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with figures for circulation in most cases,
which latter are marked by the editor of
the Directory in such a way that adver-
tisers may know how to value them.

For instance, "where a publisher fur-
nished a statement upon the accuracy of
which the editor of the Directory did not



feel warranted in risking the $100.00 for-
feit on account of indefiniteness of ex-
pression or not being properly signed,
the rating assigned is marked with two
daggers (ft)- The correctness of these
ratings is not guaranteed."

The "Show-Down."
Considering that the figures given by
the Directory are furnished by the vari-
ous publications, many of whom have
never before ventured figures, they are
interesting :

SAN FRANCISCO.
Daily Examiner, average for the past year, 75,960

" Call, average -13,269

" Chronicle, exceeding 40,000

Weekly News Letter, smallest the past year 13,000

" Wave, exceeding 12,000

" Argonaut, exceeding To^o

Monthly Overland, exceeding 7,5oott

" Traveler, average for past year 4,100

" Resources of California, exceeding 400

LOS ANGELES.

Daily Times, average for past year 15,540

Monthly Land of Sunshine, certified
average year preceding April 1st,

1896 7916

Daily Express, average for past year 7,031

" Herald, smallest edition past year 6,500

" Record, not rated

Hotel Gazette, smallest edition 292

Weekly Sunday World, smallest edition 3,000

" Investor, smallest edition „ 1,000

" Capitol, not rated

Monthly Land of Sunshine, average for

year previous to Dec. 1st, 1895 7,468

Monthly Household, exceeding 7,500ft

" California Cultivator, average year 3,240
" Rural California^, exceeding 2,250

Only three monthlies west of Chicago
claim the distinction of a circulation be-
tween seven and eight thousand. The
claims of two of these, the Overland and
the Household, are questioned by the
Directory. The third, the Land of Sun-
shine, is not. The figures of the first
two do not specify whether they stand
for the largest single edition issued du-
ring the year past or for an average of
twelve editions. ( The figures submitted
to the Directory by the Land of Sunshine
were specific and certified, and show an
average circulation during the twelve
issues preceding April 1 st, 1896, of 2,916.)

The Land of Sunshine Leads.
The foregoing are cold figures and not
misleading statements, and they demon-
strate two things. First, that this two-
year-old has the largest certified circula-
tion of any monthly in the West, al-
though by far the youngest of them all.
Second, that locally its circulation stands
second only to its senior by thirteen
years, the leading Los Angeles Daily.
Add to this the respect and interest with
which it is received, and the significant
fact that it has no waste-basket circu-
lation, but is passed front hand to hand
and eventially sent broadcast by local
readers thus multiplying its original cir-
culation many fold, and it certainly must
appeal to the sagacious business man.




The Modern Cure for Disease

SEND POK BOOK.

WATSON & CO.,



Pacific Coast Agents,

124 Market St., San Francisco, Cal.



WHY YOU SHOULD USE OUR



$10



PER ACRE

FOR FINE LANDS

IN THE



$10



GAS STOVES FANITA RANCHO



1st. Because they are much cheaper than coal
stoves.

2nd. Because they cost les» to keep in re-
pair.

3rd. Because they save enormously in "time
and temper," require no attention, and can be
lighted and extinguished in a minute.

4th. Because they make neither dirt, smoke
nor ashes.

5th. Because they take up very little space,
and for this reason are especially desirable for
those who have small kitchens or who reside in
flats.

LOS ANGELES LIGHTING CO.,

4-57 SOUTH BROADWAY.



Wm. S. ffLLEN

DEALER IN

FURNITURE
and CARPETS

MATTING, OIL CLOTH AND LINOLEUM,

BEDDING, WINDOW SHADES,
SILK AND LACE CURTAINS, PORTIERES,

CURTAIN FIXTURES, BABY

CARRIAGES, UPHOLSTERY GOODS, ETC.

TELEPHONE 241

332-334 South Spring Street

LOS ANGELES, CAL.

r*T ACQ Book Binders,

ULiAOO Blank Book Manufacturers

& LONG 2I3 " 2I5NeW L I ( ;f^gele,



EL CAJON VALLEY
I669 Acres for - . $18,000
1420 Acres for - - $12,000

Smaller Tracts for $30 to $80 per acre.
WILL GROW ANYTHING.

This property is twelve miles from the city of
San Diego and two miles from Cuyamaca Rail-
road. It belongs to the estate of Hosmer P.
McKoon, and will be sold at the appraised value.

For further information address

FANNIE M. McKOON, Executrix.

Santee, San Diego Co., Cal.

Near the Foothills

Ten-acre

Orange

Groves

in

frostless

locality.

I also have Peach
and Apricot Orch-
ards, and Vineyards and
f)\) Farming L,ands for
Stock and Grain.
All first-class and plenty of water
for irrigation.
CITY BUILDING LOTS
Inquire of owner,

W. S. ALLEN

332-334 South Spring Street, Los Angeles, Cal.

The Pacific ^ E S L ,N !!1" AN ' S




FACTORY AND SALESROOM,

618-624 South Broadway



Please mention that you " saw it in the Land of Sunshine.



Interesting.



Goes on Kecord.



" To the common understanding of
men, there are no such fools as grow and
flourish on the western confines of the
national domain. . . .

" The mistake of the (government)
proof-reader would be irresistibly funny
were it not such a crushing rebuke to the
infinite and immeasurable littleness of
the people who are resisting an appro-
priation for the improvement and con-
struction of two harbors, and, above all,
to the Senator who is the conservator
and instrument of this microspic stu-
pidity." . . . We earnestly hope our
southern friends will obtain a deep-sea
harbor. Until they do, theirs will be a
case of arrested development. Ignor-
ance, prejudice and selfishness, however,
will not win for them this prize." — The
" Overland,' 1 '' June.



" The Overland came to us for June
with a good deal of matter that was su-
perior, more that was clever, and no in-
different reading whatever The

Overland of the present is far ahead of
Overland of 28 years ago, and averages as
well as any magazine in the land." —
The Los Angeles Capital, June 13th.

"A Literary Nonentity."

" Time was when the Overland was a
live and active agency in the progress of
the State. The Overland was proud of
California and Californians were proud
of the ambitious young magazine.

All that has changed. The Overland
has become a literary nonentity, but it
remained for the present imported editor
of that publication to go further, and de-
liberately insult the people of Southern
California by such an article as that
which appeared in the June number." —
The Los Angeles Times, June 13th.



A Questionable Joke.

"An Englishman who had issued and
copyrighted in England a high-priced
poster, designed for one of his series of
books, was somewhat surprised to see it
reproduced, without authorization, in the
Overland Monthly of San Francisco. A
letter of polite protest to the editor
brought back a note in which the whole
trouble was traced to the well-known
lack of humor in the English character.
The editor could not see that he was at
all to blame, or that 'there is any ex-
planation due you.' Coming to the real
point he added : 'An American pub-
lisher would have looked on the whole
matter as a joke, but of course British
insularity prevents appreciation in this



line.' We must say, however \ that we
have known more than one American
publisher with nothing insular or British
about him, who had but the smallest ' ap-
preciation in this line.' In fact, we be-
lieve Americans would rival even the
Scotch in joking ' wi' deefeeculty,'
when the point of the jest lies in stealing
their goods." — New York Evening Post.



His Convenient Memory.

"Mr. Rounsevelle Wildman makes a
great mistake when he calls his magazine
' the only one published on the coast.'
The Land of Sunshine is so far its
superior, the Overland man did well to
forget to remember it."

— Toledo (O.) Sunday fournal.



All One Way.

"The Land of Sunshine is in every
way a credit to California." — San Fran-
cisco Call.

" Profuse in illustrations, equal to the
best in the New York magazines, it is at-
tracting attention all over the world." —
San Francisco News Letter.

1 ' Knows what people want to read and
gives it. — San Francisco Chronicle.

"An admirable monthly." — The Ar-
gonaut, San Francisco.

"This periodical is one of which
Southern California should justly feel
proud. The June number is rich in
variety and quality."

— Los Angeles Herald.

"A perfect reflection of the land in
which we live." — Los Angeles Times.

'* Entitled to rank in the very fore-
front." — Bristol, Conn., Press.

"It is already accepted by the Eastern
press as the most typical and original
magazine in the West." — The Minneapolis
Tribune.

" In typography and illustrations it is
peculiarly handsome, and its artistic ap-
pearance is equaled by its literary quali-
ty." — Chicago Inter-Ocean, June 13.

"In a year it has become a success,
being widely read and quoted for its
Western-ness tempered with culture, and
its authority on matters in its interesting
field." — Current Literature, N. Y.

"Very effectively edited. It is Cali-

fornian in the subjects of its articles and

in the finely executed illustrations. . . .

Written with unusual force and point.'

— The Bookman, N. Y.



Money Made in a Minute.

I have not made less than $16:00 any
day while selling Centrifugal Ice Cream
Freezers. Anyone should make from $5
to $8 a day selling eream and from $7 to
$10 selling freezers, as it is such a wonder,
there is always a crowd wanting cream.
You can freeze cream elegantly in one
minute, and that astonishes people so
they all want to taste it, and then many
of them buy freezers, as the cream is
smooth and perfectly frozen. Every
freezer is guaranteed to freeze cream
perfectly in one minute. Anyone can
sell ice cream and the freezer sells itself.
My sister makes from $10 to $15 a day.
W. H. Baird & Co., 140 S. Highland Ave.,
Station A., Pittsburg, Pa., will mail you
full particulars free, so" you can go to
work and make lots of money anywhere,
as with one freezer you can make a
hundred gallons of cream a day, or if
you wish, they will hire you on a salary.
Cottages by the Seaside.

Furnished cottages at L,a Jolla for rent.
Apply to C. S. Dearborn, P. M., La Tolla,
Cal.

Sets a Mark.

The little brochure just issued by the
Ice and Cold Storage Company of this
city, is a fine sample of completeness of
effect and good taste. The embossed
covers are at once rich and simple, and
do not either by ill chosen gaudiness or
inferiority, spoil the rest of the pamphlet.
The March of Progress.

That delightful seaside resort, Redondo,
rejoices in a new municipal electric
lighting plant. A very iuieresting feature
of this plant is an alternating generator,
which is remarkable for the absence of
commutator, Jbrushes and moving wire,
the armature remaining stationary and
the fields revolving. The plant was put
in by the Machinery Supply Co., of Los
Angeles, the' agents); for this^dynamo.



Giving Away Dollars.

Attention is called to the advertisement
on the front cover of this issue of Mr. E.
Petri£ Hoyle. As extensive nitrate inter-
ests in South America require his atten-
tion, Mr. Hoyle is not only compelled to
dispose of one of the most fully equipped
ranches in this section, but at a price per
acre less than that often required for un-
improved acreage.

OLDEST AND LARGEST BANK IN SODTRERN
CALIFORNIA.

Farmers and Merchants Bank

OF LOS ANQELB9, CAL.

Capital (paid up) - - $500,000.00
Surplus and Reserve - - 820,000.00

Total - - $1,320,000.00

officers :

I. W. Hellman President

H. W. Hellman... Vice-President

Henry J. Fleishman Cashier

G. A. J. Heimann Assistant Cashier

directors :
W. H. Perry, C. E. Thom, J. F. Francis,
O. W. Childs, I-W Hellman, Jr., T. I,. Duqub.
A. Glassbll, H. W. Hellman, I. W. Hellman.
Special Collection Department. Correspond-
ence Invited. Safety Deposit Boxes for rent.

OF LOS ANGELES.

Capital Stock $400,000

Surplus and Undivided Profits over 230,000

J. M. Elliott, Prest., W.G. Kerckhoff, V.Pres

Frank A. Gibson, Cashier.

G. B. Shaffer, Assistant Cashier.

directors:

J. M. Elliott, F. Q. Story, J. D. Hooker,

J. D. Bicknell. H. Jevne, W. C. Patterson

W. G. Kerckhoff.

No public funds or other preferred deposits

received by this bank.




I DR.H.3ANCHE5 m



TJ4E fiELU LIFE
GIVE!}

Supplies Oxygen to the
blood, and cures disease
and pain under nature's
own laws.



Wilcox, Artz., Feb. 8, 1894. Dear Sir : It affords me unqualified pleasure to give my testimony in
behalf of your Oxydonor " Victory." For 25 years I was a sufferer from Derangement of the Stomach,
which caused me to suffer from "headaches" to such extent as to prostrate me, and at times as often
as three days in a week, since my fifteenth year. I have been treated by eminent physicians, none of
which gave me more than temporary relief. The acidity of my stomach was such that for a week at a
time I was unable to retain food, the pain being so great as to compel me to eject it. My mother pro-
cured an Oxodonor and urged me to try it, and from the first week of its use to the present date, I have
had no trouble, and it is now over a year since I used it last. / feel that I am entirely well, I have
loaned it to several of my friends who have been convinced of its virtues, and are now as enthusiastic
as myself. You are at liberty to use this testimonial as suits you and if one fellow sufferer is benefited
I shall not have written in vain. Yours truly, E. A. NICHOLS.
For further particulars call on or address

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA OXYDONOR CO.,
Rooms 209-2x0 Wilson Block, S. E. Cor. First and Spring Sts., Los Angeles, Cal. Take Elevator

Please mention that you " saw it in the Land of Sunshine."




During the past month the Crown City Cycling Club ot Pasadena has
conducted two successful amateur bicycle tournaments.

San Diego has no bicycle track and has held no track races this year,
but much road riding is being done by both scorchers and those who ride
for solid comfort and pleasure only.

Riverside people feel much elated over their success at Dos Angeles
May 30th, when they won the annual twenty-five mile team race, that
carries with it the club championship of the Southwest. The Riverside
team was composed of George B. Cox, Carson Shoemaker and Harrv E.
Scott.

Redlands cyclists are glad to welcome home Howard Squires from the
State University. Squires is considered the best amateur track racer on
the Pacific coast.

The great derby of the Southwest is the annual seventeen mile road
race from Los Angeles to Santa Monica. It will be held this year as
usual on the morning of July 4th, and probably the Southern Pacific
will conduct a race meet on its Santa Monica bicycle track in the after-
noon. This track testifies to the enterprise of the Southern Pacific.

The Santa Ana track is being kept in good condition by riders inclined
to racing there, who are training on it. Several of the Santa Ana
flyers will take part in the Santa Monica road race.

The East Side Cycling Club of Dos Angeles will hold a bicyle tourna-
ment on Saturday afternoon, July 11. The affair is in the hands of C.
E. Patterson.

Probably more than fifty wheelmen have ridden from San Francisco to
Dos Angeles over the coast route in the last two months. This seems to
be the favorite route for a long tour with the wheelmen of San Francisco
and the North California cities As the wind blows south over most of
this route, nearly all take the steamships back.

Dester Hickok, tourmaster of the Southern California Division of the
Deague of American Wheelman, made a most interesting cycle trip last
month. In company with Messrs. Brown and Hendricks of Phoenix,
Arizona, who are following the border on a 22,000 mile tour, Mr. Hickok
rode to Santa Barbara via Cahuenga Pass, San Fernando Valley, San
Buenaventura and Carpenteria. Then on by Santa Ynez and La Puris-
ama missions to San Luis Obispo. The route from there was almost due
east to Bakersfield and back through Mojave, San Bernardino county
and Riverside. Maps and measurements were made lor a future road
book, and several weeks were devoted to in covering the ground.

For a short, easy bicycle ride there is no better route than from East
Los Angeles to Tropico on the old Camino Real route towards San Fer-
nando Mission. This bit of road is five miles long, newly paved and
kept sprinkled. It is slightly up grade all the way so that the home run
is easier than going out, as it should be for new riders and those who are
looking for pleasure. Another delightful ride is along the shady road to
the old Ostrich Farm on the west side of the river and parallel to the
Tropico run. Part of the way one can wheel along the covered irrigation
ditch or on top of the viaduct of the Crystal Springs Water Company.

R. M. Welch of San Francisco, who has charge of Coast racing matters
as a member of the National Racing Board of the L. A. W., is getting up a
Pacific Racing Circuit for late summer and early fall. The tournaments
will be in all the main wheel towns of the Pacific Slope and the many
track towns of the Southwest will have dates.



HAWLEY, KING & CO.,



FINE CARRIAGES
and BICYCLES




210 NORTH MAIN ST.,

LOS ANGELES, CAL.



THE PEEELESS

ARROW

OF 1896

CHIEF AMONG THOUSANDS




A COMBINATION OF GRACE
AND BEAUTY

High Frame

Narrow Tread

Light Weight

Great Strength
and the Most Sensitive Bearings, all
conducive to
Greatest Speed with Least Effort.

MATHEWS IMPLEMENT CO.,

General Agents

120-124 S. Los Anjyeles Street,

LOS ANGELES, CAL.



SEND FOR 1896



CATALOGUE

AND F»RICED LIST

Established 1882.



H.JEVNE



WHOLESALE



GROCER



RETAIL



ELEGANT NEW QUARTERS
208 and 210 SOUTH SPRING STREET



Please mention that you " saw it in the Land of Sunshine.



DMATIONAL* *,




'i^4*sr^»^



MARLBOROUGH SCHOOL

For Girls and Young Ladies
865 \\ . 33d St., Los Angeles.

Handsome home with family discipline and refined
family life, for twenty girls. New annex this year,
containing assemhly room, class rooms, studio,
gymnasium, etc. Preparatory to be opened this
year. Girls graduated in Latin and English
courses, and prepared for any college to which
women are admitted. Extended course in English
Language and Literature, and special opportun-
ities for work in Art, History, etc. During the
summer Mrs. Caswell travels in Euiope with
classes.



Pasadena.

Miss ohtoN's

Classical School for Girls.

A Boarding and Day School.

Certificate admits to Eastern Colleges.

Los Angeles Academy

A Boarding School for Boys
Ideal location in country, near the foothills.
Forty boys, eight teachers. Not a large school,
but a good one. Military discipline. $25000 a
year. No extras. Send for catalogue.

C. A. WHEAT, Principal,
P. O. Box 193. Los Angeles, Cal.

LOS ANGELES BUSINESS
COLLEGE



Currier Building



UNEXCELLED ....

Send for Illustrated Catalogue.



POMONA COLLEGE



Courses leading to degrees of B.A., B.S.,
and B.L. Its degrees recognized by Uni-
versity of California and other Graduate
Schools. Also preparatory School, fitting
for all Colleges, and a School of Music of
high grade.

Address, C. G. BALDWIN, Pres.

JOHN C. FILLMORE,

Director of School of Music.



FROBEL INSTITUTE



(CASA DE ROSAS.)



CHEST ADAmS ST. COR. HOOVER ST.

LtOS SHCEUES

All grades taught, from Kindergarten to College
Training School for Kindergartners a specialty

PROF. AND MME. LOUIS CLAVERIE.
Circular sent on application.

GIRLS' COLLEGIATE SCHOOL

1918-192%- South Grand Avenue

For resident and day pupils. An attractive home,
and thorough school.

MISS PARSONS AND MISS DENNEC

PRINCIPALS

226 S. Spring St., Los Angklks

Oldest, Largest and Best. Send for Catalogue.




G. A. Hodoh,

President.



N. G. Felebi,

Vice President-



Please mention that you "saw it in the L*M> of fcr»mNt.'



Ontario.



TTUATED at a distance of 35 miles from the Pacific ocean, and 39
miles east of L/OS Angeles, on the main line of both the Southern
Pacific and Santa F£ railways, is the beautiful town of Ontario.
In location, climate, soil, and water privileges, Ontario has many ad-
vantages. Fine business blocks, electric cars and lighting, handsome
churches and schools, fine residences, surrounded by what is already
becoming a great forest of citrus and deciduous orchards, blocked out
by splendid shade trees — such is Ontario at thirteen years. How many
Eastern towns twice its age and population would ever dream of half
its progress? The elevation, ranging from 950 to 2500 feet, insures a
most healthful and agreeable climate, while the conditions for growing
citrus and deciduous fruits cannot be excelled.




V'-




A NAVEL ORANGE GROVE.



For the past two years Ontario has planted more orchard lands than
any other district in Southern California, the firm of Hanson & Co. alone
having planted over 1500 acres to the various kinds of citrus and decidu-
ous fruits. This they are selling in 10 or 20-acre tracts, at prices ranging
from $150 to $400 per acre, according to location of lots and water priv-
ileges. These prices are for three-year-old orchards. The streets and
avenues are planted to ornamental and shade trees, and kept in good
order. There are some beautiful residences now on their tract.

They also have several orchards in full bearing which are good value,
and will bear investigation. Anyone desiring further information should
write for pamphlet to Hanson & Co., Ontario, or 122 Pall Mall, London,
England.



DO YOU WANT A HOME

IN ONTARIO ?

"The Model Colony"

of Southern California



ORANGE GROVES we have

LEMON GROVES sou ° ,AMS

w EHi vE OLIVE ORCHARDS ™" uss HOTBls

w-wx v -w uivviini\iy^ ELECTRIC LIGHT

GOOD LAND APRICOT ORCHARDS ELECTRIC RY

GOOD WATER pHACH ORCHARDS COMPLETE
GOOD SCHOOLS

OOO.CHOKCHES PRUNE ORCHARDS
good society ALMOND ORCHARDS sysTKM



In 5, 10, 20, or 40-Acre Tracts

At reasonable prices and on terms
to suit purchasers.



For full information and descriptive pamphlet, write to

HANSON & CO.,

Or, 122 Pall Mall, London, England. OntaHO, California,

Please mention that you "saw it in the Land of Sunshine."



Crimson Rambler Roses Redondo Carnations

15 CENT8 EACH $1.00 A DOZEN

Araucarias, Palms, and Rare House Plants

ELMO R. MESERVE

635 SOUTH BROADWAY

Cut Flowers Garden Seeds



This P\agazine.



IS PRINTED WITH NO. 168 HALF-TONE BLACK
MADE BY

California Ink Company

OF SAN FRANCISCO

Los Angeles Branch

125 E. Second St.

Send for Our Color Specimen Book

MAX MERTEN, AGENT



"t ARC THE ONLY MANUFACTURERS O
FINE BLACK PRINTING INKS
ON THE COAST



Pine |-|alf-tone Printing



A SPECIALTY



|^INGSLEY-
gARNES

&

Neuner
Co.




ENTENMANN I BORST, —

Jewelers and Watchmakers

Diamond Setters and Engravers.

Medals, Society Badges and School Pins in gold
and silver. Fine Watch Repairing a Specialty.
Any description of gold and silver jewelry made
to order and repaired. Old gold and silver bought.
217^ South Spring Street
Rooms 3, 4 and 7, Up Stairs. LOS ANGELES. CAL.

THE PRESS CLIPPING BUREAU

GUARANTEES PROMPT, ACCURATE AND
RELIABLE SERVICE.

Supplies notices and clippings on any subject
from all periodicals on the Pacific Coast, business
and personal clippings, trade news, advance
reports on all contract works.

LOS ANGELES OFFICE, 110 WEST SECOND STREET



Indian Baskets

i
Navajo Blankets

#
Pueblo Pottery

Mail Orders

Solicited.
Catalogue Sent

Free.



OPKLS,




Mexican Drawn Work and Hand-Carved Leather
Goods. Indian Photos (blue prints) 10 c. each.

W. D. Campbell's Curio Store,

325 South Spring St., Los Angeles, Cad.



Mr. Fisher has closed his music house


Mr. A. C. Bilicke, the enterprising and


at 427 S. Broadway, and will hereafter


genial proprietor of the Hollenbeck


greet the musical world at 233 S. Spring


Hotel, Los Angeles, has returned, full of


street.


the wonders of the Yosemite.



Please mention that you "saw it in the land of Sitmibini.'



WOOD & CHURCH



WE OFFER



Country
Property



City
Property

a fine ORANGE GROVE of 25 acres close to Pasadena ; n
old, and 8 acres 10 years old ; budded. One inch of water to each ten acres.
There is also a variety of fruit and ornamental trees. Never offered before for less
than $20,000, but owner wants money, and will sell at $11,250. It will pay 15 per cent, on the investment.



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