Church of England —

Christ Church, Wobiirn-sqiiare {Rev. J. J. G. Nash)
St. George, Hart-street (Rev. F. F. Goe)
Christ Church, Endell-street (Rev. S. A. Griffiihs)
Holy Trinity, Little Queen-street {Rev. N. Broinley')
Seven Dials, Short's-gardens {Rev F. S. Swindell)
St. Giles-in-the-Fields {Rev. J. M. Nisbet) .
West-street Episcopal Chapel {A Lay Missionajy)

Prench Protestant —

St. John, Bloomsbury-street {Rev. A. A. Diiponf)

Baptist—

Bloomsbury Chapel {Re7>. J. Balllie) .
Keppel Street Chapel {Rev. IV. J. Styles) .
Kingsgate Street Chapel {Vacanl)
Little Wild Street Chapel (Rev. G. E. Hatton) .

Wesleyan —

Great Queen Street Chapel {Rev. Ja77ies F. Pyle)

Swiss—

Eglise Suisse, Endell-street {Rev. JV. Pelavel)

Eoman Catholic —

Sardinia-street, Lincoln's Inn Fields

{Re7/. George S. Delaney.)



M.


E.


. *387


652


• 477


531


• 113


82


. 187


219


. 48


III


. 269


362


. 82


70



. 83

686

. 86

. 86

• 153

. 418

. 120

. 164



41

645

134

370

504

35
319



^WESTMINSTER.

Church of England —

St. James, Piccadilly {Rev. J. E. Kempe)
St. John the Baptist, Gt. Marlboro'-street .

{Rev. H. M. UAhiiaine.)
St. Luke, Berwick-street. Soho {Rev. A. IV. Oxford)
St. Peter, Great Windmill-street {Rev. H. Jojtes)
St. Philip, Regent-street {Rez'. H. Jones)
St. Thomas, King-street, Regent-street .

Rev. P. T. Bainbrigge.)
House of Charity, Greek- street {Rev. J. J. Elkmgto?i)
St. Anne, Wardour-street {Re7>. lY. Wade) .
St. Mary. Crown-street {Re7>. R. Gwynne) .



444
68

420

133
61;



51
3S6

247



Congregational-
Craven Chapel, Marshall-street, Golden-square ( Vacant) 326
Wardour Chapel, Little Chapel-street {Various) . . 63

Baptist —

Meard-street, Wardour-street {Various) . . . 236



98

413
1 8a
121

50a

33
463
65a



27a
81



316



MARYLEBONE.



Wesleyan — M.

Welsh Church, Poland-street ( Various) • • • 33

Welsh Calvinistic Methodist-
Nassau Street Chapel i8o

Eoman Catholic —

Church of the Assumption, Warwick-street .

{Ho7i. and Rev. Dr. Ca/wn Talbot. )
Notre Dame de France, 5, Leicester-place

{Rev. Leo Thomas?)
St, Patrick, Sutton-street, Soho-square

{Rev. Langton Geo. Ve?r.)

Jews —

Western Synagogue, St, Alban's-place . . . . 88
{Rev. Hermann Davids.)

Workhouse Chapel-
Westminster Workhouse Chapel, Poland-street . .160

{Rev. S. H. Hayes.)



E.

60

260



120


. 458


280


• 360


732


. 1092



rt:9



180



MARYLEBONE.

Church of England —

All Saints, Margaret-street, Cavendish-square
{Rev. W. A. M'hitworth.)
All Souls, Langham-place {Rev. S. Douglas)
St. Andrew, Wells-street, Oxford-street

{Rev. J}\ T. Hai'ldsworl/i.)
St, Mark, Charlotte-street {Rev. R. Diickwoi'tli) .
St. Paul, Great Portland-street {Rev. C. G. Williamsoii)
St. James, Westmoreland-street {Rev. H. R. Haweis) .
St. Peter, Vere-street {Rev. IV. P. Roberts) .
Trinity Chapel, Devonshire-mews West

{Rev. W. Cadma?i.)
Marylebone Chapel, 63, High-street ....
{Rev. E. G. Thomas.)

Portman Chapel, Baker-street

{Rev. H N. Sherbrooke.)
St. Marylebone, Marylebone-road {Rev. W. Barker) .

,, ,, Mission Church, Paddington-street

St. Thomas, Orchard-stree!, Portman-square

{Rev. H. Geary.)
Brunswick Chapel, Upper Berkeley-street .
{Rev. E. IV. Moore.)
Quebec Chapel, 17, Old Ouebec-street {Rev. E. Bottley)
St. Luke, Nutford-place jRev. B. H Alford)
St. Mark, Marylebone-road {Rev. G. C. Bellowes).
St. Mary, Wyndham-place {Hon. and Rev. J. Leigh) .



417



513



76S
808


• 931
. 1215


122


. 214


362
540

755


. 315

. 467
. 587


No


service.


168


. rtio5


1375


. 1181


1292
71


. 1355
. 165


371


• 302


296


. 321


*637
342


. 464
. 406


200


. 140


296


• 351



THE RELIGIOUS CENSUS OF LONDON.



M.


E.


496


- 309


450
164


. 1048
. 280


130
225


. lOI

. 278


1057
549


. 674
. 360


228


. 39


1 106


. 1260


67


52


381


. 214



*->



299



316



Church of England {co7iti?iued) —

Christchiirch, Stafford-street, Lisson-grove .

{Rev. J. L. Davies.)
Holy Trinity, Marylebone-road {Rev. IV. Cadmaii)
St. Barnabas, Bell-street, Edgvvare-road

{Rev. J. Hvtclic7is.')
St. Cyprian, Dorset-square {Rev. C. Gutcli) .
St. Paul, Grove-street, Lisson-grove

{Rev. E. A. AIidwi?iter.)
All Saints, Finchley-road {Rev. H. S. Eyre) .
Emmanuel Church, Aberdeen-place, Maida-hill

{Rev. J. G. Tanner.)
St. John's Chapel, St. John's Wood-road

{Rev. H. M. Sa}idha7?t.)
St. Mark, Upper Hamilton-terrace

{Rev. Dr. R. Dnckworth.')
St. Matthew, Carlisle-street, Portman-market

{Rev. R. F. Spe?icer.)
St. Stephen, Avenue-road, Regent's-park

{Rev. E. H. A'elson.)

Congregational—

Paddington Chapel, Marylebone-road . . .

{Rev. G. D. xMacgregor.)
Shouldham-st., Bryanston-square {Rev.J.B. Warreii) .
Trinity Chapel, John-street, Edgware-road .


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Online LibraryAlfred Firmin LoisyThe religious census of London → online text (page 1 of 10)