Andrew Lang.

Northern Nut Growers Association Report of the Proceedings at the Twenty-Fifth Annual Meeting online

. (page 9 of 15)
Online LibraryAndrew LangNorthern Nut Growers Association Report of the Proceedings at the Twenty-Fifth Annual Meeting → online text (page 9 of 15)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Union.




A Roll Call of the Nuts

_By_ DR. W. C. DEMING

_Connecticut_


In the report of the proceedings at the eighth annual meeting of this
association, held at Stamford, Conn., September 5 and 6, 1917, is an
address by the Vice President, Prof. W. N. Hutt of North Carolina,
entitled "Reasons for Our Limited Knowledge as to What Varieties of Nut
Trees to Plant." I quote from that address:

"In 1847 the American Pomological Society was formed as a national
clearing house of horticultural ideas. The first work the society
undertook was to determine the varieties of the different classes
of fruits suitable for planting in different sections of the
country. Patrick Barry of Rochester, one of the pioneers of
American horticulture, was for years the chairman of the committee
on varietal adaptation and did an immense amount of work on that
line. At the meetings of the society he went alphabetically over
the variety lists of fruits and called for reports on each one from
growers all over the country. This practice was kept up for years
and the resulting data were collected and compiled in the society's
reports. A similar systematic roll call of classes and varieties of
nuts grown by the members of this association would be of immense
value to intending planters of nut trees. In northern nut growing,
however, it may be questioned if we have yet arrived at the Patrick
Barry stage."

These were the words of Prof. Hutt in 1917, seventeen years ago. I
believe that nut growing has now arrived at the Patrick Barry stage. It
seems right, therefore, that we should begin to have an annual roll call
of the nuts. To this end I have prepared a list of nuts of the different
genera, species and varieties grown in the northeastern United States.
This list is long but by no means complete and this, by the nature of
things, it can never be. It is evident that there will not be time
enough to go over more than a small part of this list. It is, therefore,
proposed to have the list mimeographed and sent to all members for their
reports. Members are asked particularly to add to the list the names and
performances of any varieties not listed of which they may have
knowledge. In this way we shall soon be able to make our lists as nearly
complete as possible.

In order to reduce bulk and expense it will be necessary to print the
names in compact form. It is suggested that the lists be kept for
reference and that any report be made on a separate sheet under the
proper heading. I will go as far in it now as you want me to. As I call
the names of the nuts on this list I will ask the members present to
report, as briefly as possible, any knowledge they may have as to the
performance of each nut, such as the earliness of its fruiting, size and
regularity of crops, growth and vigor of tree and character of nuts.


HICKORIES

THE ANTHONY:

See Mr. Reed's paper in this report.


THE BARNES (Shag. x Mock.):

Dr. MacDaniels: There are some at Itaca which bear.

Dr. Deming: This is undoubtedly a Shagbark - mockernut hybrid. It is
entirely at home when grafted on the mockernut. This makes it of value
for there are few of our named hickories that will do well when grafted
on the mockernut. In 1933 I top-worked a mockernut with ten grafts of
the Barnes. In 1934 it bore 30 fine nuts. It appears to be an excellent
nut. There are three other nuts that I know do well on the mockernut.
One is the Wampler from Indiana introduced by W. C. Reed. Another is the
Minnie raised by Mr. S. W. Snyder. The fourth nut is the Gobble. The
Barnes is mentioned in Dr. Zimmerman's report, page 23, 1932
proceedings. Carl Weschcke has it growing at River Falls, Wis.


THE BATES (pecan x Mock.):

Mentioned in Dr. Zimmerman's report, page 23, 1932.


THE BEAM:

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report.


THE BEAVER (Shag. x Bitter.):

Dr. Deming: It grows rapidly. The nuts are not of very good quality,
like most bitternut hybrids.

The Beaver is growing in the Kellogg plantings at Battle Creek and is
mentioned in Dr. Zimmerman's report, page 19, 1932. Carl Weschcke has it
growing at River Falls, Wis. E. C. Rice, Absher, Ky., has one one-year
graft on bitternut, height 5 feet. J. H. Gage, Hamilton, Ont., has one
Beaver tree planted in 1924 and moved in 1925 growing in light sandy
soil on north shore at west end Lake Ontario. Diameter of the trunk is
about three inches, tree fifteen feet high, bore first time in 1934. It
is growing at the Riehl Farm, Godfrey, Ill., and in the Jones Nursery,
Lancaster, Pa.


THE BEAM:

Is mentioned in Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report.


THE BILLAU:

Is mentioned in Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report.


THE BONTRAGER (Shag.):

Won third prize in 1929 contest, page 53, 1931. Tree owned by John D.
Bontrager, Middlebury, Ind.


THE BROOKS (Shag.):

Is mentioned in Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report. It won ninth prize in
1929 contest, page 53, 1931, to Mrs. John Brooks, Ottumwa, Iowa. Carl
Weschcke has it growing at River Falls, Wis.


THE BURLINGTON (Pecan x shell.):

Dr. Deming: The true name of the nut we call Marquardt. The Michigan Nut
Nursery have trees bearing.

Miss Jones: A characteristic of all shellbark x pecan hybrids is that
they don't fill well.

Mr. Corsan: Are they in exceedingly rich soil or just ordinary? I find
that nuts respond to rich soil.

Miss Jones: They are in ordinary soil.

Dr. MacDaniels: We have two trees at Ithaca about ten years old which
have borne but the nuts have not filled very well.

Dr. Deming: Is the Burlington worth growing? Does it fill so badly that
it is not a success?

Miss Jones: The kernel fills out about three-fourths of the way. It
fills better than the McCallister.

Mr. Corsan: I have never seen such a fine nut in my life.

Mr. Wilkinson: It is a good hybrid and a wonderful bearer.

Dr. Deming: Every year?

Mr. Wilkinson: Yes, and matures unusually early.

The Burlington is in the Riehl plantings at Godfrey, Ill. It is
mentioned in Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report. Carl Weschcke has young
trees growing at River Falls, Wis. Sargeant H. Wellman has some young
trees at Topsfield, Mass. F. H. Frey has young tree in yard at Chicago,
but it has not borne nuts as yet. Foliage is beautiful, leaves being
rather broad but some kind of blight seems to turn them dark and they
curl up about middle of the summer.

J. W. Hershey: Of the hybrid hickories the Burlington should be
eliminated from the list and a great many others of the hickories should
be thrown out as rapidly as possible.


THE BURTON (pecan x shell.):

Mentioned in Dr. Zimmerman's report, page 20, 1932. It is growing in
Riehl plantings at Godfrey, Ill., and on Kellogg farm, Michigan.


THE CALDWELL:

It is growing in the Riehl plantings at Godfrey, Ill.


THE CASPER:

Mentioned in Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report. Parent tree in Illinois.


THE CEDAR RAPIDS:

See Mr. Reed's paper in this report, also Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926
report. It is growing on the Riehl farm at Godfrey, Ill., the Kellogg
farm at Battle Creek, Mich., and in the Carl Weschcke plantings at River
Falls, Wis.


THE CLARK (shag.):

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report and Mr. Reed's in 1931 report.

This hickory is growing on the Carl Weschcke place at River Falls, Wis.,
and in Sargeant H. Wellman's nut orchard at Topsfield, Mass.


THE COMINS:

See Mr. Reed's paper in this report.


THE COOK (shag.):

See Mr. Reed's paper in 1931 report.


THE CREAGER:

See Mr. Reed's paper in this report. This hickory is growing in the
Kellogg farm plantings at Battle Creek, Mich.


THE DENNIS (shag.):

See Mr. Reed's paper in this report and Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926
report. This hickory is growing in the Kellogg plantings at Battle
Creek, Mich., and in Carl Weschcke nut orchard at River Falls, Wis. W.
R. Fickes, Wooster, Ohio, reports the Dennis promises to be a heavy,
early bearer of fairly good quality.


THE DES MOINES (pecan x shell.):

Mentioned in Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report and by Dr. Zimmerman, page
20, 1932. Is growing in the Riehl and Kellogg farms plantings.


THE DREW (shag.):

See Mr. Reed's paper in this report and his paper in 1931 report.


THE EDABURN:

Mentioned by Mr. Bixby in his paper in 1926 report. Carl Weschcke has it
growing in his orchard at River Falls, Wis.


THE EMERICK:

See Mr. Reed's paper in this report.


THE EUREKA (shell.):

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report.


THE EVERSMAN (shell.):

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report.


THE FAIRBANKS (shag. x bitter.):

Mr. Corsan: I had eleven nuts on my tree last year. They are very small
trees.

Dr. Neilson: A Fairbanks grafted on a pignut in the spring of 1931 at
the Kellogg estate has quite a few nuts on it this season.

Miss Jones: They bear well and regularly.

Dr. Deming: Yes, they do at my place, too.

Mr. Corsan: What kind of a flavor has it?

Dr. Deming: It is bitter when you keep it but not when fresh.

Mr. Snyder: Don't judge them by one nut. They get better as you eat
them. The more you eat the better you like them.

Miss Jones: People that try them at our place don't notice much
difference between those hybrids and the shellbarks. I give them to
people any time during the winter, and they don't notice the difference.

Mr. Reed: Mr. Bixby said at one of the conventions that the Fairbanks
was a good grower, easy to propagate, bore well, not so good as to size,
thin shelled and had all the desirable characteristics of a good nut
except that it wasn't good to eat.

See Mr. Reed's paper in this report and Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926
report. The Fairbanks is mentioned in Dr. Zimmerman's report, page 19,
1932. It is growing in the Riehl orchard at Godfrey, Ill., the Kellogg
plantings at Battle Creek, Mich., in the Carl Weschcke orchard at River
Falls, Wis., and in the E. C. Rice plantings at Absher, Ky. Sargeant H.
Wellman has some young Fairbanks trees at Topsfield, Mass. Mr. W. R.
Fickes reports it is a very poor quality hickory at Wooster, Ohio, but
may be valuable for double working.


THE FLUHR (shag. x shell.):

Awarded seventh prize in 1929 contest, page 53, 1931 report, to Edgar
Fluhr, Kiel, Wis.


THE FREEL (shag.):

Entered in 1929 contest by Mrs. E. W. Freel, Pleasantville, Iowa.


THE FROMAN (shag.):

Awarded ninth prize in 1929 contest to Arlie W. Froman, Bacon, Ind.


THE GALLOWAY:

H. R. Weber: I notice the Galloway is not listed among the hickory
hybrids. The parent tree is growing in Hamilton County, Ohio, and, is
supposed to be a pecan x bitternut hybrid.


THE GERARDI (pecan x shell.):

A Member: It is like the Nussbaumer.

This hybrid is mentioned in Dr. Zimmerman's report, page 20, 1932. Also
see description by Joseph Gerardi, page 45, 1932 report. It is growing
in the Riehl plantings at Godfrey, Ill., and the Kellogg plantings at
Battle Creek, Mich.


THE GISSEL:

It is growing in the Riehl plantings at Godfrey, Ill., and in orchard of
Carl Weschcke at River Falls, Wis.


THE GLOVER (shag.):

It is mentioned in Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report and Mr. Reed's paper
in 1931 report. It is growing in the Kellogg plantings at Battle Creek,
Mich., the Carl Weschcke orchard at River Falls, Wis., and the Sargeant
H. Wellman orchard at Topsfield, Mass. E. C. Rice, Absher, Ky., has
two-year grafts on shellbark and bitternut stocks. It seems to do better
on the shellbark stocks.


THE GOBBLE (shag.):

Mentioned on page 54, 1931 report. Tree owned by William Gobble,
Holsten, Va.


THE GOHEEN (shag.):

Awarded sixth prize in 1929 contest to Mrs. Hamill Goheen, Pennsylvania
Furnace, Penna. Sargeant H. Wellman has young trees growing at
Topsfield, Mass.


THE GREEN:

See Mr. Reed's paper in this report.


THE GREENBAY (pecan x shell.):

Mentioned in Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report and in Dr. Zimmerman's
report, page 20, 1932.


THE GRIFFIN:

Mr. Bixby, page 15, 1928, report, states it is an early bearer. Dr. J.
Russell Smith, Swarthmore, Pa., reports the Griffin is precocious when
grafted on pecan but cracking test by Mr. C. A. Reed shows it to have a
very low cracking value.


THE GRUPE:

Is mentioned in Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report. It is growing in the
Jones Nursery at Lancaster, Pa.


THE HAGEN (shag. x shell.):

Mentioned in Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report. It was awarded ninth
prize in 1929 contest. Parent tree owned by Mrs. C. E. Hagen,
Guttenberg, Iowa. It is growing in the Snyder Bros.' plantings at Center
Point, Iowa, the Kellogg plantings at Battle Creek, Mich., and in the
Carl Weschcke orchard at River Falls, Wis.


THE HALES (shag.):

Mentioned in Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report.


THE HAND:

Mentioned in Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report. It is growing in the
Kellogg plantings at Battle Creek, Mich., and in the orchard of Carl
Weschcke at River Falls., Wis.


THE HILL (shell.):

Introduced by S. W. Snyder, Center Point, Iowa, and mentioned by Mr.
Bixby in his paper in 1926 report.


THE HUBER:

See Mr. Reed's paper in this report.


THE HUFF:

See Mr. Reed's paper in this report.


THE IOWA (shell.):

Mentioned in Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report.


THE KELSEY:

Mentioned in Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report. Carl Weschcke has it
growing in his orchard at River Falls, Wis.


THE KENTUCKY (shag. x mock.):

Dr. Deming: This is said to be a shagbark x mockernut hybrid but I see
no reason for the belief. It is a vigorous grower. One year my trees
were liberally sprinkled with nuts. I know that they bear from year to
year, but the squirrels get the nuts. I think it is a shy bearer.

Dr. Zimmerman: It bears regularly at my place but at Mr. Littlepage's it
isn't bearing.

This hickory is mentioned in Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report and in Dr.
Zimmerman's report, page 23, 1932.


THE KIRTLAND (shag.):

Mentioned in Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report and in Mr. Reed's paper in
1931 report. It is growing in the Jones Nursery at Lancaster, Pa., and
in the orchards of Carl Weschcke, River Falls, Wis., and of Sargeant H.
Wellman at Topsfield, Mass.


THE LAKE (shag.):

Awarded first prize in 1929 contest to Mrs. C. Lake, New Haven, Ind., R.
R. 1.


THE LEONARD (shell.):

Mentioned in Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report.


THE LANEY (shag. x bitter.):

See Mr. Reed's paper in this report and Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926
report.

Dr. Deming: I have never known them to bear anything yet at my place in
Connecticut.

Dr. Zimmerman: They haven't borne at my place, either.

See Dr. Zimmerman's report, page 19, 1932. The Laney hickory is growing
in the Jones Nursery at Lancaster, Pa., the Kellogg plantings at Battle
Creek, Mich., and the Carl Weschcke orchard at River Falls, Wis.


THE LINGENFELTER (shag.):

Mentioned in Mr. Reed's paper in 1931 report. It is growing in the
Kellogg plantings at Battle Creek, Mich.


THE MANAHAN (shag.):

Mentioned in Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report and in Mr. Reed's paper in
1931 report. It is growing in the Riehl orchard at Godfrey, Ill., and
the Carl Weschcke orchard at River Falls, Wis.


THE MANN (of Michigan shag.):

See Mr. Reed's paper in this report.


THE MANN (of Ohio, shag. x shell.): Awarded ninth prize in 1929
contest to Howard Mann, Delta, Ohio.


THE McCALLISTER (pecan x shell.):

Dr. Deming: Has anyone any new information about the filling or bearing
of the McCallister?

Mr. Wilkinson: It fills well but not heavily.

Mr. Reed: I have watched the McCallister for years and years and the
nuts have failed to fill. But there is a tree that has the reputation of
bearing a very considerable quantity of nuts. We went over to see the
tree and we found that it stood where the soil was very rich. I have
wanted ever since then to try some McCallisters and give them all of the
plant food that they could possibly consume. I believe that that has a
good deal to do with filling.

Dr. Deming: Heavy fertilization influences the filling of nuts.

The McCallister is mentioned in Dr. Zimmerman's report, page 20, 1932.
It is growing in the Kellogg plantings at Battle Creek, Mich., the
orchards of Carl Weschcke at River Falls, Wis., E. C. Rice at Absher,
Ky., of Sargeant H. Wellman at Topsfield, Mass., and in the Government
plantings at Beltsville, Md. It is also growing and doing well in the
Waite Orchard at Normandy, Tenn., see page 34, 1932 report.


THE MILFORD (shag.):

It is mentioned in Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report. It is growing in
the Jones Nursery at Lancaster.


THE MINNIE (shag.):

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report and Mr. Reed's paper in 1931
report. Parent tree is growing in the yard of the Snyder farm at Center
Point, Iowa. This hickory is growing in the Riehl orchard at Godfrey,
Ill.


THE MORTON (pecan x shell.):

Mentioned in Dr. Zimmerman's report, page 20, 1932. Is growing in the
Kellogg plantings at Battle Creek, Mich.


THE PESCHKE (shag.):

Awarded tenth prize in 1929 contest to Grace Peschke, Ripon, Wis.


THE PLEAS (pecan x bitter.):

Miss Jones: It has a very thin shell. You can crack it with your hand.

Mr. Reed: Miss Riehl has said that it is worth growing for ornamental
effect. It has great long catkins that make it really a beautiful thing,
and yet it is like all of the others as far as I know, it has that
bitter principle. It is very much the same as the other bitternut
hybrids.

The Pleas is mentioned in Mr. Bixby's paper in the 1926 report and is
listed in Dr. Zimmerman's report, page 19, 1932. It is being grown on
the Riehl farm at Godfrey, Ill., in the Kellogg plantings at Battle
Creek, Mich., in the Carl Weschcke orchard at River Falls, Wis., and
Sargeant H. Wellman has young trees doing well at Topsfield, Mass.


THE RENGGENBERG (shag.):

Awarded eighth prize in 1929 contest to Edward Renggenberg, Madison,
Wis., R. 1, Box 142.


THE ROCKVILLE (pecan x shell.):

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report. Also mentioned in Dr. Zimmerman's
report, page 20, 1932. Is growing at the Riehl farm, Godfrey, Ill., the
Kellogg plantings at Battle Creek, Mich., and in orchard of Carl
Weschcke at River Falls, Wis., and in the Jones Nursery at Lancaster,
Pennsylvania.


THE RODDY (shag. x shell.):

Awarded fourth prize in 1929 contest to John Roddy, Napoleon, Ohio.


THE ROMIG:

Is in the Kellogg plantings at Battle Creek, Mich., and Sargeant H.
Wellman has some young trees in his orchard at Topsfield, Mass.


THE SANDE (shag. x shell.):

See Mr. Reed's paper in this report.


THE SAYER (shell.):

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report.


THE SCHOENBERGER (shag.):

Awarded tenth prize in 1929 contest to Roy Schoenberger, Nevada, Ohio.


THE SEAVER (shag.):

Awarded ninth prize in 1929 contest to J. K. Seaver, Harvard, Ill.


THE SCHINNERLING:

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report. Is growing in Kellogg plantings at
Battle Creek, Mich., and in orchard of Carl Weschcke at River Falls,
Wis.


THE SHAUL:

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report. Is growing in the Kellogg
plantings at Battle Creek, Mich.


THE SIERS (mock. x bitter.):

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report. Mentioned in Dr. Zimmerman's
report, page 19, 1932. Is growing on the Riehl farm at Godfrey, Ill., in
orchard of Carl Weschcke at River Falls, Wis., and in the Jones Nursery
at Lancaster, Pa.


THE SOBOLEWSKI (shag.):

Awarded ninth prize in 1929 contest to Jos. Sobolewski, Norwich, Conn.,
R. 5, Box 56A.


THE SPRUNGER (shell):

Awarded ninth prize in 1929 contest to Caleb Sprunger, Berne, Ind.


THE STANLEY (shell.):

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report. Is growing in plantings on Kellogg
farm at Battle Creek, Mich.


THE STRATFORD (shag. x bitter.):

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report and Dr. Zimmerman's report, page
19, 1932. It is growing in the Kellogg plantings at Battle Creek, Mich.,
and the orchard of Carl Weschcke at River Falls, Wis. Dr. J. Russell
Smith, Swarthmore, Pa., reports it is one of the most precocious and
productive nuts he has when grafted on pignut. It has not missed bearing
some nuts in the last four seasons.


THE SWAIN (shag.):

See Mr. Reed's paper in this report; Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report
and Mr. Reed's paper in 1931 report.


THE SWARTZ (shag.):

See Mr. Reed's paper in 1931 report.


THE TAMA QUEEN (shell.):

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report.


THE TAYLOR (shag.):

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report; Mr. Reed's paper in 1931 report,
and Dr. Zimmerman's report, page 20, 1932. This hickory is growing in
orchard of Carl Weschcke at River Falls, Wis., and Sargeant H. Wellman
at Topsfield, Mass. W. R. Fickes, Wooster, Ohio, reports the Taylor is a
light bearer but good in quality.


The Tiedke (pecan x shell.):

See Dr. Zimmerman's report, page 20, 1932.


THE VEST (shag.):

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report and Mr. Reed's paper in 1931
report.


THE WAMPLER:

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report.


THE WEED (shag. x bitter.):

See Dr. Zimmerman's report, page 23, 1932.


THE WEIKER (shag. x shell.):

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report; Mr. Reed's paper in 1931 report
and Dr. Zimmerman's report, page 19, 1932. Is growing in the Jones
Nursery at Lancaster, Pa., and the orchards of Carl Weschcke at River
Falls, Wis., and Sargeant H. Wellman at Topsfield, Mass.


THE WESCHCKE:

A hybrid hickory at Fayette, Iowa, owned by Carl Weschcke of St. Paul,
Minn., who has grafted many bitternut seedlings at River Falls, Wis.,
with cions from this tree.


THE WESTPHAL:

See Mr. Reed's paper in this report.


THE WRIGHT (pecan x shell):

Awarded eighth prize in 1929 contest to C. D. Wright, Sumner, Mo. See
Dr. Zimmerman's report, page 20, 1932. This hickory is growing in the
Kellogg plantings at Battle Creek, Mich.


THE WOODS (shag. x shell.):

See Dr. Zimmerman's report, page 19, 1932.


THE ZIMMERMAN (shag. x shell.):

See Dr. Zimmerman's report, page 19, 1932.


THE ZURCHER:

Awarded sixth prize in 1929 contest to Menno Zurcher, Apple Creek, Ohio.


NORTHERN PECANS


THE BUSSERON:

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report. This pecan has been generally
propagated by nurserymen and is widely distributed. E. C. Rice, Absher,
Ky., reports it does better on shellbark stock than on pignut stock. Dr.
J. Russell Smith, Swarthmore, Pa., reports the Busseron pecan has proved
to be much the most precocious bearer, that ripened well filled nuts on
top of the Blue Ridge mountains, elevation 1,300 feet, fifty miles from
Washington, D. C., in a climate distinctly colder than Philadelphia.


THE BUTTERICK:

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report. This pecan has been generally
propagated and distributed by nurserymen.


THE GREENRIVER:

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report. This pecan is also well
distributed. E. C. Rice, Absher, Ky., reports Greenriver graft on
shagbark stock grew eight feet tall in two years.


THE INDIANA:

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report. This pecan also generally
distributed.


THE KENTUCKY:

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report.


THE MAJOR:

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report. Dr. J. Russell Smith, Swarthmore,
Pa., reports the major has ripened nuts on top of Blue Ridge Mountain,
elevation 1,300 feet, fifty miles from Washington, D. C., in a climate
distinctly colder than Philadelphia. The nuts are small.


THE NIBLACK:

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report. Mr. Hershey reports it should be
put on the obsolete list.


THE NORTON:

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report. Sargeant H. Wellman, Topsfield,
Mass., has some fine young trees but they are not yet bearing.


THE POSEY:

Is growing in the Jones and Riehl nurseries and in the Kellogg plantings
at Battle Creek, Mich.


THE UPTON:

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report.


THE WARRICK (Warwick):

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report. Dr. J. Russell Smith, Swarthmore,
Pa., reports that on the Piedmont plateau, elevation 500 feet, forty
miles from Washington, D. C., in a climate approximating that of
Philadelphia, the Warrick has often not ripened its nuts although some
seasons it does. John W. Hershey states the Warrick should be put on the
obsolete list.


THE WITTE:

See Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926 report. The nut is very small but of good
quality. Mr. John W. Hershey states the pecan should be put on the
obsolete list.


BLACK WALNUTS


THE ADAMS:

See Mr. Reed's paper in this report, also Mr. Bixby's paper in 1926


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 11 12 13 14 15

Online LibraryAndrew LangNorthern Nut Growers Association Report of the Proceedings at the Twenty-Fifth Annual Meeting → online text (page 9 of 15)