Archaeological Institute of America. Southwest Soc.

Out west (Volume 5) online

. (page 1 of 34)
Online LibraryArchaeological Institute of America. Southwest SocOut west (Volume 5) → online text (page 1 of 34)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


(•••.r*v»'r






m ■ ■



■*r,it $




'm<:



&■&§»



UNE, 1596 Vol. V, N<

Indian Baskets. imelGave-Dweiiers.




COPrRiOMTfO 189S tr t AND OF SUNSHINE PUB CO



10



CENTS LAND OF SUNSHINE PUBLISHING CO. t

INCORPORATED

A COPY 501-503 Stimson Building.



$1




SEASOfi OF 1896



3'i HOURS
FROM LOS ANGELES

Fishing, staging. Bartiing. Huming. BoaHng

MANY NEW ATTRACTION'S

Monster Skating Tent, Hunters"

Cabin at Middle Ranch,

BKND

Including Soloists from the Musical

Centers of the United States.

CAMPING GROUND, WATER
AND MANY VALUABLE
PRIVILEGES
To holders of the W T. Co.'s six months
round trip tickets. As the Company main-
tains the Island and improvements at heavy
expense, parties attempting to visit the
Island on i.ther boats than those belonging
to the W. T. Co. will not be allowed the
above privileges.
Address, Banking Co.,

222 S. Spring St.



FREE



HAWLEY, KING



BEHRE.



FINE CARRIAGES
and BICYCLES




pboto*
process

Co



INCORPORATED



PHOTO-PROCESS ENGRAVING



Half-Tone, Zinc Etching, Color Wok. Map,
Wood Engraving.



PRINTING BY THE CHROMATIC
PROCESS



Designing a Specialty



THE ONLY COMPLETE PLANT IN CALIFORNIA



N. E. Cor. Franklin and New High
Los Angeles




210 NORTH MAIN ST.,

LOS ANGELES, CAL.



Please mention that you " saw it in the Land of Sunshine.



THE



Land of Sunshine



A MAGAZINE OF CALIFORNIA AND
THE SOUTHWEST.




EDITED BY

CHARLES F. LUMMIS.



Volume V
June to November, 1896.



Land of sunshine publishing Co.
los angeles, cal.









Copyright 1896 by
Land of Sunshine Publishing Co.



oft Library




The Land of Sunshine.

INDEX TO VOL V

A Chinese Feud (story) Sui Seen Far. 236

Along the Arroyo Seco, illustrated .' 2

An Invitation (poem) Charlotte Perkins Stetson. 120

As Told by Themselves (story) illustrated Lillian Corbett Barnes 115

Autograph Cliff, The. illustrated Chas. F. Lummis 101

Baby Bunting, illustrated 232

Beet Sugar in California, illustrated 174

Bullfight, The (poem) illustrated L. Worthington Green. 145

Cacique, The, illustrated 220

California Fiestas, Echoes of, illustrated 22

California Lion, The, illustrated 152

California (poem) Chas. P. Nettleton. 34

Catalina (poem) ,.. Arthur Wellington Wayne. 25

Cave City of the Tyuonyi, The, illustrated Chas. F. Lummis. 11

Channel Islands, The, illustrated Homer P. Earle. 227

Chautauqua Assembly of Southern California, illustrated S. H. Weller. 78

City of the Cliff, The, illustrated Chas. F. Lummis. 184

Clams of Southern California, illustrated C. M. Drake. 158

Clubs of Los Angeles, The. illustrated 125

Confessions of a Basket Collector, illustrated J. Torrey Connor. 3

Coyote (poem) illustrated John Vance Cheney. 95

Customs of the Rio Grande (selected) John G. Bourke. 168

Cycling in Southern California, illustrated C. F. Gates. 41

Devil's Backbone, The, illustrated Geo. F. Leavens. 96

Down in the Pass of the Soledad (poem) Jeanie Peet. 183

End of a Feud, The, (story) Beatriz Bellido de Luna. 64

Fandango, The, from painting by Nahl 144

Fires in the Sierra, illustrated Abbott Kinney. 242

First American Jewelers, The, illustrated Chas. F. Lummis. 54

Ghost of the Quivira, The, illustrated Chas. F. Lummis. 222

Gold Placers of Los Angeles, illustrated J. M. Guinn. 60

Historic Figure, A, illustrated 58

History of New Mexico, A, (review) C. F. L. 204

Homes on Mountain and Desert, illustrated D. P. Barrows. 106

How Western Schools Grow 165

Hydraulic Mining, illustrated „ 46, 60

In the Lion's Den, (by the Editor) 35,72, 121, 171,207,245

In the Sierra (poem) Eleanor F. Lewis. 151

Jack (poem) Elwyn Irving Hoffman. 202

Jackrabbit Roundup, A (poem) Wm. M. Bristol. 120

Ku Yum (story) Sui Seen Far. 29

La Jolla, illustrated 84

Landmarks Club, The 21, 33, 71, 119, 170, 206, 244



Line Rider, The (poem) Florence E. Pratt. 221

Lion's Den, In the (by the Editor) 35, 72, 121, 171, 707, 245

Little Charro, The, illustrated 1S2

Localities described and illustrated ;

Acoma, N. M., 184 ; California Summer Resorts, 86; El Morro. N. M.. 101 ; Long Beach, Cal., 78 ; Mon-
terey, Cal., Chinatown, 153 ; Mt. San Antcnio, Cal., 46, 96 ; Mt. Whitney, Cal., 47 ; Natural Bridge,
Arizona, 146 ; Oceanside, Cal., 45 ; San Fernando, Cal., 215 ; The Tjnonyi, H. «., 11— and many other*.

Longing (poem) Blanche Trask. 69

Masking (poem) Blanche Trask. 28

Mexican Recipes... .„. Linda Bell Colson. 26

Mining in the Southwest, illustrated Geo. W. Parsons! 91

Mount Whitney, illustrated _ Howard Longley, 47

Musky '• Filaree," The (poem) Lillian H. Shuey. 67

My Nursery (poem) illustrated Julia Boynton Green. 70

Natural Bridge, The Greatest, illustrated Chas. F. Lummis. 146



Nectarine, The.



»5



November, Our, (poem) Julia Boynton Green. 242

Oceanside. illustrated 45

Oldest Californian. The, with portrait Edith Wagner. 234

Old Spanish " Lavaderos," illustrated Juliette Estelle Mathis. 233

Open Letter, An Charles Warren Stoddard. 68

Padre's Story, The Eve Lummis. 166

Philopena (story) Henshaw Jones. 202

Salvation of San Juan. The, illustrated 21

Santa Barbara Lighthouse, illustrated S. E. A. Higgins. 164

Sierra Madre, Summit of the. illustration 94

Some Little Heathens, illustrated Ella S. Hartnell. 153

Song (poem) Lelah A. Spalding. 10

Song of the Western Lark. The Chas. F. Carter. 31

Songs of the Navajos, illustrated Dr. Washington Matthews. ic6

" " " John Comfort Fillmore. 238

Southern California Summer 163

Southwestern Wonderland, The, Chas. F. Lummis.

IIT— The Cave City of the Tyuonyi, illustrated 1 1

IV— The First American Jewelers, illustrated < 54

V— The Autograph Cliff, illustrated 101

VI— The Greatest Natural Bridge, illustrated 146

VII— The City of the Cliff, illustrated 184

VIII— The Ghost of the Quivira, illustrated 222

That Which is Written (reviews by the Editor) 38, 75, 123, 173, 210, 24a

Told by Heliograph, illustrated J. Torrey Connor. 213

Vaquero, The Old-time Californian, illustrated by Ed. Borein

Flora Haines Loughead. 109

When Winter Widows all the North (poem) E. W. Barnard. 191

With Cycle and Camera, illustrated C. F. Gates. 215

Yates, Frederic, illustrated H. E. C. 192-



YOU WILL F*IND THE



HOLLEMBECK



PRH-EmiriEJ*lTUY

^he most centrally lo-
cated, best appointed
and best kept ffiotel
in the city.

^American or Euro-
pean Plan.



Rates



ible.



Second and ...

Spring Streets

Los Angeles, Cal.




The fieadqaapteps in lios Angeles for the Toufist Travel



GRIDER & DOW

REAL ESTATE AND INVESTMENT
BROKERS

ESTABLISHED 1881 IN LOS ANGELES

We invite correspondence with INVESTORS
desiring to buy or sell property in SOUTHERN
CALIFORNIA to engage in MANUFACTURING
or other lines of business.

We have RANCHES and FARMING LANDS,
and LARGE TRACTS desirable for COLONIZA-
TION Purposes. ORANGE, LEMON and ENG-
LISH WALNUT Groves. CITY property for sub-
division. BUSINESS BLOCKS and BUSINESS
PROPERTY for sale. BUSINESS OPPORTUN-
ITIES in commercial and manufacturing lines.
References: Leading Business Men and Banks in
Los A ngeles.
OWNERS AND SOLE AGENTS
ForKincaid— Philbin— Grosser— Fletcher— Montezuma
Clanton— Central Ave.— Briswalter and Adams Street
Tracts.

Send for illustrated Catalogue of Farms and
City Property.

OFFICE: 139 SOUTH BROADWAY.




Near the Foothills

Ten-acre

Orange

Groves

in

frostless

locality.



I also have Peach
and Apricot Orch-
ards, and Vineyards and
W\\) Farming Lands for
Stock and Grain.
All first-class and plenty of water
for irrigation.
CITY BUILDING LOTS
Inquire of owner,

W. S. ALLEN

332-334 South Spring Street, Los Angeles, Cal.



California Cubjos SKsMSriasvsLS

Gem Stones ; Mexican Opals ; Japanese Cats' Eyes ; Orange Wood, plain and
painted ; Pressed Flowers, Ferns and Mosses ; Jewelry made from Coast Shells ;
5x8 Photos, California Scenes, mounted and unmounted. Wholesale and Retail.

E. L. LOVEJOY, 126 W. FOURTH STREET

Mail Orders Solicited. Los Angeles, Cal.

Please mention that you " saw it in the Land of Sunshine."




PURITY 1 889-1 896

POPULARITY
PRICE

Are the points that sell

CORONADO
MINERAL
WATER

A California industry of seven years'
standing.

For present prices ask

CORONADO WATER CO.

CORONADO, Cal.

For Quick Delivery in Siphons,

Bottles or Tanks, you can

Telephone to

W. L. WHEDON,

114 W. First Street,

Los Angeles.



VALUABLE . . .
CIRCULATION

means READERS

To gain readers and hold them,

A PUBLICATION
MUST FURNISH
SOMETHING
READABLE.

The leading

LOS ANGELES
SAN FRANCISCO
CHICAGO
BOSTON
PHILADELPHIA
and NEW YORK

newspapers say that the

LANDOFSUNSHINE



rlog>t 10 SoufKtrA Qjiformo.




JllKfclCS

fciwracino
Company*






Please mention that you " saw it in the Land of Sunshine.'



The Land of Sunshine

Contents— June, 1896.

PAGE

Along the Arroyo Seco frontispiece

Confessions of a Basket Collector, illustrated J. Torrey Connor 3

Song Lelah A. Spalding 10

The Cave City of the Tyuonyi, illustrated Chas. F. Lummis 11

(Southwestern Wonderland Series.)

The Salvation of San Juan, illustrated 21

Echoes of California Fiestas, illustrated 22

Catalina (poem) Arthur W. Wayne 15

The Nectarine 25

Mexican Recipes Linda Bell Colson 26

Masking (poem) Blanche Trask 28

Ku Yum (story) Sui Seen Far 29

The Song of the Western Lark C. F. Carter 31

The Landmarks Club 33

California (poem) Chas. P. Nettleton 34

In the Lion's Den the Editor 35

That Which is Written the Editor 38

Cycling in Southern California, illustrated Chas. Fuller Gates 41



Works of Chas. F. Lummis.



Published by Chas. Scribner's Sons , N. Y.

A New Mexico David, and other stories of
the Southwest. Illustrated. $1.25.

" Vigorous and novel studies ... as distinctly
valuable as they are vividly interesting."

— Boston Commonwealth.

A Tramp Across the Continent. $1.25.

" His book has such heart in it, such simplicity
and strength, it is as good to read as any story ot
adventure may be."

— The Saturday Review, London, Eng.

The Land of Poco Tiempo. illustrated. $2.50.

"A charming volume." — The Academy, London.
" Uniformly and surpassingly brilliant."

—Boston Traveller.



Published by Lamson, Wolffe & Co., Boston.
JUST OUT.

The Gold Fish of Gran Chimu.

$1.50

A story of Peruvian adventure. Superbly illus-
trated from the author's photographs and from
antiquities exhumed by him in the ruins of Peru.



Published by the Century Co., N. Y.

Some Strange Corners of Our Country.

Illustrated. $1.50.

" He has written a great book, every page of
which is worth a careful reading."

—Mail and Express, N. Y.

The Man who Married the Moon, and other
Pueblo Indian Folkstories. Illustrated
by George Wharton Edwards. $1.50.

" Deserves to be classed with the best of its
kind yet produced in our country."

— The Nation, N. Y.

" We can insist on the great pleasure some ot
these stories must give the reader ; and one, ' The
Mother Moon,' is as poetic and beautiful as any-
thing we have ever read, in or out of folklore."
— N. Y. Times.



Published by A. C. McClurg& Co., Chicago.

The Spanish Pioneers. Illustrated. $1.50.

" More exciting than any romance."

— The Critic, N. Y.



ECHO MOUNTAIN HOUSE

NEVER CLOSES. Bestofser-
vice the year round. Purest of water,
most equable climate, with best hotel
in Southern California. Ferny glens,
babbling brooks and shady forests
within ten minutes' walk of the house.
Electric transportation from Echo
Mountain House over the Alpine
Division to Crystal Springs. Ths
grandest mountain, canyon, ocean and
valley Scenery on earth. Livery
stables at Echo Mountain, Altadena
Junction and Crystal Springs. Special
rates to excursions, astronomical,
moonlight, searchlight parties, ban-
quets and balls. Rates to parties of
less than ten over the entire system,
$5 oo ; to parties of from 10 to 20, $3.00
each. Full information at office of

MOUNT LOWE RAILWAY,

Cor. Third and Spring streets. Los
Angeles. Grand Opera House Block,
Pasadena, Cal. Echo Mountain House
Postoffice, Echo Mountain, California.
Most scenic 01 routes, pure air, pure water and pine shaded crests.




Wm. S. ffLLEN



DEALER IN



FURNITURE
and CARPETS

MATTING, OIL CLOTH AND LINOLEUM

BEDDING, WINDOW SHADES
SILK AND LACE CURTAINS, PORTIERES

CURTAIN FIXTURES, BABY

CARRIAGES, UPHOLSTERY GOODS, ETC.

TELEPHONE 241

332-334 South Spring Street

LOS ANGELES, CAL.




PALACE HOTEL

LEADING HOTEL IN THE CITY.



SANTA FE
New Mexico




HEADQUARTERS FOR TOURISTS

SUNNY ROOMS. 'WIDE VERANDAS

LARGE SAMPLE ROOMS

for commercial travelers. Cuisine

and table service strictly first-class.

Special Rates to Families.

V. S. SHELBY,

PROPRIETOR

S. B. SHELBY, Mjrr.



Please mention that you " saw it in the Laitd of SuifBHiif*.'



REDLANDS-.

^W^ Ranches, Residences and all

kinds of Real Estate in Redlands at reasonable
rates. See Redlands before buying. Call upon
or address JOHN P. FISK, Jr.,

Rooms i and 2 Union Bank Block,

Redlands, Cal.



We Sell the Earth-



BASSETT &. SMITH

POMONA, CAL.

We deal in all kinds of Real Estate
Orchard and Residence property.
Write for descriptive pamphlet.



SEND FOR 1896 CAXAL °2SI,



D PRICE LIST

Established 1882.



H.JEVNE



WHOLESALE



GROCER



RETAIL



An edition of 15,000 most complete Price-Current ever published.
SEND OR CALL FOR A COPY

136 and t 3 8 NORTH SPRING STREET



o o o o




o o _ o



SOLE AGENTS
FOR
THE
CELEBRATED







PIANOS



PIANOS SOLD

ON EASY INSTALLMENTS
AND RENTED



249 S. BROADWAY, byrne bldq.



o_.o_.o__o



Please mention that you " saw it in the Land of Sunshine."



OLUER

a&RAVlMC




LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA



408 SOUTH BROADWAY

Chamber of commerce
Building

RICHARD ALTSCHUL

REAL ESTATE, LOANS AND COMMISSION
References : Messrs. Lazard, Freres, New-
York ; London, Paris and American Bank. San
Francisco ; Fanners and Merchants Bank, Los
Angeles ; First National Bank, Los Angeles.




CALIFORNIA WINE MERCHANT



We will ship two sample cases assorted
wines (one dozen quarts each) to any part
of the United States, Freight Prepaid,
upon the recipt of $9.00. Pints (24 in
case), 50 cents per case additional. We
will mail full list and prices upon applica-
tion.

Respectfully,

C. F. A. LAST,



131 N. Main St.,

Los Angeles, Cal.



■HOTEL ARCADIA, Santa Monica, Cal.



The only first-class
tourist hotel in this,
the leading coast re-
sort of the Pacific. 150
pleasant rooms, large
and airy ball room,
beautiful lawn and
flower gardens. Mag-
n ificent panoramic
view of the sea. First-
class orchestra. Surf
and hot water baths
a positive cure for
nervous and rheumatic
disorders.

Time from Los An-
geles by Santa Fe or
S. P. R.R. 35 minutes,
Pasadena and Pacific
electric cars, seventy-
five minutes.



S. REINHART, Proprietor






^|_






WR^iStr$r, .^a











IE LEADING SUMMER RESORT



Please mention that you "saw it in the Land of Sunshine.'



6q



a

-^



~ to

CO -»




li


ij






1 4








i












1










o

CO


3


to


#




I"





•o






^




TSF©iRe Mm



EIGHTH AND HOPE STS.




The only thoroughly comfort-
able tourist hotel in Los
Angeles.

Heated throughout by steam.

Convenient to four lines of street
railway.

Just outside the business dis-
trict.

Strictly first-class.

None but white labor is em-
ployed.

Patio and Office of the Inn.

CONVENIENT TO ALL SUMMER RESORTS



F. A. SHEPARD



ABBOTSFORD INN CO.



CHARLES B. JACOBS



G. F. GRANGER

Real Estate and Investment Broker

Stocks, Bonds, Mortgages.

Pasadena Property a Specialty
231 W. SECOND ST.

Tel 695 Cor. Broadway, Los Angeles, Cal.



FOR SALE.



Special to the Land of Sunshine.— 6-room
modern new Colonial cottage Hall, bath, hot
and cold water, patent water closet, fine mantel,
lawn, street graded, etc. Only $2,500. Terms.
$500, cash; balance monthly. One of many good
homes in Los Angeles for sale Before you buy,
see J .M.TAYLOK & CO., 102 S. Broadway.




WOODLAWN, THE NEW RESIDENCE TRACT OF LOS ANGELES

Call on Owner for Information, at

319J4 South Broadway, Los Angeles, Cal.

Woodlawn, the residence tract of Los Angeles. Prices, $600, $700, $750, $800 and $1000. This property
can only be obtained from the owner, Thos. McD. Potter, 319H So. Broadway, Los Angeles, Cal.



Please mention that you "saw it in the Land of Sunshine. '




Mausard Collier taf Cn.



ALONG THE ARROYO SECO. photo by A C. Troman, Pasadena










\ 1 Hi


THE LAND OF^g

sunshine!




II llwi^WIBMMI ■■





Vol. 5, No. 1.



LOS ANGELES



JUNE, 1»y6.



Confessions of a Basket Collector.



>Y J. TORREY CONNOR.




S with the gathering of postage stamps, blue china,
book plates and similar bric-a-brac, the collecting of
Indian baskets leads to depletion of one's purse, and
a not infrequent transgression of the tenth com-
mandment. A collector, commonly styled a ' ' crank ' '
by the unsympathetic, but known among the faith -
ful as an "enthusiast," may not be of the elect
unless backed by a collection numbering at least
half a hundred fine specimens of basketry. This means an outlay of
from $ io to $200 per basket — although, if purchased from the makers
direct, the cost is much less. An Indian woman would sometimes sell a
basket which represented the labor of weeks for a few dollars. I put it
in the past tense advisedly, not wishing to kindle false hopes. Before
collecting became epidemic, there was always the chance of picking up a
real "find" in some out-of-the-way spot; but the curio dealer has
cornered about everything that has escaped the prowling collector, and
nowadays you bargain for your basket over a counter. A student ot
basketry will tell you, and rightly, that the value of a collection is
enhanced four-fold if the baskets are authentic — that is, if they have
been a long time in use, and were secured at first hand. In the famous
Jewett collection* all the baskets have seen service, and the greater part
of them have that beautiful, old, mellow tint that no newly woven
specimen of the textile art can boast.

This collection of one hundred and thirty baskets is the apple of its
owner's eye. Together with other Indian relics — totem poles, pipes,




• Collected and owned by Mrs. Belle M. Jewett, Lamanda Park. Cal.
Copyright 1896 by Land of Sunshine Pub. Co.



Mausarci-Collier Eng. Co.



LAND OF SUNSHINE.




Mausard-Collier Eng. Co

"Sun" Basket.
Pouch Basket.



Three-generation Basket.



medicine charms and several handsome
blankets of the Navajo and Chilcat
weaves — it fills a good-sized room.
Mrs. Jewett has refused $4000 for these
unique decorations of her boudoir.

The one hundred
and thirty baskets are
the work of twenty-
eight different Indian
tribes, the best work
being done by the
Modoc, the Tulare and
the Chocot Indians —
the Modoc basket
leading, with the Tu-
lare a close second.

They represent a
considerable expend-
iture of time as well as
money, for the collect-
ing of them extended
over a period of six
years.

Among them is a three-generation basket (shown in illustration) which
can claim to be at least one
hundred years old, since the
Indian woman of whom it
was purchased , grand-daugh-
ter of the weaver, was nearly
ninety. It was no simple
matter to secure this
heirloom, for the
sentiment an Indian
has in her uncom-
municative make-
finds expres-
sion in the
hoarding of
these relics
of her own
or her fore-
mother's
skill. But
the collector
who is wise
in his gene-
ration does
not easily




Mausard-Collier Eng. Co.



IASKET FOR STORING WHEAT.



CONFESSIONS OF A BASKET COLLECTOR



accept defeat, and after prolonged negotiations a change of .
ownership is generally effected.

Basket-making, it may be said, has been carried on among
nearly all the aboriginal tribes of America ; but by far the
finest basketry is produced by the California Coast Indians.
Indeed, their workmanship rivals that of the far-famed Japanese
weavers.

With infinite care and patience the Indian woman weaves the
flexible twigs of trees, or the stems of reeds and the long grass stalks
into a shape so perfect that you wonder at the beauty of it ; counting her
stitches so carefully that seldom does the decorative pattern fail to join
properly. There are, practically, but two kinds of weaving, the horizontal
and the upright.

Being athirst for information, I unravelled a basket to the depth of a
quarter of an inch, that I might thereby get at the ground plan and
specifications, so to speak. The weaving was horizontal. The grass
strands, four or five in number, used as "filling," were bunched and
carried round and round, row on row, being reinforced by the insertion
of grasses running lengthwise of the basket. Beginning at the bottom





LAND OF SUNSHINE-




of the basket, I
noted how all the
loose ends were
neatly concealed
by the ' ' stitch, ' ' or
coil ; this was car-
ried over and under
the horizontal
strands, each stitch
being dovetailed to
the lower row of
stitches, thus bind-
ing the whole
firmly together.

The Eel River
Indians weave the

Mausard-Collier Eng. Co. double Coil, the

stitch passing over two strands instead of one. It is identical with the
Japanese weaving.

It is easier for the weaver to widen the basket to a bowl shape than to
draw it in, bottle shape. The first is accomplished by widening the
stitch, as in crochet work, while the narrowing is done by splitting the
stitch.

Four stitches, or coils, to the inch is coarse weaving ; fifteen stitches to
the inch is reckoned fine ; and a specimen containing fifty-three stitches
to the inch, in the Campbell collection,* is the finest weaving known.
No two baskets are ever made just alike, and yet oftentimes there is a
similarity of pattern. This is not to be wondered at when it is known
that every weaver takes as a guide the patterns drawn by Dame Nature.
You can trace the lightning's zig-zag flash on this basket, on that a design
resembling the markings of the diamond-back rattlesnake. Figures of
animals — deer and bear — are sometimes copied, and also the figures of
men. The latter design is peculiar to the Yocut Indians. A fine speci-
men obtained from an old Indian showed two rows of " little men," but
those in the outer row were headless. The natural supposition was that
the weaver had tired of her task, or that the basket was large enough for
her purpose without the additional weaving necessary to complete the
headless figures. Not so ; the
figures in the outer circle were
white men, we were told, whose
heads were chopped off by Indians.

Baskets range in size all the way
from the trinket basket, no bigger
than your fist, beaded and feather-
ed gorgeously, to the immense re-
ceptacle for the storing of grain,
with a capacity of half a ton (see




'(lathered and owned by W.



Campbell, lot Angele



i Eng Co

THE TWO KINDS OF STITCH.



CONFESSIONS OF A BASKET COLLECTOR.



illustration, p. 4), and vary as much in shape as in size. There
is the prettily woven nest for the pappoose ; the large,
placque-shaped basket on which the Indians gamble with
dice made of walnut shells, halved, filled with brea (tar)
into which wampum is pressed ; the queer, conical basket
in which burdens are borne upon the back ; the caps,
worn to protect the head in carrying burdens ; the
bottle-neck basket, beloved of connoisseurs ;
the bottomless basket, which fits over a hollow- ^

ed stone, into which corn is poured and ground
with a pestle ; baskets that serve as wardrobes ;
" pitched " baskets, in which water is carried ;
deep, bowl-shaped baskets, in which water is
heated for cooking by the throwing in of hot .
stones ; grain sifters ; tobacco pouches, and
so on.

The coarser baskets, those for rough service,
are made of split twigs for greater strength.
The colors most used in "filling in" for thef
pattern, are black, brown or red. To obtain
black, the weaver soaks the stems in guano ;
other colors, in the old baskets, are purely veg-
etable .

The interweaving of feathers and beads with
the grasses is comparatively recent. The " Sun
Worshipers' basket" (see illustration, p. 4) shows
three kinds of feathers employed in decora-
tion — those of the teal duck, the wild canary
and the red feathers of the woodpecker. It is
further ornamented with rows of wampum and



Online LibraryArchaeological Institute of America. Southwest SocOut west (Volume 5) → online text (page 1 of 34)