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important measure was that providing lor
civil government in the Philippine islands.
What was known as the Lodge bill was
passed by the senate June 3 after a long
and at times acrimonious debate by a vo: e
of 48 to 30. The house passed a- substitute
bill June 26 by a vote of 147 to 97, all the
negative votes being democratic except that
of Mr. Mi-Call of Massachusetts. As agreed
upon in conference and finally passed by
both houses the law provides that the
islands shall continue to be governed by the
Philippine commission in accordance with
the instructions of the president given April
7, 1900, the executive order dated June 21,
1901, and the requirements of this act. All
laws hereafter passed by the commission
shall have an enacting clause reading "By
authority of the United States be It en-
acted by the Philippine commission."
Future appointments of civil governor, vice-
governor, members of the commission and
heads of executive departments shall lie
made by the president by and with thi- con-
sent of the senate. Section 2 relates to
the tariff, confirming previous orders of the
executive, except in so far as tuey may
conflict with the provisions of the tariff act
outlined above. Section 3 places the regu-
lation and control of commercial infer-
course with and in the islands in the hands
of the president until otherwise provided
by congress. The fourth section makes all
the inhabitants of the islands, excent such
as shall have elected to preserve their al-
legiance to Spain, citizens of the Philip-
pine islands and as such entitled to the
protection of the United States.

Section 5 contains provisions correspond-
ing to the "bill of rights" incorporated in
the amendments to the constitution of the
United States, except that trial by jury is
not included. The privileges of thy writ of
habeas corpus are not to be suspended ex-
cept in the case of rebellion or invasion,
when the president or the governor, with
the approval of the commission, may sus-
pend them as long as may be necessary.
Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude,
except as punishment for crime, shall ex-
ist in the islands. No law shall be passed
abridging the freedom of speech or of the
press or the right of the people peaceably
to assemble and petition the government
for redress or grievances.

^Section 6 provides that when a condition
of general and complete peace shall have
been established in the Philippines the
president shall order the commission to take
a census of the islands.

Section 7 provides that two years after
the completion and publication of the cen-
sus, in case such conditions of general an 1



complete peace, wilh recognition of the
authority of the United States, shall have
continued in that part of the islands nut
inhabited by Moros or other nouchristian
tribes, the president shall direct the com-
mission to call a general election for the
choice of delegates to a popular assembly
of the people, which shall be known as tlie
Philippine assembly. After this body shall
have convened and organized all the legis-
lative power herd of OJP conferred on the
Philippine commission shall be vested in a
legislature consisting of two houses the
Philippine commission and the Philippine
assembly. The assembly shall consist of
not less than fifty nor more than 100 mem-
bers, to be apportioned by the commis-
sion among the provinces as neaily as
practicable according to population. Mem-
bers of the assembly are to hold office two
years. They must owe allegiance to the
United States and must be not under 25
years of age. The remainder of the sec-
tion relates to the sessions of the legisla-
ture. which arc to tie annual and not to
continue more than ninety days, and to de-
tails of procedure.

The eighth section provides for the elec-
tion by the legislature of two resident com-
missioners to the United Siates, who shall
serve two years and be paid by the United
States- at the rate of $5,000 each a year,
with $2,000 for expenses. They must be
electors of the islands and not under 30
years of age.

Section 9 confirms the powers and juris-
diction of the Supreme court and courts of
first instance of the Philippines as hereto-
fore established by the commission. The
chief justice and the associate justices of
the Supreme court are hereafter to be ap-
pointed by the president. Section 10 cites
the cases in which the Supreme couit of the
United States may review, revise, reverse,
modify or affirm the findings of the Philip-
pine Supreme court.

Under the eleventh section the govern-
ment of the Philippines i authorized to
improve the rivers and harbors and to con-
struct and maintain wharves, lighthouses,
bonded warehouses and signal stations. Sec-
tion 12 provides that all the property and
rights of the United .States in the islands.
except such land or other property as may
be designated by the president for military
and other reservations of the United States,
shall be turned over to- the government of
the islands to be administered for the bene-
fit of the inhabitants thereof. In section 13



and productiveness and make rules for their
sale or lease. Timber and mineral lands
are excepted and the rules and regulations
are not to go into effect until approved by
the president and congress. AT single home-
stead is not to exceed sixteen hectares in
extent. (A hectare equals 2.47 acres.) Sec-
tion 14 empowers the Philippine government
to establish rules and regulations by which
persons holding lands without having se-
cured legal title thereto, though having ful-
filled all or some of the conditions required
by the Spanish law, may perfect their
titles. The Philippine commission is author-
ized to issue patents without compensation
to any native of the islands- conveying
title to any tract of public laud not more
Iliau sixteen hectares in extent which was
public land and had been actually occupied
by him or l.is ancestors prior to Aug. 13, 1898.



it is provided that the Philippine govern-
ment shall classify the public lands of the
islands according to agricultural character



THK PHILIPPINE ISLANDS.



169



Section 13 authorizes the Philippine gov-
ernment to sell to actiiiil occupants, set-
tlers and citizens of the islan.is public
lands, not timber or mineral, in tiaits not
exceeding sixteen hectares t i j acli person
and to corporations iu tracts not exceeding
1,024 hectares to any cine association. Sal. s
are to be conditioned upon actual occupancy
and Improvement of the lands for five
years.

Section 16 prescribes that in the sale of
the public domain preference shall be given
to actual occupants and settlers. Section
17 orders that all moneys receivi d from the
sale of public lands and from government
licenses to cut timber shall be covered Into
the insular treasury and be used only for
insular purposes. Section 18 continues In
force the forest laws and regulations es-
tablished by the commission, with the pro-
viso that the government of the islands
shall have the power to issue licenses to
cut timber on the reserved and unreserved
public lands and to lease land to any hold 1 r
of such license sufficient for a mill site,
not to exceed four hectares in extent. In
section 19 beneficial use ia made the basis,
limit and measure of all rights to water in
the islands and the Philippine government
is authorized to make rules and regulations
for the use of water.

Sections 20 to 62 inclusive relate to the
mineral lands of the islands. It is provided
that they shall be free and open to explora-
tion, occupation and purchase by citizens
of the United States and of the Philippine
islands, and rules for making locations, ob-
taining patents, etc., are given at length.

Sections 63. 64 and 65 authorize the Philip-
pine government to buy the lands of- re-
ligions orders and others and issue bonds
for the purchase price. This refers particu-
larly to the large tracts of land held by
the friars. This property when acquired
by the government becomes part of the pub-
lie domain and is subject to sale or lease,
actual occupants or settlers having the
preference among purchasers.

Sections 66 to 73 inclusive permit munici-
palities, with the consent of the govern-
ment of the islands, the president and the
congress of the United States, to issue
bonds for the purpose of providing funds
for all kinds of municipal betterments.

Section 74 gives the government of the
islands authority to grant franchises for
the construction of works of public utility
and service and section 75 prohibits cor-
porations from engaging in the real-estate
business and restricts them, if engaged in
agriculture, to the ownership of 1,024 hec-
tares of land.

Sections 76 to 83 inclusive authorize the
Philippine government to establish a mint
in Manila and issue subsidiary and minor
coins of silver and alloy. Section 84 relates
to the entry and clearance of vessels, the
rights of seamen and quarantine regula-
tions. Section 85 makes the treasury of the
Philippine islands and such banking asso-
eiations as may lie designated by the sec-
retary of war and secretary of the treas-
ury of the United States depositaries of
public moneys of the United States. The
86th section reserves to congress the power
to annul all laws passed by the government
of the Philippine islands and the 87th sec-
tion continues the bureau of insulm- affairs
of the war department until otherwise pro-
vided. The 88th and last section repeals
all acts, inconsistent with this law.



IMPORTS INTO THE UNITED STATES

FROM THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS.

Fiscal years ended June 30.



ARTICLES.



Free Fibers*

Other free articles

Dutiable-
Hats, etc. (straw)

Sugar (cane). .,

Tobacco, cigars

Other dutiable articles.



Total imports.



mn.



$4,251,416
23,756

5,535
103,857
14,472
18,876




6.612.797



EXPORTS FROM THE UNITED STATES
TO THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS.



ARTICLES.



Books, etc

Breadstutts

Cars, etc

Coal

Hay

Iron and steelt

Malt 'liquors

Oils

Papert

Provisions

Spirits (distilled)

Vegetables

Woodt

Other articles

Total exports



1901.



$44.160
570,376
180.696
144.995
323.994
503.127
762,176
119,424
66,141
47,374
316,024
187.698
43,010
704,985
4,014,180



1902.



$140,574
435.444
101.213
210,474
358.816
957,342
461.337
235,397
284.788
156.863
185,188
58,213
418,806

1.267.412



5,251.867



"Unmanufactured, manila.
tAnd manufactures of.

EVENTS OF THE YEAR.
Considerable progress was made in the
course of the year toward settling the
troublesome question relating to the re-
ligious orders. Gov. Taft visited Rome
in June and July and had a number of con-
ferences with the pope. An agreement was
reached that the lands of the friars should
be purchased and that the orders obnoxious
to the natives should leave the islands. All
details were left for future adjustment In
the Philippines. Archbishop Guidi was ap-
pointed apostolic delegate to the islands.
Other events were:
Feb. 22 Gen. Lucban captured by Lieut.

Stribler.
March 25 Thirty deaths and forty cases of

Asiatic cholera reported.
April 16 Gen. Malvar surrenders to Gen.

Bell.

April 21-22 Troops under Col. F. D. Bald-
win have engagement with Mbros on
island of Mindanao; seven Moros killed.
May 3 Moro fort, at Bayan, Mindanao,
taken by Col. Baldwin with 25th battery
and part of 27th infantry: eight American
soldiers killed and forty-one wounded;
Moros lose about 200.

iMay 5 Captured Moros attempt to escape
from guard; thirty-four of the prisoners
killed and nine wounded.
May 25 Gen. Cbaffee disapproves of the
findings in the Waller and Day cases and
censures the officers. (They were tried
by cpurt-martial for executing natives of
the island of Samar without trial and
were exonerated.)

June 21 Cholera spreading rapidly In Ma-
nila and the provinces. Total cases to
date: Manila. 1,530 cases and 1.236 deaths;
provinces, 7.369 cases and 5.440 deaths.
July 4 Political prisoners liberated under
amnesty proclamation of the president of
the United States. Gen. Chaffee relieved



CHICAGO DAILY NK\VS ALMANAC AND YEAH BOOK FOR 1903.



of his duties as military governor. Civil
government established except in Jolo,
parts of Mindanao and southern 1'aragua.



July 16 President orders the retirement of
Brig.-Gon. J. II. Smith for his "kill and
burn" order.



ISLAND OF PORTO RICO.



Porto Rico, according to the decision of
the United States Supreme court in the in-
sular cases May 27, 1901, is a territory
appurtenant and belonging to the United
States, but not a part of the United States
within the revenue clause of the constitu-
tion. The island was ceded to the United
States by Spain Dec. 10, 1898, and was under
military rule until the Foraker law went
into effect >ilay 1, 1900. (For the provisions of
that law see The Daily News Almanac for
1901.) In accordance with the third section
of that act, the legislative assembly of
Porto Rico having put into operation a sys-
tem of local taxation to meet the necessi-
ties of government, President McKinley on
the 25th of July the anniversary of the
landing of American troops on the island in
1898 proclaimed free trade between the
United States and Porto Rico.

GOVERNMENT Civil government, under th'e
provisions of the Foraker act, was estab-
lished May 1, 1900. The upper house con-
sists of eleven members, six of whom are
"cabinet" officers appointed by the presi-
dent; the lower hous is made up of thirty-
five delegates elected by the people every
two years. The governor, who is appointed
by the president, has practically the same
duties as the governor of any other terri-
tory of the United States. The present offi-
cers are: Governor, William H. Hunt;
secretary, Charles Hartzell; attorney-gen-
eral, James S. Harlan; commissioner of
education, Samuel M. Lindsay.

AREA AND POPULATION The area of Porto
Rico is about 3,600 square miles, and the
population, as shown by the military census
of 1899, is 953,243. Of these 941,751 are na-
tives. The whites number 589,426 and the
colored 363,817. The colored are subdivided
into 304,352 mestizos, 59,390 negroes and 75
Chinese. By departments the population is:
Aguadilla, 99.645; Arecibo, 162,308; Bayamon,
147,681; Guayama, 111,986; Humacao, 100,866;
Mayaguez, 127,566; Ponce, 203,191. The cities
having more than 5,000 inhabitants are: San
Juan. 32,048; Ponce, 27,952; Mayaguez, 15,187;
Arecibo, 8,008; Aguadilla, 6,425; Yauco, 6,108;
Caguas, 5,450; Guayama, 5,334.

EDUCATION In June, 1902, it was esti-
mated that there were 300,000 children of
school age on the island, but of these only
43,000 could be accommodated in the public
schools. There were 1,000 teachers, of whom
120 were Americans. Nine hundred schools
were open during the year. Textbooks,
elates and stationery are furnished free.
About 72 per cent of the population can
neither read nor write, but illiteracy Is
chiefly confined to the colored races.

COMMERCE For the year ended June 30,
1902, the total exports from Porto Rico to



foreign countries and the United States
amounted to $12,433,721, while the imports
from all sources amounted to $13.046,401. Of
the exports the United States took merchan-
dise valued at $8,297,422; Spain, $573,193;
Cuba, $619,395; Fiance, $1,479.795; Germany,
$324,691; Austria-Hungary, $342,071. Of the
imports $10,719,444 came from the United
States, $869.479 from Spain, $360,644 from
the united kingdom, $173,348 from France
and $202,040 from Germany.

SHIPMENTS FROM PORTO RICO TO THR

UNITED STATES.
Fiscal years ended June 30.



ARTICLES.


1901.


1902.


Bones, hoofs, etc


1.379


$2731


Coffee, green


4.305


27031


Fruits, nuts


105.277


70.H71


Hides...
Molasses


38,976
254,155


67.888
322 630




18,979


9545


Straw manufactures
Sugar, brown


38.197
4,695.104


176.412
5,890,08'J


Tobacco


417,912


1,683,237


Other articles


7.004


46,982


Total


5.581.288


8,297,422



SHIPMENTS FROM THE UNITED STATES
TO PORTO RICO.



ARTICLES.



Agricultural impPm'nts

Books, etc

Breadstuffs

Candles

Cars, vehicles

Chemicals*

Cottonf

Fibers ( veg.)t

Fish

Fruits, nuts

Glass

Gunpowder, etc

Iron and steett

Leather, shoes

Malt liquors

Oils

Paper):

Provisions}

Sugar and molasses

Tobacco*

Vegetables

Wine

Woodt

Woolt

Other articles

Total



1901.



$8.132
40.904

935.U09
32,511
70,540
11.712
1,384.881
19.072

314.495
L'0.4?
39.830
13.978

431.577
86.724
58,694
99,009
86.507

961,001
33.386
26.426

100,74
20,462

309.985

8,764

1.777.083



6,881.917



1902.



$16.983

69,840

1,040.079

54.385

132.002

135,846

2.0f]0,S2(i

30.100

300,703

26.458

28.116

13,711

1.171.136

234.331

118,450

144.512

110,222

l,336.6tti

108.298

98.191

231.450

36.705

500.081

81.056

2.579.319



10,022.507



GTTAM.

Ceded to United) States by Spain Dec. 10, 1898.

Area, about 200 square miles.

Population, about 9,000.

First American governor, Capt. R. P.
Leary, U. S. N.

Present (December. 1902) governor, Capt.
William E. Sewell, U. S. N.



'Including drugs, dyes and medicines. tMan-
ufactures of. $And manufactures of. {Com
prising meat and dairy products.



TUTUILA.

Acquired by United States, January, 1900.

Area, including Mamia and several other
small islands, 79 square miles.

Population, about 4,000.

Pango-Pango harbor acquired by the
United States in 1872.



TERRITORY OF HAWAII,



Annexed to United States Aug. 12, 1896.
Created a territory June 14, 1900.
Governor Sanford B. Dole.
Secretary Henry E. Cooper.

POPULATION According to the federal
census of 1900 tile total population of the
territory Is 154,001. In 1890 it was 89,990.
The only large city is Honolulu, which in
1900 had a population of 39,306. By island
divisions the population is as follows: Ha-
waii, 46, 843; Kaual and Niihau, 20,734; Lanai



and Maui, 25,416; Oahu, 58,504; Molokai,
2,504.

COMMERCE WITH THE UNITED STATES The
total value of the shipments of merchandise
from Hawaii to the United States for the
twelve months ended June, 1901, was $24,-
700.429. Brown sugar was the principal
item, amounting to 720,553,357 pounds, valued
at $23,922,300. The other articles of import-
ance were: Coffee, $114,340; hides and skins,
$78,413; fruits, $70,844; raw wool, $38,681;
rice, $15,347.



CUBA.



GOVERNMENT President, Tomas Estrada
Palrna.

Vice-President I.uis Estevez Romero.

Secretary of Government Diego Tamayo.

Secretary of Finance Garcia Monies.

Secretary of State and Justice Carlos Zaldo.

Secretary of Public Instruction Eduardo
Yero.

Secretary of Public Works^-Manuel Diaz.

Secretary of Agriculture

Chief Justice of the Supreme Court Cruz
Perez.

President of the Senate Domingo M. Ca-
pote.

Speaker of the House of Representatives
Pelayo Garcia.

Under the constitution as adopted the
legislative power is exercised by two elect-
ive bodies the house of representatives
and the senate, conjointly called congress.
The senate is composed of four senators
from each of the six provinces, elected for
eight years by th>e provincial councilmen
and by a double number of electors consti-
tuting together an electoral board. Half
of the electors must be persons who pay
the highest amount of taxes. One-half of
the senators are to be elected every four
years. To become a senator it Is necessary
to be a native Cuban in the full possession
of all civil and political rights and to have
attained the age of 35 years.

The house of representatives is composed
of one representative for each 25,000 in-
habitants or fraction thereof over 12.500,
elected for four years by direct vote. One-
half of the members of the house are to be
elected every two years. To be a repre-
sentative it is' necessary to be a native or
naturalized Cuban who has lived eight
years in the republic, to be in possession
of all civil and political rights and to have
attained the age of 25 years. The salary
of members of congress is $3,600 a year.
Two sessions of congress are to be held
each year, the first beginning on the first
Monday in April and the second on the
first Monday in November .

The president of the republic must be a
native or naturalized Cuban citizen in the
full possession of all civil and political
rights and have attained the age of 40
years. He is elected by presidential elect-
ors, his term of office is four years and
he cannot serve more than three consecu-
tive terms. The vice-president must have
the same qualifications as the president and
his term of office is the same. He presides
over the senate, but votes only in case of
a tie. The president's salary is $25,000 a



native Cubans and have attained the age
of 35 years. Each province has one gov-
ernor and one provincial council elected by
direct vote of the people. Each council is
composed of not less than eight nor more
than twenty members. The municipal dis-
tricts are governed by municipal councils
elected by direct vote and each district has
an alcalde, also elected by direct vote of
the people. All male Cubans 25 years of
age or over have the right of suffrage.

ORGANIZATION OF THE REPUBLIC The or-
ganization of the republic of Cuba, begun in
1900, Was practically completed on the 20th
of May, 1902, when the military occupation
of the island by the United States came to
an end and Gen. Tomas Estrada Palma was
inaugurated as the first president. Follow-
ing is the chronological order of the chief
events in the formation of the new state:

Sept. 15, 1900 Delegates to constitutional
convention elected pursuant to order of the
military governor.

Nov. 5, 1900 Constitutional convention be-
gins its session in Havana.

Feb. 21, 1901 Constitution is signed by
members of the convention.

June 12, 1901 Platt amendment defining
future relations of the United States and
Cuba accepted by the convention.

Oct. 31, 1901 Convention dissolved.

<Dec. 31, 1901 First general election, held;
electors favorable to Palma and Romero
chosen.

Feb. 24. 1902 Presidential electors meet
in Havana and cast their votes for Palma
artd Romero as president and vice-president
respectively.

.May 5, 1902 First session "Of the first
Cuban congress begins.

May 15.- 1902 House and senate In joint
session formally declare Palma elected
president and Romero vice-president.

May 20, 1902 President Palma inaugu-
rated. Gen. Wood, military governor, sails
for the United States. Flag of the United
States hauled down.

AREA AND POPULATION The total area of
Cuba is 35,994 square miles. The population
in 1899, when the last census was taken,
was 1,572,797, distributed among the six
provinces as follows:

Havana 424,804 ' Puerto Pri'cipe 88,234

Matanzas 202,444 Santa Clara 356,536

Pinar del Rio.. 173,064 Santiago 327,715

Population of principal cities:



Cardenas



21.940



Cienfuegos 30,33s

Havana 235,981



Matanzas



36.374



Puerto Pri'cipe 25.102
Santiago



43.090

About 67 per cent of the population is
white.
COMMERCE The total value of merchan-



1



1C,2 CHICAGO


DAILY XKWS ALMANAC ANI> YKAU HOOK FOR I'.tOS.


disc, exclusive nf <>ld and silver. ini|x>:ted
into Cuba during the American oe.-upan, y
(Jan. 1, 1899, to May 20. 1902) was *225.-
437,135, and of the exports, H8q.609.067. Of
the Imports the United States furnist ed 43
per cent, united kingdom 15. Spain 15,
France 4.5 and Germany 4 per cent. Of the
exports the United States took 75 per cent,
united kingdom 9, Germany 7. i<rauce 2.5
and Spain 2 per cent. For the period from
July 1, 1901, to May 19, 1902. inclusive th
latter date marking the close of American
occupancy the total value of imports of
merchandise was $58,387.453 and of exports
$43,520,444. Of tfie imports $25,200,790 came
from the United States. $8,654,025 from the
United kingdom, $3,253,094 from, Germany,
$2,741,061 from France and $8.278.147 from
Spain. Of the exports $29.671.683 went to
the United States,- $5,425,627 to the united
kingdom, $3,651,574 to Germany, $1,185,055
to France and $1.117,136 to Spain.
The principal articles imported were cat-
tle, wheat, flour, coffee, cloth and manu-
factures of cloth, bags for sugar, fish, glass-
ware, steel, machinery, olive oil, provisions,
vegetables, rice and manufactures of wood.
The chief articles of export were sugar
($14,773.889), tobacco wrappers ($10.753.310),
cigars ($11,520,239), cacao, fruits and nuts,
sponges and wood.
IMMIGRATION Prom Julv 1, 1901, to May



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