American Society of Civil Engineers.

Transactions of the American Society of Civil Engineers (Volume 81) online

. (page 166 of 167)
Online LibraryAmerican Society of Civil EngineersTransactions of the American Society of Civil Engineers (Volume 81) → online text (page 166 of 167)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


personal expense, stock of the most profitable strains, and distributed
it, after practical demonstration on his own large experimental farm,
among the most intelligent farmers of the Northwest, most of whom
he knew personally. This practice he continued through thirty years,
and the splendid condition of the live stock interest of that section
to-day is largely the result of his labors.

He taught soil restoration and rotation of crops ; set up a laboratory
for soil analysis, and established demonstration plots, on farms along
the line of the railway, to demonstrate to the farmers, by object
lessons, what startling results could be obtained by scientific fertiliza-
tion and cultivation. He was always ready to talk to a group of
farmers, and gave no small part of his life's forces, through his later
years, to the effort to persuade them to better methods.

He was the first to advocate the conservation of natural resources
on a large scale. The memorable address which he delivered in 1906
created a profound impression, and ran through many editions and
languages. He made heavy demands on his business time and physical
resources to comply with requests to address bodies of representative
men assembled to discuss economic and scientific problems, but he
regarded this as a form of public service which it was his duty to
perform.

Irrigation, waterways, all forms of internal improvement, banking
and other forms of finance, the theory of credit, and the virtue of
thrift, every aspect of railroad operation, regulation, and improvement,
almost every practical human activity received his study and profited
by the conclusion of his wonderfully analytic and almost unerring
mind. Some of the more important of these were grouped in his
volume of economical and sociological discussions, entitled "Highways
of Progress", published in 1910. It is amazing to observe, in that col-
lection, the range of his thought, the wealth of his information, and
the validity of his conclusions.

Among the larger interests of his later years was the acquisition
of the two banks in St. Paul, and their consolidation under the name
of the First National, to which was joined the Northwestern Trust
Company, and all placed under the immediate control of one of his
sons. This great financial institution is intended to be, not merely a
clearing house for the enormous financial interests of the properties
in which he was concerned, but an agency for liberating the Northwest
from outside control, and for increasing and stabilizing its prosperity.



1S36 MEMOIR OF JAMES JEROME HILL

It has been and is a power in advancing the interests of the farmers
and helping them to surer and larger returns. Until a few days before
his death, he was as busy as he had been for years before, with plans
for the upbuilding of the country and the improvement of the com-
mon lot.

He was a patron and lover of the arts. His collection of pictures is
known at home and abroad by its excellence, and is the result of his
judgment in selection. He was a connoisseur of precious stones, and
his investments in these were marked by his usual good business judg-
ment. He was an omnivorous reader, and, being possessed of a remark-
able memory, had accumulated a wealth of detailed information upon
a Avide range of subjects, such as few men of his age, or any age or
generation, ever possessed. His philanthropy did not stop with words,
for he was extremely generous, in a practical, material way. He gave
impartially to many educational institutions, his only condition being
that the schools that received his aid should be conducted under the
auspices of some religious denomination.

His private benefactions were constant and great; they were made
with care and discrimination, and he avoided publicity in them to the
last degree.

For many years, during the earlier part of his career, he cannot be
said to have attracted, excepting among his own group of business
associates and capitalists, the more than passing notice of the then
leaders of thought and finance. He never attempted to attract such
notice by spectacular staging of any of his enterprises. His sayings
and doings were rather looked upon by most eastern men with a mild
commiseration ; but, as his system of railways developed, and the results
of his so-called theories began to prove their value, and to be seen in
many respects to be the very basic foundation of the prosperity of the
railways of the country, they were copied by other systems, and, from
train haul to accounting, the Great Northern was for years a school
at which railway men were glad to learn; and many graduates from
that school, trained by practical experience in its methods, can be
found holding high positions in railway service, in all parts of the
United States. During the last decade of his life, there was no one
whose voice, in general economics and financial matters, was listened
to with more respect than that of Mr. Hill. The judgment of no one
man in this country, perhaps, counted for so much in determining
American financiers to take up the first loan asked by the Allies. He
thoiight its acceptance essential to our own business life and prosperity,
and that his reasons were soxuid and his conclusions well taken, is
amply proven by subsequent developments.

Though his plans were well wrought out, and the results he
achieved came from thorough preparation, he could strike with light-
ning quickness and terrific force, whenever occasion demanded. He



MEMOIK OF JAMES JEROME HILL 1837'

was plain of speech, simple and sincere of thought, but a giant of power
when roused to effort by obstacles that had to be overcome, and he
was — first, last, and all the time — an American. The men on his rail-
roads recogTiized his character and ability, and through all classes and
ranks there ran a spirit of cheerful loyalty that could only have been
evoked by a man of his wonderful personality. Among the many who
were privileged to know him intimately, particularly the old-timers,
who had been with him in the long-gone-by days of his early struggles,
the feeling was one of deep and sincere affection, and everywhere, over
the whole nation and in other countries, the general sentiment of
respect and sorrow at his death, as a personal and public loss, has been
deep and wide.

It is a safe prediction that the great record of what he achieved
will insure increased recognition as time goes on. Yale University
conferred upon him the degree of LL.D. in 1910. The Hill Professor-
ship of Transportation was established at Harvard not long ago, with
an endowment contributed by seventy-four friends who were delighted
to do him this honor.

He was a man of quiet domestic tastes,' and his serenest hours were
those spent in his beautiful home at St. Paul, where his friends were
always welcome, and from which they always came away feeling that
they had been privileged to share in the happiness of an ideal American
fireside. Throughout all his years, he demonstrated in his own life that
a strict adherence to moral laws was a true attribute of greatness.

Much of the planning of his construction work in all lines was done
in the seclusion of his home, to which he habitually drew men of all
classes for conference and instructions, and his library there was the
workshop in which was produced many of his masterpieces.

On August 19th, 1867, he was married to Miss Mary Theresa
Mehegan, of St. Paul, and his widow, three sons, and six daughters
survive him.

Volumes of anecdotes could be written to illustrate his manner of
dealing with various situations. Through them all runs the strong
vein of humor which was so marked a feature of his character. Above
all, he asked for independence in judgment by his subordinates, and
no surer path to his disfavor could be found than to endeavor to fore-
stall his opinion, and recommend accordingly. Though he was a man
of strong convictions, even in matters of minute detail, he was always
open to argument, and ready to receive and weigh suggestions, and to
give them consideration. Once a decision was made, however, he
expected speed and economy in the prosecution of the project in hand,
and was content with nothing less than the best results. Take him all
in all, to one who understood in a measure the salient features of his
individuality, and realized the broad view-point from which he regarded



1838 MEMOIR OF JAMES JEROME HILL

every subject, he was an eminently satisfactory man to be associated
with, and such association was a liberal education.

After Mr. Hill's death, hundreds of messages of sympathy poured
in upon the family from all parts of the covmtry, from lands across
the sea, from people of the greatest diversity of condition. It was a
spontaneous tribute which showed in what esteem he was held by high
and low alike. Corporations, associations, municipal bodies, cities,
and States, united to regret him and to do honor to his memory. It is
impossible to reproduce here any considerable portion of these tributes;
but an extract, as of date June 3d, 1916, from the minutes of the Board
of Directors of the Great Northern Railway Company, the creation of
which was his greatest life work, shows to what degree he was appre-
ciated by his close associates :

"Resolved. That in the death of James J. Hill, the Great Northern
Railway Company laments the loss of the man who brought it into
being, who made it an instrument for the development of this country,
who led it with unerring wisdom, who foresaw and safeguarded its
future, and to whom it owes all that it has been and all it hopes to be."

James Jerome Hill was elected a Fellow of the American Society of
Civil Engineers on January 10th, 1889.



TRAIS^SACTIONS



American Society of Civil Engineers



INDEX
VOLUME I^XXXI



Subject Index, Page 1840
Author Index, Page 1853



Titles of papers are in quotation marlcs when given with the
author's name.



VOL. LXXXI



SUBJECT INDEX



AGRICULTURE.

"A Complete Method for the Classification of Irrigable Lands." F. H.
Peters. (With Discussion.) 222.

AMPHITHEATRE.

See GRANDSTANDS AND STADIA.
APPRAISAL.

See VALUATION.
BEAMS. A

— of concrete and reinforced concrete. 1 124 ct seq.

BUILDINGS.

"Underpinning Trinity Vestry Building for Subway Construction."
H. de B. Parsons. (With Discussion.) 74.

CABLEWAYS.

"An Aerial Tramwa}'^ for the Saline Valley Salt Company, Inyo
County, California." F. C. Carstarphen. 709. Discussion : Rich-
ard Lamb and H. F. Scholtz. 743.

CANALS.

— for irrigation; size, cost, etc. 237 et seq.

"Surges in an Open Canal." R. D. Johnson. (With Discussion.) 112.

"The Distribution of Stresses in Mitering Lock-Gates, with Special
Reference to the Gates on the Panama Canal." Henry Gold-
mark. 1621.

CEMENT.

Analyses of — for test specimens of concrete to be immersed in sea

water. 652.
Kinds of — defined. 11 13.

CITIES.

Structural development of — . 585, 631.

COFFER-DAMS.

Coffer-dam used in raising the battleship Maine; also other sheet-
piling — . 553.

"Unusual Coffer-Dam for i 000- Foot Pier, New York City." Charles
W. Staniford. 498. Discussion : Frederic R. Harris, D. A. Watt,
C. A. Wentworth, Thomas H. Wiggin, T. Kennard Thomson,
Charles S. Boardman, William M. Black, and F. E. Cudworth.

543-



SUBJECT INDEX 1841

COLUMNS.

— of concrete and reinforced concrete. 1124 et seq.

CONCRETE.

— walls for I 000- ft. pier. 532.
Disintegration of — . 682.

"Final Report of the Special Committee on — and Reinforced — ."

(With Discussion.) iioi.
"Multiple-Arch Dams on Rush Creek, California." L- R. Jorgensen.

(With Discussion.) 850.
"Tests of — Specimens in Sea Water, at Boston Navy Yard." R. E.

Bakenhus. 645. Discussion : T. Kennard Thomson, J. J. Yates,

J. R. McClintock, S. B. Williamson, Waldo C. Briggs, Charles S.

Bilyeu, W. E. Day, Robert Ridgway, George W. Fuller, A. H.

Rhett, Marshall W. Brown, Albert Larsen, W. Watters Pagon,

R. J. Wig and Lewis R. Ferguson. 676.
Tests of — underpinning piles for subway on Fulton Street, New

York City. 87 ct scq., 103 et seq.

CONTRACTOR'S PLANT.

— for constructing coffer-dam for i 000-ft. pier. 528.

— , Lexington Avenue Subway, New York Cit}-. 379.

— , Stony River Dam. 1019.

COSTS OF WORK.

Cost data for excavating tuimcls for Lexington Avenue Subway, New

York City. 381.
Cost of constructing coffer-dam for New York City pier. 540.
Cost of constructing multiple-arch dams. 880.
— • , Stony River Dam. 1022.

DAMS.

"Designing an Earth Dam Having a Gravel Foundation, with the Re-
sults Obtained in Tests on a Model." James B. Hays. 1. Dis-
cussion : W. G. Bligh, J. C. Oakes, C. E. Grunsky, H. T. Pease,
Malcolm Elliott, Edward Wegmann, E. C. La Rue, George M.
Bacon, H. A. Petterson, D. C. Henny, and Joseph Jacobs. 25.

Hydraulic-fill, diversion dam. 309, 335.

"Multiple-Arch — on Rush Creek, California." L. R. Jorgensen.
850. Discussion: F. O. Blackwell, A. D. Flinn, F. W. Scheiden-
helm, Edward Wegmann, Walter J. Douglas, Edwin Duryea, L.
H. Nishkian, Gardner S. Williams, and George W. Howson. 882.

"The Reconstruction of the Stony River Dam." F. W. Scheiden-
helm. 907. Discussion : J. W. Ledoux, J. K. Finch, P. P. Ruten-
berg, Fred F. Moore, W. S. Downs, H. L. Coburn, H. F. Dunham,



1843 SUBJECT INDEX

Orrin L. Brodie, William Cain, Charles E. Gregory, Kenneth C.
Grant, L. R. Jorgensen, Edward Wegmann, Irving P. Church,
M. M. O'Shaughnessy, Joel D. Justin, and Ross M. Riegel. 1024.

DEPRECIATION.
See VALUATION.

DRAINAGE.

— for Yale Bowl. 264.

— of foundation soil. Stony River Dam. 988 et seq.

DRILLING.

Method of — used at Rogers Pass Tunnel. 464.

Methods and cost of — , Lexington Avenue Subway, New York City.
343-

EARTH PRESSURES.

" — : A Practical Comparison of Theories and Experiments." L. D.
Cornish. 191. Discussion: William Cain, G. M. Braune, and F.
N. Menefee. 202.

ECONOMICS.

"A Alethod of Determining a Reasonable Service Rate for Municipally

Owned Public Utilities." J. B. Lippincott. (With Discussion.)

413-
"Final Report of the Special Committee to Formulate Principles and

Methods for the Valuation of Railroad Property and Other Public

Utilities." (With Discussion.) 131 1.
"Final Report of the Special Committee to Investigate the Conditions

of Employment of, and Compensation of. Civil Engineers. (W^ith

Discussion.) 1207.

EMBANKMENT.

Tests of model — . 506, 546, 548.

"The Yale Bowl." Charles A. Ferr}\ (With Discussion.) 249.

EMPLOYMENT.

"Final Report of the Special Committee to Investigate the Conditions
of Employment of, and Compensation of, Civil Engineers."
(With Discussion.) 1207.

ENGINEERING.

"Final Report of the Special Com.mittee to Investigate the Conditions
of Employment of, and Compensation of. Civil Engineers." (With
Discussion.) 1207.



SUBJECT INDEX 1843

EXCAVATION.

Method of — in Rogers Pass Tunnel. 448.

Methods used in excavating tunnels for Lexington Avenue Subwaj^

New York City. 341.
Rock — for I 000- ft. pier. 528.

FILTRATION.

Comparison of well-water supply with filtered supply. 773.
FINANCE.

"A Method of Determining a Reasonable Service Rate for Municipally
Owned Public Utilities." J. B. Lippincott. (With Discussion.)
413-
FLASH BOARDS.

— and supports, spillway, Stony River Dam. 1006.

FLOODS.

"Control of the Colorado River as Related to the Protection of Im-
perial Valley." J. C. Allison. (With Discussion.) 297.

"Final Report of the Special Committee on — and Flood Preven-
tion." (With Discussion.) 1218.

Records of flood flow considered in designing spillway for Stony River
Dam. 926.

FLUMES.

"Surges in an Open Canal." R. D. Johnson. (With Discussion.) 112.

FORESTS,

Reforestation as a method of flood control. 1223.

FOUNDATIONS.

"Designing an Earth Dam Having a Gravel Foundation, with the Re-
sults Obtained in Tests on a Model." James B. Hayes. (With
Discussion.) i.

"Multiple-Arch Dams on Rush Creek, California." L. R. Jorgensen.
(With Discussion.) 850.

"The Reconstruction of the Stony River Dam." F. W. Scheidenhelm.
(With Discussion.) 907.

"Underpinning Trinity Vestry Building for Subway Construction."
H. de B. Parsons. (With Discussion.) 74.

FRICTION.

Frictional resistance of various soils. 947, 1044.

GAS AND GAS-WORKS.

"Final Report of the Special Committee to Formulate Principles and
Methods for the Valuation of Railroad Property and Other Pub-
lic Utilities." (With Discussion.) 1311.



1844 SUBJECT INDEX

GEOLOGY. !

Geological and foundation conditions at Stony River Dam. 918.

Geological clues to flood heights. 1270.

Geological conditions of Ohio Valley near Parkersburg, W. Va. 753.

GRANDSTANDS AND STADIA.

Stadium at Tacoma. 289.

"The Yale Bowl." Charles A. Ferry. 249. Discussion: Thomas C.

Atwood, J. B. French, H. C. Keith, H. F. Dunham, Henry C.

Hitt and Alexander S. L3'nch. 280.

GROUND-WATER.

Laws of underground flow. 48.

"The Water Supply of Parkersburg, W. Va." William AI. Hall.
(With Discussion.) 749.

GROUTING.

Pressure — under footings, Stony River Dam. 987.

HEAD-GATES.

— on the Colorado River. 302, s;i7.

HEAT.

Transmission of — through balsa wood. 149.

HYDRAULIC JUMP.

"Surges in an Open Canal." R. D. Johnson. (With Discussion.) 112.

INSULATION.

Insulating properties of balsa wood for cold storage. 149 cf seq.

IRRIGATION.

"A Complete Method for the Classification of Irrigable Lands." F. H.
Peters. 222. Discussion: T. Kennard Thomson and G. N.
Houston. 243.

"Control of the Colorado River as Related to the Protection of
Imperial Valley." J. C. Allison. (With Discussion.) 207.
TnTMT^l '^''^ >[':'/f



Online LibraryAmerican Society of Civil EngineersTransactions of the American Society of Civil Engineers (Volume 81) → online text (page 166 of 167)