Alice Bertha Gomme.

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788.565,904


921,301,932


132.736.IKH


IS'.*!. .


779.7 - U.074


S-82.000.938


102.SK2264


62.302.251


172,961,617


842.026.926


1.055.558.553


213.531.H30


1S97. .


764,780,412


1.050.993.556


2M,2fi3.U4


115.iM8.00-


102.:i08,2ls


880,278.419


1.153.301.774


273.023,355


1898. .


616,049.654


1.231.482.3JM


615.432.67h


151.319.45r


70.511.630


7t57.869.10t


l.S01.B.9tiO


534.624.H51


1899. .


c.'.ir.iisjs;


1,227.023.302


529.X74A1.


119,829,65!


93.841,141


816,778.148


1.330,8tJ4.44:


504.OK6.295


1900. .


849.941.184


1,394,483,062


-tt4.541.bffr


79,828.481


NH.'.iT'.Ui:;


929,770.670


l,499.462.11t


569.691.446


1901.


823.172.1(55


J.487,764.!M1


*;4.:,'.ri.v.


102.437.708


117.470.35"


925,809.875


1.605.235,34h


679,625.475


1902* .


903.327.0711 1,3S1,719.401


478,392.33(


80.253,508


98.:;oi.:!ii


!K!..V4I.57!


1,480.020.74


496.440. 162


Total. . .


:,:;-j;>:iV)():;'.ii :;i;u:>r.i:;n;i


:ntfM433r>.


.'.:;. :ai.tvs


:;.si5.2i.-, ; .i:>:


85575851077


4(&5H4tni214


4,6H2.55*. 137


Subject to revision.


NIITK -Morcliandis-j and snorio arn combined in the columns at right of table for the


purpose of showing tlio total inward and ontwanl movement of values by years.



40 CHICAGO DAILY NKWS ALMANAC AND YEAR BOOK FOR 1903.


INTERNAL REVENUE.






Comparative statement showing the receipts from the several objects of internal taxation
in the United States during the fiscal years ended June 30, 1901 and 1902.


OBJECTS OF TAXATION.


1901.


1902.


Increase.


Decrease.


SPIRITS.
Spirits distilled from apples, peaches, grapes,
pears, pineapples, oranges, apricots, berries,
prunes, tigs and cherries


$1,660,198.10

109,194,505,24
268.251.11
4.429.353.96
449,435.81
1,655.88
3,080.00
3,001.40
18,498.00


$1,543,524.72

113,741,591.18

288.771.84
6,043.097.11(1
496.482.88
]. 110.01
3,040.00
3.233 JO
17.162.10




$116,673.44


Spirits distilled from materials other than
apples, peaches, grapes, pears, pineapples,
oranges, apricots, berries, prunes, flgs and
cherries
Rectifiers (special tax)


$4,547,085.94
20.520.7:;
613.743.04
47,047.07


Retail liquor dealers (special tax)
Wholesale liquor dealers (special tax)






545.87
40.00


Stills and worms, manufactured (special tax)..
Stamps for distilled spirits intended for export
Case stamps for distilled spirits bottled in bond
Total

TOBACCO.

Cigars weighing more than 3 pounds per thou-




232.00


1.335.90


116.027.979.56


121,138.013.13


5.110.033.57




20.775.363.73


18,311,142.25




2,464,221.48
273,000.57
751,459.06


Cigars weighing not more than 3 pounds per


684.504.05
3,407,433.94

19,609.89
2,003,021.32
35,292,205.76
59.865.35
15.710.50
16,604.27
206.213.74
1,874.58


410,903.48
2,655,974.88

31,164.67
1,696,429.02
28,612.614. 1/.
50.641.59
10.810.08
12,425.56
144,826.94
962.57




Cigarettes weighing not more than 3 pounds




Cigarettes weighing more than 3 pounds per


11,554.78


Snuff.
Tobacco, chewing and smoking


3tti,592.30
6,079,661.61
8,72176
4 10042










4,178.71
61,386.80
912.01






Miscellaneous collections relating to tobacco..
Total

FERMENTED LIQUORS.

Ale, beer, lager beer, porter and other similar
fermented 1 iqu ors




62,481,907.13


51.937.9i5.19




10.54Jiy81.ll4


74,956.593.87
146.320.56
215.041.59
346.848.40

5.103.23


71,166,711.65

167.826.36
241 ,458.87
404,993.94

7.313.57


""21,505.86
26.415.28
58,145.54

2,810.34


3,789,882.22


Retail dealers in malt liquors (special tax)
Wholesale dealers in malt liquors (special tax)
Miscellaneous collections relating to fer-
mented liquors








Total
OLEOMARGARINE.


75.669,907.65


71,988,902.3!)




3,681,005.26


2,032.926.67
16,225.00
385,245.25

83,704.52


2.463.615.23

19.500.00
377,732.23

83.645.00


430.688.56

3.27J.01)




Manufacturers of oleomargarine (special tax).
Retail dealers in oleomargarine (special tax). .
Wholesale dealers in oleomargarine (special
tax)




7,513.02
59.52




Total


2.518,101.44


2,944,492.46


426.391.02




FILLED CHEESE.


13,055.97

1,566.67
30.00
14 65264






13.tt55.97
I,566.li7
6.00


Manufacturers of filled cheese (special tax)... .
Retail dealers in filled cheese (special tax)






24.00
24 00




MIXED FLOUR.

Per barrel of 196 Ibs or more than 98 Ibs


1,364.08
2,849.99
292.56
1,077.23

1.022.50


12.44
1,244.86
145.02
310.53

500.00




1,351.64
1,605.13
147.54
766.70

522.50


Half barrel of 98 Ibs or more than 49 Ibs




Quarter barrel of 49 Ibs or more than 24> Ibs.. .
Eighth barrel of 24mbs or less






Manufacturers, packers or repackers of mixed
flour (special tax)




Total....


6,606.36


2,212.85




4.393.61


SPECIAL TAXES NOT ELSEWHERE ENUMER-
ATED.


317,440.62
2,952,528.70


362,160.52
3,125,572.71


4t,719.90
173.044.01




Bankers, capital exceeding $25.000. for each ad-
ditional $1,000 in excess of $25,000







ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY TONS OF GOLD. 41


INTERNAL REVENUE. CONTINUED.


OBJECTS OF TAXATION.


1901.


1902.




Increase.


Decrease.


SPECIAL TAXES. CONTINUED.

Billiard rooms '..


$322,603.94
259.149.34.
87,915.28


$286,880.80
230,172.34




$35,723.34
28,977.00
87,915.28
759.05
8,879.38


Brokers, stocks, bonds, etc








Brokers, custom-house


5.260.48
34,791.93
41,420.30
10.071.00
73,810.00
47,508.17
13,229.26


4,500.83
25,912.55
44,065.66
11.018.45
67.847.50
52,580.45
52,184.71








Bowling alleys


$2.645.30
947.45






Exhibitions not otherwise provided for


5.968.56




5,078.28
38,955.45


Brokers, class 2




Total


4.165,735.14: 4,262,902.32


97,167.18




LEGACIES AND DISTRIBUTIVE SHAKES OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY.

Legacies, lineal issue or ancestor, brother or


3,495.920.54
912,343.69

68,767.37
4,840.75
730,026.33


3,781,468.83
639,940.42

79,997.32
4,082.84
337,477.11


285,548.29




Legacies, descendant of a brother or sister
Legacies, brother or sister of the father or
mother, or a descendant of a brother or sis-


272,403.27


11,229.95


Legacies, brother or sister of the grandfather
or grandmother, or a descendant of the


757.91
392.549.22


Legacies, any other degree of collateral con-
sanguinity than is hereinbefore stated, or
stranger in blood




Total


6.211.898.68


4,842,966.52




868,932.16


SCHEDULES A AND B.

Schedule A


34.998,836.30


12,913.856.90




22,084,979.40


Schedules


4,242,200.02


528,935.79




3,713,204.23


Total


89.241,036.32


13.442.792.69




25,798,243.03


BANKS, BANKERS, ETC.




227.50


227.50




Notes of persons, state banks, towns, cities,
etc., paid out
Total .-.


1,918.00


1,918.00


1,918.00


227.50




1,690.50


MISCELLANEOUS.

Excise tax on gross receipts


1,027.294.99


130,376.50




296,918.49






500.00
364,077.72
208.209.05
3,767.93
1 307 531 20


500.65
47,407.98
22,341.22
2,273.99




317,269.74

185,807.83
1.493.94
1 531 9">6 50








Collections not otherwise herein provided for.




Aggregate receipts


306.871,609.42


271.867,990.25




35,003,079.17


"Tax repealed on a
RECEIPTS BY STATES AND TERRITO
State or territory. Collections. State or territo
Alabama 1402,515.47 La. and Miss..
Arkansas 154,098.73 Maryland*
Cal and Nev 3,785,92(5.74 Massachusetts


ad after July

RIBS DURI
ry. CollectAo
.... $2,453,925
.... 7,410,911
.... 6,950,538
.. 4.5SO .S!K


1, 1901.

NG THE FISCAL YE^
ns. State or territory.
47 North Carolina
17 N. and S. Dakota. .
74 Ohio


t R 1902.
Collections.
$5,618,666.60

157,927.87
22,073,559.51

1,092,010.89
22,841,069.22
458.075.29
1,940.477. 37
1,143,982.58
4,097,788.'.4
1,401,375.66
10.029.94:(.22
71,807,990.25
k


Col and Wyo . . 976,428.88 Michigan


42 Oregon,
84 ton, A
87 Pennsyl
23 South Ci
Ten ness
m. Tex&s...


Washing-
aska
vania
irolina
ee


Conn and R. I 3.002.808.61 Minnesota 2,161,062


Florida 011,534.09 Missouri 14.212.323


(jeoreia 601. 806.54 Montana. Idat


o 792,057


Hawaii 7023522 and Utah


Illinois 5402911536 Nebraska 9SSQ7R9




Indiana 25.178,552.61 N. H., Me. and
Iowa L251.160.r4 New Jersey....


Vt. 964.528.08 Virginia
.... 8,035.940.35 West Vii
riz. 70,730.18 Wiscons
. . . 38.694.831.27 Total .


ni nia


Kas., I. T. and O.T. . 750.470.32 N. Mex. and A
Kentucky 21,969,013.30 New York


~)


Including Delaware, District of Columbia and two counties of Virgin's


ONE HUNDRED AND T\


From the opening of the government assay
office in Seattle, Wash., July 15, 1898, to the
close of business June 30, 1902, the gold de-
posited amounted to 3,506,032.66 troy ounces,
or 120.5 avoVdupois tons, having a coinage


^ENTY TONS OF GOLD.

value of $57,563,046.25. Of this, $9,387,064
came from Alaska, U. S. A.; $45,109,318.76
from Yukon territory, Canada; $2,465,094.26
from British Columbia and $601,569.23 from
Washington, Oregon, Idaho and foreign coin.



CHICAGO DAILY NKWS ALMANAC AM) YEAR BOOK FOU 1U03.



NORTHWESTERN GAME AND FISH LAWS.
The dates given are those for the open season except where it is otherwise specified.



ILLINOIS.
A. J. Lovejoy, State Game Commissioner,

Springfield, 111.

HUNTING Deer and wild turkeys (after
1904) Sept. 1 to Jail. 15.

Pheasants and partridges (after 1904) Aug.
31 to Oct. 1.

Mourning doves Aug. 1 to Dec. 1.

Squirrels July 1 to Dec. 1.

Snipe and plover Sept. 1 to April 25.

Wild geese, ducks, brant or other water-
fowlSept. 1 to April 15.

The use of ambush devices, swivel guns,
etc., in hunting game birds is forbidden.

In the amended law of 1901 no mention is

made of quail or woodcock.
FISHING Fishing with nets, June 1 to April
15.

Fishing with seines, Aug. 1 to April 15.

Fishing with hook and line, all the year.

The use of anything but hook and line in
taking black bass, pike or pickerel is
unlawful all the year. No fish may be
taken within 400 feet below any dam be-
tween April 15 and June 15.
LICENSES For hunting Nonresidents, $10.50.

Licenses are issued by the secretary of
state, who will send blanks on appli-
cation.

WISCONSIN.
Henry Overbeck, Jr., State Game Warden,

Madison, Wis.

HUNTING Woodcock, partridge, pheasant,
prairie chicken Sept. 1 to Nov. 30.

Grouse of all kinds, plover and snipe
Sept. 1 to Nov. 30.

Rabbit and squirrel (use of ferret pro-
hibited) July 1 to May 1.

Otter, marten, beaver or flsher Feb. 1
'to May 1.

Wild duck, brant or any aquatic fowl,
including snipe, but excepting wiia
geese Sept. 1 to Dec. 30.

Swan Perpetually protected.

Mongolian. Chinese or English pheasant
and quail of all varieties Protected till
September, 1903.

Deer Nov. 10 to Nov. 30.

Deer in Sauk, Adams, Columbia, Richland,
Marquette, Fond du Lac, Sbeboygan,
Manitowoe and Calumet counties Al-
ways protected.

Fawn Always protected.

Not more than two deer may be killed by

one person in one season.
FISHING Trout, all varieties April 15 to
Aug. 31. ^

Black, yellow and Oswego bass May 25 to
Feb. 28.

Muskellunge and pike May 25 to Feb. 28.

There are restrictions on fishing in some
counties and the open season varies in
others.

LICENSES For deer and all other game-
Residents, $1.

For deer and all other game (not pro-
tected) Nonresidents, $25.

For all game (not protected) except deer
Nonresidents. $10.

Licenses issued by county clerks.

MICHIGAN.
Grant M. Morse, State Game and Fish

Warden, Portland, Mich.
HUNTING Deer, except on the island of Bols
Blanc, Lapeer. Huron, Monroe. Sanilac.
Tuscola. Macomb. Allegan, Ottawa and
St. Clair counties Nov. 8 to Nov. 30.



Deer in counties named cannot be hunted
till Nov. 8. 1906.

Moose, elk and caribou Protected until
laii.

Fox, black and gray squirrel Oct. IB to
Nov. 30.

Beaver Protected until 1906.

Otter, flsher and marten Nov. 15 to May 1.

Mink, raccoon, skunk and inusbrat Nov.
'1 to Aug. 30.

Partridge, quail, spruce hen. woodcock
Oct. 20 to Nov. 30, except that partridge
may be killed in the upper peninsula
from Oct. 1 to Nov. 30.

Prairie chickens, Mongolian and English
pheasants, wild turkey and pigeon Pro-
tected till 1910.

Ducks, geese and all wild waterfowl
Oct. 1 to Nov. 30.

Jacksnipe, pin-tail, whistler, spoon-bill,
butter-ball and saw-bill ducks March 2
to April 10.

Antwerp or homing pigeon and mourning
doves Permanently protected.

All song and insectivorous birds except
blackbirds, English sparrows 1 and crows
Permanently protected.

No person can kill more than three deer
in any one year. Ambush devices cannot
be used in hunting game birds. Only
the ordinary gun of ten-caliber or less
can be used.

FISHING Speckled trout, grayling, salmon.
California trout, German trout May 1
to Sept. 1.

In Maple river. Emmet county, the open
season for the above varieties of fish is
May 1 to Aug. 1.

Black bass (with hook and line only)
May 20 to April 1.

Fish less than eight -Inches in length can-
not be taken from Au Sable river or
any of Its tributaries. On all other
streams fish less than six Inches in
length cannot be taken. More than fifty
fish must not be taken by one person in
one day from the Au Sable river or any
of its tributaries.

Protected game and flsh cannot be trans-
ported out of the state. Sale prohibited.
LICENSES For hunting deer Residents, 75
cents: nonresidents. $25.

Apply to county clerks for license.

MINNESOTA.

Samuel F. Fullerton, Executive Agent of
Board of Game and Fish Commis-
sioners, St. Paul, Minn.
HUNTING Snipe, pinnated grouse and sharp-
tailed grouse Sept. 1 to Nov. 1.
Quail and ruffed grouse Oct. 1 to Dec. 1.
Woodcock and upland plover July 4 to

Oct. 31.
Wild duck, goose, brant or any wild

aquatic fowls Sept. 1 to Jan. 1.
The sale or shipment of the above-named

game birds is prohibited.
Peer Nov. 10 to Nov. 30.
Male moose or male caribou Nov. 15 to

Nov. 20.

Each hunter is allowed to kill three deer,
one moose and one caribou. Sale or ship-
ment by common or private carrier Is
prohibited.
FISHINO Any variety of trout April 15 to

Sept. 1.
Any variety of bass June 1 to March 1.



NORTHWESTERN GAME AND FISH LAWS.



All other food fish, except thoso caug'.it
with nets In International waters or
waters in which fishing with nets is
permitted May 1 to March 1.

The sale of brook trout and bass before

Jan. 1, 1908. is prohibited.
LICENSES Hunting deer, moose and elk
Residents, 25 cents; nonresidents, $25.

Citizens of states that have license laws

Erohlbitiug citizens of Minnesota from
untiug iu their respective, states have
to pay a license fee of $25.

IOWA.
George A. Lincoln, Game Warden, Cedar

Rapids, Iowa.

HUNTING Pinnated grouse and prairie
chicken Sept. 1 to Dec. 1.

Woodcock July 10 to Jan. 1.

Ruffed grouse, pheasant, wild turkey and
quail Nov. 1 to Jan. 1.

Wild duck, goose and brant Sept. 1 to
April 15.

Squirrels Sept. 1 to Jan. 1.

Beaver, mink, otter and muskrat Nor. 1
to April 1.

The use of ambush devices, except that
decoys may be used in hunting wild
ducks and geese, is prohibited. Hunt-
ing at night and for traffic is forbid-
den. No one person shall kill in one
day more than twenty-five grouse, prairie
chicken, woodcock, quail or pheasant.

All harmless birds, except bluejays and

English sparrows, are protected.
FISHING Trout and salmon March 1 to
Nov. 1.

Bass, pike, croppies or other game flsn
May 15 to Nov. 1.

Fishing, except by hook and line, Is pro-
hibited, but any person may use one
trot line extending half way across any
stream between May 15 and Dec. 1.

The Missouri. Mississippi and the part of
the Des Moines river forming state
boundary are excepted.

LICENSES For hunting Residents, no
license; nonresidents, $10.50.

Licenses payable to county auditors.
INDIANA.

There is no game warden under the In-
diana law. Frank L. Littleton, Fletcher
Bank building, Indianapolis, is state warden
for the League of American Sportsmen.
HUNTING Quail, ruffed grouse, prairie
chicken and pinnated grouse Nov. 10 to
Jan. 1.

Deer, wild turkeys and pheasants No
open season.

Squirrels June 1 to Oct. 1, Nov. 10 to
Jan. 1.

Wild geese, wild ducks, brant and other
wild waterfowl Sept. 1 to Oct. 1, Nov.
10 to April 15.

Wild doves Aug. 15 to Oct. 1, Nov. 10
to Jan. 1.

Residents of Indiana and nonresidents who
have secured a license may hunt squir-
rels, wild duck and other wildfowl
from Oct. 1 to Nov. 10, provided they
have been given a nermlt by the com-
missioner of fisheries and game.

The shooting or hunting of birds or any
kind of game on Sunday Is forbidden.

Only rowboats and pushboats may be used
in hunting waterfowl. Only twenty-four
ducks may be shot In one day by one
person. The same is true of quail.
FISHING All fish in Inland waters of the
state April 1 to Pec. 1.

Fishin* with hook and line All the year.

Fishing by any person with more than
one trot line at one time Is prohibited.



No person shall take more than twenty

black bass on one day. Ice fishing is

unlawful.
No pickerel less than twelve inches In

length or black bass less than six inches

in. length shall be caught.
LICENSES For hunting in the open seasons

Residents, free; nonresidents, $25.50.
Licenses are procured from county Circuit

court clerks.

NEBRASKA.
George B. Simpkins, Chief Deputy Game

and Fish Commissioner, Lincoln, Neb.
HUNTING Deer having horns ajjd antelope
having horns Aug. 15 to Nov. 15.

Prairie chicken, sage chicken and grouse
Oct. 1 to Nov. 30.

Quail (after Nov. 1, 1903) Nov. 1 to Nov.
30.

Wild ducks, geese, brant, swans, cranes
and game waterfowls Sept. 1 to April 15.

Jacksnlpe, Wilson snipe and yellow legs-
Sept. 1 to April IB.

Wild pigeons, doves and plover April 15

to Oct. 30.

FISHING Trout not less than eight Inches In
length June 1 to Oct. 31.

Only one deer and one antelope may be
killed by one person in one season. Two
deer or two antelope may be killed, but
not two of both. No pe'rson shall have
in his possession at one time more than
ten wild geese or brant, or more than
fifty ducks and fifty other birds, nor
more than fifty fish.

LICENSES For hunting and fishing Non
residents, $10.

For hunting and fishing anywhere In the
state Residents, $1.

Licenses may be procured from the countv
clerks.

COLORADO.

C. W. Harris, State Gam^ and Fish Com-
missioner, Denver, Col.
HUNTING Horned deer and antelope Aug

15 to Nov. 5.
Turkeys, prairie chickens, sage chickens

and grouse Aug. 15 to Oct. 31.
Ducks, geese, snipes, curlews, brant,

swans and cranes Sept. 1 to April 15.
For ducks, etc., in regions over 7,000 feet

above sea level Sept. 15 to April 15.
Wild pigeons and doves July 15 to Sept.

30.

Buffalo, mountain sheep, quails, pheas-
ants, partridges, ptarmigans or beaver
No open season.

FISHING Trout, whitefish. grayling, sunflsh,
bass, catfish and wall-eyed pike June 1
to Oct. 31.

One person is limited to fifty ducks and
twenty-five other birds, twenty pounds
of trout and fifty pounds of other fish
in a calendar day, and to one elk, one
deer and one antelope In one season.
LICENSES None is required. Transportation
out'of the state is allowed on a nermit
which costs for each elk $10, deer or
antelope $5 and lot of fish $2.

NORTH DAKOTA.
Ever Wagness, State Game Warden, Devil's

Lake. N. D.

HUNTING Prairie chicken, pinnated grouse,
sharp-tailed grouse, ruffed grouse, wood-
cockSept. 1 to Oct. 15.
Quail, English or Chinese pheasant, wild

swans Protected till 1905.
Wild ducks Sept. 1 to May 1.
Wild geese, cranes and brant Sept. 1 to
May 1.



44



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR BOOK FOH 1903.



Game birds cannot be bunted or killed
from ambush or with other than the
ordinary gun.

Buffalo, moose, elk, caribou and mountain
sjieep Permanently protected.

Deer Nov. 10 to Dec. 1.

Beaver and otter Protected till 1905.

Antelope Protected till 1911.

Not more than twenty -five game birds
may be killed by one person in one day,
and not more than five deer, beaver or
otter in one season.
FISHING No restrictions.
LICENSES For hunting any game in the
open season Residents, 76 cents; non-
residents, $26.

Licenses are Issued by the county auditors.
SOUTH DAKOTA.

Each county has a fish warden, who is also
game warden.



HUNTING Prairie chicken, pinnated grouse,
sharp-tailed grouse, ruffed grouse Sept.
1 to Jan. 1.

Wild duck, wild goose, brant and wild
crane Sept. 1 to May i.

Plover and curlew Sept. 1 to May 15.

Beaver and otter Protected till 1911.

Not more than twenty-five game birds can



be killed by one person in one day.
>nly gun shot
be used.



Only gun shot from the shoulder may



Buffalo, elk,- deer, antelope and mountain

sheep Oct. 15 to Jan. 1.
Carcasses of big game can neither be sold

nor shipped out of the state.
FISHING Fishing except with hook and line

is forbidden.

LICENSES For hunting birds or large game-
Nonresidents, $10.

Licenses are procured from the county
treasurers.



THE CARNEGIE INSTITUTION.



In December, 1901, Andrew Carnegie of-
ferfld the government of the United States
$10,000,000 for the establishment of a na-
tional university. Owing to the form in
which the gift was made the offer was not
at once accepted, but the difficulties were
removed and In the first week of January,
1902, "The Carnegie Institution" was in-
corporated in Washington. After consulta-
tion with Mr. Carnegie the incorporators
elected the following board of trustees:



William B. Dodge.
John S. Billings.
William N. Frew.
Lyman J. Gage.
Daniel O. Gilman.
John Hay.
Abram S. Hewitt.
Henry L. Higginson.



Seth Low.
Wayne MacVeagh.
D. O. Mills.
S. Weir Mitchell.
W. W. Morrow.
Elihu Root.
John C. Spooner.
Andrew D. White.



Edward D. White.
Charles D. Wnlcott.
Carroll D. Wright.



Henry Hitchcock.
C. L. Hutchinson.
William Lindsay.

EX-OFFICIO.

President of the United States.
President of the United States Senate.*
Speaker of the House of Representatives.
Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution.
President of the National Academy of

Sciences.

Daniel C. Gilman was elected president
of the institution Jan. 29.

The purpose of the institution as form-
ally explained bv Mr. Carnegie Is: It is
proposed to found in the city of Washing-
ton, In the spirit of Washington, an insti-
tution which, with the co-operation of In-
stitutions now or hereafter established,
there or elsewhere, shall, in the broadest
and most liberal manner, encourage inves-
tigation, research and discovery; encourage
the application of knowledge to the im-
provement of mankind; provide such build-
ings, laboratories, books and apparatus as
may be needed, and afford instruction of



an advanced character to students when-
ever and wherever found, inside or outside
of schools, properly qualified to profit there-
by. Among Its aims are these:

1. To increase the efficiency of the uni-
versities and other institutions of learning
throughout the country by utilizing and add-
ing to their existing facilities and by aid-
ing teachers in the various institutions for
experimental and other work in these in-
stitutions as far as may be advisable.

2. To discover the exceptional man in
every department of stuay, whenever and
wherever found, and enable him by finan-
cial aid to make the work for which he
seems specially designed his life work.

3. To promote original research, paying
great attention thereto as being one of the
chief purposes of this institution.

4. To increase facilities for higher educa-
tion.

5. To enable such students as may find
Washington the best point for their special
studies to avail themselves of such advan-
tages as may be open to them in the mu-
seums, libraries, laboratories, observatory,
meteorological, piscatorial and forestry
schools and kindred institutions of the sev-
eral departments of the government.

6. To insure the prompt publication and
distribution of the results of scientific in-
vestigationa field considered to be highly
important.

These and kindred objects may be at-
tained by providing the necessary appa-
ratus for experimental work, by employing
able teachers from the various institutions
in Washington or elsewhere and by en-
abling men fitted for special work to devote
themselves to It through salaried fellow-
ships or through salaries with or without
pensions in old age or through aid In other
forms to such men as continue their special



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