Alice Bertha Gomme.

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Victoria jubilee railwav bridge, Montreal
(1854-1860; rebuilt, 1898^ Length. 2 miles:
cost of original structure, $7,000,000; of
new structure, $1,500,000.



LEGAL BUSHEL WEIGHTS IN ILLINOIS.



Washington bridge'. Now York (1889)
length, 2,384 feet; cost, $2,700,000.

Waterloo, London (1811-1817) Length, 1,710
feet; cost, $2,375,000.

Weiehsel river bridge, near Fordon, Ger-
many (1891-1893) Total length, 4,346 feet;
cost, $2,100,000; said to.be largest bridge
in Germany.

White Pass & Yukon railroad bridge, Alas-
kaTotal length, 850 feet; height. 275 feet.

Winona, Minn., over the Mississippi (1890-
1891) Total length, 2,760 feet.



Yekaterinoslaf. Russia, over the Dnieper
Two-story highway and railway bridge;
length, 4,094 feet.



NOTE TTie above list of great bridges and
viaducts is necessarily incomplete, space
permitting mention of only a few of the
hundreds of notable structures of this kind
in the world. It includes, however, most of
those remarkable for size, cost and engi-
neering skill displayed in their construction.



ARCTIC AND ANTARCTIC EXPLORATION.



Lieut. Robert E. Peary, U. S. N., and
the members of his expedition arrived at
Sydney, N. S., Sept. 18, in the steamer
Windward, after a sojourn of more than
four years In the arctic regions. The stait
was made from New York July 2, 1898, and
the first year was spent in establishing
headquarters at Etah in north Greenland
and in making other preparations for a
dash to the pole. The conditions in 1S99
were not favorable and it was not until
May, 1900, that he succeeded in reaching a
high latitude. His record then was 83 deg.
50 mi. north, the highest point attained
up to that time in the western hemisphere.
In the same month he succeeded in round-
ing the northern extremity of Greenland.
In 1901 the conditions were again unfavor-
able and nothing of importance was accom-
plished, but April 1. 1902. Lieut. Peary
started on another trip northward over the
polar sea. He took with him llensen, the
colored man who has accompanied him on
most of his trips, four Eskimos and six
sledges. After six marches open leads and
floes in motion were encountered. Two of
the natives were sent back. As the others
advanced the floes became smaller, the
pressure ridges larger and the open leads
more numerous. Finally at 84 deg. 17
min. north latitude, northwest of Hecla,
the ]H>lar pack became impracticable and
further efforts to advance were given up.
The party returned in safety to Cape Sa-
bine and on the arrival of the Windward,
Aug. 5, started for home by way of God-
havn. The scientific instruments and arctic
library abandoned by the Greely expedition
were recovered and brought back.

The arctic expedition tinder Capt. Otto
Sverdrup also returned home after an ex-
tended stay in north Greenland. The start
was made from Christiania, Norway, June
14, 1898, in the Fram (Forward), the ves-
sel in which Nansen made his famous voy-
age. No attempt was made to reach the pole,
but much valuable work was accomplished
in the way of surveying, particularly along
the south and west coasts of Ellesmere
land and the hitherto unknown districts to
the west of that regio'n. The Fram was
imprisoned in the ice in Jones sound, be-
tween Baffin bay and the Arctic ocean, for
three vears. and it was not until July,
1902, that the vessel was released by a
heavy southern storm. Leaving Godhavn,



Greenland. Aug. 16. the expedition reached
Christiania Sept. 28.

The fluely equipped Baldwin-Ziegler ex-
pedition which left Tromsoe, Norway, July
16. 1901, for Franz Josef land and the north
pole proved a failure owing to dissensions
between the leader, Evelyn, B. Baldwin,
and the sailing master and other officers.
A number of supply camps were established-
up to 80 deg. 22 min., but nothing else was
accomplished, anil Baldwin returned to Hon-
ningsvaag, Norway, Aug. 1, 1902. Mr. Zieg-
ler announced his purpose to continue the
work of exploration with another command-
er in charge.

Word was received in August from the
antarctic expedition under command of
Prof. Otto Nordenskjold which left Gothen-
burg, Sweden, Oct. 16, 1901, on the steamer
Antarctic. The vessel when last heard
from was imprisoned in the ice in the
vicinity of Louis Philippe land and prep-
arations had been made to proceed in dog
sledges.

A Scotch antarctic expedition under the
leadership of William S. Bruce sailed in
the Norwegian whaler Scotia from the port
of Troon, Scotland, Oct. 25. Its objective
was the region south of the South Atlantic
ocean between the zones being investigated
by the Nordenskjold and the 'Drygalski ex-
peditions.

The record of the principal polar expedi-
tious since 1853 now stands:

N'ort.hlatitude .
Year. Explorer. Deri. Min.

1871 Oapt. Hall 82 16

1876 Capt. Nares 83 10

1879 Lieut. De Long 77 15

1882 Lieut. Greely 83 24

1900 Lieut. Peary 83 50

1891 Lieut. Peary 83 24

1895 Fridtjof Nansen 86 14

1900 Duke d'Abruzzi 86 33

1902 Lieut. Peary 84 17

*86 deg. 33 min. 49 sec. the farthest
north yet attained.

Record of principal antarctic expeditions:

South latitude.

Year. Explorer. D(g. Min.

1774 Oapt. Cook : 71 . 15

1823 Capt. Weddell 74 15

1842 Capt. Ross 77 49

1895 Borchgrevink 74 10

1898 De Gerlache 71 36

1900 Borchgrevink 78 5Q



LEGAL BUSHEL WEIGHTS IN ILLINOIS.



Articles. Pounds.

Apples, dried 24

Bin-ley 48

P.i'M us. castor 46

Beans, white >

Bluegrass Seed 14

Bran 20

Buckwheat 52



Articles. Fount!:
Coal, stone 8



Cloverseed

Corn in ear 70

Corn, shelled 56

Flaxseed 56

Hair, plastering 8
Hemp seed 44



Articles. Pounds.

Lime, unslaked 80

Malt 3S

Oats 32

Onions



Peaches, dried 33

Potatoes, Irish 60

Potatoes, sweet... .50



Articles.

Rye

Salt, fine

Salt, coarse...
Timothy seed.
Turnips



Pounds.
.56
.65
.60

.45

...V,



Wheat 60



196 ' CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR BOOK FOR 1903.


THE PUBLIC DOMAIN.


VACANT LANDS IN TIIE UNITED STATES AT THE CLOSE OF THE FISCAL
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1902.
[From the report of the commissioner of the land office.]


STATE OR TERRITORY.


ABEA UNAPPROPRIATED AND

U^KESDltVEU.


v Area

reserved.


Area ap-
propriated.


Surveyed.


Unsurveyed.


Total.




Acres.
S04,060


Acres.


Acres.
304.060
367.9h.;..v>;
47.298,682
3,008.215
41,552.434
38,424.412
1,435314
42.302,659


Acres.
51.520
H20.174
19,724.717
2.560
10,088,270
5,658.303
19.259
1,331,311


Acres.
32.302.340




367,983,506
36,137,316


Arizona


11.166.3:0
3,008.215


5.773.94 1
30.532.'.';>
42.3S4.216i
82,365,445

33,618.0T.7 1
.65!>.470 i
35.842.r>iai
22,SI50.400




33,001.480
34.130.115
1.2T5:244
]2,375.:J8


7,950.954
4,2114.297
160.070
29,187,351








Illinois




















1965888(1












35.646.686l
50.415,2:17
27.376.s>i
36,312. 4'.Ti.
42.644,^129 1
29,532.580
43.52ti.21W
17,164,669
39.549.812
3,053.413

I6.8s<;.;,u:
26,513.113
26,062.720
17,229.57.-)
23,525,:S
25.1B1.3I1
4,858,8!tf
21.127,454
34,770.28:1
7,876,305




979,6M8




Bra'oos

210.073
386,170
3,553.143
152.540
269.541
61,439.514
8.980.857
61,299,818
55,157,116
15,071,477


987.875
1,468.434
120.535
5,000.508




145.055
886,170
1.533,6;!5
152.510
2(59,541
17.454.210
8.980.S5!-
SO. 154,755
40.821.5J1
10,121,977


65.018






2.019,508












43,985,304

""31.145.663
14,:-;35.575
4,949,500


14,999.417
606.611
5,983.409
6,385,181
3,325,490


Nebraska






Ohio




3.789.976
23,597.960
10.985,547
10.865.81)2
4,945,116
139.244
40.804,945




3,789,976


3,754.849
5.878.411
32.791.676
5.574.068
10,546. 165
365.353
10,7/3.662




8,275.711

397.866
31.242,617
6,128,145


31.873,671
11.383.413
42.108.479
11,079461

139,244
43,783,313


South Dakota










2,978,368


Grand total


301,979,945


591,976.169


893,955.476


151.161.P38


764.422.726


*The unreserved lands in Alaska are i
as estimated. DISPO SAL O

The following la a statement of the aei
age disposed of during the fiscal year cud
June 30, 1902:

CASH SALES. ACT

Private entries 19,105


DOS

F I
e-

ed

.1.
13

:)1
TS
98
90
23

S9
4

7::
27

27
DO

61
15


tly unsui

'UBLIC I
Act Jan

relief
Act Jan
for rol
includi
Arizon
Act Mar
homesi
on ahs


veyed and

jANDS.

e 7, 1900 (31
of John C.

14, 1901 (3

ief of occup
d in the Al{

J


mappropriated, fSo far

Stat., 1617), Acres.
Smith 135.95


1 Stat., 729),
ants of lands
;odones grant,

sn nn


Public auction 80,840


ch 3, 1901 (31 Stat., 1085),
eader's right to purchase
ndoned military reserva-




Mineral-land entries 97,657


Desert-land entries (original).... 929,230
Excesses on homestead and other
entries 23,256


Total

Homestt
Entries
Milita
Privat
Valent
Wyane
Sioux
State s
Rallroac
Wagon-r
Small h
Donatioi
Indian
Swamp
Swamp


1 757 592 63


MISCELLANEOUS.

ad entries (original) 14,033,245.78










y-bounty la
e land scri;
in** scrip


nd warrants. 6*613.58


Cash substitution 130


Act March 3, 1887, adjustment of
railrbad land grants and for-
feiture of lands 9,638


IKO nc\


otte scrip 40. nn


half-breed s
*lections




Act July 5, 1884, providing fur
disposal of abandoned military


. . 1 4SS 371 ni


selections 1 931 904 60


oad selections 40,710.30


Act Sept. 29, 1890, forfeiting cer-
tain railroad grants 160.00




Act Aug. 23, 1894, abandoned mil-


17
98


allotments 81 ion in


lands paten
land indemD




Act Jan. 18, 1897, Greer county
(O T) lands 4,451


ity lands pa t-

19 SQ.1 7S


Act June 6, 1900, (31 Stat., 672),
to ratify an agreement with
Indians of Fort Hall reserva-
tion v; 17,539.91




17,614,792.55


Total area of public-land en-
tries and selections 19,372,385.18



AMERICAN FOREST RESERVES. 17


INDIAN LANDS. Acres.

Cherokee 273.50


A cres.
Area Indian lands 11G.150 12


Klamath Indian reserve 440.00
Southern Ute 11,329.43


Aggregate 19,488,535.30


Ute 55,142.72
Osage trust and diminished re-
serve 37,415.43


RECEIPTS OF THE LAND
Total receipts from disposal of
public land \


FFICE.
5,880,088.65
288,666.68
41,415.97

27,478.70

1,014.45
23.262.7:?


Kansas trust and diminished re-


Chippewa 5,080.42


Total receipts from disposal of
Indian lands


Flathead 480.00


Total receipts from depredations


1 Ponea 12.19
Omaha 3,841.18


Total receipts from


sales of tirn-
tarch 3, 1891,


Colville Indian reserve.


1,455.45


and June 4 1897


116,150.12


Total receipts from sales of gov-
ernment property (old office fur-
niture)




RECAPITULATION.


Total receipts for furnishing
copies of record and plats


Area miscellaneous entries 17,614,792.55


6,261,927.18






AMERICAN FOREST RESERVES.


There are fifty-four forest reserves created by presidential proclamations under section 24
of the act of March 3, 1891, embracing 90,175,765 acres, as follows :


STATE OR TERRITORY.


Name of reserve.


Date of procla-
mation creat-
ing reserve
or changing
boundary
thereof.


Present
estimated
area, in
acres.




Afognak Forest and Fish Culture reserve
(reserved under sections 21 and 14, act
March 3, 1891)


Dec. 24. 1892
Aug. 20. 1902
Feb. 2o, 18 ! .
5 Aug. 17,1898
t April 12, 1902
Aug. 17, 1898
5 May 10, 1898
I Oct. 21, 1899
April 11, 1902
July 2, 1902
July 22. 102
July 30, 1902
Dec. 20, 1892
Feb. 14, 1893
Feb. 25, 1893
5 Feb. 25, 18a3
i Jan. 80, 1899
Feb. 22. 1897
5 Feb. 22. 1897
I Oct. 17,1901
5 Mar. 2, 1898
i June 29, 1898
April 13. 1899
Oct. 2, 1899
J Oct. l(i, 1S9I
\ June as, liK):.'
< Feb. 11, 1892
I Mar. 18, 1892
June 23. !8'.i->
Dec. 9, 1892
Dec. 24. 1892
April 11, 1902
Feb. 22, 1897
Feb. 22,1897
Feb. 22, 1897
Feb. 22, 1897
Feb. 10, 18'.'9
Aug. Ki, 1902
Aug. 1(5, 1902
Sept. 4, 1902
April Ki, 1902
April It!, 1902
(Jan. 11,1892
|May 27,1898
Mar. 2, 1899


403,640
4,500.2 .-0
1,851.520
| 1,975,310
4,658,880
| 423,080

387,300
155.520
118,(>00
169,000
555.520
4.090.(K)0
737,280
I 109,920
C91.200
| 068,100
| 1,614,594

13(i,335
145.000

\ 1,129,920

I 184,320
179,200
683.520
858,240
77,980
4,147.200
045.120
1.882.400
2,920,080
40,320

noi.ooo

730,000
1,311,(XX)
85,123
123,779

| 431,040

2,327,040

500.000




The Alexander Arehi
Grand Canyon Foresl
The Sail Francisco S


pelaso Forest reserve
reserve


California


lountains Forest re-


The Black Mesa Fore
The Prescott Forest i

The Santa Rita Fores
The Santa Catalina F
The Mount Graham *
The Chiricahua Fores
San Gabriel Timber L
Sierra Forest reserve
San Bernardino Fore
The Trabuco Canyon
The Stanislaus Fores
The San Jacinto Fore
The Pine Mountain a




eserve










and re serve


Forest reserve


t reserve




nd Zaca Lake Forest


The Lake Tahoe Fore
The Santa Ynez Fore

The White River For

Pike's Peak Timber I
Plum Creek Timber I
The South Platte For
Battlement Mesa For
The San Isabel Fores
The Bitter Root Kore




>t reserve


est reserve




and reserve


and reserve




t reserve




Idaho and Washington..


The Priest Hiver For<
The Flathead Forest
The Jjewis and Clark
The Gallatin Forest r
The Little Belt Moun
The Madison Forest i
The Absaroka Forest
The Dismal River Fo
The Niobrara Forest

The Pecos River Fore

The Gila River Fores
The Lincoln Forest re


jst reserve




i Forest reserve


tain Forest reserve. .






New Mexico




st reserve




t reserve


iserve


July 20. 1902



CHICAGO DAILY MOWS ALMANAC ANI> YKAK HOOK 1- OR UMl.'i.



AMERICAN FORKST RKSKRVES.-CONTINUEl).



STATE OK TERRITORY.


Name of reserve.


Date'nf iimi lu-
iiiiitinii creat-
ing rrxri'i'e
or changing
boundary
thereof.


T'rntnit

I'Htillltltlll
II I'l I!, ill

acreg.


Oklahoma


Wichita Forest reser-ve
Bull Run Timber Land reserve


July 4. 1901
June 17, 1892

1 Sept, 28, 1898
July 1, UX)1

Sept. 28, 189
( Feb. 22. 1*97
< Sept. I 1 .'. lts
Feb. 22. 1897
Feb. 10. is'f.i
Aug. 3, 1901
5 Feb. 22. 1897
1 April 8, 1901
I Feb. 22. 1S9?
April 7, 1900
^July 15,1901

Feb. 22,1897
1 Mar. 80, 1891
1 Sept. 10. 18111
| May 22. 1902
[June 13, 1902
( Feb. 22, 1897
I June 29. 1900
t May 22. 1902
< Feb. 22. 1897
- M:iy 22, 1902
Oct. 10, 190d
j May 22, 1902
I July IB, 1902


57.120
142.080

i 4.4:511.120

18,500
j 1.211.K80

S;.-)..V.M:

f,,. Mil
Stl.400
j- 3.42i'..400

'- UtKi.880

2,027,520
I 1.834,240

I 1,21(5.960

I 4.12T.:)
50.820
| 420,581


So. Dakota and Wyoming
Utah

Washi ngton


The Cascade Kange Forest reserve (area
reduced by executive order dated June
29, 1901, and also by act of May 22, 11)02 [32
Stat., 202], creating the Crater Lake Na-
tional park)


Ashland Forest reserve


The Black Hills Forest reserve


The Uintah Forest reserve
The Fish Lake Forest reserve. . . .


The Payson Forest reserve


The Washington Forest reserve


Wyoming


The Olympia Forest reserve


The Mount Rainier Forest reserve (area
reduced March 2, 1899, by act of Congress
creating the Mount Rainier National
park; 30 Stat., 993)


The Yellowstone Forest reserve




The Big Horn Forest reserve


The Teton Forest reserve


The Crow Creek Forest reserve


The Medicine Bow Forest reserve





STREET RAILWAYS OF THE UNITED STATES.



Mileage and number of employes in the chief ci
labor, Washington, L). C,



City. Miles.

New York 1,236.68



Chicago 1,030.00 10,386

Philadelphia . 480.00

St. Louis 321.00

Boston 213.68

Baltimore 353.00

Cleveland 218.05

Buffalo 293.00

San Francisco 258.76

Cincinnati ... 208.00

Plttsburg 172.41

New Orleans.. 175.90

Detroit 379.45

Milwaukee ... 219.97

Washington .. 208.51

Newark 89.68

Jersey City.... 61.37

Louisville 122.00

Minneapolis .. 131.00

Providence ... 81.00

Indianapolis .. 110.00

Kansas City.. 139.50

St. Paul 127.23 734



JSmp.

25,692



7,381
4,982
5,000
2,670
1,919
1,788
3,161
2.200
1,955
1.S91
2,235
2,437
1,798
1,500
675
817
984
1,850
870
1,300



City.
Rochester ....

Denver

Toledo

Allegheny

Columbus, O..
Worcester ....

Syracuse

New Haven...

Paterson

Fall River

St. Joseph, Mo.

Omaha

Los Angeles...

Memphis

Scranton

Lowell

Albany

Cambridge . . .
Portland, Ore.

Atlanta

Grand Rapids.

Dayton

Richmond, Va.



ties. [From the report of the department of
, for September, 1902.]



M-Ufg.

105.60

144.03

102.00

52.04

90.00

140.00

99.72

55.00

49.19

39.24

40.00

71.70

285.50

100.80

76.66

69.71

27.55

39.22

119.00

145.00

52.97

72.00

118.00



Emp.
799



472
503
1,000
570
425



952
570
1,350
350
643
940



Oity.

Nashville

Seattle

Hartford

Reading

Wilmington ..

Oamden

Trenton

Bridgeport .,.

Lynn

Oakland, Cal..
L/awr'ce, Mass.
New Bedford..

lies Moines

Spring'd, Mass

Troy

Hoboken

Elizabeth

Peoria, 111

Quiney, III....
Springfd, 111..
Kockford. 111..
K. St. Louis, 111.
Jollet, 111



Miles.
64.00
90.00
76.51
33.00
62.00
67.00
39.30
90.40
41.90

130.00
24.26
21.43
42.43
73.63
26.20

140.56

301.11
56.00
17.00
32.00
38.00
72.50
45.00



Emp.
350
512
315
UB
233
428
250
455
240
700
13
ISO
375
460
500
1,500
2,720
247
129"
140
82
347
170



FIRE AT WATERBTTRY, CONN.



Thirty-throe of the finest business build-
ings in Waterbury, Conn., wert; destroyed
by a lire which began early on the evening
of Fell. 2 and continued until the next
day. Among the structures burned were



the Masonic Temple, the Scovil house, Wa-
terbury American building and Reid &
Hughes' department store. The total loss
was placed at between $3,500,000 and $4,000,-
000.



POLITICAL COMMITTEES.



I'M



Political Committees (19004904).

REPUBLICAN NATIONAL COMMITTEE.



Headquarters Chicago and New York.

Chairman M. A. Uanua, Ohio.

Secretary Perry S. Heath, Indiana.

Treasurer Cornelius N. Bliss, New York.

Asst. Treasurer Volney W. Foster, Illinois.

Subtreasurer Edwiu F. Brown, Illinois.

Executive Committee, Chicago Henry C.
I'ayne of Wisconsin, vice-chairman; Perry
S. Heath of Indiana, secretary; Kichard
C. Kerens of Missouri, Urueiue Stewart of
Illinois, Harry S. New of Indiana.

Executive Committee, New YorK Joseph H.
Mauley of Maine. N. B. Scott of West Vir-
ginia, Fred S. Gibbs of New lork, Frank-
lin Murphy of New Jersey, Cornelius N.
Bliss of New York.

Alabama J. W. Demmlck Montgomery

Arkansas Powell Clayton

Eureka Springs and City of Mexico

California W. C. Van Fleet.. San Francisco

Colorado A. M. Stevenson Denver

Connecticut Charles F. Brooker Ansonia

Delaware John E. Addicks Wilmington

Florida John G. Long St. Augustine

Georgia Judson W. Lyons

Augusta a:id Washington, D. C.

Idaho D. W. Stanwood Pocatello

Illinois Graeme Stewart Chicago

Indiana Harry S. New Indianapolis

Iowa Ernest E. Hart Council Bluffs

Kansas David W. Mulvane Topeka

Kentucky John W. Yerkes Danville

Louisiana Lewis S. Clark Patterson

Maine Joseph H. Manley Augusta

Maryland Louis E. McCoinas

Hagerstown and Washington, D. O.

Massachusetts George V. L. Meyer.. Boston

Michigan J. W. Blodgett Grand Rapids

Minnesota Thomas II. She vlin. Minneapolis

Mississippi H. C. Turley Natchez

Missouri Richard C. Kerens St. Louis

Montana C. H. MeLeod Missoula

Nebraska R. B. Schneider Fremont

Nevada Patrick L. Flauigau Reno

New Hampshire

New Jersey Franklin T. Murphy .. .Newark
New York Frederick S. Gibbs.... New York
North Carolina J. C. Pritchard

Marshall and Washington, D. C.

N. Dakota Alexander McKcnzie. .Bismarck

( )hii. Myron T. Herriek Cleveland

Oregon George A. Steel Portland

Pennsylvania M. Stanley Quay Beaver

llhude Island Chns. R. Brayton. Providence
South Carolina John G. Capers.. Charleston

South Dakota J. M. Gi ne Chamberlain

Ti'iiin'ssee Walter P. Brownlow, M. C....

Jonesboro and Washington, D. C.

Texas R. B. Hawley. M. C

Galveston and Washington. D. C.

Utah O. J. Salisbury Salt Lake City

Vermont Jamea W. Broek Montpelter

Virginia George E. Bowden Norfolk

W.'st Virginia N. B. Scott...:

Wheeling and Washington, D. C.

Washington George H. Baker. . .Goldendale
Wisconsin Henry C. Payne Milwaukee



Wyoming Willis D. Vandevanter

Cheyenne and Washington, D. C.

Alaska John G. Healdt Juneau

Arizona W. M. Griffith Tucson

New Mexico Solomon Luna Los Lunas

Oklahoma William Grimes Kingfisher

Indian Ter. W'm. M. Mellette. ...Muskogee
District of Columbia Myron M. Parker..

Washington

Hawaii Harold M. Sewall Honolulu

CHAIRMEN STATE~COMMITTEES (1902).
Alabama Willard I. Wellman Huntsville

Arkansas H. L. Remmel .Little Rock

California William M. Cutt<?r

Palace hotel, San Francisco

Colorado D. B. Fairley

1625 Champa street. Denver

Connecticut Andrew F. Gates Hartford

Florida Henry S. Chubb Gainesville

Georgia W. A. Pledger Vtlanta

Idaho Frank R. Godding Boise

Illinois F. H. Rowe...Gt. Northern, Chicago
Indiana James P. Goodrich

Majestic building, Indianapolis

Iowa It. H. Spence

Equitable bdg., Des Moines

Kansas Morton Albangb Topeka

Kentucky C. M. Barnett Louisville

Louisiana Emile Kuntz

139 Decatur street. New Orleans

Maine F. M. Simpson Bangor

Maryland P. L. Goldsborough Baltimore
Massachusetts A. H. Goettlng

194 Washington street, Boston

Michigan Gerrit J. Diekema Detroit

Minnesota Robert Jamison

Windsor hotel, St. Paul

Missouri Thomas J. Akins St. Louis

Montana William Lindsey Helena

Nebraska H. C. Lindsey. the Lindell, Lincoln

Nevada George T. Mills..! Carson City

New Hampshire J. H. Gallinger

White's Opera House, Concord

New Jersey E. C. Stokes (acting).. Trenton
New York George W. Dunn

Fifth Avenue hotel. New York

North Carolina J. C. Pritchard. Greensboro

North Dakota L. B. Hanna Fargo

Ohio Charles Dick. .Clinton bdg., Columbus
Oregon W. F. Matthews

Benson block, Portland

Pennsylvania .M. S. Quay

1417 Locust street, Philadelphia

Rhode Island Hunter C. White. Providence

South Dakota Frank Crane Sioux Falls

Tennessee Jacob W. Borchee Knoxvill

Texas Cecil A. Lyons Sherman

Utah P. P. Christensen

Central block. Salt Lake City

Vermont Ira A. Allen Fairhaveh

Virginia Park Agnew Alexandria

Washington Ellis 'Morrison Seattle

W. Virginia W. M. O. Dawson.. Charleston
Wisconsin George E. Bryant

Pfister hotel, Milwaukee

Wyoming J. A. Van Orsdell Cheyenne

New Mexico Frank A. Huhbell. Albuquerque
Oklahoma C. M. Cade Guthrie



Headquarters Chicago.

Chairman James K. Jones,- Washington,

D. C.

Vice-Chainnan W. J. Stone. St. Tvouis. Mo.
Secretary C. A. Walsh, Ottumwa, Iowa.



DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL COMMITTEE.



Treasurer M. F. Dunlap, Jacksonville, 111.

Executive Committee J. G. Johnson, Ar-
kansas, chairman: C. A. Walsh, Iowa,
secretary; W. J. Stone, Missouri; H. D.
Clayton, Alabama; Thomas Gahan, 1111-



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR BOOK FOR 1903.



Alameda
. . .Denver
.Stamford
Dover



nois; D. J. Campau, Michigan; J. M.
GutlVy, Pennsylvania; George Fred Wil-
liams, Massachusetts; T. D. O'Brien, Min-
nesota; Thomas Taggart, Indiana; James
C. Duhlmau, Nebraska; Norman E. Mack,
New York.

Alabama H. D. Clayton Eufaula

Alaska L. L. Williams Juneau

Arizona J. B. Breathitt Tucson

Arkansas J. P. Clarke Little Rock

California M. F. Tarpey

Colorado Adair Wilson

Connecticut H. S. Cumuiiugs.,

Delaware R. R. Kenuey

District of Columbia Vacant.

Florida George P. Raney Tallahassee

Georgia Clark Howell A t lanta

Hawaii W. H. Cornwell Honolulu

Idaho E. M. Wolfe Mountain Home

Illinois Thomas Gahau Chicago

Indiana Thomas Taggart Indianapolis

Indian Territory Vacant.

Iowa C. A. Walsh Ottumwa

Kansas J. G. Johnson Peabody

Kentucky L'rey Woodson Oweiisboro

Louisiana N. E. Blanehard Shreveport

Maine George E. Hughes Bath

Mary land A. P. Gorman Laurel

Massachusetts G. F. Williams Boston

Michigan D. J. Campau Detroit

Minnesota T. D. O'Brien St. Paul

Mississippi A. J. Russell Meridian

I Missouri William J. Stone St. Louis

Montana J. S. M. Neill Helena

Nebraska J. C. Dahlrnaii Omaha

Nevada J. R. Ryan Virginia City

New Hampshire True L. Norris. Portsmouth

New Jersey W. B. Gourley Paterson

New Mexico H. B. Fergusson.. Albuquerque

New York N. E. Mack Buffalo

North Carolina Joseph Daniels Raleigh

North Dakota J. B. Eaton Fargo

Ohio John R. McLean Cincinnati

Oklahoma J. R. Jacobs Shawnee

Oregon M. A. Miller L-biinon

Pennsylvania J. M. Guffey Pittsburg

Rhode Island G. W. Greene Woonsocket



Online LibraryAlice Bertha GommeChicago daily news national almanac for .. (Volume 1903) → online text (page 41 of 89)