Amherst House.

Amherst : the village beautiful, cultured and literary online

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IE AMHERST HOUSE, AMHERST, MASS , D. H, KENORICK, Pro



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BI''..\L"I'IFUL is tin- situation, exquisite the attrac-
tions and \videsi)read the fame of this charm-
ing New I'jigland \illage.

A plateau rising from the fertile meadows of Old
Hadley, half inclosed by the Pelhani hills and within
the shadow of the Holyoke mountain range, with
Mount ioby stretching its bulk across the valley to
the north, while in the distant west, beyond the ma-
jestic Connecticut and the steeples of the Meadow-
City, tower the hills of old Berkshire. Upon the
broad slopes of this ])lateau are grouped the colleges,
the churches and homes of this picturesque and inter-
esting village.

Admirably located in the heart of the town is
Amherst College, founded in 1821, whose rolls dur-
ing its three-quarters century existence, have borne
the names of men who ha\e won fame, honor and
love from native state and country. The college
buildings are set upon a hill, clustered about the Old
Chapel tower which crowns the summit, while the
grounds embrace about eighty-seven acres, besides
Blake field, Hallock mrk and Pratt Athletic field, all



within ri\c minutes' walk of the campus, and one of
the chief features of a \isit to Amherst is a walk
through these i ollege grounds and a glance at the
buildings and their interesting histories.

()(( n]iying a position unsurpassed for beauty and
healthful location, about a mile from the center of
the town, is the Massachusetts Agricultural College,
foimded more than thirty-five years ago by an act of
Congress, the purposes of which, together with its
extensive and beautiful grounds and buildings are
fully described and illustrated in succeeding pages.

There are also located here several private
schools of a high grade and a Summer School of Lan-
guages, the latter established nearly a quarter of a
century ago and having a large and constantly increas-
ing number of pupils from nearly every state in the
Union, who find Amherst a place unexcelled for rec-
reation and study.

^\■ith its dozen churches, including several beau-
tiful edifices, its free public libraries, its attractive
town hall, its village improvement societies, agricul-
tural society and numerous social and secret organi-



zations, the town offers additional attractions for
visitor or resident.

Nowhere in New England is found a town with
more modern and attractixe homes and residences,
with such beautiful and well-keiit grounds, while in
keeping are the \aried and magnificent walks and
drives throughout the village, bordered with luxuriant
shade trees and leading to mountains and meadows,
forest and field, grove and glen. It is of interest to
visitors that a fine livery, known as the Amherst House
Livery, T. L. Paige, Pro])., offers exceptional service
for large or small ]jarties, while some of the favorite
drives are described elsewhere in this booklet. Am-
herst is not a manufacturing \illage in any sense, but
several old established and profitable industries are
located here, including two large straw hat manufac-
tories at the centre, straw and leatherboard, sash and
blind and wood working factories at South Amherst.
The principal crops raised in this section are hay,
com, oats, rye, potatoes and tobacco. Fnnt growing
is a well established industry and market gardening is
engaged in extensively, while the dairy business is
large and profitable.

Of the many prosperous farms in the Connecti-
cut valley those of Amherst rank most fa\orable, and
in this publication will be found description and il-



lustrations of one of the best in this section, devoted
to dairy and stock raising.

Two railway lines pass through Amherst. The Bos-
ton &: Maine (Central Mass. Div.) affords quick con-
nection with Boston, Worcester, Northampton, the
county seat (eight miles distant), with Springfield
(about 25 miles distant) and with New York.
The New London Northern provides connection
with Fitchburg and North Adams (via Millers Falls)
and with New 'S'ork (via New London steam-
boat or Boston & Albany railroad). A local street
railway line affords convenience of travel from both
stations through the town, while a carriage and hack
service is also provided.

The business firms of Amherst are progressive
and visitors will find well appointed stores here in all
lines of business, the principal ones being represented
in this publication, while not the least to be written
about the town are the accommodations and means of
hospitality afforded at the Amherst House, where
guests for a day, week, month or season can obtain
accommodations seldom enjoyed outside the large
cities, with a service and table unsurpassed. The
hotel is first class, up-to-date and conducted in a thor-
oughly efficient manner. It is further described and
illustrated in succeeding pages.



AA\III:P5T HOUSI:.



hV TIK1A\A5 .1. MAI?l'iri.



rlXKI.V l.OC.Vl'I'.D in the business centre of the
town, yet within sight of and but a few niinntes'
walk to the college grounds and fronting on the
"Common," a beautiful stretch of green lawn shaded
with elms, this hotel occupies a site unsurpassed for
convenience and enjoyable surroundings. The build-
ing is of brick, four stories high, a broad veranda ex-
tending on two sides being exceedingly pleasant and
comfortable with chairs and rockers, and commanding
a fine view of the common and the four streets lead-
ing from the square.

The hotel has two convenient entrances, one
leading direct to the main stairway to the parlors and
dining room and the other on the front to the office.

The first or ground floor is devoted to the office,
which occupies the front, in the rear of which are
nice large and well lighted sample rooms, a fine la\a-
tory, recently rebuilt and equipped with open plumb-
ing in a thoroughly sanitary manner by S. A. Phillips
of .'\mherst, a barber sho]) and a spacious and well
furnished billiard hall.

On the second floor front is the large main |iar-
lor with French windows opening upon the \ eranda



on the front and side. It is extremely pleasant and
in\iting, with open fire])lace, piano and ri( h uphol-
stery. .\ \ery attractive reception room similarly
furnished and decorated adjoins the main jiarlor, being
connected by folding doors.

The main dining room and the culinary depart-
ment occujjy the main jjortion of the second floor.
The dining room is very jileasantly situated, finely
\entilated and well lighted with windows on two sides,
the street side having French windows opening upon
the veranda. It accommodates 125 guests and is
comfortable at all seasons.

The culinary department is most conveniently
located and modernly equipped and arranged for the
most efficient and prompt service, while everything
about this important department is exceedingly whole-
some. The kitchen, serving room, meat and pastrj'
rooms and refrigerators are conveniently connected
with each other and the entire arrangement is equal
to hotels of large cities. A private dining room
which will accommodate 20 guests is also situated on
this floor, being used for parties and small banquets
to considerable extent.



The cuisine is in charge of a skilled chef and
competent assistants, and the table of this hotel is
the pride of the management, for it is not excelled in
liberality, variety and general excellence by any hott-l
in New England at similar rates. It is daily supplied
with fresh cream, milk and butter direct from the
best farms and creamery of Amherst, while from the
Massachusetts Agricultural College farm are had the
choicest and most delicious strawberries, asparagus,
celery and other produce for which the college is
noted. The meats, jjrovisions and poultry are the
most select to be obtained in the market, and the
best is none too good. The service is jiromjit, courte-
ous and obliging at all times, uhilf the daily menu
all that could be desired by the most particular guest.

The chambers throughout the hotel are all out-
side rooms, comprising high studded, well lighted and
airy sleeping apartments arranged single or en suile,
finely furnished and exceedingly comfortable, with
open fireplace, closet and wardrobe, with speaking tube
connecting each room with the office. AVell appointed
bath and toilet rooms are conveniently located on
each floor. The hotel is heated throughout with
steam and lighted by gas and electricity and provided
with long distance telejihone.

The Amherst House is under the personal man-



agement of the proprietor, Mr. D. H. Kendrick, who
has most successfully conducted the hotel for the past
nine years, during which time he has added yearly
improvements and withal made the house a strictly
first-class hostelry with a most desirable patronage,
which reputation it has always enjoyed under his man-
agement. Mr. Kendrick has attained a thorough
knowledge of every requirement in each branch of
the hotel business during the 30 years he has devoted
to it and his guests are made to feel at home and to
enjoy all the comforts of his hotel if attention and
service can effect the same. The rates at the Amherst
House are the most reasonable for liberal and effi-
cient service. Regular rate is §2.50 per day. Special
rates by month or season, and any information fur-
nished by addre.ssing D. H. Kendrick, Amherst, Mass.
The Amherst House Lixery, T. L. Paige, proprie-
tor, provides a first-class livery and depot hack service
for guests of the hotel and all visitors to the town.
This livery is equipped equal to those of large cities
and large and small parties can lie accommodated,
while single and double teams with reliable and satis-
factory horses can be had at all times. Orders can
be left at Amherst House office or may be telephoned.
.A description of some favored drives will be found
elsewhere in this booklet.



AMHERST HOUSE LIVERY.
FEED AND HACK STABLE.

T. L. PAIGE, PROP.

HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS.

Tally- Ho. Barge, Hacks, Double and
Single Teams Furnished at Short Notice.



CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES.

Orders left at Hotel Office will receive
prompt attention.

TELEPHONE.






I R I



DELIGHTFUL DRIVES EROM AAMIERST.



THKRE ARK FKW sections of New Kngland that
offer more delightful opportunities for driving,
and for miles around easy country roads wind through
valleys and over highlands that lavishly display all the
beauty and grandeur of Nature's rarest charms.

Mount Holvoke, eight miles. Southwesterly to
Middle street of Hadley, then south along the Con-
necticut River two and one-half miles ; then up the
mountain side to the half-way house, where car is
taken for the summit.

Oi.n Hai.i.f.v, four miles. By the "Old Road,"
Aniitv street or by Northampton street.

LicvKkErr, six miles. Through North Amherst
"city" and directly north, or by North Amherst and
" Factory Hollow. "

South Deerfield, ten miles. Through North
Amherst, northwesterly, Sunderland village and across
bridge and around base of Sugar Loaf Mountain. Old
Deerfield, of great historical interest, is five miles far-
ther, while the return may be made through North
Hatfield meadows, directly south, across the ri\ er by
the Hatfield ferrj-, and thence to Amherst.

NoRTHAMFiox, eight miles. Over straight road
from -Amherst Center through Old Hadley.



Kasi HA.Mi' TON, eleven miles. By way of North-
ampton, while return by way of Mount Tom station
and Hockanum ferry is fourteen miles.

Haifiei.ii, five miles. By way of North Hadley
across river by jjicturesque ferry. Return by way of
Northampton, southward, is eleven miles, or by Sun-
derland, northward, is fourteen miles.

Whaielv and Whately Glen, twelve miles. By
way of North Hadley, across Ferry to Hatfield, and
northwesterly from Hatfield center, while return by
South Deerfield and .Sunderland, two miles farther.

Belchertown, ten miles. Through East Am-
herst village, then direct road, passing Pansy Park.

Old Bay Road, four miles. Right hand road
after ascending hill beyond Mill River, along foot of
Holyoke range, was once part of stage route to Boston.

The Notch, five miles. To the Bay road, thence
over Holyoke mountain range.

South Hadley, eight miles. Beyond Notch ;
return by road around base of Mount Holyoke, three
I miles farther, or crossing Smith's Ferry and following
I river to Northampton is five miles longer.
' Information in detail about these and other beau-

I tiful dri\es cheerfully given at Amherst House livery.



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E. D. MARSH,

Amherst's Leading

House ••• Furnisher.

FURNITURE AND CARPETS ,

Rugs and Draperies, Window Shades and
Picture Frames,

18 and 20 PHCENIX ROW.




MAIN STREET, TOWN



^a COMMON,— A View frorr




COLLEGE

^; Co-OP. Steam Laundry

So. Pleasant St., Amherst.

TRANSIENT WORK AT SHORT NOTICE
WHEN REQUIRED.

Work left at Amherst House
Office Promptly Attended to.

OFFICE NEXT TO AMlTY ST. SCHOOL HOUSE.

Telephone at Laundry and Office.




OFFICE, THE AMHERST HOUSE.




The Leading Dry Goods Store

OF AMHERST.

H.B. EDWARDS & CO.



DRY AND FANCY GOODS,
DRESS GOODS, CLOAKS

AND SUITS AT LOWEST PRICES
CUTLER'S BLOCK, MERCHANT'S ROW




IN PARLOR, THE AMHERST HOUSE.



IT IS SUPPLIED WITH THE BEST OF EVERYTHING
FROM AMHERST'S LEADING MARKET.

G. S. KENDRICK,

Meats, Provisions and Poultry,

ALL KINDS OF FISH, FRUITS
AND VEGETABLES

CUTLER'S BLOCK, AMHERST.

ESTABLISHED IN 1866.




MAIN DINING ROOM, THE AMHERST HOUSE.



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James F. Page,

AMHERSTS LEADING

^ SHOE DEALER,^

>Storc KslablihlicJ in 1:154 .

"Queen Quality" and "Sorosis" for Ladies,

■■ Elite"— all kinds— $3 50, for Men,

are our Specialties.

REPAIRING PROMPTLY DONE.

Williams' Block, Amherst.

NEXT TO POST OFFICE.




RECEPTION
ROOM,
AMHERST HOUSE.



A. E. HOBART'S FARM,

Situated on North Pleasant Street about two miles on
main road from Amherst House.




Farm comprises 60 acres with 30 liead of cattle entirely
devoted to Dairy. Mill^ test is of higliest standard and always
above that required by law. This farm has supplied Amherst
House for seven years.



GLYNN,

The College Tailor*

ALL THE NEW AND DESIRABLE Jt Jt,
THINGS IN SUITINGS, OVERCOATINGS,
TROUSERINGS AND FANCY VESTINGS.

Cleaning, Pressing and Repairing done on
short notice at reasonable prices.

GLYNN, The College Tailor,
AMHERST.




BILLIARD HALL, THE AMHERST HOUSE.



AAA55ACHUSETTS AGRICULTLIPAL COLLEGE.



IN jri.V, 1862, Congress |)assed an act granting to
each state a portion of the public lands, the money
from the sale of which, it was provided, should go
toward establishing and maintaining at least one col-
lege where, " the leading object shall be, without
excluding other scientific studies, and including mili-
tary tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are
related to agriculture and the mechanical arts, in order
to |)romote the liberal and practical education of the
industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions
of life. "

The Massachusetts Legislature formally accepted
the grant April 18, 1863, and afterward set aside one-
third of it for the Massachusetts Institute of Tech-
nology of Boston.

The trustees for the Massachusetts Agricultural
C'ollege were incorjiorated by an act of April 29, 1863,
and their share of the Congressional grant comprised
360,000 acres, which yielded $146,000. ']"he loca-
tion of the college was decided upon when the town



of .\mherst promised $50,000 and sufficient land at a
reasonatile rate, which offer was accejjted May 25,
1864.

The present estate of the college, comprising
383^ acres, was purchased at a cost of about $43,000,
and the erection of the first college building was au-
thorized May 26, 1866. The College was opened for
students in October of the following year, the enter-
ing class numbering 33, with four instructors.

Such in brief was the founding of this important
and successful institution, one of the first of its kind
in the country and one which has proved worthy of a
Nation and State's generosity as well as the siibstan-
tial ]irovisions of its parent town. Few colleges can
boast of as many attractive features, for here the pros-
pective student will find an opportunity to secure a
maximum education at a minimum cost, tuition free,
board at a trifling figure, and work for the asking if
necessity demands it. He will find a farm of 150
acres under cultivation, with model barn stocked with




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE EUILDINGS.



a hundred head of cattle and having a most modern
ecjuipment ; a horticultural department of loo acres,
with greenhouses, orchards and grounds laid out for
the practical study of market gardening, floriculture,
fruit culture and forestry. He will find an experi-
ment department, some 80 acres in extent, with lab-
oratories, greenhouses, insectaries and barns, where
are being worked out all conceivable problems in the
use of fertilizers, feeding of animals, soil investigations,
plant diseases, testing of fruits and vegetables, ])re-
vention of insect ravages, and relations of tem])era-
ture and moisture to growth. He will find a growing
librar\' of 18,000 carefully selected volumes, almost
entirely scientific in character and well abreast of the
literature of the day, in which he will not only be in-
\ ited and tirged to enter, but also taught by personal
reference the jtrincipal of subject investigation and
valueing of authoritative testimony. He will find a
corps of 18 professors and assistants, each doing
faithfully and conscientiously the work assigned him :
a ( ertain definite re


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Online LibraryAmherst HouseAmherst : the village beautiful, cultured and literary → online text (page 1 of 2)