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Northern Nut Growers Association Report of the Proceedings at the Twenty-Fifth Annual Meeting online

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it until this fall, when the nuts are ripe. They are heavily set with
bloom now. To assist me in this work, I am wondering if the Association
has anything in its files pertaining to the varieties that he has. As
you know, one can identify a tree quicker if he knows what he is looking
for.




Letter From Mrs. E. W. Freel

_Pleasantville, Iowa, September 5, 1934_


Yesterday, when coming home, we drove around (which was not out of our
way) to see those walnut trees about which you made inquiry. The Freel
tree has been topped and it has made a wonderful growth this year and is
going to make a very pretty tree. The Marion has a few walnuts on this
year, but they are falling off due to the dry weather this year. Last
year it was loaded. The Metcalf tree has some on but, like the others,
most all of them have fallen off. It was also full last year. The
Worthington tree also had some on this year, but have all fallen off. It
also had walnuts on last year.

I have never known any of these trees to be a complete failure unless it
would be this year due to the drought which has been pretty severe with
us. We have had no garden to speak of and the crops in this section have
almost been a complete failure.

The Wheeling tree had walnuts on last year but I have been unable to get
out there this year. It is off the gravel road and it has been raining
here for the last two days.

I have not been able to get out to the hickory nut trees. They had some
nuts on last year but not very plentiful. I have noticed along the
highways, as we would be driving along, that some of the hickory nut
trees were full and others would not have any on, but do not know as yet
how the drought will affect them.

I wish we could attend the convention, but it will be impossible for us
this year.




Letter From Geo. W. Gibbens

_Godfrey, Illinois, September 6, 1934_


The Mid-West Nut Growers' Association is not functioning.

There will be a normal crop of black walnuts in this section of the
state. The hickory and pecan crop is very light. The chestnut crop will
be light. Many of our chestnut trees were killed by the drought this
summer. Some young trees on cultivated land will develop nuts, and a few
of the older trees may do so.

For many years here (E. A. Riehl Farm) we have been trying to grow the
English walnut to bearing size. This year we have a young tree that is
bearing. It is the Alpine.

I wish we could attend the convention.




Letter From Fred Kettler

_Platteville, Wisconsin_


In regard to the Kettler walnut tree here: It seems to be gradually
dying; has many dead branches, which is caused by the drought we have
had the last few years. We should get 25 to 30 inches rainfall a year
and we had only 8 or 10 last year and about that same amount this year.
The ground is wet down only about 15 inches on top. Below that it is
dry.

The old tree had quite a few nuts on this year. However, most of them
were blown off by a cyclone six weeks ago. There is about a peck of nuts
on the tree now.

All walnuts here are only half a crop on account of the June beetle and
the weather conditions, and they are quite small nuts, the weather being
so dry.

I grafted 150 of the Wisconsin No 1, or Kettler walnut. It was boiling
hot here in April and May and it again spoiled it for me. We watered
them every day and shaded them, but the heat and dry, hot dirt was too
much. All were grafted on young yearling trees close to the ground where
I covered them with dirt. Many started, but died later; anyway, I
succeeded in getting six more nice trees started (one to three feet tall
now). My tree from last year is about five feet tall and made some side
branches; so you see I am getting started. I doubt if I can get any
graft wood from the old tree next spring.

We are in the nursery business just in a small way. We have only the
best of varieties.

I have discovered also a thin-shell hickory nut with a wonderful meat. I
don't know if I will get any of the nuts this year as they have been
stealing them every year, I am told by the man who owns it. I succeeded
in getting one growing on a young pecan tree I had. I think it is even
better than my walnut. I enclose one with a this year walnut sample. The
hickory is a last year sample.

What our country needs is timber on every farm from one acre to ten
acres, according to size of farm, all over the United States. Then we
will get more rain. That would be a real crop control - instead of
destroying crops like the New Deal is doing. Planting a strip of timber
from Canada to the Gulf will not help anyone. We believe the
"brain-trusters" need a doctor.




Telegram


Sept. 11, 1934.

Dear Dr. Morris:

The Northern Nut Growers' Association is in session in the W. K. Kellogg
Hotel, Battle Creek, Michigan. The members present are reminded that
this is the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Association. It recalls with
interest the first meeting held in New York City, which was called to
order by Dr. Deming, at which you became charter President, Mr. T. P.
Littlepage of Washington, charter Vice President, Dr. Deming, charter
Secretary.

It is the unanimous feeling of the present membership that the society
for which you and the others so ably laid the foundation at that time
has been abundantly justified by the accomplishments of the
organization. We are especially indebted to you for the able leadership
from you which the Association enjoyed, not only while you served in an
executive capacity, but during the many years which followed while you
were an active leading member, and now for approximately ten years
during which you have been Dean.

We regret that impaired health makes it impossible for you to attend
meetings at present, but we assure you that your name is not being
forgotten nor is the work which you inaugurated being allowed to lapse.

(Signed by the members present.)




Catalogue of Top-Grafted Nut Trees on the Kellogg Farm, Kellogg School
Grounds, and Kellogg Estate.


Place and Variety Species Stock Year Grafted

Kellogg School -
1. Fairbanks Hybrid Hickory Pignut 1933
2. Pleas, Des Hicans Pignut 1934
Moines and
McCallister

Kellogg Farm (Farm Lane)
1. Broadview English Walnut Black Walnut 1931
Crath English Walnut Black Walnut 1932
2. Allen Black Walnut Black Walnut 1932
Wiard Black Walnut Black Walnut 1933
3. Dennis Shagbark Pignut 1934
4. Creager Hybrid Hickory Pignut 1934

(Hickory Block)
1. Fairbanks Hybrid Hickory Pignut 1931
2. Rohwer Black Walnut Black Walnut 1932
3. Crath English Walnut Black Walnut 1933
(McIntyre)
4. Haviland Shellbark Pignut 1931
5. McCallister Hican Pignut 1931
6. Burlington Hican Pignut 1932
7. Des Moines Hican Pignut 1932
8. Creager Hybrid Hickory Pignut 1932
9. Dennis Shagbark Pignut 1932
10. Stanley Shellbark Pignut 1931
11. Wiard Black Walnut Black Walnut 1933
12. Ohio Black Walnut Black Walnut 1931
13. Des Moines Hican Pignut 1932
14. Pleas Hican Pignut 1934
15. Cedar Rapids Shagbark Pignut 1931
16. McDermid English Black Walnut 1933
17. Shinnerling Shagbark Pignut 1932
18. Stratford Shagbark Pignut 1932
19. Hand Shagbark Pignut 1932
20. Rockville Hican Pignut 1931
21. Rohwer Black Walnut Black Walnut 1933
22. Des Moines Hican Pignut 1932
23. Stratford Shagbark Pignut 1932
24. Beaver Hybrid Hickory Pignut 1932
25. Gerardi Hican Pignut 1934
26. Creitz Black Walnut Black Walnut 1931
27. Ohio Black Walnut Black Walnut 1930
28. Ohio Black Walnut Black Walnut 1930
Howell Black Walnut

Kellogg Farm (55 acre field)
1. Creitz Black Walnut Black Walnut 1932
2. Rohwer Black Walnut Black Walnut 1932
Stambaugh Black Walnut Black Walnut 1932
Wiard Black Walnut Black Walnut 1932
McDermid English Walnut Black Walnut 1932
Crath English Walnut Black Walnut 1932
3. Crath English Walnut Black Walnut 1932
4. Wilkinson English Walnut Black Walnut 1933
5. Wiard Black Walnut Black Walnut 1933
6. Adams Black Walnut Black Walnut 1934
7. Beck Black Walnut Black Walnut 1934
8. Wiard Black Walnut Black Walnut 1933
9. Franquette English Walnut Black Walnut 1933
10. Ohio Black Walnut Black Walnut 1931
Rohwer Black Walnut Black Walnut 1932

Pasture Field -
1. Ohio Black Walnut Black Walnut 1930
2. Ohio Black Walnut Black Walnut 1930
3. Des Moines Hican Bitternut 1933
and Pleas Hican 1934
4. Ohio Black Walnut Black Walnut 1931
5. Ohio Black Walnut Black Walnut 1931
6. Wiard Black Walnut Black Walnut 1933
7. Ohio Black Walnut Black Walnut 1930
8. Crath English Walnut Black Walnut 1932
9. Crath No. 2 English Walnut Black Walnut 1932
10. McDermid English Walnut Black Walnut 1932
11. Corsan Chinese Walnut Black Walnut 1932
12. Carpenter Black Walnut Black Walnut 1932
Beck Black Walnut Black Walnut 1933
13. Grundy Black Walnut Black Walnut 1932
Franquette English Walnut Black Walnut 1933

Kellogg Estate -
1. Fairbanks Hickory Hybrid Pignut 1931
2. Crath No. 5 English Walnut Black Walnut 1932
3. Burlington Hican Pignut 1932
4. Stratford Shagbark Nursery Tree 1932
5. Faust Heartnut Japanese Walnut 1932
6. Crath English Walnut Black Walnut 1932
7. Crath English Walnut Black Walnut 1932
8. Alpine English Walnut Black Walnut 1932
9. Turkish Hazel Tree Hazel (colurna) Seedling 1932
10. McDermid English Walnut Black Walnut 1932
11. Burlington Hicans Pignut 1932
Des Moines 1933
12. Fairbanks Hickory Hybrid Pignut 1931
Dennis Shagbark 1931
Des Moines Hicans 1933
13. Fairbanks Hybrid Hickory Pignut 1931
Burlington Hican 1931
Des Moines Hican 1932
Stratford Shagbark 1931




EXHIBITS


Mr. A. B. Anthony, Sterling, Ill.

Bitternut No. 1
Bitternut No. 2
Shagbark - Shellbark cross No. 1
Shagbark - Shellbark cross No. 2
Shagbark - Shellbark cross No. 3
Shagbark - Shellbark cross No. 4


Mr. J. F. Wilkinson, Rockport, Ind

Busseron pecan
Indiana pecan
Kentucky pecan
Major pecan
Greenriver pecan
Butterick pecan
Posey pecan
McCallister Hican

Hican variety Mr. Wilkinson suggests calling Bixby in honor of the late
Willard G. Bixby.
Ohio black walnut
Stabler black walnut
Thomas black walnut


Mr. F. H. Frey, Chicago, Ill.

Wheeling black walnut, new find by Mrs. E. W. Freel, 1932
Worthington black walnut, from Mrs. E. W. Freel, 1932
Marion black walnut, Mrs. E. W. Freel, 1932
Freel black walnut, Mrs. E. W. Freel, Pleasantville, Iowa
Metcalf black walnut, from Mrs. E. W. Freel
Stabler walnut, "one lobe," O. H. Casper, Anna, Ill.
Oklahoma seedling, black walnut, evidently J. rupestris
(per Dr. Waite, pg. 61 - 1932)
Rohwer black walnut, from John Rohwer, Grundy Center, Iowa
Grundy black walnut, from John Rohwer, Grundy Center, Iowa
Kettler or Wisconsin No. 1, from Fred Kettler, Platteville, Wisc.
Shellbark hickory, seedling No. 1, Mrs. E. W. Freel, Pleasantville, Iowa
Shellbark hickory, seedling No. 2, Mrs. E. W. Freel, Pleasantville, Iowa
Cedar Rapids shagbark hickory, from S. W. Snyder, Center Point, Iowa
Shinnerling shagbark hickory, from Chas. Shinnerling, Amana, Iowa
Hagen shagbark hickory, from S. W. Snyder, Center Point, Iowa


G. H. Corsan, Echo Valley, Islington, Ontario, Canada

DuChilly and other European filberts grown on his place in Canada
Jones hybrid filberts, corylus americana - corylus avellana
Photograph of Corsan nut exhibit at Canadian National Exhibition
Craxezy, butternut, from Union City, Mich. From Harry Burgart, Michigan
Nut Tree Nursery
Mitchel hybrid heartnut, from Scotland, Ontario
Stratford hickory, exhibited by Mr. Snyder, Center Point, Iowa.
Mr. Snyder says this is the best bearing hickory for his section
in Iowa.


Prof. J. A. Neilson, Michigan State College, E. Lansing, Mich.

Harris black walnut, Allegan, Mich.
Thomas black walnut
Everett Wiard black walnut, Ypsilanti, Mich.
Glen Allen black walnut, Middleville, Mich.
Dan Beck black walnut, Hamilton, Mich.
Ten Eyck black walnut
Adams black walnut, Scotts, Mich.
M. S. C. Campus heartnut, East Lansing, Mich.
Crawford heartnut
Mrs. Henry Hanel, heartnut, Williamsburg, Mich.
Gellatly heartnut, Westbank, B. C.
Lancaster heartnut, Graham Station
McKenzie heartnut, B. C.
Mitchell heartnut, Scotland, Ont.
Fred Bourne, heartnut, Milford, Mich.
W. S. Thompson heartnut, R. 2, St. Catherines, Ont.
English, Chatham, Ont.
Mitchell butternut, Scotland, Ont.
Col. B. D. Wallace butternut, Portage La Prairie, Manitoba, Can.
Korean pine nuts, Abbotsford, P. Q.
W. S. Thompson filbert, R. 2, St. Catherines, Ont.
Harry Weber hazel, R. 2, Cleves, Ohio
Beck English walnut, Allegan, Mich.
W. S. Thompson English walnut, R. 2, St. Catherines, Ont.
Larsen English walnut, Ionia, Mich.
English walnut, from Broadview, B. C.
McDermid English walnut, St. Catherines, Ont.
Clyde Westphal pecan, Marcellus, Mich.
Fairbanks hickory, grown at Grand Rapids, Mich.
Haviland hickory, Bath, Mich.
Green hickory, Battle Creek, Mich.
Mrs. Ray D. Mann hickory, Davison, Mich.
Hill hickory, Davison, Mich.
Lyle House hickory, Fowlerville, Mich.
Miller hickory, North Branch, Mich.
Pleas pecan and bitternut hybrid hickory
Burlington hican
Rowley chestnut, Orleans, Mich.
John E. Dunham, chestnut, Oshtemo, Mich.
Chinese chestnuts, Ridgetown, Ont.




REGISTRATION


Frank H. Frey, Chicago, Illinois
A. S. Colby, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois
A. B. Anthony, Sterling, Illinois
Mr. Harry Burgart, Union City, Michigan
Mrs. Harry Burgart, Union City, Michigan
Mrs. Charles Halder, Ceresco, Michigan
Mrs. Anton Burgart, Union City, Michigan
Mr. Gilbert Becker, Climax, Michigan
Mrs. Gilbert Becker, Climax, Michigan
Carl F. Walker, Cleveland Heights, Ohio
Lennard H. Mitchell, Washington, D. C.
Mrs. Lennard H. Mitchell, Washington, D. C.
Homer L. Bradley, Kellogg Farm, Augusta, Michigan
J. F. Wilkinson, Rockport, Indiana
G. H. Corsan, Echo Valley, Islington, Ontario
Dr. G. A. Zimmerman, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
Mrs. G. A. Zimmerman, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
Oliver T. Healy, Union City, Michigan
Mrs. Anna H. Bregger, Bangor, Michigan
John T. Bregger, Bangor, Michigan
Mrs. John T. Bregger, Bangor, Michigan
S. E. Monroe, Chicago, Illinois
J. A. Neilson, East Lansing, Michigan
Mrs. J. A. Neilson, East Lansing, Michigan
Mrs. C. M. McCrary, Augusta, Michigan
C. M. McCrary, Augusta, Michigan
Mildred M. Jones, Jones Nurseries, Lancaster, Pennsylvania
Mr. Harry R. Weber, Cincinnati, Ohio
Mrs. Harry Weber, Cincinnati, Ohio
D. C. Snyder, Center Point, Iowa
W. K. Kellogg, Battle Creek, Michigan
Dr. J. H. Kellogg, Battle Creek, Michigan
Rollin H. Tabor, Mt. Vernon, Ohio
George L. Slate, Geneva, N. Y.
L. H. MacDaniels, Ithaca, New York.
L. Housser, Cloverdale, Ontario
Fae Noverr, Enquirer and News, Battle Creek, Michigan
Zenas H. Ellis, Fair Haven, Vermont
Joan Deming, Hartford, Connecticut
Mrs. Oliver Healy, Union City, Michigan
Mr. Howard W. Harris, Allegan, Michigan. R. D. No. 7
Mr. Scott Healy, Otsego, Michigan. R. F. D. No. 2
Mrs. Scott Healy, Otsego, Michigan. R. F. D. No. 2
Glen Grunner, Coldwater, Michigan. R. D. No. 3
Leon Ford, Battle Creek, Michigan
Marshall Moon, Battle Creek, Michigan
Dean Phillips, Battle Creek, Michigan
Lawrence Poole, Battle Creek, Michigan
Evelyn Alwood, Battle Creek, Michigan
Martha Richmond, Battle Creek, Michigan
Irene VaVn De Bogart, Vicksburg, Michigan
Cleone Wells, Battle Creek, Michigan
Herbert Bush, Battle Creek, Michigan
Dorothy Jenney, Battle Creek, Michigan
Cecelia Plushnik, Battle Creek, Michigan
Vernice Fox, Battle Creek, Michigan
Edward A. Malasky, Battle Creek, Michigan
C. A. Reed, U. S. Dept, of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
T. V. Hicks, Battle Creek, Michigan. R. 3
Norman Crittenden, Galesburg, Michigan
Arnold G. Otto, Detroit, Michigan
Miss Mary Barber, Kellogg Co., Battle Creek, Michigan
Professor V. R. Gardner, M. S. C., East Lansing, Michigan
H. A. Cardinell, M. S. C., East Lansing, Michigan
E. P. Gerber, Apple Creek, Ohio
Lila M. Gerber, Apple Creek, Ohio
Dora E. Gerber, Apple Creek, Ohio
H. W. Kaan, Wellesley, Massachusetts
R. S. Galbreath, Huntington, Indiana
Mrs. R. S. Galbreath, Huntington, Indiana
Dr. W. C. Deming, Hartford, Connecticut
Everett Wiard, Ypsilanti, Michigan
Mrs. E. Wiard, Ypsilanti, Michigan




BOOKS AND BULLETINS ON NORTHERN NUT GROWING


1. Nut Culture in the United States, U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, 1896.
Out of print and out of date but of great interest.

2. The Nut Culturist, Fuller, pub. Orange Judd Co., N. Y., 1906. Out of
print and out of date, but a systematic and well written treatise. These
two books are the classics of American nut growing.

3. Nut Growing, Dr. Robert T. Morris, pub. MacMillan, N. Y. 2nd edition
1931, price $2.50. The modern authority, written in the author's
entertaining and stimulating style.

4. Farmers' Bulletin No. 1501, 1926, Nut Tree Propagation, C. A. Reed,
to be had free from U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. A very
full bulletin with many illustrations.

5. Tree Crops, Dr. J. Russell Smith, pub. Harcourt, Brace & Co., N. Y.,
1929, price $4.00. Includes the nut crop.

6. Annual reports of the Northern Nut Growers' Association from 1911 to
date. To be had from the secretary. Prices on request.

7. Bulletin No. 5, Northern Nut Growers' Association, by W. G. Bixby.
2nd edition, 1920. To be had from the secretary. Price 50 cents.

8. Farmers' Bulletin No. 1392, Black Walnut Culture for both Timber and
Nut Production. To be had from the Supt. of Documents, Gov. Printing
Office, Washington, D. C. Price 5 cents.

9. Year Book Separate No. 1004, 1927, a brief article on northern nut
growing, by C. A. Reed, to be had free from U. S. Dept. of Agriculture,
Washington, D. C.

10. Filberts - G. A. Slate - Bulletin No. 588, New York State Agricultural
Experiment Station, Geneva, N. Y., December, 1930.

11. Leaflet No. 84, 1932, Planting Black Walnut, W. R. Mattoon and C. A.
Reed, to be had free from U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.

12. Harvesting and Marketing the Native Nut Crops of the North, by C. A.
Reed, 1932, mimeographed bulletin, to be had free from U. S. Dept. of
Agriculture, Washington, D. C.

13. Dealers in Black Walnut Kernels, mimeographed bulletin by C. A.
Reed, 1931, to be had free from U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, Washington,
D. C.

14. Eastern Nursery Catalogues Listing Nut Trees, mimeographed leaflet
to be had free from U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.

15. Twenty Years Progress in Northern Nut Culture. A 48-page booklet of
valuable information and instruction by John W. Hershey. Nuticulturist,
Downingtown, Penna. Price 25 cents.

16. Files of The American Nut Journal, to be had from the publishers,
American Nurseryman Publishing Co., 39 State St., Rochester, N. Y.


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Online LibraryAndrew LangNorthern Nut Growers Association Report of the Proceedings at the Twenty-Fifth Annual Meeting → online text (page 15 of 15)