Alfred Tennyson Tennyson.

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BALLADS



AND OTHER POEMS



BY



ALFRED TENNYSON



LONDON
C. KEGAN PAUL & CO., i PATERNOSTER SQUARE

1880



(The rights of translation and of reproduction are reserved)



TO

ALFEED TENNYSON

MY GRANDSON



Golden-hair'd Ally whose name is one with mine,

Crazy with laughter and babble and earth's new wine,

Now that the flower of a year and a half is thine,

O little blossom, O mine, and mine of mine,

Glorious poet who never hast written a line,

Laugh, for the name at the head of my verse is thine.

May'st thou never be wrong'd by the name that is mine !



CONTENTS.



•o<



BALLADS AND OTHER POEMS.

PAGE

The First Quarrel 1

Kizpah 13

The Northern Cobbler 25

The Revenge : a Ballad, op the Fleet . . 40

The Sisters 53

The "Tillage Wife ; or, The Entail . . . . 71
In the Children's Hospital . * . . . .87
Dedicatory Poem to the Princess Alice . . 97

The Defence of Lucknow 99

Sir John Oldcastle, Lord Cobham . . .112

Columbus . . 125

The Voyage of Maeldune 110



VI CONTENTS.

Page
De Profundis:

The Two Greetings 156

The Human Cry . . . . ... 161



SONNETS.

Prefatory Sonnet to the 'Nineteenth Century ' 162

To the Rev. W. H. Brookfield 163

Montenegro 164

To Victor Hugo 165

TRANSLATIONS, ETC..

Battle of Brunanburh » . 169

Achilles over the Trench . » . . . . 179

To the Princess Frederica of Hanover on her

Marriage ......».♦ 182

Sir John Franklin 183

To Dante 184



THE FIRST QUARREL.
(In the Isle of Wight.)

i.
1 Wait a little/ you say, ' you are sure it 11 all come

right,'
But the boy was bom i' trouble, an' looks so wan an*

so white :
Wait ! an' once I ha* waited — I hadn't to wait for long.
Now I wait, wait, wait for Harry. — No, no, you are

doing me wrong !
Harry and I were married : the boy can hold up his

head,
The boy was bom in wedlock, but after my man was

dead ;

<~4y n



'1 THE FIRST QUARREL.

I ha' work'd for him fifteen years, an' I work an' I

wait to the end.
I am all alone in the world, an' you are my only friend.



II.

Doctor, if you can wait, I'll tell you the tale o' my

life.
"When Harry an' I were children, he call'd me his own

little wife ;
I was happy when I was with him, an' sorry when he

was away,
An' when we play'd together, I loved him better than

He workt me the daisy chain — he made me the cows-
lip ball,

He fought the boys that were rude an' I loved him
better than all.



THE FIRST QUARREL. 3

Passionate girl tho' I was, an' often at home in dis-



grace,



I never could quarrel with Harry — I had but to look
in his face.

in.

There was a farmer in Dorset of Harry's kin, that

had need
Of a good stout lad at his farm ; he sent, an' the

father agreed ;
So Harry was bound to the Dorsetshire farm for years

an' for years ;
I walked with him down to the quay, poor lad, an'

we parted in tears.
The boat was beginning to move, we heard them

a-ringing the bell,
< I'll never love any but you, God bless you, my own

little Nell.'

b 2



4 THE FIRST QUARREL.

IV.

I was a child, an' be was a child, an' he came to harm ;
There was a girl, a hussy, that workt with him up at

the farm,
One had deceived her an' left her alone with her sin

an' her shame,
And so she was wicked with Harry ; the girl was

the most to blame.

v.

And years w T ent over till I that was little had grown

so tall,
The men would say of the maids ' Our Nelly's the

flower of 'em all.'
I didn't take heed o' them, but I taught myself all I

could
To make a good wife for Harry, when Harry came

home for good.



THE FIRST QUARREL. 5

VI.

Often I seem'd unhappy, and often as happy too,
For I heard it abroad in the fields 6 I'll never love any
but you ; '

* I'll never love any but you ' the morning song of the

lark,

* I'll never love any but you ' the nightingale's hymn

in the dark.

VII.

And Harry came home at last, but he look'd at me

sidelong and shy,
Yext me a bit, till he told me that so many years had

gone by,
I had grown so handsome and tall — that I might ha'

forgot him somehow — >
For he thought — there were other lads — he wasfear'd

to look at me now.



6 THE FIRST QUARREL.

VIII.

Hard was the frost in the field, we were married o'

Christmas day,
Married among the red berries, an' all as merry as

May —
Those were the pleasant times, my house an' my man

were my pride,
We seem'd like ships i' the Channel a-sailing with

wind an' tide.

IX.

But work was scant in the Isle, tho' he tried the

villages round,
So Harry went over the Solent to see if work could be

found ;
An' he wrote ' I ha' six weeks' work, little wife, so

far as I know ;
I'll come for an hour to-morrow, an' kiss you before I



go-'



THE FIRST QUARREL. 7

X.

So I set to righting the house, for wasn't he coming

that day %
An' I hit on an old deal-box that was push'd in a

corner away,
It was full of old odds an' ends, an' a letter along wi'

the rest,
I had better ha 7 put my naked hand in a hornets' nest.



XI.

' Sweetheart ' — this was the letter — this was the letter

I read —
c You promised to find me work near you, an' I wish

I was dead —
Didn't you kiss me an' promise 1 you haven't done it,

my lad,
An' I almost died o' your going away, an' I wish that

I had.'



8 THE FI&bT QUARKEL.

XII.

I too wish that I had — in the pleasant times that had

past,
Before I quarrell'd with Harry — my quarrel — the first

an* the last.



XIII.

For Harry came in, an' I flung him the letter that

drove me wild,
An' he told it me all at once, as simple as any child,
What can it matter, my lass, what I did wi* my

single life ]
I ha' been as true to you as ever a man to his wife ;
An* she wasn't one o' the worst.' ' Then/ I said, ' I'm

none o' the best.'
An' he smiled at me, ' Ain't you, my love 1 Come,

come, little wife, let it rest !



THE FIRST QUARREL.

The man isn't like the woman, no need to make such

a stir.'
But he anger'd me all the more, an' I said ' You were

* keeping with her,
When I was a-loving you all along an* the same as

before.'
An' he didn't speak for a while, an' he anger'd me

more and more.
Then he patted my hand in his gentle way, * Let by-
gones be ! '
' Bygones ! you kept yours hush'd,' I said, ' when you

married me !
By-gones ma' be come-agains ; an' she — in her shame

an' her sin —
You'll have her to nurse my child, if I die o' my lying

in!
You'll make her its second mother ! I hate her — an'

I hate you ! '



10 THE FIRST QUARREL.

Ah, Harry, my man, you had better ha' beaten me

black an' blue
Than ha' spoken as kind as you did, when I were so

crazy wi' spite, •
1 Wait a little, my lass, I am sure it 'ill all come right.

XIV.
An' he took three turns in the rain, an' I watch'd him,

an' when he came in
I felt that my heart was hard, he was all wet thro' to

the skin,
An' I never said ' off wi' the wet,' I never said * on

wi' the dry,'
So I knew my heart was hard, when he came to bid

me goodbye.
1 You said that you hated me, Ellen, but that isn't

true, you know ;
I am going to leave you a bit — you'll kiss me before

igor



THE FIRST QUARREL. 11

XV.

c Going ! you're going to her — kiss her — if you will/

I said, —
I was near my time wi' the boy, I must ha' been light

i' my head —
' I had sooner be cursed than kiss'd ! ' — I didn't know

well what I meant,
But I turn'd my face from him, an' he turn'd his face

an' he went.

XVI.

And then he sent me a letter, ' I've gotten my work

to do;
You wouldn't kiss me, my lass, an' I never loved any

but you ;
I am sorry »f or all the quarrel an* sorry for what she

wrote,
I ha' six weeks' work in Jersey an' go to-night by

the boat/



1 2 THE FIRST QUARREL.

XVII.

An' the wind began to rise, an' I thought of him out

at sea,
An' I felt I had been to blame ; he was always kind

to me.
Wait a little, my lass, I am sure it 'ill all come

right '—
An' the boat went down that night — the boat went



down that night.



R1ZPAIL



17—.



I.
Wailing, wailing, wailing, the wind over land and

sea —
And "Willy's voice in the wind, ' mother, come out

to me.'
Why should he call me to-night, when he knows that

I cannot go ?
For the downs are as bright as day, and the full moon

stares at the snow.



14 RIZPAH.

II.

We should be seen, my dear ; they would spy us out

of the town.
The loud black nights for us, and the storm rushing

over the down,
When I cannot see my own hand, but am led by the

creak of the chain,
And grovel and grope for my son till I find myself

drenched with the rain.

in.
Anything fallen again 1 nay — what was there left to

fall?
I have taken them home, I have number'd the bones,

I have hidden them all.
What am I saying 1 and what are you 1 do you come

as a spy ?
Falls 1 what falls ? who knows ? As the tree falls so

must it lie.



HIZPAH. 15



IV.



Who let her in 1 how long has she been 1 you — what

have you heard 1
"Why did you sit so quiet 1 you never have spoken a

word.
— to pray with me — yes — a lady — none of their

spies —
But the night has crept into my heart, and begun to

darken my eyes.

v.

Ah — you, that have lived so soft, what should you

know of the night,
The blast and the burning shame and the bitter frost

and the fright % .
I have done it, while you were asleep— you were only

made for the day.
I have gather'd my baby together— and now you may

go your way.



16 BIZPAII.



VI.

Nay — for it's kind of you, Madam, to sit by an old

dying wife.
But say nothing hard of my boy, I have only an hour

of life.
I kiss'd my boy in the prison, before he went out to

die.
' They dared me to do it/ he said, and he never has

told me a lie.
I whipt him for robbing an orchard once when he was

but a child —
' The farmer dared me to do it/ he said ; he was

always so wild —
And idle — and couldn't be idle — my Willy — he never

could rest.
The King should have made him a soldier, he would

have been one of his best.



EIZPAH.



VII.

But lie lived with a lot of wild mates, and they never

would let him be good ;
They swore that he dare not rob the mail, and he

swore that he would ;
And he took no life, but he took one purse, and when

all was done
He flung it among his fellows — I'M none of it, said

my son.



VIII.



I came into court to the Judge and the lawyers. I

told them my tale,
God's own truth — but they kill'd him, they kill'd him



for robbing the mail.



18 RIZFAH.

They hang'd liim in chains for a show — we had always

borne a good name —
To be hang'd for a thief — and then put away — isn't

that enough shame 1
Dust to dust — low down — let us hide ! but they set

him so high
That all the ships of the world could stare at him,

passing by.
God 'ill pardon the hell-black raven and horrible fowls

of the air,
But not the black heart of the lawyer who kill'd him

and hang'd him there.

IX.

And the jailer forced me away. I had bid him my

last goodbye ;
They had fasten'd the door of his cell. ' mother ! '

I heard him cry.



KIZPAH. 19

I couldn't get back tho' I tried, lie had something

further to say,
And now I never shall know it. The jailer forced me

away.

x.

Then since I couldn't but hear that cry of my boy

that was dead,
They seized me and shut me up : they fasten'd me

down on my bed.
' Mother, O mother ! ' — he call'd in the dark to me

year after year —
They beat me for that, they beat me — you know that

I couldn't but hear ;
And then at the last they found I had grown so stupid

and still
They let me abroad again — but the creatures had

worked their will.

c 2



20 RIZPAH.

xr.
Flesh of my flesh was gone, but bone of my bone was

left—
I stole them all from the lawyers — and you, will you

call it a theft ?—
My baby, the bones that had suck'd me, the bones

that had laughed and had ciied- —
Theirs ! Ono! they are mine — not theirs — they had

moved in my side.

XII.

Do you think I was scared by the bones ? I kiss'd

'em, I buried 'em all — -
I can't dig deep, I am old — in the night by the

churchyard wall.
My Willy 'ill rise up whole when the trumpet of

judgment 'ill sound,
But I charge you never to say that I laid him in holy

ground.



RIZPAH.



21



XIII.

They would scratch him up — they would hang him

again on the cursed tree.
Sin ? yes — we are sinners, I know — let all that be,
And read me a Bible verse of the Lord's good will

toward men —
i Full of compassion and mercy, the Lord ' — let me

hear it again ;
* Full of compassion and mercy — long-suffering. ' Yes,

O yes !
For the lawyer is bom but to murder — the Saviour

lives but to bless.
7/e'll never put on the black cap except for the worst

of the worst,
And the first may be last — I have heard it in church

— and the last may be first.



22 EizrAH.

Suffering — long-suffering — yes, as tlie Lord must

know,
Year after year in the mist and the wind and the

shower and the snow.

XIV.

Heard, have you 1 what % they have told you he never

repented his sin.
How do they know it 1 are they his mother 1 are you

of his kin 1
Heard ! have you ever heard, when the storm on the

downs began,
The wind that 'ill wail like a child and the sea that

'ill moan like a man %

xv.

Election, Election and Reprobation — it's all very well.
But I go to-night to my boy, and I shall not find him
in Hell.



EIZPAII. 23

For I cared so much for my boy that the Lord has

look'cl into my care,
And He means me I'm sure to be happy with Willy,

I know not where.

XVI.

And if lie be lost — but to save my soul, that is all

your desire :
Do you think that I care for my soul if my boy be

gone to the fire 1
I have been with God in the dark — go, go, you may

leave me alone —
You never have borne a child — you are just as hard

as a stone.

XVII.
Madam, I beg your pardon ! I think that you mean

to be kind,
But I cannot hear what you say for my Willy's voice

in the wind —



24 RIZPAH.

The snow and the sky so bright — he used but to call

in the dark,
And he calls to me now from the church and not

from the gibbet — for hark !
Nay — you can hear it yourself — it is coming — shaking

the walls —
Willy — the moon's in a cloud Good night. I am

going. He calls.



25



THE NORTHERN COBBLER.

i.

Waait till our Sally cooms in, fur thou mun a' sights 1

to tell.
Eh, but I be maain glad to seeii tha sa 'arty an' well.
' Cast awaay on a disolut land wi' a vartical soon - 2 ! ?
Strange fur to 2:0a fur to think what saailors a* seean

an' a* doon ;
* Summat to drink — sa* 'ot ? ' I 'a nowt but Adam's

wine :
What's the 'eat o'this little 'ill-side to the 'eat o' the line?



1 The vowels a'i, pronounced separately though in the
closest conjunction, best render the sound of the long i and y
in this dialect. But since such words as crdiln\ dann\ iv7iai,
a? (I), &c., look awkward except in a page of express phonetics,
I have thought it better to leave the simple i and y> and to
trust that my readers will give them the broader pronuncia-
tion.

2 The 00 short, as in ' wood.'



2G THE NORTHERN COBBLER.

II.

' What's i' tha bottle a-staimiiig theer 1 ' I'll tell tlia.

Gin.
But if thou wants thy grog, tha mun go'a fur it down

to the inn.
JSTaay — fur I be maain-glad, but thaw tha was iver sa

dry,

Thou gits naw gin fro* the bottle theer, an' I'll tell
tha wny.

in.

Mea an' thy sister was married, when wur it 1 back-
end o' June,

Ten year sin', and wa 'greed as well as a fiddle i' tune :

I could fettle and clump owd booots and shoes wi' the
best on 'em all,

As fer as fro' Thursby thurn hup to Harmsby and
Hntterby Hall.



THE NORTHERN COBBLER. 27

We was busy as beeas i' the bloom an' as 'appy as

'art could think,
An' then the babby wur burn, and then I taiikes to

the drink.

IV.

An' I weant gaiiinsaay it, my lad, thaw I be hafe

sha'amed on it now,
We could sing a good song at the Plow, we could

sing a good song at the Plow ;
Thaw once of a frosty night I slither'd an' hurted my

huck, 1
An' I coom'd neck-an-crop soomtimes slaape down T

the squad an' the muck :
An' once I fowt wi' the Taailor — not hafe ov a man,

my lad —
Fur he scrawm'd an' scratted my faace like a cat, an'

it maade 'er sa mad

1 Hip.



28 THE NORTHERN COBBLER.

That Sally she turn'd a tongue-banger, 1 an' raated ma,

' Sot tin' thy braains
Guzzlin' an' soakin' an* smoakin' an' hawmin' 2 about

i' the laanes,
Soli sow-droonk that tha doesn not touch thy 'at to

the Squire ; '
An' I loook'd cock-eyed at my noase an' I seead 'im a-

gittin' o' fire;
But sin' I wur hallus i' liquor an' hallus as droonk as

a king,
Foalks' coastom flitted awaay like a kite wi' a brokken

string.

V.

An' Sally she wesh'd foalks' cloaths to keep the wolf

fro' the door,
Eh but the moor she riled me, she druv me to drink

the moor,



1 Scold. 2 Lounging.



THE NORTHERN COBBLER. 29

Fur I fan', when 'er back wur turn'd, wheer Sally's

owd stockin' wur 'id,
An' I grabb'd the munny she ma'ade, and I weiir'd it

o' liquor, I did.



VI.



An' one night I cooms 'o'ani like a bull gotten loose at



a iaax*



An' she wur a-waaitin' fo'mma, an' cry in* and tearin'



'er 'aair,



An' I tummled athurt the craadle an' sweiir'd as I'd

break ivry stick
0' furnitur 'ere i' the 'ouse, an' I gied our Sally a kick,
An' I mash'd the taiibles an' chairs, an' she an' the

babby beal'd, 1
Fur T knaw'd naw moor what I did nor a mortal

beast o' the feald.



Bellowed, cried out.



30 THE NORTHERN COBBLER.

VII.

An' when I wa'aked i' the murnin' I seead that our

Sally went la'amed
Cos' o' the kick as I gied er, an' I wur dreadful

asha'amed ;
An' Sally wur sloomy ! an* draggle-taail'd in an owd

turn gown,
An' the babby's fa'ace wurn't wesh'd an' the 'ole 'ouse

hupside down.

VIII.

An' then I minded our Sally sa pratty an* neat an

sweeat,
Stra'at as a pole an' clean as a flower fro' Vad to feeat :
An' then I minded the fust kiss I gied 'er by Thursby

thurn ;
Theer wur a lark a-singm* 'is best of a Sunday at

murn,



1 Sluggish, out of spirits.



THE NORTHERN COBBLER. 31

Couldn't see 'im, we 'e'ard im a-mountin' oop 'igher

an' 'igher,
An' then 'e turn'd to the sun, an' 'e shined like a

sparkle o' fire.
' Doesn't tha see 'im/ she axes, ' fur I can see 'im 1 '

an I
See'ad nobbut the smile o' the sun as danced in 'er

pratty blue eye ;
An' I says ' I mun gie tha a kiss/ an' Sally says

1 Noa, thou moant/
But I gied 'er a kiss, an' then anoother, an' Sally says

' cloiint ! '



IX.

An' when we coom'd into Meeatin', at fust she wur

all in a tew,
But, arter, we sing'd the 'ynm togither like birds on a

beugh;



32 THE NORTHERN COBBLER.

An' Muggins 'e pre'ach'd o' Hell-fire an' tbe loov o'

God fur men,
An' then upo' coornin' awaay Sally gied me a kiss ov

'ersen.

x.

Ileer wur a fall fro' a kiss to a kick like Saatan as fell
Down out o' heaven i' Hell-fire — thaw theer's naw

drinkin' i' Hell ;
Me'a fur to kick our Sally as kep the wolf fro' the

door,
All along o' the drink, fur I loov'd 'er as well as afoor.



XI.

Sa like a graat num-cumpus I blubber'd awaay o' the

bed —
1 Weant niver do it naw moor 3 ' an* Sally loookt up an'

she said,



THE NORTHERN COBBLER. 33

1 I'll upowd it l tha weiint ; thou'rt laike the rest o' the

men,
Thou'll go'a sniffin' about the tap till tha does it agean.
Theer's thy hennemy, man, an 1 I knaws, as knaws tha

sa well,
That, if tha seeiis 'im an' smells 'im tha'll foller 'im

slick into Hell.'

XII.

' Xa'ay,' says I, ' fur I weiint go'a sniffin' about the

tap.'
' Weant tha 2 ' she says, an' mysen I thowt i' mysen

1 mayhap/
1 Noa : ' an' I started awa'ay like a shot, an' down to

the Hinn,
An' I browt what tha seeiis stannin' theer, yon big

black bottle o' gin.



1 Til uphold it.

D



34 THE NORTHERN COBBLER.

XIII.

' That caps owt,' 1 says Sally, an* saw she begins to cry,
But I puts it inter 'er 'ancls an' I says to 'er, * Sally/

says I,
* Stan' 'im theer i' the naame o' the Lord an' the

power ov 'is Gra'ace,
Stan' 'im theer, fur I'll loook my hennemy strait i' the

la ace,
Stan' 'im theer i' the winder, an' let ma locok at 'im

then,
E' seelims naw moor nor watter, an' 'e's the Divil's

oan sen.'

■■• )

XIV.

An' I wur down i' tha mouth, couldn't do naw work

an' all,
]STasty an' snaggy an' shaliky, an' poonch'd my 'and wi'

the hawl,



1 That's beyond everything.



THE NORTHERN COBBLER. 35

But she wur a power o' coomfut, an' sattled 'ersen o*

my knee,
An' coiixd an' coodled me oop till agean I feel'd mysen

free.

xv.
An' Sally she tell'd it about, an' fo'alk stood a-gawmin' l

in,

i

As thaw it wur summat bewitch 'd istead of a quart o'

gin;
An' some on 'em said it wur watter— an' I wur

chousin' the wife,
Fur I couldn't 'owd 'ands off gin, wur it nobbut to

saave my life ;
An' blacksmith 'e strips me the thick ov 'is airm, an'

'e shaws it to me,

6 Feeal thou this ! thou can't graw this upo' watter ! '
says he.



1 Staring vacantly.
d 2



36 THE NORTHERN COBBLER.

An' Doctor 'e calls o' Sunday an' just as candles was

lit,
6 Thou moant do it/ he says, ' tha mun break 'im off

bit by bit/
1 Thou'rt but a Methody-man,' says Parson, and laays

down 'is 'at,
An' 'e points to the bottle o' gin, ' but I respecks tha

fur that ; '
An' Squire, his oan very ssn, walks down fro' the 'All

to see,
An' 'e spanks 'is 'and into mine, ' fur I respecks tha,'

says 'e ;
An' coostom age'an draw'd in like a wind fro' far an'

wide,
And browt me the bocots to be cobbled fro' hafe the

coontryside.



THE NORTHERN COBBLER. 37



XVI

An' theer 'e stans an' theer 'e shall stan to my dying

da'ay ;
I 'a gotten to loov 'im ageiin in anoother kind of a

waay,
Proud on 'im, like, my lad, an' I keeaps 'im clean an*

bright,
Loovs 'im, an' roobs 'im, an' doosts 'im, an* puts 'im

back i' the light.

XVII.

Wouldn't a pint a' sarved as well as a quart Kaw

doubt :
But I liked a bigger feller to fight wi' an' fowt it out.
Fine an' meller 'e mun be by this, if I cared to taaste,
But I moiint, my lad, and I weant, fur I'd fe'al mysen

clean disgraaced.



38 THE NORTHERN COBBLER.

XVIII.

An' once I said to the Missis, ' My lass, when I cooms

to die,
Smash the bottle to smithers, the Divil's in 'im,'

said I.
But arter I chaanged my mind, an' if Sally be left

aloan,

I'll hev 'im a-buried wi'mma an' taake 'im afoor the
Thro'an.

XIX.

Coom thou 'eer — yon laady a-steppin' along the

stree'at,
Doesn't tha knaw 'er — sa pratty, an' feat, an' neat,

an' sweeat 1
Look at the cloiiths on 'er back, thebbe ammost

spick-span-new,
An' Tommy's fa'ace is as fresh as a codlin 'at's wesh'd

i' the dew.



THE NORTHERN COBBLER. 39



XX.



'Ere's our Sally an' Tommy, an' we be a-goin to dine,
Bali con an' taates, an' a beslings-puddin' l an' Adam's



wine :



But if tha wants ony grog tha mun goii fur it down

to the Hinn,
Fur I weant shed a drop on 'is blood, noa, not fur

Sally's o'an kin.



1 A pudding made with the first milk of the cow after
calving.



40



THE REVENGE.
A Ballad of the Fleet.

I.

At Flores in the Azores Sir Richard Grenville lay,

And a pinnace, like a flutter'd bird, came flying from
far away :

* Spanish ships of war at sea ! we have sighted fifty-
three ! '

Then sware Lord Thomas Howard : ' 'Fore God I am
no coward ;

But I cannot meet them here, for my ships are out of
gear,



THE REVENGE. 41

And the half my men are sick. I must fly, but follow
quick.

"We are six ships of the line ; can we fight with fifty-
three V

ii.

Then spake Sir Richard Grenville : ' I know you are

no coward ;
You fly them for a moment to fight with them again.
But I've ninety men and more that are lying sick

ashore.
I should count myself the coward if I left them, my

Lord Howard,
To these Inquisition dogs and the devildoms of Spain.'

- in.
So Lord Howard past away with five ships of war

that day,
Till he melted like a cloud in the silent summer

heaven;



42 THE REVENGE.

But Sir Richard bore in hand all his sick men from

the land
Very carefully and slow,
Men of Bideford in Devon,
And we laid them on the ballast down below ;
For we brought them all aboard,


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