Alice Bertha Gomme.

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unfolded niece of cardboard not exceeding
3 9-16 by 5 9-16 inches, nor less than 2 15-16
by 4% inches, and must bear at the top of
the address side the words "Post Card."
Advertisements and illustrations may be
printed on either side provided they do not
interfere with the distinctness of the ad-
dress or postmark.

Among the articles requiring first-class
postage are blank forms filled out in writ-
ing; certificates, checks and receipts filled
out in writing; copy (manuscript or type-
written) unaccompanied by proof sheets;
plans and drawings containing written
words, letters or figures; price lists contain-
ing written figures changing individual
Items; old letters sent singly or in bulk;
typewritten matter and manifold copies
thereof, and stenographic notes.

SECOND CLASS. All regular newspapers,
magazines and other periodicals issued at
stated intervals not less frequently' than
four times a year, when mailed by publish-
ers or news agents, 1 cent a pound or frac-
tion thereof; when mailed by others, 1 cent
for each four ounces or fractional parts
thereof.

THIRD CLASS. Books, circulars, pamphlets
and other matter wholly in print (not In-
cluded in second-class matter), 1 cent for
each two ounces or fractional part thereof.
The following named articles are among
those subject to third-class rate of postage:
Almanacs, architectural designs, blue prints,
bulbs, seeds, roots, scions and plants, cal-
endars, cards, press clippings with name
and date of papers stamped or written in,
engravings, samples of grain in its natural
condition. Imitation of hand or type writ-
ton matter when mailed at postoffice win-
dow in a minimum number of twenty iden-
tical copies separately addressed; insur-
ance applications and other blank forms
mainly In print; printed labels, lithographs,
maps, music books, photographs, tags,
proof sheets, periodicals having the char-
acter of books and publications which de-
pend for their circulation upon offers of
premiums.

FOURTH CLASS. All matter not In the
first, second or third class, which is not in
its form or nature liable to destroy, deface
or otherwise damage the contents of the
mailbag or harm the person of any one
engaged in the postal service. 1 cent an
ounce or fraction thereof. Included in
fourth-class mail matter are the following
articles: Blank books, blank cards or pa-
per, blotters, playing cards, celluloid, coin,
crayon pictures, cut flowers, metal or wood
cuta, drawings, dried fruit, dried plants.



electrotype plates, framed engravings, en-
velopes, geological specimens, letterheads,
cloth maps, samples of merchandise, met-
als, minerals, napkins, oil paintings, paper
bags or wrapping paper, photograph albums,
printed matter on other material thuii pa-
per, queen bees properly packed, stationery,
tintypes, wall paper and wooden rulers
bearing printed advertisements.

UNMAILABLE MATTER. Includes that which
is prohibited by law, regulation or treaty
stipulation and that which by reason of
illegible or insufficient address cannot be
forwarded to destination. Among the arti-
cles prohibited are poisons, explosives or
inflammable articles, articles exhaling bad
odors, vinous, spirituous and malt liquors,
specimens of disease germs, lottery letters
and circulars, indecent and scurrilous mat-
ter.

SPECIAL DELIVERY. Any article of mail-
able matter bearing a 10-cent special-deliv-
ery stamp in addition to the regular post-
age is entitled to immediate delivery on
its arrival at the office of address between
the hours of 7 a. m. and 11 p. m., if the
office be of the free-delivery class; and be-
tween the hours of 7 a. m. and 7 p. m., if
the office be other than a free-delivery of-
fice.

REGISTRATION. All mailable matter may
be registered at the rate of 8 cents for each
package in addition to the regular postage,
which must be prepaid. An indemnity not
to exceed $10 for any one piece, or the
actual value if less than $10, will be paid
for the loss of first-class registered matter.

LIMITS OP WEIGHT. No package of third
or fourth class matter weighing more than
four pounds, except single books, will be
received for conveyance by mail. The limit
of weight does not apply to second-class
matter mailed at the second-class rate of
postage, or at the rate of 1 cent foreachfour
ounces, nor is it enforced against matter
fully prepaid with postage stamps affixed
at the first-class or letter rate of postage.

MONEY-ORDER FEES. For domestic money
orders in denominations of $100 or less the
following fees are charged:
For orders for sums not exceeding $2.50...3c

For over *2.50 and not exceeding $5 5c

For over $5 and not exceeding $10 8c

For over $10 and not exceeding $20 lOc

For over $20 and not exceeding $30 12c

For over $30 and not exceeding $40 15c

For over $40 and not exceeding $50 ISc

For over $50 and not exceeding $60 20c

For over $60 and not exceeding $75 25c

For over $75 and not exceeding $100 30c

SUGGESTIONS. Direct your mail matter to
a postoffice, writing the name of the state
plainly; and if to a city, add the street and
number or postoffice box of the person ad-
dressed. Write or print your name and ad-
dress, and the contents, if a package, upon
the upper left-hand corner of all mail mat-
ter. This will insure the immediate return
of all first-class matter to you for correc-
tion, if improperly addressed or insufficient-
ly paid: and if it is not called for at des-
tination it can be returned to yon without
going to the dead-letter office. If a letter,
it will be returned free. Undelivered sec-
ond, third and fourth class matter will not
be forwarded or returned without a new
prepayment of postage. When a return card
appears on this matter either the sender or
addressee is requested to send the postage.
Register all valuable letters and packages.



DIFFERENCE IN TIME.



21



FOREIGN.

Mail matter may bo sent to any foreign
count i-y subject to the following rates and
conditions :

REGISTRATION. Eight cents additional to
ordinai-y postage oil all articles to foreign
countries.

Ox LETTERS. Five cents for each half
ounce or fraction thereof prepayment op-
tional except as to Canada and Mexico.
Double rates are collected on delivery of un-
paid or short-paid letters.

POST CARDS. Single. 2 cents each; \*th
paid reply, 4 cents each.

"Private Mailing Cards" (Post Cards).
Two cents each, subject to conditions gov-
erning domestic post cards.

On newspapers, books, pamphlets, photo-
graphs, sheet music, maps, engravings and
similar printed matter, 1 cent for each two
ounces or fraction thereof. Prepayment re-
quired at least in part.

To CANADA (including Nova Scotia, New
Brunswick, Manitoba and Prince Edward
Island). Letters, 2 cents for each ounce or
fraction thereof; postal cards, 1 cent each;
books, circulars and similar printed matter,

1 cent for each two ounces or fraction
thereof; second-class matter, same as in the
United States; samples of merchandise, 1
cent for each two ounces. Minimum post-
age, 2 cents. Merchandise, 1 cent for each
ounce or fraction. Packages must not ex-
ceed four pounds In weight prepayment
compulsory.

CUBA. Rates of postage same as to the
United States.

To MEXICO. Letters, postal cards and
printed matter, same rates as In the United
States; samples, 1 cent for each two ounces;

2 cents the least postage on a single pack-
age; merchandise other than samples can be
sent only by parcels post.

LIMITS OF SIZE AND WEIGHT. Packages
of samples of merchandise to foreign coun-
tries must not exceed twelve ounces, nor
measure more than twelve inches in length,
eight in breadth and four in depth; and
packages of pYinted matter must not exceed
four pounds six ounces.

PARCELS POST.

Unsealed- packages of mailable merchan-
dise may be sent by parcels post to Jamaica,
including the Turks and Caicos islands,
Barbados, the Bahamas, British Honduras,
Guatemala, republic of Honduras, Mexico,



the Leeward islands. New Zealand, Nica-
ragua, the republic of Colombia, Salvador,
Costa Rica, the Danish West India islands
^St. Thomas, St. Croix and St. John Brit-
ish Guiana, the Windward islands, New-
foundland, Trinidad, including Tobago, and
Germany at the postage rate and subject
to the conditions herein prescribed. Parcels
may also be sent to Chile and Venezuela,
subiect to these conditions, at the rate
of 20 cents per pound or fractional part
thereof.

Limit of weight 11 pounds

Greatest length 3 feet 6 inches

Postage 12c a pound or fraction thereof

Greatest length and girth combined... 6 feet

Except that parcels for Colombia, Costa
Rica and Mexico must not measure more
than two feet in length or more than four
feet in girth.

A parcel must not be posted in a letter
box, but must be taken to the postoffice
window and presented to the person in
charge, between the hours of 9 a. m. and
5 p. m., where a record will be made and
a receipt given therefor.

INTERNATIONAL MONEY ORDERS.

For sums not exceeding $10 lOc

Over $10 and not exceeding $20 20c

Over $20 and not exceeding $30 30c

Over $30 and not exceeding $40 40c

Over $40 and not exceeding $50 50c

Over $50 and" not exceeding $60 60c

Over $60 and not exceeding $70 70c

Over $70 and not exceeding $80 80c

Over $80 and not exceeding $90 90c

Over $90 and not exceeding $100 $1

Domestic rates apply to Cuba and to the
Island possessions of the United States. For
Mexico the rates are one-half of the regular
international fees.

Money orders are exchanged between the
United States and Switzerland. Great Brit-
tain and Ireland, Germany, France, Italy,
Canada and Newfoundland, Jamaica, New
South Wales, Victoria, New Zealand,
Queensland, Cape Colony, Windward and
Leeward islands, Belgium, Portugal, Tas-
mania, Sweden, Norway, Japan, Denmark,
Netherlands, Dutch East Indies, the Ba-
hamas, Trinidad and Tobago, British Gui-
ana, republic of Honduras, Austria, Hun-
gary, Hongkong, Salvador, Bermuda, Lux-
emburg, South Australia, Cuba, Chile, Brit-
ish Honduras, Egypt, Finland and Korea.



DIFFERENCE IN TIME.



By noting the variation In time oetween
the cities representing the eastern, central,
mountain and Pacific divisions in the United
States and those in AlafcKa, Hawaii, Porto
Rico and th_> Philippines and in foreign
countries the variation in time between all
the other cities in the United States and the
places named may be easily calculated.
TUe time in all cases except where other-
wise specified is local or actual time.

When it is 12 o'clock noon on Monday,
eastern time, In New York the correspond-
ing time in the cities named below is:

Chicago (central tlme)'.ll:00 a. m., Monday
Denver (mountain time). 10:00 a. m., Monday
S. Francisco (Pac. time). 9:00 a. m., Monday

Sitka, Alaska 7:58 a. m., Monday

Honolulu 6:28 a. m., Monday

Havana, Cuba 11:30 a. in., Monday

San Juan, Porto KIco. ..12:35 p. m., Monday

Dublin 4<34 p. m., Monday

Edinburgh 4:47 p. m., Monday

London 5 :00 p. m., Monday



Paris 6

Berlin 5

Vienna 6

Rome 5

Brussels 5

The Hague 5

Copenhagen 5

Christiania 5

Stockholm 6

St. Petersburg 7

Constantinople 6

City of Mexico 10

Valparaiso, Chile 12

Madrid ....7 4

Bern 5

Calcutta, India 10

Pretoria 6

Rio de Janeiro 2

Pekin 12

Manila 1

Tokyo .-, 2

Melbourne 2

Sydney 3

Apia, Samoa 5



:09 p. m,
:53 p. m
:05 p. m
:49 p. in.
:17 p. m
:17 p. m
:50 p. m
:42 p. m
:12 p. m
:01 p. m
6 p. m
4 a. in
:13 p. m
:45 p. m.
:29 p. m
:53 p. m
:55 p. m
:07 p. m.
:45 a. m.
:03 a. m.
18 a. in.
:39 a. m,
:04 a. m.
:33 a. m.



, Monday
, Monday
, Monday
, Monday
, Monday
, Monday
, Monday
, Monday
, Monday
, Monday
, Monday
, Monday
, Monday
, Monday
, Monday
, Monday
, Monday
, Monday
, Tuesday
, Tuesday
. Tuesday
, Tuesday
, Tuesday
, Tuesday



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR BOOK FOR 1903.



LEGAL HOLIDAYS.



Alabama Jan. 1; Feb. 22; Mardi Gras (the
day before Ash Wednesday, first day of
Lent); Good Friday (the Friday before
Easter); April 26 (Confederate Memorial
day); July 4; Labor day (first Monday iu
September) ; Thanksgiving day (last Thurs-
day in November) ; Dec. 25.

Arizona Jan. 1; Feb. 22; May 30 (Decora-
tion day); July 4; general election day;
Dec. 25.

Arkansas Jan. 1; Feb. 22; July 4; Thanks-
giving day; Dec. 25.

California Jan. 1; Feb. 22; May 30 (Dec-
oration day); July 4; Sept. 9 (Admission
day) ; Labor day (first Monday in October) ;
general election day in November;
Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25.

Colorado Jan. 1; Feb. 22; Arbor and School
day (third Friday in April); May 30;
July 4; first Monday in September; gen-
eral election day; Thanksgiving day;
Dec. 25; every Saturday afternoon from
June 1 to Aug. 31, in the city of Denver.

Connecticut Jan. 1; Feb. 12 (Lincoln's
birthday); Feb. 22; state fast day; May
30; July 4; Labor day (first Monday in
September); Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25;
banks close Saturdays at 12 noon.

Delaware Jan. 1; Feb. 22; May 30; July 4;
first Monday in September; Thanksgiving
day; Dec. 25.

District of Columbia Jan. 1; Feb. 22;
March 4 (Inauguration day); May 30; iuly
4; first Monday in September; Thanksgiv-
ing day; Dec. 25.

Florida Jan. 1; Jan. 19 (Lee's birthday);
Arbor day (first Friday in February);
Feb. 22; April 26 (Confederate Memorial
day); June 3 (Jefferson Davis' Ivirthday) ;
July 4; first Monday in September; Thanks-
giving day; general election day; Dec. 25.

Georgia Jan. 1; Jan. 19 (Lee's birthday);
Feb. 22; April 26 (Confederate Memorial
day); June 3 (Jefferson Davis' birthday);
July 4; first Monday in September: Thanks-
giving day; Arbor day (first Friday in
December); Dec. 25.

Idaho Jan. 1; Feb. 22; Arbor day (first Fri-
day after May 1); July 4; first Monday in
September; general election day; Thanks-
giving day; Dec. 25.

Illinois Jan. 1; Feb. 12 (Lincoln's birth-
day); Feb. 22; May 30; July 4: Labor day
(first Monday in September); general,
state, county and city election days;
Thankapiving day; Dec. 25.

Indiana Jan. 1; Feb. 22: public fast day;
May 30; July 4; first Monday In Septem-
ber; general election day; Thanksgiving
day; Dec. 25.

Iowa Jan. 1; Feb. 22: May 30; July 4; first
Monday in September; general election
day; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25.

Kansas The only holidays by statute are
Feb. 22, May 30, Labor day (first Monday
In September) and Arbor day; but the
days commonly observed in other states
are holidays by common consent.

Kentucky Jan. 1: Feb. 22; May 30; first
Monday in September; Thanksgiving day;
general election day; Dec. 25.

Louisiana Jan. 1; Jan. 8 (anniversary of
the battle of New Orleans): Feb. 22;
Mardi Gras (day before Ash Wednesday):
Good Friday (Friday before Easter) : April
26 (Confederate Memorial day): July 4:
Nov. 1 (All Saints' day) ; general election
day; fourth Saturday in November (Labor



day, in the parish of New Orleans only);
Dec. 25; every Saturday afternoon in New
Orleans.

Maine Same as the state of Delaware;
banks close Saturdays at 12 noon.

Maryland Jan. 1; Feb. 22; May 30; July 4;
first Monday in September; general elec-
tion day; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25;
every Saturday afternoon.

Massachusetts Feb. 22; April 19 (Patriots'
day); May 30; July 4; first Monday in
September; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25.

Michigan Same as the state of Delaware.

Minnesota Jan. 1; Feb. 12; Feb. 22; Good
Friday (Friday before Easter); May 30;
July 4; first Monday in September;
Thanksgiving day; general election day;
Dec. 25; Arbor day (as appointed by the
governor).

Mississippi First Monday in September;
by common consent July 4, Thanksgiving
day and Dec. 25 are observed as holi-
days.

Missouri Same as the state of Delaware;
every Saturday afternoon in cities of 100,-
000 or more inhabitants.

Montana Jan. 1; Feb. 22; Arbor day (third
Tuesday in April); May 30; July 4; first
Monday in September; general election
day; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25; any day
appointed by the governor as a fast day.

Nebraska Jan. 1; Feb. 22; Arbor day (April
22); May 30; July 4; first Monday in Sep-
tember; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25; ap-
pointed fast day.

Nevada There are no statutory holidays,
but by common consent those usually ob-
served in other states are generally kept.

New Hampshire Feb. 22; fast day appoint-
ed by the governor; May 30; July 4; first
Monday in September: Thanksgiving day;
general election day; Dec. 25.

New Jersey Jan. 1; Feb. 12; Fof). 22; May
30; July 4; first Monday in September;
general election day; Thanksgiving and
fast days; and every Saturday afternoon.

New Mexico Jan. 1; July 4; Thanksgiving
and fast days; Dec. 25; Decoration. Labor
and Arbor days appointed by the governor.

New York Jan. 1; Feb. 12; Feb. 22; May
30; July 4; first Monday in September;
general election day: Thanksgiving and
fast days; Dec. 25; every Saturday "after-
noon.

North Carolina Jan. 1: Jan. 19 (Lee's birth-
day); May 10 (Confederate Memorial day);
May 20 (anniversary of the signing of the
Mecklenburg declaration of independence) ;
July 4; state election day in August:
first Thursday in September (Labor day) ;
Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25; every Satur-
day afternoon.

North Dakota<-Jan. 1; Feb. 12: Feb. 22;
May 30; July 4; Arbor day (when appoint-
ed by the governor): general election day:
Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25.

Ohio Jan. 1; Feb. 22: May 30; July 4; first
Monday in September; general election
day; Thanksgiving day: Dec. 25; every
Saturday afternoon in cities of 50,000 or
more inhabitants.

Oregon Jan. 1; Fob. 22: May 30; first Satur-
day in June: first Monday in September;
general election day; Thanksgiving djiy;
public fast day; Dec. 25.



HKCIL'KOCITY TREATIES AND AGREEMENTS.



Vermont Jan. 1; Feb. 22; May 30; July 4;
Aug. 16 (Beuningtou Battle day); Thanks-
giving day; Dec. 25.



Washington Jan. 1; Feb. 12 (Lincoln's
birthday); Feb. 22; May 30; July 4; nrst
Monday in September; general election
day; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25.



Pennsylvania Jan. 1; Feb. 12; Feb. ^2; Muy
30; Good Friday; July 4; nrst Monday in
September; general election day; Thanks-
giving day; Dec. 25; every Saturday after-
noon.

Rhode Island Feb. 22; first Wednesday in
April (state election day); first Friday in
April (Arbor day); May 30; July 4; first
Monday in September; general election
day; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25.

South Carolina Jan. 1; Jan. 19 (Lee's birth-
day); Feb. 22; May 10 (Confederate Me-
morial day); general election flay;
Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25, 26, 27.

South Dakota Same as In North Dakota.

Tennessee Jan. 1; Good Friday; May 30;
July 4; first Monday in September; gen-
eral election day; Thanksgiving day; Dec.
25; every Saturday afternoon.

Texas Jan. 1; Feb. 22 (Arbor day); March
2 (anniversary of Texas Independence);
April 21 (anniversary of battle of San
Jacinto); July 4; first Monday in Septem-
ber; general election day; appointed fast
days; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25.

Utah Jan. 1; Feb. 22; first Saturday in
April (Arbor day); May 30; July 4; July
24 (Pioneer day) ; first Monday in Septem-
ber; Thanksgiving and appointed fast
days; Dec. 25.




The national holidays, such aa July 4,
New Year's, etc., are such by general cus-
tom and observance and not because of
congressional legislation. Congress has
passed no laws establishing holidays for the
whole country. It has made Labor day a
holiday in the District of Columbia, but
the law is of no effect elsewhere.



RECIPROCITY TREATIES AND AGREEMENTS.

In force between the United States and foreign countries since 1830. [Table prepared by
the bureau of statistics. Washington, D. C.]



FOREIGN COUNTRY.



Took effect.



Terminated.



British North American possessions (treaty)

Hawaiian islands (treaty)

Brazil (agreement)

Santo Domingo (agreement) .'

Great Britain Barbados (agreement)

Jamaica (agreement) ,

Leeward islands (agreement)

Trinidad, including Tobago (agreement)

Windward Isl., excepting Grenada (agreement)...

British Guiana (agreement)

Salvador (agreement)

Nicaragua (agreement)

II ond viras (agreement)

Guatemala (agreement)

Spain, for Cuba and Porto Rico (agreement)

Austria-Hungary (agreement)

France (agreement)



March 16,1855

Sept. 9, 1876



April 1,1891

Sept. 1,1891

Feb. 1,1892

Feb. 1,1892....,



Feb. 1,1893

Feb. 1,1892

Feb. 1,1892

April 1,1892

Feb. 1, 1892 (provisional)
March 12, 1892,



March 17, 1866,
Apr! 130, 1900.



Aug. 27, 1894.



Germany (agrsemen t)

Portugal and Azores and Madeira Isl. (agreement)

Ital y ( agreement )

Switzerland (treaty of 1850)



May 25. 1892 (provisional)

May 30, 1892

Sept.l, 1891 (provisional)

May26, 1892

June 1,1898 ,

( Feb. 1,1892

jjulyl3,1900

June 12, 1900

July 18,1900

*June 1,1890



Still in force.
Aug. 24, 1894.
Still in force.
Still in force.
Still in force.
March 23, 1900.



Under "most favored nation" clause of the treaty of 1850.

EXISTING AGREEMENTS SUMMARIZE!}.



FRANCE The United States reduces the
rate of duty on crude tartar from France
to 5 per cent ad valorem; on brandies or
other spirits to $1.75 per gallon; also a re-
duction on still wines and vermuth, and on
paintings to 15 per cent ad valorem, while
the French government gives its minimum
tariff rates to canned meats, table fruits,
dried fruits, lard, manufactured and pre-
pared pork meats, hops, paving blocks,
staves and logs and sawed or squared tim-
ber and lumber from the United States.

GERMANY The United States gives the
same tariff rates as those named In the
treaty with France on tartar, brandies,
still wines and paintings, and the German
government gives to the United States the
same tariff rates as those given to Belgium,
Italy. Austria-Hungary, Roumania, Russia
and Switzerland during the existence of the
present tariff treaties with them and an-



nuls its regulations regarding dried fruits
from the United States, providing in thei
stead a system of Inspection on account of
the San Jose scale.

PORTUGAL The reductions on crude tar-
tar, brandies, wines and paintings accorded
to Germany and France are given by the
United States to Portugal, and the Portu-
guese government gives to the United
States as low rates of duty as those ac-
corded to any other country, except Spain
and Brazil, on breadstuff's, lard, mineral
oils, agricultural implements and certain
machinery for manufacturing.

ITALY The above-named rates with refer-
ence to tartar, brandies, sttll wines and
paintings are given by the United States,
and a reduction Is made by the Italian gov-
ernment on imports of cotton-seed oil, fish,
machinery, scientific instruments, fertiliz-
ers and skins.



24 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR BOOK FOR 1903.


QUALIFICATIONS FOR SUFFRAGE.




PREVIOUS




.






RESIDENCE





^




REQUIREMENTS
FOR VOTERS IN THE


BEQtTlUKI).


1


1


Excluded from








*J


VARIOUS STATES.




_~


.


.


*





voting.




B


c


~-






.8






a


|


?


^










E


Q





$




03




ALABAMA Citizens of good


ly.


m


30 d


Jtid


Yes.


Yes.


If convicted of treason, embezzle- 1


character and understanding, or














mentof public funds, malfeasance j


aliens who have declared inten-














in office or other penitentiary of-


tion: must exhibit poll-tax ro-














fenses, idiots or insane.


AHKANSAS Like Alabama, ex-


iy.


m


-.Od


Od


No..


Tes.


Idiots, insane, convicts until par-


cept as to ''good character."
CALlFORNlA-Citizens by nativ-


iy.


Wd




>0d


res.


Yes.


doned, nonpayment of poll tax.
Chinese, insane, embezzlers of pub-


ity; naturalized for 90 days, or














lic moneys, convicts.


treaty of yueretaro.
















COLORADO-Citizens, male or fe-
male, or aliens who declared in-


>m


IOd


d


Od


Yes.


Yes.


Persons under guardianship. In-
sane, idiots, prisoners convicted


tention 4 months before offer-














of bribery.


ing to vote.
CONNECTICUT Citizens who


iy.




m




Yes.


Yes.


Convicted of felony or other infa-


can read.
DELAWARE Citizens paying $1


iy.


m




.Od


No..


Yes.


mous crime unless pardoned.
Insane, idiots, felons, paupers.


registration fee.
FLORIDA Citizens of United


1 V


.






fes.


res.




States.














under kruardian. felons, convicts.


G EORG 1 A Citizens who can read
and have paid all taxes since 18TT.


ly.


iiu






(a)


<o.. Persons convicted of crimes pun-
ishable by imprisonment, insane,



Online LibraryAlice Bertha GommeChicago daily news national almanac for .. (Volume 1903) → online text (page 5 of 89)