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History of Bedford, New Hampshire from 1737: being statistics compiled on the occasion of the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the incorporation of the town, May 15, 1900 online

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BERKELEY

IBRARY

NIVERSITY OF
CALIFORNIA



y



HISTORY



OF



BEDFORD

New Hampshire

Prom 1737

Being Statistics Compiled on the Occasion of the

One Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary

of the Incorporation of the

Town, May 15, 1900



fie^U^JL } V), U,



PUBLISHED BY THE TOWN



CONCORD, N. H.

THE RUMFORD PRINTING COMPANY

1903



LOAN STACK



$3/332;



Notice by the Publishing Committee.

1850.



The undersigned, having completed the labors assigned them,
present to the inhabitants of Bedford this volume, illustrative of
their past history. They gratefully acknowledge the cooperation in
this work of the citizens generally, and their cheerful assistance in
collecting materials, furnishing information, and fixing dates. The
committee have also availed themselves of the town books, grave-
yard inscriptions, records in family Bibles, ancient newspaper and
manuscript journals ; wherever they have resorted to published
works, they have given credit, accordingly, in the proper place.

If under some heads, as the Centennial Celebration and Geneal-
ogies, there may appear to the reader to be too much minuteness of
detail, it should be remembered that what may now seem to be
small items may in fifty or one hundred years hence be of incalcula-
ble importance. The only regret is that such a work was not com-
menced at an earlier period, when much that is now lost was within
the memory of some living. After all their endeavors to attain
accuracy it is feared some errors will be found in dates and names,
as is almost unavoidable in a work like the present. In the order of
arrangement, too, some matter may seem to come in anomalously,
being introduced in one part, when it properly belongs to another
part of the volume. But it was hoped — if the important facts were
given — it would not be viewed of much consequence whether they
were or were not in exactly the right section. But the compilation,
such as it is, is commended to the candor of the community.

Peter P. Woodbi rv.
Thomas Savage.
Y\ t tt.t,tam Patten.



434



Notice by the Publishing Committee.



In accordance with the appointment made pursuant to a vote of
the town, the undersigned undertook the labor of preparing and
publishing a history of the town, which should supplement that pub-
lished in 1851. Their effort has been to produce a book which
might compare favorably with the excellent work of their predeces-
sors. The book is intended to contain all the facts stated in the
earlier edition, as well as such additional items of interest as have
arisen since the publication of the former work.

They have gratefully to mention the assistance of Miss Mary E.
Manning, Miss Martha R. Woodbury, Mrs. Lyman Kinson, Miss
Evelyn Stevens, Mrs. Charles H. Woodbury, and Mr. George C. Gil-
more in the preparation of some of the articles, and to all others
who have shown a sincere interest in this work, they render the
thanks of the town.

To Mr. George W. Fowler of Pembroke they also desire to par-
ticularly express their thanks for the assistance he has rendered them
in their work.

The genealogies have been furnished in most cases by representa-
tives of the families concerned, and except when specified were
compiled by Miss Mary E. Manning.

The illustrations are those of the oldest houses in town, so far as
the committee have been able to ascertain the date of their erection.
They are all pictures of houses built prior to the beginning of the
nineteenth century.

In compiling the article on Fatal Casualties the committee have
endeavored to enumerate all the events which should properly be
described under this head, still some occurrences may not have been
related ; if so the omission is unintentional.

The record of births, deaths, and marriages has been made up
from the town records. They have been followed exactly except in
cases where they have been known to be incorrect.



NOTICE BY THE PUBLISHING COMMITTEE. V

The record of the men of Bedford who enlisted in the army from
other towns than Bedford is necessarily incomplete. ' So far as is
possible all such names have been included, but there were men
born and brought up in Bedford who enlisted elsewhere, and whose
names the committee cannot now ascertain. The numbers on the
map are situated in each school district as follows, inclusive :



District No. 1,


1-76


District No. 6,


235-277


2,


77-108


7,


278-314


3,


109-147


8,


315-348


4,


148-198


9,


349-389


5,


199-234


10,


390-410



The order of arrangement of the present history departs some-
what from that adopted in the former edition of the book, but the
committee has indulged the hope that the change is in the direction
of improvement.

The services of the committee have been voluntary and without
recompense, but the task of compiling and arranging the matter,
while somewhat arduous, has for the most part proved exceedingly
agreeable.

The story of the town's part in the greater work of the state and
nation's history is not fully, cannot be fully, told. It is largely a
silent record of men who cheerfully and promptly performed then-
public and private duties in a spirit of high determination to do well
the work they had set their hands to do.

The reader must be wise enough to see between the lines many
things which are beyond the power of the historian to portray.

Conscious that full justice has not been given to the work com-
mitted to their care, they yet present this book to their fellow-towns-
men in the confident expectation that they will be " to its faults a
little blind, and to its virtues very kind."

That this book may be of aid to coming generations in an appre-
ciation of what their fathers were and did, and that to their fellow-
townsmen it may be a source of interest and improvement, is the
hearty wish of the committee.

John A. Kiddle.
William M. Patten.
Quixoy Bakxard.
Arthur W. Holbrook.
Gordox Woodbury.



Table of Contents.













Page.


Centennial Celebration ... . 1


Address, Isaac 0. Barnes .










7


Festivities of the Occasion










34


Letters Read










59


Historical Notices










72


Topography and Industries










72


Brickmaking










78


Fish and Wild Game










77


Streams and Ponds .










79


Bedford Men of Note










82


Indians on the Merrimack










83


Early Settlement










85


Origin of the Town .










90


Mason and Gorge's Claim










95


First Proprietors











100


Incorporation .










105


The Proprietors' Records










117


Roads, Landings, and Bridges










214


Manchester & Milford Railroad










220


Bridges ....










221


Landings ....










231


Piscataquog Village










232


Industries :












Mills ....






.




238


Tanneries and Cooper Shops










247


Blacksmith Shops










248


Cider Mills










250


Shoemaking










251


Stores ....










252


Spinning and Weaving










254


Pounds .....










266



Vlll



TABLE OF CONTENTS.



Taverns










258


The Church










263


Members, 1850










264


Members, 1904










268


Notes from Records










271


Universalist Society










274


Baptist Society










. 275


Ministry










. 277


Rev. John Houston










281


Rev. William Pickles








294


Rev. David McGregore








298


Rev. Thomas Savage








311


Rev. Arthur Little








320


Rev. Ira C. Tyson .








321


Rev. Daniel H. Colcord








323


Rev. Albert D. Smith








323


Rev. Charles H. Fields








324


Rev. William C. Lindsay








324


Rev. Albert P. Watson








325


The Meeting-house








326


Dedication of New Town Hall




337


Fiftieth Anniversary Church Dedication .


354


One Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary Celebration


355


Address, Rev. Ira C. Tyson


367


Graveyards .....






382


Ministerial Land .










389


Parsonage Association










400


Presbyterian Vestry .










402


Bedford Messenger










404


Music in Bedford










405


Ladies' Social Circle .










412


Schools










417


List of Teachers










433


College Graduates










446


Physicians of Bedford










448


Lawyers of Bedford










462


The French War










466


The Revolutionary War










480


Bedford Men in










498


War of 1812










502



TABLE OF CONTENTS.



IX



Militia










502


The Civil War ....










511


Bedford Men in










515


Spanish- American War










524


Extracts from Records










525


Societies of Bedford :












Agricultural Society










550


Lyceum Association .










552


The Grange










553


Lafayette Lodge of Masons










567


Golden Cross Commandery










568


Library










570


Slavery in Bedford










573


Changes in Manners and Customs










578


Early Settlement in Ohio .










588


Changes in Occupancy of Farms .










592


Fatal Casualties, etc. .










634


Longevity .....










645


Statistics of Taxation .










648


Invoice of 1750










656


1801










658


1850










662


1901










677


Population .....










691


Vital Statistics :












Births ....










694


Marriages










738


Deaths ....










759


Town-meeting ....










783


Boards of Selectmen










784


Town Treasurers










788


Constables . . . .










789


Justices of the Peace










790


Moderators










792


Representatives










793


Town Clerks .










794


Tax Collectors .










794


School Boards .










795


Library Trustees










796


Delegates to Constitutional Con


venti


311 •.






796



TABLE OF CONTENTS.



Town-meeting:

Supervisors of Check-lists
Vote for Governor .

One Hundred and Fiftieth Anniv

Genealogies . .

Addenda ....

The History of 1908 .



ersar



v Celebration



797
797
801
821
si 9, 1129
. 1130



List of Illustrations.



Bedford Center from Bell Hill




Frontispiece.


The Grain Rock .




■ Op]


josite


page 44


The Pulpit








80


Indian Rock








82


The Walker Monument








86


The Old Meeting-house








32*


The New Town House








338


The New Meeting-house








357


The Old Graveyard .








382


Center Graveyard and Vestry








384


Center Graveyard — west view








3K4


Joppa Graveyard








386


South Graveyard








S88


Schoolhouses :










Districts 1 and 2








4 Hi


Districts 3 and 4








422


Districts 5 and 6








428


Districts 7 and 8








434


Districts 9 and 10








440


Old Houses :








Col. Daniel Moore House i


md Moore's Tavern




480


Houston House and Riddle House .




596


Walker House and Chandler House .




608


Hoi brook House (Gilchris


t Tav


ern) and Joppa


Store


626



Centennial Celebration



OF THE



TOWN OF BEDFORD, N. H.



PRELIMINARY ARRANGEMENTS.

Notice was given publicly, by advertisement and from the pulpit,
that a meeting of the inhabitants of Bedford would be held at the
town house on Wednesday, February 7, 1849, to take into consider-
ation the approaching 19th of May, 1850; which completed a cen-
tury from the incorporation of the town. Met according to notifica-
tion.

Voted, Samuel Chandler, chairman of the meeting, and Dr. P. P.
Woodbury, secretary.

After discussing for some time the subject of the call, it was
thought expedient to commemorate the day by a public address, and
such other exercises as may be thought best at some future day.

Voted, That a committee of three be appointed by the chairman
to have the subject brought before the town, by an article in the
warrant for the annual town-meeting, in March next, and address
the citizens on the subject at that time. P. P. Woodbury, Thomas
Savage, and William Patten were appointed this committee.

At the annual March meeting, an article to this effect having been
inserted in the warrant, the subject was presented, and received with
the most cordial feelings by the inhabitants, and it was —

Voted, That they would celebrate the day, and that the same
individuals, P. P. Woodbury, Thomas Savage, and William Patten
be a committee to carry the same into effect.

The committee met at Dr. Woodbury's, March* 23d, 1849. After
consultation it was agreed to direct the following letter :

Bedford, March 23d, 1849.
Isaac O. Barnes, Esq. :

Dear Sir : The undersigned, being a committee appointed by the
town of Bedford, at their last annual town-meeting, to carry into
effect the commemoration of the 19th of May, 1850, — that being
2



Z HISTORY OF BEDFORD.

one hundred years since its incorporation, — we hereby respectfully
invite you to address the inhabitants of Bedford on that occasion.
The materials for such an address are abundant.
Yours respectfully,

Peter P. Woodbury,
Thomas Savage,
William Patten.

Boston, March 27th, 1849.
Gentlemen : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your
letter of the 28d inst., inviting me to be present and address the
inhabitants of Bedford on the 19th of May, 1850, — being the hun-
dredth anniversary of the incorporation of that town.

Although I am highly nattered by the kind partiality which has
prompted you to extend to me this invitation, yet I assure you, gen-
tlemen, I accept with great reluctance and very many misgivings,
because I am very sensible that the committee could have confided
the task to much abler men — natives of our town. Yet, under all
the circumstances, I am constrained to comply with your request,
and will, if I have the ability to do so, be with you on the day pro-
posed, and discharge, as well as I may, the obligation which this call
imposes upon me.

I remain, gentlemen, very respectfully,

Your obedient servant,

Isaac O. Barnes.
Messrs. P. P. Woodbury,
Thomas Savage,
William Patten,

Committee.



MEASURES PREPARATORY TO A HISTORY OF THE

TOWN.

CENTENNIAL.

The inhabitants of Bedford, male an 1 female, are requested to
meet at their town house, Monday, 30th of April, next, at 2 o'clock
p. m., to see what measures shall be adopted to celebrate the 19th
May, 1850.

P. P. Woodbury,
• Thomas Savage,

William Patten,

Committee.

April 30th, 1849. Met agreeably to notice; chose Samuel Chan-
dler, Esq., president, and Dr. P. P. Woodbury, secretary.

Individuals were appointed to prepare genealogical and statistical
accounts, as follows :



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION. 6

To Rodney McLaughlin was assigned the history of the Barron
and Martin families.

Ann Oit, history of the Orr family.

Isaac Riddle, history of the Deacon Aiken family.

Samuel Chandler, history of the Smith family.

Moody M. Stevens, history of the Moore and Elijah Chandler
family.

William P. Riddle, history of the Riddle and Aiken family.

John Goffe, history of the Goffe family.

Joshua Vose, Jr., history of the Vose family.

James Walker, history of the Walker family.

Gardner Xevins, history of the Barnes family.

P. P. Woodbury, history of the Gordon family.

David Atwood, history of the Bell family.

Cyras W. Wallace, history of the Wallace family.

Daniel Moore, history of the Burns family.

Samuel Abbott, history of the Abbott and Rand family.

The above families were thus assigned because they had become
extinct in town, or had no representatives that would feel them-
selves responsible without such assignment.

B. F. Wallace was appointed to prepare a history of Piscataquog
village. The selectmen, in connection with the town clerk, to give
lists of town officers, representatives, population, valuation, taxation,
support of paupers, bridges, etc. Rev. Thomas Savage was
designated to prepare a history of the church and ministry, schools,
etc. P. P. Woodbury, table of physicians. James Walker, table of
attorneys. Adjourned to May 28, 1849.

May 28th, 1849. Met according to adjournment. Chose P. P.
Woodbury, T. Savage, and W. Patten a committee to petition the
selectmen to have the subject brought before the town for their
action.

The subject was brought before the town at their next meeting,
and the town directed the same committee, viz., Woodbury, Savage,
and Patten, to do what they should think best in regard to the con-
templated celebration, calling meetings, making preparations, etc.
Also, the town ordered the selectmen to employ some one to make
a map of the town, by actual survey, and have a lithographic im-
pression of the same, to be attached to the contemplated history of
the town, by the above committee.

The survey was made, and the map drawn by B. F. Wallace, ap-
pearing in the history of 1851.

At their annual meeting the town also voted $800 to meet the
expenses of the publication, the money to be refunded to the town



4 HISTORY OF BEDFORD.

after the sale of the books. At this meeting, also, the town still
directed the above committee to procure and have the necessary
arrangements made for the centennial.

April 28th, 1850. A meeting was called by the chairman of the
committee, at which meeting Samuel Chandler was chosen chair-
man, and James Walker, secretary. Immediate arrangements were
made for the celebration.

The following gentlemen were chosen to act on the occasion :

President of the Day.
PETER P. WOODBURY.

Vice-Presidents.

Thomas Chandler, John McAllister,

Moody M. Stevens, Theodore Goffe,

Samuel Chandler, John Patten,
John French.

Committee of Arrangements.

District No. 1. — Leonard C. French.

2. — Willard Parker and Daniel Moore.

3. — Isaac Darrah and John Patten.

4. — John Adams and Adam Chandler.

5. — Andrew J. Dow and G. W. Riddle.

6. — Joseph H. Stevens.

7. — John Barr.

8. — L. C. French, 2d, and Thomas G. Holbrook.

9. — Charles F. Shepard.
10.— John Goffe.
11.— Elijah C. Stevens.
12. — Gardner Nevins.
13. — Rodney McLaughlin.
14. — James Walker.
Union District. — Simon Jenness.

The 19th of May coming on the Sabbath, it was concluded to
have the celebration on the 22d. It was further decided to supply
the tables with meats and other refreshments, suitable for the occa-
sion, free of expense ; and, also, that the several committees of
arrangements invite all the inhabitants within their respective dis-
tricts to contribute money and provisions for the occasion ; and
further, that the committee of invitations, P. P. Woodbury, T. Sav-
age, and W. Patten, invite all absent friends and natives of the town,
with others, at their discretion. More than three hundred printed
cards of invitation were forwarded, and many more that were writ-
ten.



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION. O

May 22, 1850. The Sabbath previous (the 19th) was a pleasant
and beautiful day. The Monday and Tuesday following were very
rainy, but on the morning of the 22d, the sun rose with all his splen-
dor and beauty, the day was remarkably fine and brilliant, and this
is the more worthy of note, as several days after the 22d were rainy,
causing the remark to be made that Providence seemed to give us
one delightful day among a number that were unfavorable. As
early as 8 o'clock a. m. the people began to assemble. On the Satur-
day previous, the tables, with a platform for the speakers, elevated
about four feet, with an area of twenty feet square, were arranged
on the common immediately south of the town house. It was ex-
pected to attend the exercises of the forenoon in the new Presbyte-
rian church, but, in consequence of the number of people, nearly
3,000, it was found to be impracticable. The procession having
reached Dr. Woodbury's, there received the president of the day,
vice-presidents, orator, chaplain, and committee of arrangements. It
then made a circuit near the church and back to the common, where
the company took their appropriate seats, attended with martial
music. The following is the order of procession, and of the exer-
cises of the day :

BEDFORD CENTENNIAL.
ORDER OF PROCESSION.

The procession will form precisely ,at 10 o'clock, at the Presbyterian

Church.

Aid. Chief Marshal. Aid.

Aid. President of the Day. Aid.

Orator, and Chaplain.

Vice-Presidents, and Readers of the Charters.

Committee of Arrangements.

Invited Guests.

Citizens Generally.



ORDER OF EXERCISES.
I. Voluntary from the Choir.
II. Invocation and Reading of Scripture.

By Rev. Cyrus W. Wallace.
III. Hymn. By Nathaniel Greene, Esq., of Boston.

Read by Rev. James T. Woodbury, of Acton, Mass.

O God, who heard our father's prayer

For liberty and life, —
Who ruled the Elemental war

And shielded them from strife—
To Thee we bend, to Thee we raise,
With grateful hearts, the hymn of praise.



b HISTORY OF BEDFORD.

Thou, whom our fathers fled to serve,

Who didst their steps sustain,
"When they their trembling hearts did nerve

To seek this far domain —
To Thee their children bend, and raise,

With grateful hearts, the hymn of praise.

God of our fathers, hear us now,

Incline Thine ear, we pray,
And mercy to their children show,

Assembled here to-day.
While they, to Thee, attempt to raise,
With grateful hearts, this hymn of praise.

IV. Reading of the Charter for Narragansett No. V.

By James W. Savage, Esq., New York City.
V. Reading of Petition and Town Charter.

By D. B. French, Dartmouth College.
VI. Prayer. By the pastor, Rev. Thomas Savage.

VII. Psalm LXXVIII. Read by Rev. Thomas Savage.

(Tune, " St. Martins." Congregation will unite with the choir.)

Give ear ye children to my law,

Devout attention lend;
Let the instructions of m3' mouth,

Deep in your hearts descend.

My tongue by inspiration taught,

Shall parables unfold,
Dark oracles, but understood

And own'd for truths of God,

Which we from sacred registers,

Of ancient times have known;
And our forefathers'. pious care,

To us has handed down.

Our lips shall tell them to our sons,

And they again to theirs—
That generations yet unborn

May teach them to their heirs.

Thus shall they learn in God alone,

Their hope securely stands—
That they may ne'er forget his works,

But practice his commands.

VIII. Address. By Hon. Isaac O. Barnes, of Boston.
IX. Original Hymn. By Miss Stevens, of Bedford.

Read by Rev. Stephen T. Allen, of New York City.
(Tune, "Lisbon.")

Roll back, thou tide of time,

Nor let thy pace be slow,
To place us where our fathers stood

A hundred years ago.

Theirs was a thorny way,

A rugged path they trod ;
Theirs, too, a noble courage was,

To dare so wild a road.



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION. I

Heroic, brave, and true,

In heaven alone their trust,
Our fathers faced a savage foe,

Nor deemed the act unjust.

The dark and deepening shade

Of forests bending low,
O'er hill and dale was densely spread

A hundred years ago.

To-day with grateful hearts

Their memories we recall-
Commemorate departed worth,

To God ascribing all.

X. Benediction. By Rev. Samuel Abbott, of Antrim, N. H.

ADDRESS.

BY HON. ISAAC O. BARNES.

This is an occasion of unusual interest to all of us. It is an im-
portant epoch, not only in the history of our town corporation, but
of the nation, and even of the world, which can scarcely be passed
in silence, or regarded indifferently. It is a point of time when all
seem inclined to pause and review, as carefully and as much as it
may be done the events of the past.

The end of the present year completes a period of one hundred
years, comprising the last half of the eighteenth and the first half of
the nineteenth centuries; and it may be well said to have been infi-
nitely more eventful than any other equal portion of time since
the apostolic age. One hundred years ago Europe — enlightened,
refined, intellectual Europe — had scarcely emerged from barbarism.
George II sat upon the throne of England. The bloody massacre
of Culloden had just been enacted, and had released the then new
House of Hanover from further fear of the return of the Stuarts.
Louis XV reigned in France, Pope Benedict in the Eternal City.
Elizabeth was empress of Russia. Philip V was king of Spain, and
Frederick the Great and Theresa, ruled with despotic sway in Aus-
tria and Germany.

The population of Great Britain was not half as large as that of
the United States is now. The whole number of British colonial



Online LibraryArsène HoussayeHistory of Bedford, New Hampshire from 1737: being statistics compiled on the occasion of the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the incorporation of the town, May 15, 1900 → online text (page 1 of 126)