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AMERICA'S MOST FAMOUS SEASIDE RESORT



September, 1596



Vol. V, No.



IE, GREATEST NATURAL BRIDGE.




COPYRIGHTED 1895 BY LANDOF SUNSHINE PUB. CO



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Daily Times, LosAngeles.aver-

age issue for past year 15.540

Monthly Land of Sunshine,
certified av. issue for year

preceding April 1st, '96 7916

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smallest edition 1000

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nia, exceeding 400

Weekly Capitol, L.A. not rated

Daily Hotel Gazette, Los An-
geles, smallest edition 292

tt Accuracy questioned by A. N.

Directory.



that you "saw it in the Land of Sunsiiink."



The Land of Sunshine

Contents— September, 1896.

PAGE

The Fandango, from painting by Nahl frontispiece

The Bullfight (poem), illustrated, L. Worthington Green 145

The Greatest Natural Bridge, illustrated, Chas. F. Lummis 146

(Southwestern Wonderland Series.)

In the Sierra (poem), Eleanor F. Lewis 151

The California Lion (life study by Henry Dixon) 152

Some Little Heathens, illustrated, Ella S. Hartnell 153

Southern California Clnms, illustrated, C. M. Drake 158

In the Rose Garden (poem), Grace Ellery Channing 161

The Trade Rat, Mary E. Wright 162

Southern California Summer 163

Santa Barbara Lighthouse, illustrated, S. E. A. Higgins 164

How Western Schools Grow 165

The Padre's Story, Eve Lummis t 166

Customs of the Rio Grande, John G. Bourke 168

The Landmarks Club, illustrated 170

The Lion's Den 171

That Which is Written 173

Beet Sugar in California 174

Some Bicycle Clubs 177



Works of Chas. F. Lummis



Published by Chas. Scribner's Sons.N. Y.

A New Mexico David, and other stories of
the Southwest. Illustrated. $125.
" Vigorous and novel studies ... as distinctly

valuable as they are vividly interesting."

— Boston Commonwealth.

A Tramp Across the Continent. $1.25.

" His book has such heart in it, such simplicity
and strength, it is as good to read as any story of
adventure may be."

— The Saturday Review, London, Eng.

The Land of Poco Tiempo. illustrated. $2.50.

"A charming volume. "—7 he Academy , London.
" Uniformly and surpassingly brilliant."

— Boston Traveller.

Published by Lamson, Wolffe & Co., Boston.
JUST OUT.

The Gold Fish of Gran Chimu. #1.50

A story of Peruvian adventure. Superbly illus-
trated from the author's photographs and from
antiquities exhumed by him in the ruins of Peru.

" Novel and touching. . . . The spirit throughout
is alert and gay, and the sympathy with delicately
strung natures charming : even the literal trans-
lation of a foreign idiom (a very dangerous ex-
periment) adds to the grace and naturalness of
Mr. Lummis's tale."— 7Ae Nation, N. Y.



Published by the Century Co., N. Y.

Some Strange Corners of Our Country.

Illustrated . $ 1 .50.
" He has written a great book, every page of
which is worth a careful reading."

— Mail and Express, N. Y.

The Man who Married the Moon, and other

Pueblo Indian Folkstories. Illustrated

by George Wharton Edwards. $1.50.

" Deserves to be classed with the best of its

kind yet produced in our country."

— The Nation, N. Y.
" We can insist on the great pleasure some of
these stories must give the reader ; and one, ' The
Mother Moon,' is as poetic and beautiful as any-
thing we have ever read, in or out of folklore."
— N. Y. Times.

Published by A. C. McClurg & Co., Chicago.

The Spanish Pioneers. Illustrated. $1.50.

" More exciting than any romance."

— The Critic, N. Y.

" At times quite as brilliant as Parkman."

— Boston ' Traveller.

" The world has accepted this young man, has
found that there was much to learn in the direction
of his interests, found that he was an attractive
and reliable guide ; and he has not been long in
coming to a point where he is regarded as master
of his field."— The interior, Chicago.



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Building

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REAL ESTATE, LOANS AND COMMISSION
References : Messrs. Lazard, Freres, New
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Please mention that you 'saw it in the Land ok fUlOTlllHII "









THE* LAND OF^

sunshines!









Vol. 5 No.



LOS ANGELES



SEPTEMBER, 1896.



The Bull Fight.

BY L. WORTHINGTON GREEN.

The couriers that from Chihuahua go
To distant Cusi aud to Satev6

Announce the feast of ali the year the crown —
Se corren los toros !

And Juan brings his Pepita in to town.

The rancherias on the mountain side,
The haciendas of the llano wide,

Are quickened by the matador's renown.
Se corren los toros !

And Juan brings his Pepita in to town.

The women that on ambling burros ride,
The men that trudge behind or close beside

Make groups of dazzling white and blue and brown.
Se corren los toros !

And Juan brings his Pepita in to town.




Mausard-Collier Eng. Co.
Copyright 1896 by Land of Sunshine Pnb. Co.



Photo, by C. F. L.



146 LAND OF SUNSHINE

Or else the lumbering carts are brought in play,
That jolt and scream and groan along the way,

But to their happy tenants cause no frown.
Se corren los toros !

And Juan brings his Pepita in to town.

The Plaza de los Toros offers seats,

Some deep in shade, on some the fierce sun beats :

These for the don, those for the rustic clown.
Se corren los toros !

And Juan brings his Pepita in to town.

Pepita sits, so young and sweet and fresh,
The sun shines on her rich hair's dusky mesh.

Her day of days, how soon it will be flown !
Se corren los toros!

And Juan 's brought his Pepita in to town.

The bull is harried till the governor's word
Bids the diestro give the agile sword,

Then shower the bravos and the roses down !
'Sta muerto el toro!

And Juan takes his Pepita back from town.




K? THE SOUTHWESTERN WONDERLAND.

VI: The Greatest Natural Bridge.

BY CHARLES F. LUMMIS.

MONG all the wonders of Nature in the Southwest,
one of the greatest — and one of the least known
— is the stupendous Natural Bridge which spans
the canon of Pine Creek, in the edge of the
Tonto Basin, Arizona. For more than a century
the trivial Natural Bridge of Virginia has been
famous the world over ; and in old volumes of
travel was rated among the marvels of the earth.
But if you were to take the Virginia bridge, and find sixty more like it,
and lump them all together, the sum would not make one of the Pine
Creek Bridge. Out here, Nature does not work on the one-cent plan,
but with genuine Western liberality and daring.

The Tonto Basin is off the line of travel ; but there is neither danger
nor special hardship in reaching it. Coming by the Santa Fe' route to
Ash Fork, A. T., one goes to Prescott by rail ; thence by private con-
veyance to Camp Verde ; and thence, also by buckboard or horseback,
to the little Mormon settlement of Pine. From there the five miles to
the bridge must be made horseback or on foot.

Picking his way over the lava-strewn plateau, the traveler comes sud-
denly to a jumping-off place. From the abrupt rim he looks down 1500
feet of precipitous, matted hillside, to a perfect little gem of a valley,
almost circular and about half a mile in diameter. A tiny house and
barn nestle under huddled trees. In front are the green-dotted ranks of
young orchards. North and south of them, are irregular dark scars,.



THE GREATEST NATURAL BRIDGE.



147



overgrown with wild trees ; and on all sides the mountains seem to wall
this bowl-like oasis. It is a picture of beauty and peace — and not a
hint, as yet, of the savagery and wildness of its hidden wonder.

Here is the 160-acre homestead of old Dave Gowan, a quaint, sincere,
patriotic Scot whose hermit home is unique. I believe he is the only
man in the world who has a two-story farm.

Walking down through his apricot orchard, he leads you to an unex-
pected hole between the trees ; and peering down through this two-foot
orifice, you catch your breath — for over 200 feet below you see a beauti-
ful stream . As a matter of fact, his five-acre orchard occupies a part of
the top of the Natural Bridge !




Mansard-Collier Bng. Co. Copyright 1891 by C. F. 1

UNDER THE NATURAL BRIDGE



THE GREATEST NATURAL BRIDGE.



149



A rugged path leads along the rim-rock where the level orchard sud-
denly breaks off into an indescribably savage chasm ; and zigzags down
the cliff toward the bottom of the canon. A short scramble, and you
stand in the eternal shadow of the South Arch — an almost perfect dome
200 feet high. There are three of these domes, as wonderfully accurate
as they are overwhelmingly huge ; with symmetrical flying buttresses
that seem to uphold the mighty triple vault. At your side shouts the
musical little river — born within half a mile from the splendid springs
which roll from the limestone caves underlying Gowan's whole farm.
On the left, far up toward the roof, is an enormous level platform, like
the choir of this stupendous cathedral. You must mount the ladder to




l-Collier Eng. Co. Copyright 1891 by C. F. Lumc

THE NATURAL BRIDGE FROM THE SOUTH



A5o



LAND OF SUNSHINE.



this shelf before you can understand the Natural Bridge. Once up in
that hushed, twilit loft, you grasp the enormous span of the Bridge — and
marvel at the strange providence whereby the insensate water which
wrought all this wonder, left just here the central pier of limestone, ioo
feet in circumference, which supports the roof.

Descending from the great platform to the side of the stream, scram-
bling with some difficulty around the pretty little fall which plunges
into the magnificent bowl-like pool, you can presently traverse the
whole distance under the Bridge, and emerge from the North Arch —
which is lower and more fantastic than the other. The canon for half a
mile here is wonderfully interesting ; walled with picturesque cliffs and
choked with enormous boulders — among which grows one of the largest
sycamores in the United States. On the west side the cliff is a precipice
of splintered red granite, 1600 feet high ; on the east, a limestone wall
of 200 feet, over whose brink the boundary trees of Gowan's farm lean
and whisper. This limestone wall is honeycombed with caves, running
back a great distance and full of snowy apparitions. These caves have
never been explored, though Gowan has pried into them. Once, when
he tried to find the end, he was lost for three days and nights, without
torches, food or water, and came thus near to death under his own farm.

In prehistoric times the
Bridge and the caves were
places of refuge for the abor-
igines. The indications, so
far as I could determine, are
that they never had*a settle-
ment here ; but a spot so
imposing could not fail to
impress the Indian mind . Per-
haps as retreats from danger,
even more probably as shrines
for prayer, the savages whose
ruined towns dot Strawberry
valley and other arable oases
in that region , resorted to this
marvelous spot in the days
before there was an America.
One can almost people it
again, and see the shamans
" making medicine" in the
great stone loft under the
Bridge ; the stark youth swim-
ming in the great pool — to the
very bottom of whose 90 feet
of crystal water you can trace
the sinking of the pebble you
throw in — or the women and

lUiuard-Collier Kog Co. Copyright 1891 by C. F. Lummi.. children huddling in the CaveS

THE NORTH ARCH.





1 1 •• .


■'


w^p




%



IN THE SIERRA.



151



while the warriors fought off
the swarming Apaches.

The Virginia Bridge is 240
feet high, 100 feet span and
45 feet wide. The Pine
Creek Bridge is 290 feet high
(to the bottom of erosion),
over 500 feet span, and more
than 600 feet wide (up and
down stream). It is incom-
parably the largest natural
bridge in the world, and one
of the greatest scenic won-
ders. The accompanying
illustrations are the first
photographic reproductions
of this marvelous freak of
Nature ever published;* and
while no photograph and no
description can give com-
petent idea of the Arizona
Natural Bridge, they may
show enough to induce in-
telligent travelers to visit it.
It is another spot which the
government should make a
national park, to be held,
against all vandals, for the
benefit of generations a little
less philistine. And I may
add that the old Scotch her-
mit is patriotic American
enough to be more than
willing to dedicate his won-
derful homestead for this
purpose.



♦Though drawings from some
of them were published in my
Strange Corners of Our Country.
(The Century Co., N. Y.)




4



Mausard-Collier Eng. Co. Copyright 1891 by C. F. Lunar

THE BIG SYCAMORE.



In the SrERRA.

BY ELEANOR F. LEWIS.

The gaunt pines rise above the lower trees,

And spreading buckeyes, with their cone-shaped bloom,
While from amongst their moon-lit, leafy gloom —
The pale, sweet elder-blossoms scent the breeze.

Deep in the woods, where wrait,h-like shadows shift,
With the soft motion of the oak-leaves' drift,
Come the wierd cries of whirring owls that seem



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