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Oh 930 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa.




Please mention that you " saw it in the Land of Sunshine. ,!



Ca -



City
Property

WE OFFER



WOOD & CHURCH



Country
Property

a fine ORANGE GROVE of 25 acres close to Pasadena ; n acres 25 years

old, and 8 acres 10 years old ; budded. One inch of water to each ten acres.

There is also a variety of fruit and ornamental trees. Never offered before for less

than $20,000, but owner wants money, and will sell at $11,250. It will pay 15 percent, on the investment.

We have a fine list of Los Angeles and Pasadena city property ; some are bargains.

Mortgages and Bonds for Sale.

123 S. Broadway, Los Angeles, Cal. Pasadena Office, 16 S. Raymond Ave.

HOTEL GREEN, Pasadena, Cal.




J. H. HOLMES, Manager



THE LARGEST

MOST MODERN

and BEST APPOINTED

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baths. Gardens, conservatory, orchestra,
etc. Centrally located in Pasadena, SO
minutes from Los Angeles by three
lines of steam railway. Pasadena and Los
Angeles Electric Cars pass the door
every fifteen minutes.



qjiru-Ln



o
o

a

o
o
o

o
o



/T^ONTEMPLATING to keep an exclusive !
vi2/ Carpet and Drapery House I have de- ]

cided to close out my entire stock of
Furniture at cost, and during this sale I will TTT

offer Caipets and other floor coverings at a ^^

little above cost; this will enable you to
furnish your house at the very lowest prices.
This furniture comprises all the leading
makes and different woods, such as Solid
Mahogany. Curly Birch, Bird's-eye Maple and
Oak, manufactured by the leading manu-
facturers at Grand Rapids, Chicago, Cincin-

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HI II 1 1 M I V am j offered to you at cost.

and Carpets***



RETIRING

From the

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LOS ANGELES. CAL.
rmrjjuTjijmjuTJTJT raTrLru UTJTajinjTr\JUTJTjTruqru^irLfi^

" Tempting prices without quality are
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For reliable
quality and good
values in





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H. JEVNE



MOST ELEGANT

AND COMPLETELY STOCKED

GROCERY ON THE COAST



208=210 S. SPRING STREET



Please mention that you 'saw it in the Land ok Sunshine.*



The Land of Sunshine

Contents— November, 1896.

PAGE

Southwestern Types ; A Pueblo Cacique frontispiece

The Line Rider (poem), Florence E. Pratt 221

The Ghost of the Quivira (illustrated), Chas. F. Lumrnis 222

(Southwestern Wonderland Series.)

The Santa Barbara Islands (illustrated), Homer P. Earle 227

Fire in the Sierra Madre (illustration) 231

Old Spanish L,avaderos (illustrated), Juliette E. Mathis 233

The Oldest Californian (with portrait), Edith Wagner 234

A Chinese Feud (story), Sui Seen Far 236

Songs of the Navajos, John Comfort Fillmore 238

Our November (poem), Julia Boynton Green 242

Fires in the Sierra, Abbot Kinney 242

The Landmarks Club 244

In the Lion's Den (by the editor) 245

That Which is Written (by the editor) 248



ACRES 0P LAND FOR SALE

SUBDIVIDED TO SUIT

IN SAN LUIS OBISPO AND SANTA BARBARA
COUNTIES

Suitable for Dairying, Fruit and Vegetable Growing. Climate perfect, Soil fertile, Water abundant
$15.00 to $50.00 per acre. Terms to suit. Don't buy until you see
this part of California.
For further Information apply to:

PACIFIC LAND COMPANY (Owners)

SAN LUIS OBISPO, CALIFORNIA

See illustrated aiticle in this magazine.



A TOUR TO CALIFORNIA IS NOT COMPLETE WITHOUT SEEING



mM^S




A Branch of the Nor-
walk Ostrich Farm—

THE OLDEST
AND LARGEST

in America.

An O-t licit Feather
Boa or Coll arctic,
made from the local
product, makes a
pleasing and useful
souvenir of the Golden
State.

Take the Pasadena
and Los Angeles Elec-
tric cars, or Terminal
Ky. cars.



THE OSTRICH FARM AT SOUTH PASADENA.



that you " saw it in the Land of Sonshine."



Fishers Music House



427 SOUTH BROADWAY



LOS ANGELES, CAL.




world renowned SOHMER PlANOS



-SOLE AGENCY



tiv:




MauMU-d-Collier Eng. Co.



Copyright 1895 by C. F. Lummu.



SOUTHWESTERN TYPES



— A CACIQUE OF THE PUEBLOS.




THE LANDS OF







r 'vkv3«»ifi


THE LAND OF<*©g

sunshine!











Vol. 5 No. 6.



LOS ANGELES



NOVEMBER, 1



The Line Rider.

BY FLORENCE EVELYN PRATT.

Over the mesa, 'neath the milk-white moon,
Leisurely riding through the wonder-night,
Went Sanderson, line-rider, full of dreams
Of young Dolores, sweetest of brown maids.
(Something lies hidden in the coyote* grass).

Only a month ago those cation walls
Moon-white, beheld a shadowy train wind down —
Contrabandista, laden with mescal ;
Pepe their chief, exultant, almost home.
(Something lies sullen in the coyote grass).

Apache rumors had preceded them,

Herding white settlers homeward. Sanderson,

Frontier-wise, watched the canny Mexicans,

Saw them untroubled ; couched, and got his prey.

(Something lies vengeful in the coyote grass).

Musing, his firm mouth smiling now and then
With reminiscent tenderness, he rode,
Unheeding how that Pepe had fled unscathed,
Until his horse, snorting and trembling, shied —
(A sudden spring from out the coyote grass ! )

O brown Dolores ! musing 'neath the moon
That floods the homely old adobe walls,
Ask Pepe, when he comes to you tonight,
Whose horse he rides ? what makes his dagger dark
(Something lies silent in the coyote grass ! )




*Co-y6h-ty.

New York, N. \



•Copyright 1896 by Land of Sunshine Pub. Co.




222

THE SOUTHWESTERN WONDERLAND.

VIII. The Ghost of the Quivira.

BY CHAS. F. LUMMIS.

HE most romantic and remarkable ruin in the United
States is that of the spectral and long-forgotten
"city" which is the last resting place of the most
famous myth in North America, the myth of the
Quivira.* There are larger ruins on this continent
(though none within our national borders), and some
handsomer. But no other is so ghostly in look, nor
the grave of so many centuries of golden hopes.

The myth of the Quivira originated in 1540, in
the pueblo of Pecos, N. M. — itself a ruin now.
Just then Francisco Vasquez de Coronado — having explored from the
Grand Canon of the Colorado to the Rio Grande — had come there.
The Pecos, to be rid of him, procured a Pawnee captive to tell him of
the Quivira, a fabulous city of gold far to the northeast. Coronado made
an astounding march in pursuit of this will-o'-the-wisp ; overrunning
what is now the Indian Territory and Kansas, to about where Kansas
City stands today. He proved the myth a lie in the very year of its
invention ; for he found the Quivira — the tepees of a Teton tribe of
nomad, buffalo-tagging savages, absolutely ignorant of the precious
metals. But though strangled so young, the Quivira fable is not dead
yet. Even sober Onate, the founder of New Mexico, more than half a
century later, chased the golden bubble ; and so did many others in the
two centuries following. And more Americans believe today in the
fable than ever Spaniards did. I have known a man to start from Los
Angeles on this fool's errand within twelve months.

In these 365 years, however, the locus of the myth has shifted from
the eastern edge of Kansas a matter of 800 miles — clear down to the




Mansard-Collier Eng.Co. THE aHO ST OF THE QUIVIRA. Co PT r



THE GHOST OF THE QUIVIRA.



223




Mausard-Collier Eng. Co



Copyright 1S01 by C. F. Lumn



THE CONVENT, TABIRA.

center of New Mexico; and there it has halted for good. It will never
move again — for no other place is so' fitting. And doubtless it will
never perish, since fools will never cease.

For something like a century, now, the name " Gran Quivira" (Great
Quivira) has been applied to the wonderful ruins "which are the subject
of this article. It is of course a stupidity out of whole cloth ; another
case where sheepherders and gold-crazy vagabonds have been permitted
to make what we are pleased to call history. Not only has this spot not
the remotest connection with anything distantly related to the Quivira ',
but it is a town so historic and so unmistakable that only ignorance
could have misnamed it. It is the City that was Forgotten — till a his-
torian came along with common-sense. Namely, Bandelier.

From the valley of the Rio Grande at Alburquerque you see close on
the east the long range of 10,000-foot peaks which begin with the San-




224



LAND OF SUNSHINE.




dias and stretch far to the south,
shutting off from the valley the
boundless great plains. You can
go by carriage or horse, through
Tijeras Canon and the hamlets of
Chilili, Taiique and Manzano, a
long, hard, interesting ride ; but
you will do well not to go without
a guide, and you must carry, the
last day going, water for your
animals as well as for yourself.

On your right is the great
mountain wall, on this side send-
ing down to your very path the
vanguard of its noble armies of
pines. On your left, the plains
stretch brown to the very sun-
rise. Far down them glitter the
Accursed Lakes, where millions
of buffalo drank till the gods
blasted the waters to saltness, in
anger at a treachery (so the
Pueblo folk-lore says). For cen-
turies they have been the natural
salt-works of the aborigines and
Mexicans for more than a hundred miles.

The little Mexican towns are interesting — in one, at least, you may
seethe Penitente* processions — and your itinerary will naturally in-
clude the superb ruins of Abo and Cuaray.t And from Punta de Agua
you come down into the strange, hushed, grassy loneliness of the plain ;
with solitary junipers, and shadow-like antelope drifting into your ken
and out.

Toward evening, when the unearthliness of the whole scene has so
penetrated that you feel that nothing could be incredible — then of a






Eng Co. Drawn hy A. T. BaDdelier.

PLAN OF THE GREAT CHURCH.




• *■»*• °° THE MISSION OF TABIRA. ">Pjrright 1891 b, C P. Lommis.

«See the May, '96, number of this magazine. tKwah-r_y«r.




A PORTAL IN TiR'^A.

(With arabesque lintel.)



Copyright 1S91 by C. F. Lureti



226



LAND OF SUNSHINE



sudden you fall upon a sight which you simply would not have believed
if you had seen it three days before. Even now, though you no longer
call your eyes a liar, you can hardly take their first word for it. For up
on yonder smooth, brown whale-back ridge stands the Ghost of the
Quivira* There is nowhere else in the world such a spectre city.
Especially when you view it from the higher ground to the east, at dawn
or evening twilight, the illusion is perfect. It is a ghost.

This was, 300 years ago, Tabira — a town of the Tompiros tribe of the
Pueblo Indians. It was discovered by Chamuscado in 1581; seen by
Espejo in 1582; officially visited and its submission received by Onate in
1598. September 9, 1598, Fray Francisco de San Miguel became the
missionary of this pueblo; and about 1628 the first church was built. Its
ruins are still visible. Before 1650 a new church and a convent were
reared — and it is this huge building of grey stone, 202 feet front and
131 feet deep, with its great cruciform temple, its maze of rooms and
passages, its arabesque-carved lintels (unspoiled by two centuries' expos-
ure to the weather) its ponderous walls, that has been the great mystery




L A. Kng. Co. Copyright 1891 by C. F.

THE RUINS FROM THE SOUTHWEST.

to the unread shepherd and prospector. They have gophered the walls
and dug a hundred feet in the bedrock for buried treasure ; and the tales
that are current of subterranean rivers, caves full of diamonds, vaults
bursting with gold, would put the Arabian Nights to the blush. To
persons of ordinary intelligence it seems needless to say that there never
was any treasure of any sort in any of these old Mexican missions —
except the treasures of heroic faith.

Between 1670 and 1675 the Apaches wiped out Tabira, and it has never
since been occupied. Its survivors fled to El Paso ; and their dwindling
descendants live near there to this day.

The communal many-storied houses of the pueblo are now little more
than tousled mounds of stone, with here and there a room amid the
wreck. But the great roofless temple, little shorn of its first stature,
breached here and there but invincible still, faces the dumb sunlight,
careless of Time. It stands for an age of chivalry and adventure and
finding out, whose very swineherds could not have understood a sort
of Americans too trivial to go to see the most fascinating ruin in America
north of the tropic of Cancer.

*For a full description see The Land of Poco Tiempo (Scribners), Chap. XI.



The Santa Barbara Islands.

BY HOMER P. EARLE.




©p'



fHE coast of Southern Califor-
nia from Point Concepcion
to Point Rincon lies east
and west, and then bends to the
southeast ; despite the prevailing
belief that one must sail west to
reach the abrupt islands off Santa
Barbara, Ventura and San Pedro.
There could hardly be a more in-
teresting cruise, so readily made in
American waters, than that to the
Channel islands.

Beating up the coast from San
Pedro, the first island visited by our
party was Anacapa, not quite four
miles long and not quite iooo feet in
elevation, and smallest of the group
except the insignificant island of
Santa Barbara. Its extreme narrow-
ness and the striking razor-edge of
its ridge add to its apparent height.
The east end is brilliantly white
with the deposits of sea birds ; other-

Uiiion Eng. Co. Photo, by Brewster, Ventura. wise the Coloring is UUUSUally dark.

sand erosion, san nicolas. T k e bold, black contour, the savage
attack of the breakers on the misshapen rocks give an impression of
grim solitude ; but at a rifle-shot, the air is suddenly darkened by an
astounding swarm of pelicans, gulls and shags, and filled with thousands
of harsh cries.

Anacapa is uninhabited, unless one counts campers and the Chinamen
who spend a part of the year there in a tent amid piles of iridescent
abalone shells and square yards of the evicted tenants, drying in the sun,
to be shipped to Chinatown.

Santa Cruz, west of Anacapa, is a magnificent island nearly twenty
miles long and the most extensive in area of all, though Catalina is a
mile and a half longer. Its highest peak reaches 2407 feet, much the
greatest elevation in the group, seconded by Catalina with 2000 feet.
None of the other islands look so inviting ; the hills are nowhere bare
and bleak like the crags of Anacapa or the sand dunes of San Nicolas,
and often proffer shade and bosky quiet, as at Prisoner's Harbor.

The island is owned by Justinian Caire, of Oakland, who has made it
more than a magnificent estate, a veritable patriarchy — especially inter-
esting at shearing time in April and at the wine-pressing in August and
September, when the force of workmen is swelled by those brought over
from the mainland. Great quantities of wool and wine are annually ex-



THE SANTA BARBARA ISLANDS.



229



ported. Capacious storehouses and cellars are at the main ranch-house ;
there is the green sweep of vines up the hillsides, and multitudes of
sheep are everywhere.

We sailed west along the north shore, a rocky wall of extraordinary
coloring, honeycombed with caves and grottoes, and carved into curious
patterns by the weather. The caves are especially worth exploration.

Santa Rosa and San Miguel, not visited for lack of time, lie west of
Santa Cruz. San Miguel is six and a half miles long and 860 feet high,
with just vegetation to support its sheep, and has no good anchorages.
Santa Rosa is twice as long, almost twice as high, and far more inviting
to the visitor.

Although in geology they do not materially differ, to the ordinary
observer no two of these islands are alike. Anacapa is a brown rock ;
Santa Cruz is yellow with grass and green with trees while the general
color from a distance is dull red. San Nicolas is far the most striking of
all. Thirteen miles long and 890 feet high, hopelessly arid, without
safe anchorages, washed by a tremendous, swell and worn by violent
winds, it is a wonder of beauty and unfriendliness. The brilliant sea,




Commercial Eng Co



MEMORIES OF THE CRUISE.



230 LAND OF SUNSHINE

the bulwarks of black rock, the great white sand-dunes and brown up-
lands, patched with crimson ice-plants, make a memorable combination
of color.

The principal feature of San Nicolas is the result of erosion by sand.
The outcropping sandstone has been worn and carved by the flying sand
into strange terraces, caves and columns. Areas three hundred feet
wide and half a mile long are covered with fragments up to two feet
high, one to six inches through, and only a few feet apart, resembling
elaborately turned table legs, or stalagmites. Sometimes two or three
support a flat rock like a table. Many are hollowed and filled with sand.
It is easy to believe the assertion of the captain that sand has been
blown from these dunes to ships twenty miles away.

From San Nicolas to San Clemente is about 60 miles east-southeast,
and there at Gallagher's Landing we next cast anchor. Yellowish
brown, waterless, treeless and shrubless throughout its length of nine-
teen miles and its height of 870 feet, it has withal a large population of
sheep who satisfy their thirst by chewing the ice-plant. Tom Gallagher
and Peter Jensen live with the sheep, and Gallagher has an unbroken
record of thirty -one years here. Chinese fishermen cast their nets and
hunt the abalone ; and an occasional boat brings supplies to the two
inhabitants.

The only remaining island, besides little Santa Barbara, is Santa Cata-
lina, notable for its beauty and diversity of landscape and most popular
as a resort, and already many times described.

All this group plunge boldly into the sea and the water about
them becomes suddenly deep. It is also surprisingly clear, and one of
the most enchanting sights of the cruise was a peep into the gorgeous
aquaria, wherein the business and pleasures of the delicately tinted fish
may be studied at leisure.

Fishing is good everywhere and adapted to any temperament — the
placidity of the seeker after rock bass or the adventurous spirit of the
townsman who would capture a tuna or a jew fish. The barracuda is a
graceful acrobat and easily turns a somersault complex enough to sadden
the professional tumbler. It is inspiring to watch a school of porpoises
toiling through the sea in eager leaps and plunges, forging ahead in a
dense column of several hundred and making a roar like a waterfall.
A whale now and then raises its huge maj>s partly out of the water and
blows a geyser into the air with an uncanny snort. The sociable seal,
so human in many of its ways, barks cheerfully as it looks up a luncheon
aud bathes not far from members of the party.

Aside from the natural pleasures of such a trip, the curio collector has
a further incentive. Mortars, jars, arrow-heads, mace-heads, etc., are to
be found on nearly every island, together with the bones of those who
shaped them. To some of our party the discovery of these was the
main object of the voyage ; they were rewarded with skulls dug out of
the sand and with various kinds of heavy stoneware characteristic of
the races that once populated this group. It would be interesting to
know which eyes will have looked on these islands to the best advantage;
those now gone from those dry sockets, or ours.

Lot Angeles.




Mausard-Collier Eng. Co. A FOREST FIRE IN THE SIERRA MADRE.




Mausard-Collier Km. Co.



BABY BUNTING.



Photo, by Cobb. Albuquerque, N. M.



233



Old Spanish Lavaderos.'




conveniences had
"stationary tubs



By JULIETTE ESTELLE MATHIS.

EAUTIFUL, but now mostly vanished with other
traces of the earlier and simpler domestic life in
this favored land of the open air, are the quaint
washing-wells and rubbing-stones of brick or
hollowed rock, contiguous to the running springs
and arroyos beneath the breezy branches of fruit-
trees, willows or giant alisos. In the pleasant
pastoral times that are no more, before modern
usurped their important office, these sylvan
were part of the economy of every household.



They formed effective stage-setting for many animated and attractive




THE OLD LAVADSRO



Commercial Eng Co.

scenes. The pretty lavandera, with round, bared arms and brown eyes,
limpid as the shadowed well whereby she knelt, too busy at her legitimate
occupation, limpiando la ropa, to notice the stealthy approach of her
novio, found herself clasped and kissed before she could forbid the
butterfly adorer'who was off and away too swiftly to catch the richly
deserved, but badly aimed, rebuke she flung after him. And here
groups of women knelt and scrubbed and slapped the soapy linen upon
the rock, and laughed and gossiped as people could at their work in
those patriarchal times.

The illustration shows the lost lavaderos in the historic de la Guerra
gardens at Santa Barbara, used by numerous generations in the past.
For many years the spring that fed them was used as the domestic sup-
ply by various families in the neighborhood ; but it has finally been
utilized by the local water company. The lavaderos were buried under
the debris of the new water plant. To reward my explorations another
set, not quite so elaborate as these, was discovered in the lower side of



234



LAND OF SUNSHINE



the inclosure toward the sea. They serve as drinking pools now* for
feathered folk and quadrupeds only ; the main body of the water hav-
ing been diverted. A large weeping willow waves near them ; and old
fig, olive, orange, peach, pear and pomegranate trees are growing
irregularly about.

These gardens once covered many acres devoted to orchard, vineyard
and vegetables. They have been partially cut up into town blocks; but
not all. The lower end, toward the foothills, terminates in a willow-
marsh, whose waters, fed by the overflow and the winter "rains, find
their way out through the estero to the Santa Barbara Channel. We
are very modern, now ; but one sometimes sighs for the picturesque and
happy era when the lavadero held its own and even wash-day was a
pleasant function.

Santa Barbara, Cal.



The Oldest Calieornian.

BY EDITH WACNER.

LD Gabriel, chief of a now extinct tribe of Tulare
Indians, died six years ago in Salinas, Monterey
county, California, at the reputed age of 151
years. He left his tribe and had been living at
Carmelo for a number of years before Fray Juni-
pero Serra came to Monterey. At the time of
the landing of the Franciscan Fathers Gabriel
was a grandfather. Marrying at fifteen he could
have been a grandfather at thirty-two. He was,
it is claimed, Father Junipero's first convert in
that region ; and with tears streaming down his
time-scarred face he told Father Sorrentini of his
baptism whence he had received the name of
Gabriel 120 years before.

Father Sorrentini, the priest of Salinas, took a
great interest in the lonely old Indian who had
come down from another century. He preserved with care everything
relating to Gabriel and was firmly convinced of his unparalleled age.

The Mission Indians were taught trades by the missionaries. Gab-
riel's was stone cutting and stone laying. In the twilight of his life he
used to tell with great pride of his skill as a workman.

Father Serra erected a chapel of adobe where now stands San Carlos
Mission, and old Gabriel used to give minute details concerning its
building. Taking along his little band of trained workers, Father Juni-
pero also built the Soledad and San Antonio Missions. The records show
that Gabriel was with these founders. And he himself, before these
records were examined, used to describe the, to him, eventful journey.

Many old people remember him as ancient when they were children.
Senora Munras who died at ninety affirmed that the old Indian had
grandchildren older than she. Senora Castro who died at ninety-five re-
membered when a child calling him " Old Gabriel."




EngraviD? Co.
OLD GABRIEL



THE OLDEST CALIFORNIAN. 235

Father Sorrentini came to Monterey with Bishop Amat in 1845. Gab-
riel then was pointed out to them as being Father Serra's first convert.
His sixth wife had then been dead thirty years. In 1883 Father Sorren-
tini administered the last sacrament of the Church to Zacarias a son of
Gabriel's by a third wife. This Zacarias was over a hundred ; and for
years before his death had been more fee"ble in body and mind than his
father.

Gabriel was very abstemious, using neither intoxicating liquors nor
tobacco. For many years before he died he did not bathe but instead



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