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physicians, finally resorting to Hot Springs in the
hope of being benefited, but in vain. I would
improve for a few days and then grow worse
again ; in fact, helpless, until I gave up all hopes
of ever being any better, when I was induced to
try Robinson's Thermal Bath Cabinet, and now I
have so far recovered, through the use of the
Bath alone, that I am able to attend to my house-
hold duties with the greatest ease. I "want to
recommend R. T. B. Cabinets to all who suffered
as I have Don't give jour money to doctors and
keep your disease, but buy a cabinet and take
your baths at home. Mrs Annie Jeffries.

444-446 South Hill St., Los Angeles

This is the bath used by Drs. Knox
and Taylor in their Sanitarium, and their
testimony is that it is the best, most
easily managed, cheapest and most effi-
cient bath now in use.

We cheerfully recommend it to all.
Dr. C. R. Knox
Dr. T. B. Taylor, A.M.
Proprietors Second St. Sanitarium,
Long Beach, Cal.
July 20th, 1896.



Please mention that you



it in the Land ok Sdnshinr."






DO YOU WANT A HOME

IN ONTARIO ?



U



The Model Colony"

of Southern California



ORANGE GROVES we have

LEMON GROVES SOLIDBANKS

— OLIVE ORCHARDS ™ R ™

GOOD WND APRICOT ORCHARDS ELECTRIC RY

GOOD WATER PHACH ORCHARDS COMPLETE

GOOD SCHOOLS

ooodchukchbs PRUNE ORCHARDS
good society ALMOND ORCHARDS SYSTEM



In 5, io, 20, or 40-Acre Tracts



R.t Reasonable Prices and on Terms
to suit purchasers



For full information and descriptive pamphlet, write to

HANSON & CO.,

Ontario, California.

Or, 122 Pall Mall, London, England.



Please mention that you "saw it in the Land of Sdnshins.



Hawley, King & Co.



Will Remove



THEIR BRANCH CARRIAGE REPOSITORY — — — «-

To cor. Broadway and Fifth St., about Sept. 10th




Up to Date of Removal from 210-213 N. Main St., PRICES WILL BE REDUCED
on Vehicles and Bicycles. 1896 Heatings, S85 ; 1895 Keatings, 865.



HOTEL ARCADIA, Santa Monica, Cal



The only first-class
tourist hotel in this,
the leading coast re-
sort of the Pacific. 150
pleasant rooms, large
and airy ball room,
beautiful lawn and
flower gardens. Mag-
n ificent panoramic
view of the sea. First-
class orchestra. Surf
and hot water baths
a positive cure for
nervous and rheumatic
disorders.

Time from I,os An-
geles by Santa Fe or
S. P. R.R. 35 minutes,
Pasadena and Pacific
electric cars, seventy-
five minutes.



S. REINHART, Pf





The Hotel Ltillie

534 S. Hill St., Los Angeles, Cal.

In the central part of the city. Open all the year.
Electric cars pass every six minutM. New house, ele-
gantly furnished, all large outside sunny rooms, broad
halls and beautiful verandas. Fronting Central Park,
adorned with an endless variety of flowering shrubs and
i tropical shade trees! The air from tin 1'ark
comes to guests freighted with aroma. It is the favorite
resort of citizens and strangers.

The proprietor, J. H. MI.I-IE, w »l spare no pains or
expense to make his guests feel at home, supply them
with the best of food and see that they receive every
proper attention.

t9" Low prices for the summer.



October, 1596 Vol. V, No.

BEAUTIFULLy

I L LL1STHATE



It GITY OF THE GUFF




LosAngelejT

tOt>v«»iCMTEO 1895 ftY LANDOf SUNSHINE PUB.CO



10



CENTS LAND OF SUNSHINE PUBLISHING CO..

INCORPORATED

A COPY 501-503 Stimson Building.



$1



A
YEAF



HOTEL GREEN, Pasadena, Cal.




J. H. HOLMES, Manager



THE LARGEST

MOST MODERN

and BEST APPOINTED

Hotel in Los Angeles County. Even.- mod-
ern convenience : over 300 sunny arid spa-
cious rooms, with private parlors and
baths. Gardens, conservatory, orchestra,
etc. Centrally located in Pasadena, 30
minutes from Los Angeles by three
lines of steam railway. Pasadena and Los
Angeles Klectric Cars pass the door
every fifteen minutes.



•J-|OTEL AHCADIA, Santa Monica, Cal.



The only first class
tourist hotel in this,
the leading coast re-
sort of the Pacific. 150
pleasant rooms, large
and airy ball room,
beautiful lawn and
flower gardens. Mag-
n ificent panoramic
view of the sea. First-
class orchestra. Surf
and hot water baths
a positive cure for
nervous and rheu-
matic disorders.

Time from Los An-
geles by Santa Fe or
S. P. R.R. 35 minutes,
Pasadena and Pacific
electric cars, seventy-
five minutes.

S. REINHART, Proprietor




THE LEADING SEASIDE RESORT



ARTISTIC FRAMING




S



George Eliot, SiSf£

Pictures, Mouldings, Artists' Material and stationery



SEED COMPANY

113 N. Main St.,
Los Angeles, Cal.

New Importation of
Beautiful

FLOWERING BULBS

Grown to Our Order in Haarlem,
Holland :

Hyacinths. Lilies of the Valley,

Anemones Azaleas,
Renunculus, Crocus,
Tulips, Freesia-.

Narsissus, Liliuni lianisii,

etc. , etc.

SEND YOUR ORDERS
NOW.



**lease mention that you " saw it in the Land of Sdnshine."



YOUWII :L KINI3TH E j40llLEflBECK ^S



PRH-HOQIJlEIlTIiV

^he most centrally lo-
cated, best appointed |1|||
and best kept Botel
in the city.

^American or Suro-
pean Plan.



Rates reasonable.
SECOND and SPiWG i




Lios Angeles, Cal.



A TOUR TO CALIFORNIA IS NOT COMPLETE WITHOUT SEEING

A Branch of the Nor-
walk Ostrich Farm —

THE OLDEST
AND LARGEST

in America.

An Ostrich Feather
Boa or Coll arette,
made from the local
product, makes a
pleasing and useful
souvenir of the Golden
State.

Take the Pasadena
and Los Angeles Elec-
tric cars, or Terminal
K.v. cars.

THE OSTRICH FARM AT SOUTH PASADENA.

O A I I FO R N I A O U R I OS Polished and unpolished shells of all
^ ML ir^niNIM UHD^ varieties found on the Pacific Coast ;
Gem Stones ; Mexican Opals ; Japanese Cats' Eyes ; Orange Wood, plain and
painted ; Pressed Flowers, Ferns and Mosses ; Jewelry made from Coast Shells ;
5x8 Photos, California Scenes, mounted and unmounted. Wholesale and Retail.

E. L. LOVEJOY, 126 W. FOURTH STREET

Mail Orders Solicited. Los Angeles, Cal.

I. T. 7WIHRTIN,..

531 AND 533 S. SPRING ST.

FURNITURE

IUM. OIL CLOTH AND
SOODS.

Largest Household Lines in Southern Cal,





Hair and Silk Floss Mattresses $8,50 and up.



OPEN MOC



SATURDAY



Please mention that you "saw it In the Land of Sunshine."



City
Property



WOOD & CHURCH



Country
Property



«/r nCECD afine ORANGE GROVE of 25 acres close to Pasadena; n acres 25 years

If L UTrLn old, and 8 acres 10 years old ; budded. One inch of water to each ten acres.

There is also a variety of fruit and ornamental trees. Never offered before for less

than $20,000, butowner wants money, and will sell at $11,250. It will pay 15 per cent, on the investment.

We have a fine list of Los Angeles and Pasadena city property ; some are bargains.

Mortgages and Bonds for Sale.

123 S. Broadway, Log Angeles, Cal. Pasadena Office, 16 S. Raymond Ave.




WOODLAWN, THE NEW RESIDENCE TRACT OF LOS ANGELES

Call on Owner for Information, at

319>£ South Broadway, Los Angeles, Cal.

Woodlawn, the residence tract of Los Angeles. Prices, $600, $700, $750, $800 and $1000. This property
an only be obtained from the owner, Thos. McD. Potter, 319^ So. Broadway, Los Angeles, Cal.




DLSIQhiriG AIMM&Q55INC
riR}T (LA» WORK (tomm®-***

044 WEST ffOFITGO STo
(L®3 AWfiELES, <L£Q-o



Please mention that you 'saw it in the Lani> oh Sunshink."



The Land of Sunshine

Contents— October, 1896.

PAQB

The Little Charro frontispiece

Down in the Pass of the Soledad, Jeanie Peet 183

The City of the Cliff, illustrated, Chas. F. Lummis 184

(Southwestern Wonderland Series, VII.)

When Winter Widows all the North (sonnet), E. W. Barnard 191

The Return of Frederic Yates, illustrated 192

Songs of the Navajos, illustrated, Dr. Washington Matthews 196

Jack (poem), Elwyn Irving Hoffman 202

Philopena (story), Henshaw Jones 202

A History of New Mexico 204

The Landmarks Club 206

Ip the Lion's Den, the editor 207

That Which is Written, the editor 210

With Cycle and Camera, illustrated 213



TELEPHONE RED 1475.




fenjfraoing
Company*

?>csig»eriaift
PMo-fci^rawrj



Ijotel



Baltimore «««



Rooms, Parlor and Halls Heated by Steam.
The Electric Cars pass the door.
Buttner & Hnodgrass,

Cor. 7th and Olive Sts., Los Angeles



Authority on

Circulation?

These figures were furnished by the
following publications to the Ameri-
can Newspaper Directory, N. Y.,
prior to April, 1896 :
Daily Times, LosAngeles.aver-

age issue for past year 15,540

Monthly Overland, San Fran-
cisco, exceeding 7,5°ott

Western Monthly, formerly

The Household Journal 7 ,500ft

Dail/ Express, Los Angeles,

average for past year 7031

Daily Herald, Los Angeles,

smallest edition past year.... 6500
Monthly Traveler, S. F., certi-
fied average for past year... 4100
Monthly California Cultivator

Los Angeles, av. past year... 3240
Weekly Sunday World, Los

Angeles, smallest edition 3000

Monthly Rural Californian,

Los Angeles, exceeding 2250

Weekly Investor, Los Angeles,

smallest edition 1000

Daily Record, L. A., not rated
Monthly Resources of Califor-
nia, exceeding 400

Weekly Capitol, LA. not rated
Daily Hotel Gazette, Los An-
geles, smallest edition 292

tt Accuracy questioned by A. N.
Directory.

This Directory credits the Land
of Sunshink with a larger certified
average circulation than any of the
above publications, with the excep-
tion of the L. A. Times ; while the
annuals about to be issued by Lord
& Thomas, Chas. F. Fuller, and N.
W. Ayer & Son, show that the
smallest issue of the Land of Sun-
shine during the twelve months
Ereceeding and inclusive of Septem-
er, 1896, was 8,000.



Please mention that you "saw it in the Land of Sdnshinb."



50,000 ACRE6 OP LAND FOR SALE

SUBDIVIDED TO SUIT

IN SAN LUIS OBISPO AND SANTA BARBARA
COUNTIES

Suitable for Dairying, Fruit and Vegetable Growing. Climate perfect, Soil fertile, Water abundant,
$15.00 to $50.00 per acre. Terms to suit. Don't buy until you see
this part of California.
For further Information apply to :

PACIFIC LAND COMPANY (Owners)

SAN LUIS OBISPO, CALIFORNIA



(~*T A OO Book Binders,

ULAOO Blank Book Manufacturers



& LONG 2I32I5New

Tel. Main 535



Souvenir, Pamphlet and Catalogue Work

A SPECIALTY.



Los Angeles.



union phoio. Ens. go. 1



21/3 S. BROADWAY

LOS ANGELES



$10



PER ACRE

FOR FINE LANDS

IN THE



$10



FANITA RANCHO

EL CAJON VALLEY



1669 Acres for
1420 Acres for



. $18,000
- $12,000

Smaller Tracts for $30 to $80 per acre.

WILL GROW ANYTHING.

This property is twelve miles from the city of
San Diego and two miles from Cuyamaca Rail-
road. It belongs to the estate of Hosmer P.
McKoon, and will be sold at the appraised value.

For further information address

FANNIE M. McKOON, EXECUTRIX.

Santee, San Diego Co., Cal.



rmjnaLANTERNs wanted amm




Views, Portraits, and Everything for
Illustrative Purposes. Original Designs
for Posters and Cover Plates.



inj\ruTnjTjTJTjiruTJTjTjaruTJTjxr^^ ruTXurruiJTJT.iJTJxnjxRjajTJAJxrj



RETIRING

From the

FURNITURE

BUSINESS

furniture

J and Carpets**



duuinrmsiTLnru



/T^ONTEM PLATING to keep an exclusive
\§) Carpet and Drapery House I have de-
cided to close out my entire stock of
Furniture at cost, and during this sale I will
offer Carpets and other floor coverings at a
little above cost; this will enable you to
furnish your house at the very lowest prices.
This furniture comprises all the leading
makes and different woods, such as Solid
Mahogany, Curly Birch, Bird's-eye Maple and
Oak, manufactured by the leading manu-
facturers at Grand Rapids, Chicago, Cincin-
nati, New York and Boston. All first-class
and offered to you at cost.

W. S. ALLEN

332 and 334 South Spring Street
LOS ANGELES. CAL.



o
o

b
o
o

b
o



1 I

UTJTJXTlJXriJXI UXrUTJTJTTtJTJ UXflJ^^
Please mention that you 'saw it in the Land of Sonshinr •




MMurd-Collier Eag Co.



Photo, by Lorenso Beoerril,
THE LITTLE CHARRO.




Vol. 5 No. 5.



LOS ANGELES



OCTOBER, 1896.



Down in the Pass of the Soledad.



BY JEANIE PEET.



Down in the pass of the Soledad, a hundred years ago,
The trees held court, in an open glade, by a murmuring river's flow.
The judge was there in his robes of state ; the witnesses were seen ;
The jury stood up like forms of fate, all in their waving green.

The herald winds, on the mountain wall, summoned the court; and then
Was heard the echoing clash and call of the discord made by men.
Gifted with powers that gods might wield, cursed with a cruel pride,
A band of Indians swept the field; and man had come to be tried.

With softly solemn, relentless voice, the judge, when all was heard,
In charging the jury, left no choice. " Guilty," the foreman's word.
The sentence spoken was exile swift ; done was the Indians' day.
The wind came down through the mighty rift, and swept their traces
away.
*********

The years convene, and the court is there. Over the lonely scene
Vasty fleeces, the shepherd's care, wander, the hills between.
They, too, vanish ; a mirage strange — come and gone like a thought.
And nature waits for a further change, where an eden lies unsought.

" Oyez ! Oyez ! " The swift winds roam. " Come into court! " they cry.
" The tiny homestead cabins have come, under the cloudless sky."
The green trees wave with a murmur deep, granting to man their shade.
Man shall be helped to sow and reap, till his heavens of home are made.



Copyright 1896 by Land of Sunshine Pub. Co.




x8 4 LAND OF SUNSHINE

Still on the changing scene they gaze. Still in their robes they'll stand
When even our children's children's da\s are done in the pleasant land-
All must pass into Time's exile ; but — if the court may please —
Let us tarry, one summer's while, under Ravenna's trees!

HaroM. Cal

THE SOUTHWESTERN WONDERLAND.
V

VII. The City of the Cliff.

BY CHARLES F. LUMM1S.

F Acoma remains as fresh and fascinating a theme to
the reader as to the writer who has described it in
so many chapters, then no pardon need be asked
for this brief review — particularly as herewith are
given several unique illustrations, never before
published, of the most picturesque town in the
world. After scores of visits I find it more interest-
ing than ever ; and no visit has ever failed to dis-
close some new wonder and enchantment.

Acoma lies in the county of Valencia, in western New Mexico, a
dozen miles south of the Atlantic & Pacific Railroad. It may be reached
from several stations ; but the feasible way for the average tourist is'to
alight from the train at Laguna (where he will also see a very interesting
though modern pueblo ; a daughter of Acoma, founded in 1699) and get
Kirsch to provide transportation. The trip is a perfectly safe one ; but
it is wise to be companioned by someone who knows the country.
With a proper guide, plenty of lunch, and two days' time (if possible),
one can have very inexpensively an experience unique in a lifetime.

Fraj - Marcos of Niza, the heroic Franciscan who discovered New
Mexico — and whose only detractors are prophets of their own ignorance —
heard of Acoma in 1539 as Ahacus: The native name was and still is
Ah-co; Acoma being a Spanish form. The first Europeans who saw
this wonderful spot were Francisco Vasquez Coronado, the greatest of
North American explorers, and his little army, in 1540. And from that
astonishing expedition of his which 356 years ago overran so many
thousands of trackless leagues in what is now United States, we have
the first descriptions of the peerless city of the rock. I say " peerless "
not careless^. No other human habitations are so nobly situated ;
and there are only two places on earth (one in "the Saxon Switzerland"
and one in the Deccan) which at all compare with it, except the high-
perched pueblos of Moqui. These are remotely in the same class ; but
none of them rival it in grandeur or in wildness. Knowing every
extraordinary townsite in the New World, one comes back to Acoma as
strangest and most splendid of them ail.

From the eastern slope of the Continental Divide the vast sandstone
blanket which gives the Southwest a formation unique in the|world, mak-
ing it the land of mesas, is cut by winding canons. Between them —
and made by them — are the characteristic "tables;" flat-topped, cliff-




Mausard-Collier Eng Co.



A TRAIL TO ACOMA.

(Mesa Encantada in the distance. ]



Fhoto. by C. F. Li



iS6 LAND OF SUNSHINE.

sided, from a few rods square to many miles on a side. Where two of
these erosion-clefts from the Black Mesa come together like forks of a
river to form a mightier stream, is one of the typical valleys of New
Mexico. Eight or ten miles long, a mile to two miles broad, hemmed
on either side by bright-colored and fantastically-eroded sandstone pre-
cipices 500 to 1000 feet high ; its trough-like floor, smooth to the eye
with distance and soft with the mossy gramma grass ; and all bathed in
that ineffable atmosphere which is half dream and half mirage — it seems
an enchanted valley if ever human eyes have looked upon anything
that can deserve those words. Especially from some commanding look-
out when the evening light is low, it is so unearthly in its beauty as no
other spot I have ever seen in the three Americas. And noblest of all,
in that matchless view, are the strange, tall, ghostly forms that seem to
march with lengthening shadows down that magic valley — the fantastic
buttes, mesas, and spires that stand rear-guard of the ages.

Chief of these — and the noblest single rock in America — is Katzimo,
the Enchanted Mesa ; a superb bulk of colored sandstone, nine hundred
feet high and over a mile in circumference. It is the most perfect type
of a mesa, and has a most romantic history. It was the earlier Acoma ;




L.A. Ene Co ACOMA FROM THE WEST. Photo, by C F. Lmnmis

and on the summit of its tremendous cliff the eagle town of the Quires
nested. Until the great ladder- rock — a fragment detached from the
cliff and resting against it — fell during a great flood. The people were
planting in the valley when their pueblo was thus snatched a thousand
feet above their reach ; all but three women, who perished in the lofty
town. Since that day (sometime in the middle ages) no human foot has
trodden the summit of the Mesa Encantada.

Acoma today occupies a townsite not so lofty but even more pictur-
esque. Three miles south of the Mesa Encantada is the most splendid
specimen of fantastic erosion on this continent. An "island " in the
air ; a rock with overhanging sides nearly 400 feet high, seventy acres
in area on the fairly level top, indented with countless great bays,
notched with dizzy chasms, flanked by vast buttresses so sheer Assyrian
in their chance carving bv the rain that one could believe the builders
of Nineveh had learned their trade here, so labyrinthine in its peri-
meter that no man will find the last word of it — and I, who may safely
claim to know it better than any other white, do not feel that I half
know it — it is a rock wonderland worth crossing the world to study,
even if it had no other attributes.



THE CITY OF THE CLIFF



187




L. A. Eng Co. Copyright 1890 by C. F. Lummis.

THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF ACOMA.

But it has. On its top stands a town which in artistic charm, ethno-
logic interest and romantic history together, has no peer.

The pueblo of Acoma is three vast parallel terraced blocks, each block
nearly a thousand feet long, and looking for all the world, from a little
distance, as if carved from the bedrock. It is one of the most perfect
types still remaining of the prehistoric Pueblo architecture ; three
stories high, with the blank back walls of the old defensive scheme —
and even in front, modern security and the nudgings of convenience
have caused the breaking of but few first stories with doors and windows.
Most of the houses remain of the type invented when every house must
be a fort, as well as every town a Gibraltar. One climbed a dozen feet
to his first roof, and pulled the ladder up at night ; lived in the second
and third stories, and used the ground floor as a cellar, reached only by
a trap-door in a room of the second story. Against enemies armed only
with bows and arrows, this sort of architecture was a very fair defense.
And it is eloquent of the danger that walked in darkness and the de-
struction that wasted at noonday, in those old times, to see — in all the




**'**** -:3



188 LAND OF SUNSHINE.

length and breadth of the hundreds of thousands of square miles over
which the Pueblos ranged in different ages — how comfort had to be
sacrificed for safety. Nothing but the eagle ever sought such inacces-
sible e3 T ries as these victims of their own civilization. Because they
were farmers instead of free-booters, because they had homes instead of
being vagrants, they were easy to find ; and thej T were the prey of a
hundred nomad tribes. It was only b3^ their wonderful system of forti-
fied townsites and homes that they held their own. To this day Acoma
goes half a mile for water, and anj-where from two to fifteen miles to
the cornfield. That of the prehistoric times in New Mexico was the
most precarious farming in human history ; and only the patience that
is always a part of the patriarchal organization, supplemented by the
greater patience that is learned by those for centuries beleaguered, could
have held to their little corn and squash-patches these first American
farmers. It was the stone hoe in the right hand, the bow and arrow in
the left ; and in the long run the scratchlike furrows drank a richer and
redder irrigation than came from the little acequias. Sometimes it was
the painted Apache who fell in his raid ; and sometimes the Pueblo
farmer who came to fertilize his own field, while his topknot (and
thereby his virtues) went to enrich the pirates of the plains.

In front of, and some hundreds of yards apart from, the houses of
Acoma stands the huge old church, a miracle at once of faith and labor.
It is not the original temple of the new God here — founded by Fray
Juan Ramirez, the Apostle of the Acomas, in 1629. That stood a little
nearer the town, and was destroyed in the terrible Pueblo Rebellion of
1680, when the gentle missionary Fray Lucas Maldonado was butchered
by his flock. The present structure dates from about 1700. Every
grain of its enormous bulk was brought up the precipice from the
plain ; its forty-foot timbers, fourteen inches square, came twenty miles
from Mt. San Mateo by man-power ; its gravej-ard — a stone- walled box
200 feet square, and forty-five feet deep at the outer edge — is filled with
earth brought up the same wild trails on patient backs. And for that
matter the infinite tons of earth and stone which compose the houses of
600 people came by the same way.

When one knows the approaches to Acoma, the inconceivable labor
which built this skyward town begins to be guessed at. During the
present generation a trail has been built, up which horses come ; but
that did not count in the construction of Acoma. Before it, the several
trails which crept up by toe-holes in various clefts of erosion were not
just the thing for the average tourist. Only two American women
have ever traversed any of the serious trails up that cliff; and on
the very easiest of them all — the famous Camino del Padre, by which
Fray Ramirez made his ascent in the face of a hail of arrows — I have
had almort to carry educated American men. The most picturesque of
these stone ladders are the one just southeast of the church, and the
one of which a glimpse is shown on page 1S5. The latter has been
long deserted, after many fatalities ; and since erosion has smoothed

* So photographically described in Bandelier's historical novel The Delight Makers.



THE CITY OF THE CLIFF.



1S9



off many of the tiny "steps," no human being has traversed its whole
dizzy course in many years.

The shape of the mesa is' that of a pair of eyeglasses. The southern




190



LAND OF SUNSHINE



*\



oval is unoccupied, but is much visited — since here is the chief water-
supply, a beautifully picturesque rainwater reservoir in the living rock.
And on this same cliff, but never seen by half a dozen white men, is a
perfect cliff-dwelling which faces the rising sun.

At about the neck which joins the two mesas — the bow of the eye-
glasses — is the spot where Vicente de Zaldivar with less than 70 men
stormed Acoma, and where the soldier- poet Gaspar de Villagran made
his heroic leap, on the 22d of January, 1599. It was the most wonder-



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