American University.

American University Bulletin Catalog Issue: The Summer School (Volume 1937) online

. (page 3 of 5)
Online LibraryAmerican UniversityAmerican University Bulletin Catalog Issue: The Summer School (Volume 1937) → online text (page 3 of 5)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


ministration and Political Science. B.S., Northeast Missouri
State Teachers; M.A., Missouri; Ph.D., American.

Robert S. Sackett, Assistant Professor of Psychology. A.B., Miami ;
Ph.D., Yale.

John W. McConnell, Assistant Professor of Economics and So-
ciology. B.A., Dickinson; Ph.D., Yale.

Allen J. Fisher, Assistant Professor of Economics and Business Ad-
ministration. B.S. Econ., Pennsylvania; M.L., Ph.D., Pitts-
burgh.

Charles M. Hudson, Jr., Instructor in English. B.A., M.A.,
Vanderbilt ; Graduate study, Yale.

SUPPLEMENTARY STAFF

{Arranged alphabetically)
To supplement the work of its full-time faculty, the University has
available for its course offerings the services of experts connected with
the government or with learned societies and research organizations
located in the city. Members of the supplementary staff for 1937-38
giving work which will be taken by students in the School of Public
Affairs who are working for either a certificate or degree in the field
of Public Administration or Business Administration follow:

BEATRICE AlTCHISON, Lecturer in Mathematics and Statistics. B.A.,
Goucher; M.A., Oregon; M.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins.

Clyde B. AlTCHISON, Lecturer in Administrative and Interstate Com-
merce Law. B.Sc, LL.D., Hastings; M.A., Oregon; Ph.D.,
American. (Member, Interstate Commerce Commission.)

F. J. Bailey, Lecturer in Financial Administration. A.B., Middle-
bury; LL.B., Georgetown. (Assistant to the Director in Charge
of Division of Research and Investigation, Bureau of the Budget.)



Robert Barnett, Lecturer in Government Correspondence. A.B.,
University of Tennessee; (Chief of Communications and Review
Section, Social Security Board.)

Ismar Baruch, Lecturer in Public Administration. Ph.B., Brown;
M.A., Princeton; LL.B., George Washington. (Chief, Divi-
sion of Personnel Classification, United States Civil Service Com-
mission.)

Frederick F. Blachly, Lecturer in Public Administration. A.B.,
Oberlin ; Ph.D., Columbia. (Staff Member, Institute for Gov-
ernment Research, Brookings Institution.)

Carman G. Blough, Lecturer in Accounting. A.B., Manchester;
M.A., Wisconsin; C.P.A., States of Wisconsin and North Da-
kota. (Chief Accountant, Securities and Exchange Commission.)

Samuel S. Board, Lecturer in Personnel Administration. A.B.,
Yale. (Chief, Qualification Section, Personnel Division, Re-
settlement Administration, Department of Agriculture.)

William Dow Boutwell, Lecturer in Public Relations. B.S., Illi-
nois; Graduate Study, George Washington. (Chief, Editorial
Division, Office of Education, Department of Interior.)

Frederick M. Davenport, Member of Administrative Board,
School of Public Affairs. A.B., Wesleyan ; Ph.D., Columbia.
(Chairman, National Institute of Public Affairs.)

Gordon Dean, Lecturer in Jurisprudence. A.B., Redlands; J.D.,
Southern California; LL.M., Duke. (Special Assistant to the
Attorney General, Department of Justice.)

Calvert L. Dedrick, Lecturer in Statistics. A.B., M.A., Ph.D.,
Wisconsin. (Assistant Chief Statistician, Division of Statistical
Research, Bureau of the Census.)

James F. Grady, Lecturer in Government Correspondence. A.B.,
Boston; Graduate Study, Pittsburgh, California. (Special As-
sistant to the Governor, Farm Credit Administration.)

Morris H. Hansen, Lecturer in Statistics. B.S., Wyoming; Gradu-
ate Study, American. (Office of the Executive Assistant to the
Director of the Bureau of Census.)

Joseph P. Harris, Lecturer in Public Administration, and Chairman ,
Committee on Approval of Thesis Projects for Graduate Students
in Public Administration. A.B., Kansas; Ph.D., Chicago. (Di-
rector of Research, Committee on Public Administration, Social
Science Research Council.)

Henry B. Hazard, Adjunct Professor of Political Science. LL.B.,
Oregon ; LL.M., D.C.L., American. (Chief Attorney, Assistant
to the Commissioner of Immigration and Naturalization, U. S.
Department of Labor.)



George Y. Jarvis, Laboratory Assistant in Statistics. A.B., George
Washington; Graduate Study, American. (Junior Agricultural
Economist, United States Department of Agriculture.)

J. A. Jordan, Lecturer in Administrative Law. LL.B., LL.M.,
George Washington. (Senior Attorney, Farm Credit Admin-
istration.)

W. A. Jump, Lecturer in Financial Administration. (Director of
Finance and Budget Officer, Department of Agriculture.)

Peter B. Keplinger, Lecturer in Public Administration. B.P.,
B.Ph., Colorado College; M. of Forestry, Michigan. (Chief, Di-
vision of Personnel Management, United States Forest Service.)

Forrest E. Linder, Lecturer in Statistics. B.A., M.A., State Uni-
versity of Iowa; Ph.D., University of Iowa. (Head, Section on
Final Results and Analysis, Division of Vital Statistics, Bureau
of Census.)

Blaine F. Moore, Lecturer on Public Finance. A.B., Kansas;
A.M., Illinois; Ph.D., Columbia. (Finance Department, U. S.
Chamber of Commerce.)

Howard B. Myers, Lecturer in Statistics. B.A., Washburn ; Ph.D.,
Chicago. (Director, Division of Social Research, Works Prog-
ress Administration.)

Oswald Nielsen, Lecturer in Accounting. Ph.B., Chicago; Ph.D.,
Minnesota. (Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, De-
partment of Commerce.)

Gordon E. Ockey, Lecturer in Statistics. A.B., Wisconsin; Gradu-
ate Study, California. (Assistant Agricultural Economist, Bu-
reau of Agricultural Economics, Department of Agriculture.)

John B. Payne, Lecturer in Accounting. A.B., George Washing-
ton ; B.C.S., Southeastern; C.P.A., State of North Carolina.
(Chief, Records and Accounts Section, Agricultural Adjustment
Administration.)

J. Perlman, Lecturer in Statistics. B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Wisconsin.
(Chief, Division of Wages, Hours and Working Conditions,
United States Bureau of Labor Statistics.)

C. M. Purves, Lecturer in Statistics. B.A., Macalester; M.A.,
Minnesota. (Senior Agricultural Economist, Department of
Agriculture.)

Charles Putnam, Lecturer in Social Security Administration. A.B.,
LL.B., Ph.D., Harvard. (Special Writer and Editor, Educa-
tional Division, Bureau of Informational Service, Social Security
Board.)



Vergil Reed, Lecturer in Economic Geography. M.S.B., Indiana;
Ph.D., Columbia. (Assistant Director, Bureau of the Census.)

Henry Reining, Jr., Lecturer in Public Administration. A.B.,
Akron; A.M., Ph.D., Princeton. (Educational Director, Na-
tional Institute of Public Affairs.)

William H. Rowe, Lecturer in Accounting. A.B., Michigan ; M.S.,
Kansas State Agricultural College. (Agricultural Economist,
Department of Agriculture.)

Oliver C. Short, Lecturer in Public Administration. A.B., M.A.,
University of Pennsylvania ; Graduate study, Johns Hopkins.
(Executive Assistant to the Director, Bureau of the Census.)

James J. Somers, Lecturer in Accounting. B.S. in Commerce, North
Carolina; M.S. in Accounting, Columbia. (Reviewing Account-
ant, Farm Credit Administration.)

B. Ralph Stauber, Lecturer in Statistics. B.S., State College of
Washington; M.S., Minnesota. (Agricultural Economist, De-
partment of Agriculture.)

William H. S. Stevens, Adjunct Professor of Business Administra-
tion and Economics. B.A., Colby; M.A., George Washington;
Ph.D., Pennsylvania. (Head Economist, Interstate Commerce
Commission; Member, Central Statistical Board.)

A. Sturges, Lecturer in Statistics. B.S., Oregon Agricultural Col-
lege. (Agricultural Economist, Department of Agriculture.)

John W. Webb, Lecturer in Statistics. B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Colum-
bia. (Coordinator of Urban Surveys, Works Progress Admin-
istration.)

Charles West, Lecturer in Public Administration. A.B., A.M.,

Ohio Wesleyan ; A.M., Harvard; LL.D., National. (Under

Secretary of the Interior.)
Harry J. Winslow, Lecturer in Statistics. B.S., M.S., University

of Minnesota. (Federal Emergency Relief Administration.)
Ernest J. Wolfe, Lecturer in Social Security Administration. B.S.

in B.A., Miami; M.A., Columbia. (Instructor, in Charge of

Curriculum, Division of "In Service" Training, Social Security

Board.)
Walter H. Young, Lecturer in Public Administration. A.B., Ohio

Wesleyan ; LL.B., George Washington.



ORGANIZATION OF THE FACULTY OF THE SCHOOL
OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Administrative Board

Mr. FLEMMING, Chairman

Dr. Woods Dr. Griffith

Dr. Arneson Dr. Marshall

Dr. Correll Dr. Seckler-Hudson

Dr. Engel Dr. Stevens

Dr. Davenport Mr. Baruch

Mr. Blough Mr. Short
Miss Stockberger, Secretary

Committees

Admission to Undergraduate Standing: Dr. Engel, Chairman; Dr.
Gewehr; Dr. Seckler-Hudson. Dr. Woods, Mr. Flemming,
Mrs. Golder, Miss Stockberger, ex officio.

Admission to Graduate Standing: Dr. Arneson, Chairman; Dr.
Seckler-Hudson; Dr. Huelster. Dr. Griffith, Mr. Flemming,
Miss Feagans, Miss Stockberger, ex officio.

Admission to Candidacy for M.A. in Public Administration or Ph.D.
in Public Administration : Dr. Arneson, Chairman; Dr. Seckler-
Hudson; and Dr. Huelster. Mr. Flemming, Miss Stockberger,
ex officio.

Approval of Thesis Projects for Graduate Students in Public Admin-
istration: Dr. Harris, Chairman; Dr. Arneson; Dr. Marshall;
Dr. Seckler-Hudson; Dr. Reining; and Dr. Blachly. Mr. Flem-
ming, ex officio.

Curriculum: Members of the Administrative Board.
Requirements for Certificates and Degrees: Members of the Admin-
istrative Board.



FOREWORD



The School of Public Affairs of The American University, with
offices at 1905 F Street, N. W., was organized in 1934 for the pri-
mary purpose of serving government employes who desire to obtain
special training which will enable them to carry on their present activi-
ties in a more effective manner, and to prepare themselves for positions
of greater responsibility. This program, which is often referred to as
the School's "In-Service" Training Program for Federal Employes,
has been made possible in part by a grant from the Rockefeller Foun-
dation.

In the development of the courses offered as a part of the "In-Serv-
ice" Training Program the School has adopted the practice of calling
upon outstanding experts in each field to discuss their problems with
the members of the classes, and then to provide the students with the
opportunity of discussing their problems with these experts. The con-
tributions of these experts are designed to supplement the work of the
full-time faculty.

Cooperative "In-Service" training courses have also been developed
with the following departments of the Federal Government: The
Graduate School of the Department of Agriculture ; the Census Bu-
reau of the Department of Commerce ; the Farm Credit Administra-
tion ; the Social Security Board ; and the Bureau of Labor Statistics
of the Department of Labor.

In connection with its "In-Service" training program the School of
Public Affairs has developed work leading toward a Certificate in
Public Administration; a Certificate in Business Administration; a
Bachelor of Science degree in Public Administration ; and a Bachelor of
Science degree in Business Administration. Also, in cooperation with
the Graduate School of the University, programs have been developed
leading to the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy in
the field of Public Administration. The details of these programs are
set forth in the next section of the bulletin.

Every effort is being made by the School to give all possible atten-
tion to the needs of the individual. Candidates for certificates and
undergraduate degrees will be assigned to faculty members who will
make a careful study of their needs and abilities. Graduate students
will be aided in every possible manner by faculty members under whom
they are carrying on their research work.



10



GRADUATION AND ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
FOR CERTIFICATES AND DEGREES



The following graduation and admission requirements have been
established for the Certificates and Degrees offered through the School
of Public Affairs.

Graduation Requirements for the Certificate in Public or
Business Administration

To become eligible for a Certificate in Public Administration a
student must complete 45 semester hours of courses with an average
of C. At least 30 semester hours of this work must be taken in resi-
dence at The American University.

The candidate for the Certificate in Public Administration must
have taken and passed, in addition to specialized work in the field of
Public Administration approved by the Chairman of the field or his
representative, the following basic courses or their equivalents : Prin-
ciples of Economics; English Composition; American Government;
Elementary Statistics ; Elementary Accounting.

A candidate for a Certificate in Business Administration must meet
the same hour requirements and must pass the same basic courses as
a Candidate for a Certificate in Public Administration. In addition,
he must consult with the Chairman of the work in the field of Busi-
ness Administration or his representative, and must pass courses in this
field approved by the Chairman.

Students enrolled for work leading toward the Certificate may not
register for more than nine hours of courses in any one semester.

Admission to Candidacy for a Certificate in Public Adminis-
tration or a Certificate in Business Administration

Admission to candidacy for a Certificate in Public Administration
or a Certificate in Business Administration will be granted only to
employes of the Federal Government, or of state and local govern-
ments. In a few instances employes of Washington business firms will
be admitted to candidacy for a Certificate in Business Administration.

Admission is based upon the student's secondary school record, and
upon evidence indicating that his previous training and experience
qualify him for admission. The scholastic requirement is the comple-

11



tion of a four-year course in an accredited high school, or its equivalent.
The minimum number of units required is fifteen. As a rule, students
are not admitted unless they meet the requirements in full. All ex-
ceptions to the general regulations must be approved by the Committee
on Admission to Undergraduate Standing.

Persons desiring to be admitted to candidacy for either one of these
certificates should provide the office of the School with all of the re-
quired information at as early a date as possible prior to the opening
of the semester in which they plan to begin their work. This infor-
mation will be passed on by the Committee on Admission to Under-
graduate Standing as soon as possible. If this information is not avail-
able prior to the beginning of the semester, a student will be registered
tentatively pending action on his credentials by the Admissions Com-
mittee. Credentials must, however, be submitted within six weeks
after the date of registration ; otherwise the tentative registration will
be cancelled.

In defining what is meant by a "unit" of high school work, the
School of Public Affairs adheres to the following statement approved
by the National Conference Committee on Standards of Colleges and
Secondary Schools, by the College Entrance Examination Board, and
by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching: "A
unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school."

This statement assumes that the length of the school year is at least
thirty-six weeks, that a recitation or laboratory period is from forty
to sixty minutes in length, and that the study is pursued four or five
periods a week.

The following subjects are acceptable for admission:

Algebra 1 , 2, or 3 units

Biology 1 unit

Botany h or 1 unit

Chemistry 1 unit

Civics \ unit

Drawing, Freehand \ or 1 unit

Drawing, Mechanical I or 1 unit

Economics 1 unit

English (four years) 3 units

French \ (1 yr.), 2, 3, or 4 units

Geometry, Plane 1 unit

Geometry, Solid \ unit

German \ (1 yr.), 2, 3, or 4 units

Greek \ (1 yr.), 2, 3, or 4 units

History, American \ or 1 unit

History, Ancient \ or 1 unit

12



History, English \ or 1 unit

History, Medieval \ unit

History, Modern \ or 1 unit

Latin \ (1 yr.), 2, 3, or 4 units

Music I or 1 unit

Physics 1 unit

Physiography \ or 1 unit

Physiology \ unit

Public Speaking ^ or 1 unit

Science, General 1 unit

Spanish \ (1 yr.), 2, 3, or 4 units

Trigonometry \ unit

Zoology \ or 1 unit

Vocational or Commercial Subjects \ to 3 units



Graduation Requirements for Degree of Bachelor of Science
in Public Administration and Bachelor of Science in
Business Administration

Through the School of Public Affairs it is possible for a student to
obtain either a Bachelor of Science in Public Administration or a
Bachelor of Science in Business Administration.

The minimum requirement for these degrees is the completion of
130 semester hours of course work with an average of C for all courses
taken throughout the entire college course.

At least 40 semester hours of credit must be secured in courses num-
bered above 300. Juniors must complete at least 12 semester hours
of courses in the 300 group.

Employed students are expected to carry not more than nine hours
of work each semester. Credit will not be given in a course for which
the student has not officially registered, nor for work taken in excess
of the schedule approved.

No degree is conferred except after the completion of at least 30
semester hours of work in residence at The American University.

Candidates for both degrees must have completed the requirements
in each one of the five groups listed below :

I. Required Subjects

1 . English 12 hours

2. Speech 2 hours

3. Philosophy 4 hours

4. Physical Education 6 hours

13



II. Modern Foreign Languages

A reading knowledge of either French, German, or Spanish,
to be satisfied by examination or by 12 hours of college study
of the language selected. Failure to demonstrate a reading
knowledge by examination will require the satisfactory comple-
tion of at least a year of course study in college.

III. Social Sciences

Twelve hours of work distributed over at least two of the
social sciences listed below, with at least six hours in one depart-
ment :

Public Administration Business Administration

Political Science History

Economics Sociology

IV. Mathematics and Natural Science

Twelve hours from the courses listed below, at least six of
which must be in a laboratory science :

Biology Physics

Chemistry Mathematics

V. Humanities

Twelve hours to be distributed over at least two subjects,
with at least six hours in one subject:

Art Religion

Music Education

Philosophy Classics
Psychology

In addition to the requirements above, a student desiring to obtain
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Public Administration must com-
plete, with an average of B, at least 30 hours of work in Public Admin-
istration approved in advance by the Chairman of the Department of
Public Administration.

In addition to the requirements above, a student desiring to obtain
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration must
complete, with an average of B, at least 30 hours of work in Business
Administration approved in advance by the Chairman of the Depart-
ment of Business Administration.

A student who has been admitted to candidacy for either the degree
of Bachelor of Science in Public Administration or Bachelor of Science
in Business Administration must complete his requirements for the
degree within four years after his admission. Prospective students in

14



reading the requirements listed below for admission to candidacy for
these degrees will note, however, that formal admission to candidacy
does not take place until at least 60 hours of undergraduate credits
have been earned.

Admission to Candidacy for Bachelor of Science in Public
Administration or for Bachelor of Science in Business
Administration

In order to be admitted to candidacy for either the degree of
Bachelor of Science in Public Administration or the degree of Bachelor
of Science in Business Administration a student must be an employe
of the Federal Government, or an employe of a state or local govern-
ment. In a few instances employes of Washington business firms will
be admitted to candidacy for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Busi-
ness Administration.

In addition, the student must have completed at least 60 semester
hours of work with a grade of C or better in an accredited institution
of higher learning.

(Admission to candidacy is not to be regarded as the same as admis-
sion to the School of Public Affairs. Students who have less than
60 hours of work may apply for admission to the School either as
special students or as candidates for a Certificate in Public or Business
Administration. Upon the successful completion of sixty hours of
work the question of admission to candidacy for a degree will be con-
sidered by the School.)

A student desiring to apply for admission to candidacy for either
one of these degrees must meet the following additional requirements:

1. He must present to the School for consideration by the Com-
mittee on Admission to Undergraduate Standing an official certificate
of the institution last attended by him showing (a) his entrance credits
presented for admission to college; (b) his complete college record,
including grades in each subject taken; and (c) honorable dismissal.

2. To be admitted as a student in good standing he must have com-
pleted creditably all work for which he was registered in the other
institution. As a rule, no credit is given for work of grade D.

3. Credit for work done in other institutions is regarded as pro-
visional at the time of the applicant's admission and will not be con-
sidered as final until he has satisfactorily completed at least fifteen
semester hours of work in the School of Public Affairs.

Persons desiring to be admitted to candidacy for either one of these
degrees should provide the office of the School of Public Affairs with
all of the required information at as early a date as possible prior to
the opening of the semester in which they plan to begin their work.

15



This information will be passed on by the Committee on Admission to
Undergraduate Standing as soon as possible. If this information is
not available prior to the beginning of the semester, a student will be
registered tentatively pending action on his credentials by the Admis-
sions Committee. Credentials must, however, be submitted within
six weeks after the date of registration ; otherwise the tentative regis-
tration will be cancelled.



Admission to the School of Public Affairs as an Undergradu-
ate Student not a Candidate for a Certificate or Degree
at American University

Students who desire to be admitted to the School of Public Affairs
as undergraduate students and who desire to receive credit for work
taken but who do not, at least for the present, desire to become candi-
dates for either a certificate or a degree from The American Uni-
versity do not need to file a complete transcript of work taken at other
educational institutions.

Such students must, however, file with the office of the School a
statement from the institution last attended by them indicating their
present academic status.

Ordinarily this statement should be filed in the Registrar's office
at the time the student registers for his courses. If the statement is
not available at this time, however, a student will be registered tenta-
tively pending the filing of the statement. The statement must, how-
ever, be submitted within six weeks after the date of registration ;
otherwise the tentative registration will be cancelled.



Admission to the School of Public Affairs as a Special
Student not a Candidate for a Certificate or Degree

Students who do not meet the ordinary requirements for admission
to the School of Public Affairs may, on the basis of their previous
training and experience, apply to the Committee on Admission to
Undergraduate Standing for admission to the School for the purpose
of taking certain courses for credit with the understanding that they
are not candidates for either a certificate or degree.

If, at any time, admission deficiencies have been removed, special
students may request the Admissions Committee to admit them to
regular undergraduate standing.

16



The

SCHOOL of PUBLIC AFFAIRS
of



The American University



A Professional School for
Government Employes



x*y





.



"IN-SERVICE" TRAINING
PROGRAM for FEDERAL
EMPLOYES . . .
1937 FALL TERM



Practical courses conducted by outstand-
ing experts in and out of the government
service in the following fields:

Public Administration P. 3

Personnel Management P. 3-4

Supervision P- 4

Administrative and Constitu-


1 3 5

Online LibraryAmerican UniversityAmerican University Bulletin Catalog Issue: The Summer School (Volume 1937) → online text (page 3 of 5)