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RONICITY




1



9



9



RHODODENDRON



SYNCHRONICITY

ALMOST 13,000 PEOPLE WITH

SEPARATE IDEAS, VALUES

BACKGROUNDS, EXPERIENCES,

GOALS AND DREAMS

TOGETHER IN THE SAME
TIME AND PLACE

APPALACHIAN STATE
UNIVERSITY 1989



Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



http://www.archive.org/details/rhododendronseri1989appa




THE RHODODENDRON



Opening


2


Student styles


16


IN SYNC Magazine


18-71


ATHLETICS


148


ACADEMICS


234


FACES


304


INDEX


390


CLOSING


396



1989

VOLUME 67

APPALACHIAN STATE UNIVERSITY

BOONE, NC 28608




INDIV ■ DUAL

IT WAS THE INDIVIDUALS WHO MADE THE
UNIVERSITY UNIQUE. THEY BROUGHT WITH THEM

DIVERSE IDEAS, VALUES, BACKGROUNDS, EXPERIENCES,

GOALS AND DREAMS, MAKING APPALACHIAN STATE

A DYNAMIC PLACE TO BE.

INDIVIDUALS KNEW WHO THEY WERE AND
WHAT THEY WANTED.




Linda Bowen (center) inspects
Jason Levergood's leg brace, the

result ot a soccer injury.





An excited Steve Gill gives a
thumb's up during the Homecom-
ing parade, as his co-producer of
the Sparky Woods Show, John
Pritchett (le(t), looks out over the
crowd.




Student Shawn Brown pauses
between classes to enjoy excep-
tionally warm tali weather.




SIMUL ANEOUS



AT APPALACHIAN STATE, WE WERE ALL DIFFERENT.

WE EACH HAD OUR OWN PERSONALITIES AND

EDUCATIONAL NEEDS.

NOT EVERYONE WAS SEEKING THE SAME DEGREE.

BEING A LIBERAL ARTS UNIVERSITY MADE A BIG

DIFFERENCE IN THE TYPES OF PEOPLE WHO WERE

ATTRACTED TO IT. THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS CERTAINLY

MADE A NAME FOR ITSELF, BUT FOR EVERY BUSINESS

MAJOR, THERE WAS SOMEONE WHO WAS MAJORING IN

LEISURE STUDIES, ELEMENTARY EDUCATION, OR EVEN

NATURAL PHARMACOLOGY THROUGH AN INDEPENDENT STUDY.

ALTHOUGH WE TOLD OUR PARENTS WE WERE GOING TO SCHOOL

TO LEARN, WE OFTEN FOUND IT HARD TO EXPLAIN THAT THE
MOST VALUABLE LESSONS WE LEARNED WERE FROM EACH OTHER.




Tanya Roberts can always find
something to smile about.




PAR




LLE



I J I



LIFESTYLES RAN PARALLEL TO EACH OTHER.

STUDENTS AND BOONE TOWNSPEOPLE SOMETIMES DISAGREED ON ISSUES SUCH

AS THE NOISE ORDINANCE. A FEW STUDENTS VIOLENTLY OPPOSED A NEW

CITY ORDINANCE WHICH MADE LOUD NOISE ILLEGAL. JUST ABOUT ANY

PARTY HELD WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS WAS SUBJECT TO BEING BROKEN UP

AND THE HOST OR HOSTESS BEING FINED UP TO $100. EVEN THE SOUND

OF UNLOADING AND OPENING BOXES WAS ENOUGH TO BREAK THE LAW. SOME

STUDENTS SAW THIS AS AN EFFECTIVE WAV To KEEP THEM FROM ENJOYING

THEIR RIGHT TO PARTY.

ALTHOUGH THERE WERE SOME PROBLEMS WITH TOWN RELATIONS, THERE WERE
ALSO GOOD TIMES WHEN STUDENTS AND LOCALS WERE ABLE TO RESOLVE

THEIR DIFFERENCES AND HAVE FUN TOGETHER. STREET DANCES,

HOMECOMING FESTIVITIES, AND UNIVERSITY-SPONSORED FUNCTIONS WERE

THE MOST POPULAR WAYS TO GET BOTH VERY DIFFERENT GROUPS TOGETHER.




Homecoming representative (or
BSA, Miss Black Culture Francis
Phillips, waves to a crowd of
townspeople and students.



Dr. Leslie Furr, professor ol Lei-
sure Studies, enjoys a sunny after-
noon at the Klondike Cafe.





DIV RSE



WE ALL HAD OUR DIFFERENT WAYS OF DOING

THINGS.

THERE WERE, OF COURSE, THE STEREOTYPES. SILLY

FRESHMEN, TIRED UPPERCLASSMEN, 1960'S.

THROWBACKS,

1980'S YUPPIES, AND JUST PLAIN GOOD OLE BOYS

ALL HAD THEIR LITTLE NICHES IN THE GREAT

SCHEME OF THINGS.

THE BEST PART OF BEING AT ASU WAS THAT IT WAS

EASY TO BE WHO WE WANTED TO BE. WE COULD BE

THAT SILLY FRESHMAN ANY TIME WE FELT LIKE

IT, AND THEN PUT ON OUR BUSINESS SUITS AND

BECOME A VISION OF OUR FUTURES. IN

FACT, IT WAS COMMON TO SEE STUDENTS DRESSED

IN SUITS ONE DAY (ALTHOUGH THAT USUALLY

HAPPENED

ONLY DURING ON-CAMPUS JOB INTERVIEWS) AND IN

THEIR RIPPED JEANS AND SNEAKERS THE NEXT.





Homecoming is great for dressing up.




The Home Boys, an intramural
lootball team, ride m the home-
coming parade. Many students
and Boone residents participated
in the annual event.



CONTEMP




RANEOUS



MY MOST ENJOYABLE MOMENTS WERE THE ONES I WORKED HARD

FOR. THERE WAS SOMETHING HORRIBLY SATISFYING IN

TURNING ON THE TELEVISION AFTER SPENDING SIX HOURS

WITH A FRENCH BOOK.

SOMETIMES, THE PROJECTS, PAPERS, TESTS, AND THE
PART-TIME JOB THAT STARTED LOOKING SUSPICIOUSLY FULL-
TIME MADE THE WORLD A HECTIC PLACE TO BE. WE NEVER
SEEMED TO HAVE ENOUGH TIME TO GET EVERYTHING DONE AND
STILL ENJOY OURSELVES.

AS IT IS WITH MOST THINGS, THE LESS TIME WE HAD,
THE MORE PRECIOUS IT SEEMED.




Kent Bridges doesn't have time
{or a photo as he ducks into Belk
Library for a study session.

Sitting atop the rock wall outside oi
Plemmons Student Union, Ran-
dall Faw collects his thoughts.




11





CHRONO OGICAL



ALL THIS DIVERSITY COEXISTED IN RELATIVE
PERFECT HARMONY.

IT IS AMAZING THAT WE WERE ALL ABLE TO GET ALONG THE

WAY WE DID. MAYBE BEING A MOUNTAINEER WAS THE

COMMON THREAD THAT BOUND US TOGETHER.

OF COURSE, IT COULD HAVE BEEN THE WEATHER. BOONE IS

KNOWN FOR ITS SHORT SPRING AND SUMMER SEASONS AND

FOR ITS LONG, HARSH WINTERS.

I OVERHEARD ONE BOONE CITIZEN SAY THAT THE REASON HE

LIKED ASU WAS BECAUSE OF THE EFFECT OF THE WEATHER

ON STUDENTS.

''IT'S TOO HARD TO BE SNOBBY WHEN YOU'RE
FREEZING TO DEATH," HE SAID.




Quiet time is found during an Indi-
an summer afternoon under the
protection of the new gazebo at
Tomlinson Park.





13



PROGR m SSIVE




WE LEARNED THAT ONCE YOU'VE STARTED, IT'S HARD
TO GO BACK.

EVEN WHEN WE FELL OFF OF LIFE'S PROGRESSIVE TRACKS,
WE PICKED OURSELVES UP AND TRIED NOT TO LOOK BACK
TO WHERE WE CAME FROM, BUT TO WHERE WE WERE GOING.




Boone has seen many children
grow up. Some choose to stay to
attend ASU. while others find liv-
ing at home while going to school
is dilhcult.



Going to class is sometimes not
very stimulating, especially when
you have to give up a good nap!

Senior Serge Villani spends his
tree Friday afternoon in the sun-
shine with friends.





14



STU




ENT



STYLES



JENNY CASTLES



"Student Styles is a fun section. The magazine is great
(In Sync Magazine). We cover everything from Shake-
speare and Ballet South to your standard parties and
skiing.

"My first couple of years, I didn't give Boone any
credit, but I found I was missing out. It's true. Boone
really has a lot to do.

"I liked working with The Rhododendron, even



though I was up there all the time. I don't mind being up
there late until it gets really late and the building starts
groaning. That worries me. But the late hours don't
bother me because I realize that that's just part of the
business.

"Graphic design is a whole lot of fun. God knows, it
better be ... it's what I want to do for the rest of my life."




SECTION EDITOR




17




18 In Sync





I



N SYNC, the mini-magazine for the
1989 Rhododendron, takes a look at
App in a different light and shows our
fair school in all its glory, covering
everything from Fun to Fashion to
Food and all points in between.



In Sync L^ 19





HAT FUM



Article by Leatha Fields

Photos by Billy Hue/in

Imagine a typical exchange
overheard on Sanford Mall
on a Thursday afternoon:
"What are you doing this
weekend?"

"Oh, I have to stay in Boone
again. It's soooo boring!"

Don't despair, dear readers. Yes,
Virginia, there is a Santa claus, and
there is something to do in Boone.
Appalachian State and the
surrounding areas offer a myriad of
"things to do." Any adventurous
Appalachian student can find
something to do in his/her quest
for FUN.

For starters, there's eating, a
favorite activity all year 'round, but
especially when the mercury drops,
cutting down on many outdoor
activities.

Continued on page 22

Senior Benjy Johnson, from Greensboro, en-
joys jammin' in his spare time.

Another way Apps enjoy their spare time is
relaxing at the Klondike with Gumby and a
good beer






Boone pro v/des perfect seasonal conditions for all sorts of outdoors sports around, like hunting,
enjoyed by Seniors Vinnie Soden and Keith Yow.

Parks are not forgotten. In fact, Melissa Oglesby, Jenny Castles, Tina McCrain, Angie Garrison,
a



and Stephanie Barbour are having fun rediscovering chutes and ladders.

'he incline press is Dennis Burdick's

students spend hours of free time.



The incline press is Dennis Burdick's idea of fun, in the Quinn Center, where a great many
s




70

In Sync £\J 21



Many restaurants deliver sand-
wiches and pizza for a switch from
campus food without leaving cam-
pus. On the cheap side, a student
can dine at one of many fast-food
restaurants in Boone, such as Mc-
Donald's, Wendy's, Arby's, Taco Bell,
or Burger King. More varied (and
expensive) menus can be found at
restaurants such as Rochelle's, The
Red Onion Cafe, Makoto's, Pepper's,



R



elaxing with an afternoon of making music
isn 't real rough to think of.

Appalachian sports are tons-o-fun, and Yosef
agrees at Homecoming 1988.



or The Daniel Boone Inn. Anything
you want to eat can be found in
Boone, be it guacamole from Shor-
ty's or hot, stuffed potatoes at
Bash Riprock's. Experiment and find
your favorite place to hang out and
stuff your face!

For the more visually oriented,
there's the option of seeing a movie
in a theater or renting an older one
for the VCR. Boone has three the-
aters (The Flick, the Appalachian
Theater, and the Chalet Triple The-
ater) that offer a wide variety of
films all week long. Just about ev-
ery weekend A.P.P.S. (Appalachian





Popular Programming Society) pre-
sents several films shown in I.G.
Greer Theater. The films are nifty
modern films or old classics such
as "The Witches of Eastwick,"
"Dead of Night," "Dirty Dancing,"
and "Hairspray."

A little less expensive method is
renting movies from one of Boone's
video outlets, such as National Vid-
eo. What better to do late Saturday
night than pop popcorn, watch
"Night of the Living Dead" for the
umpteenth time and scream your
head off?

To whip you bod into shape and
provide a little recreation at the
same time, there's nothing like
sports. The big one in Boone is ski-
ing, of course. Locales such as
Hawksnest and Sugar Mountain offer
ski rental, slopes, lessons, and ei-
ther natural or manmade snow.
What more could you want?

On campus, there's the Quinn
Center. For free, you can lift
weights, do aerobics, play volleyball,
run laps, and play racquetball, all
indoors. Intramural sports, such as
basketball and volleyball, offer re-






3£9



creation, competition, and the
chance for community building. In
town, there's bowling and roller
skating. The Office of Outdoor Pro-
grams on campus organizes canoe-
ing, camping, and hiking trips for
students, plus providing high-ropes
and obstacle courses. They also
rent equipment at an inexpensive
price. My personal favorite sport is
sheep/cow tipping. This is the prac
tice of taking several friends, piling
them in the car at two a.m., and
driving out into the countryside.
Find an unsuspecting cow/sheep
asleep while standing up, and tip it
over. It doesn't hurt, just freaks th
animal out. It's quite a riot.

The opening of the Linn Cove
Viaduct has made driving on the
Parkway more popular this year
than over. Most people do this in
the fall, in order to watch the
leaves change colors.

When everything's closed, there';
nothing better than a good party!
Have a few friends over, crank up
the music, and make your own fun
Of course, drinking accompanies
most parties, beer being the first
beverage of choice.

If you're into dancing, Geno's in
the High Country Inn and the newly
opened Legends on campus are her
for you. Geno's has a very popular
"Ladies' Night" on Thursdays, wher
women get in free. Legends has a
DJ dance, with dance music and
videos on most Saturday nights.

Going to see bands perform is
another great form of entertain-
ment. Students can see local bands
such as Fear and Loathing or The
Outer Limits, perform in the Pub or
at Legends.



Summer days, which were abundant thi
winter, bring out hackey sackers on San
ford mall and everywhere else you turn.









jT*?&!










A/7/3 provides the best setting Iq7
activities as the cool summers and even"
rooter winters unfold.







-



WHAT FUN? Continued



Farthing Auditorium, Chapell Wilson
Hall, and I.G. Greer play host to great
plays and performances. Large-scale
productions by professional troupes,
such as "Sweet Charity" and "The
Nutcracker Suite," have graced the
stage of Farthing this year, for rela-
tively inexpensive costs. Comedian
Steven Wright also appeared in Far-
thing, bringing his unique and twisted
brand of humor. Smaller scale student
productions, such as "Tiger at the
Gates" and "Fools", were presented
in Chapell Wilson Hall and the I.G.
Greer arena theater, showcasing stu-
dent talent and providing quality en-
tertainment at a low cost.

On chilly winter afternoons, there's
nothing better than doing a little shop-



ping. (My mother would say there's no
such thing as a little shopping, but
that's another story altogether.) The
Boone Mall plays host to many nifty
stores, offering everything from pets
to jewelry. In addition, there are a
variety of specialty stores in Boone,
such as the Bare Essentials Natural
Foods store and the Ruff Hewn outlet,
which offer items a little off the beat-
en path. Even if your wallet is empty,

es, even instructors relax on their own
time. Dave Fakes of the CMA Department
takes it easy and does some recording.

kiing is a big App attraction and like Andy
Heath, Tom Shelton and Paul Lehman, a lot

of students put in serious hours on the slopes.






there's always the fun of "window
shopping."

Lastly, there's a more offbeat form
of entertainment that my friends and I
like to engage in . . . going out to play
in the Blowing Rock public park. Sec-
ond childhood, you say? Hah! Who can
resist swingsets, slides, and merry-go-
rounds? Try it for fun some weekend!

So you see, there are things to do
for fun in Boone. Some of them just
require a little searching out. If you
mix a little ingenuity, spontaneity, and
good friends, it's easy to make your
own fun. And if all else fails, there's
always STUDYING ... Did I say some-
thing wrong? ££j



roups of friends gather in the Quinn courts
for endless games of roundball.

ne ball in the side pocket is a laid back
game of pool for Brian Hamlin and his
buddy Mark Cline.




In Sync



25




Climbing walls wouldn't bt horn waj
_Jt^'^BwV < ^ /7 p be fad m B<*^^&>





Students find their own fun most of the time
with friends, pals, fun folks or just strange
people.



B



roome-Kirk pool provides aquatic fun for
those who lap In luxury.



One of the biggest ASU plusses is the prox-
imity of the slopes and ski bunnies that can
be found there.



59

In Sync LVJ 27




ONLY LOVE



Would you like to go out on
a date Saturday night after
the game?"
A "date?" Just what is a
date, anyway? Generations ago, the
boy would traditionally pick up his
date and meet her parents. A trip
to the local soda shop or drive-in
was always a hit. But along with
the eighties came a change in
dating practices. The formality of
dating lost its appeal and women
began to take the initiative in many
dating situations. Women began to



call the men and even to ask the
men out on dates, an act which
would have caused much
controversy years before. So what
is a date today? The general
consensus among college Freshmen
is that a date is a time to get to
know someone and to have fun,
whereas upperclassmen refer to a
date as a time for two people to gc
out, do something special, and
spend quality time together. But
what is the purpose of getting to
know someone better and spending



Don't look now, they're kissing
a



time with them? The majority of
girls feel a guy's purpose in asking
for a date is to see how far they
can get with the girl, yet most guys
stated their reasoning was one of
being attracted and desiring
companionship. The guys, on the
other hand, view girls as wanting to
be seen with the guy or wanting to
trap the guy into a relationship.

After reviewing these facts, you
are still determined to have a date
for Saturday night. What do males
and females look for in a date?



Guys admit looks are important,
especially in first attracting their
attention, yet later the girl's inner
self outweighs this aspect. Girls
likewise appreciate good looks, but
also agree the guy's personality is
more important. Financial stability,
honesty, and loyalty are other
attributes of a great date.

You finally get the courage to
ask the guy or girl out who you
have been watching for months.
Where will you go and what will
you do? Dinner at Woodlands, Casa



again!



Many couples retreat to their dorms
for time alone.

Article by Cathy Ferguson
Photos by Jerry Galardi



28 It's Only Love





popular method of keeping warm on a cold
winter night.

ash Riprocks is a casual place for couples to
spend time together.




Rustica, Makoto's, or Tijuana Fat's,
a movie, dancing at Geno's, or a
trip to one of the numerous parties,
the Blue Ridge Parkway, or the
infamous Howard's Knob is
acceptable. How expensive will these
activities be? According to the
interviewed people, anywhere from
$.50 for a ride up to "The Knob,"
to $65 for dinner. The males say
they always pay if it's a first date
and usually only one female in 10
or so even offers to split the bill.
But the females say that after



In Sync I_\»J 29




IT'S OHll 10VE Continued



dating someone a while, they often
either split the cost of a date or
even pay for the whole thing.

Okay, so how often do people
date? College students here date
approximately eight times a month.
Anyone who can multiply can
calculate the outrageous price of
dating. But what are the
alternatives? Staying at home and
watching TV or the VCR is a very
popular alternative to spending a lot
of money on a date. Some students
even prefer staying in because there
is more one-on-one contact than
going out in public.



What about sex? Only one of the
interviewed students does not
practice "safe sex," using a condom
during intercourse. "Safe sex"
practices not only reduce the risk
of pregnancy, but also reduce the
risk of contracting AIDS — the
epidemic of the Eighties.

Just how do males and females
feel about sex today, and especially
on the first date? The majority of
the males disagreed with sex on the
first date, as it makes them

Amadeus is a close-by place for some
quiet conversation and a hot cup of
coffee.



uncomfortable with the girl and her
morals. The girls were divided in
their answers of "definitely not"
and "it depends on who he is" to
the question of sex on a first date.
Surprisingly, all of the males say
they do not expect sex on the first
date. Both males and females agree
sex is important to their
relationships, yet it is not the
foundation of the relationship.

As these facts reveal, dating has
drastically changed since our



parents' first date. It is still one of
the most popular activities on
campus, however. Whether you go
out on a date to get to know
someone better, to have a good
time, or just to be seen with
someone, it all goes back to that
initial interest in someone which is
often not only unpredictable, but
downright mysterious. Dating
sometimes takes this spark and
transforms it into a relationship,
perhaps even true romance. Cg



D



atmg these days can be pretty costly.



30 IT'S Only Love






N



ot all dates are for quiet time; in fact,
a night on the town is always a blast.

let, then again, some prefer to be alone.

\trip to one of Boone's three theatres is
[entertaining as always.



In Sync LW 31



*&fe



x ^ 1 - ~.




■\ - : 3



I.'.V-^



-s*



k



IE




M/c/e by Candy Hendrick
Photos by Jerry Galardi, Sam Poley, and Robin
Ballew

' hat is there to say about
fads and fashions at
ASU? EVERYTHING!! With
such a large group of
students, Appalachian State
University offers a wide variety of
styles. You can find everything from
holes in acid-washed jeans, to dirty
bucks and saddle oxfords, to
alternative styles, to tie-dyes.
Anything you desire can be found
roaming the mountain streets. All
you have to do is open your eyes
and take a look. And if there is a
certain fad or fashion that can't be
located, don't worry, SOMEONE IS
SURE TO THINK OF IT SOON!!!

Many of the trendy fads are in
style at App. Preppies, tie-dyes,
dirty bucks, mini skirts, earthy



clothes, friendship bracelets, and
alternative styles are all making an
enormous showing this year.
Whenever you look out the window,
you are sure to see a colorful array
of tie-dyed everything and very
short minis. If not, you are bound
to spot a group of preppies or
people without shoes. This trend is
practiced by some of the
upperclassmen at ASU.

It is a well-known fact that you
can spot a freshman easily because
of the way he or she coordinates



tetty Ballew is dressed to kill in black leath
er, very hip indeed.

(enim is an American and college campus
standard.





ILL DRESSED UP Continued

their clothes to the extreme. This
action is done because the
freshmen want "to dress to
impress." Upperclassmen, on the
other hand, don't make such an
extreme effort. We find that as you
get more comfy with school, the
same thing happens with your .
clothes. Dressing for comfort, even
to the extreme of going barefoot, is



important.

Accessories can add a great deal
to an outfit. On many female
shoulders at ASU, you will find
oversized tote bags, either imitation
leather or Greek-lettered canvas
bags. These items are very much in
style. Another popular accessory
worn by women is costume jewelry.
Brooches, pins, necklaces, bracelets,



.#'



and earrings are some of the "up-
and-coming" fads here. You will
probably see at least one of these
articles on each and every female
here. Designed panty hose and
stockings are also getting a great
deal of attention. Women's legs are
now streaked with fishnets, hearts,
pearls, and yes, diamonds. Just
having a nice pair of legs doesn't



get it anymore, unless they're
wrapped in fishnet.

Many people can be spotted from
time to time wearing alternative
styles. Horn-rimmed glasses, paisley
print and plaid shirts, "bad" ties,
and rolled up cuffs are an
increasing fad among students.

In addition to older and



In the End' the stone washed and bleached
look is a big hit.

rank watches are spotted everywhere these
days.

Jressing for comfort is important, especially
to those who are active.




V-w.







.■ •>*.






1" .^.



implicity most times is as stylish as it gets.



tia^




'ac/r m Black and trying to relax.






ootwear made fun in the fall of '88.



.*\j



N '



ootwear this year is as diverse as you dare.



v uzanne Lowe and Daphne Anderson are

sporting a throwback from the 60's —
tiedyes.



riendship bracelets and fashion jewelry sure
are fads.



artha Willson is styling In her stone
xwwwashed shirt, all the rave these days.
Note, also, the trendy belt.

'hese days you can find just about tie-dyed
. everything.

Jou can still get by with a style all your own.



NITH NO PLACE TO GO




alternative styles, ASU students are
also very "hip" into today's
fashions. Many students have '
developed an original style in the
art of rips. You can find holes in
jeans, shirts, and even shoes. The
white-wash look also plays an
important part in these styles. You
find this look on every article of
clothing imaginable.

Watches are big this year, tank
watches. You have your choice
between dress and sport. Dress
tank watches with roman numerals
and leather or skin bands are
spiffy. When dressing down, sport
tank watches with velcro bands are
hip.

For some unknown reason, the
popular way to wear Reeboks,
Nikes, Converse, or any other shoe
is dirty. When there is dirt on the
sneaker, the sneaker is in style. The
only time when this practice is not
true is when the shoes are cheap,
white tennis shoes. Don't ask why,
but girls go crazy if there is a
single speck of dirt on cheap, white
sneakers. This reaction is a typical
fad. Two more popular types of
shoes are Sebago Campsiders and



the dirty bucks. They are both
extremely comfortable and can be
worn with almost anything.

A large number of females have
started wearing lots of men's
clothing, such as shirts, ties,
sweats, and jackets. So, guys, if
you can't find your favorite pair of


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