Arthur Newsholme.

School hygiene: or, The laws of health in relation to school life online

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The difficulty of regulatmg the temperature of the rooms
without closing the registers has been overcome in the Bridge-
port School-house, by enclosing the heating surface for each
room in a separate jacket of metal and then subdividing ic
into five sections, so arranged that any number may be used
or cut off" at pleasure, the supply of pure air remaining always
the same.



CHAPTER VIII.

Drainage Arrangements.

Lavaforiea. — Urinals. — Water-closets. — Soil-pipe. — Drains —
Earth-closets.

The school premises should always be so placed that there is
a fall from them capable of being utilised for drainage. A site
without means of drainage is not worth having at any price.

Lavatories should be kept stricdy clean, and the waste-pipes
not allowed to run directly into the drain, but trapped, with a
fresh-air inlet on the house side of the trap. In one case, the
writer distinctly traced an outbreak of typhoid fever in a school
to the direct connection of the lavatory-waste with a Mansergh's
trap, the arrangement of which had been inverted by an
ignorant workman. In cold climates, disconnection, on the
English system, is impracticable. It is well to remember that
sometimes the overflow-pipes from wash-basins are connected
with the drain, even when the waste-pipes are properly dis-
connected. An offensive smell may arise from decomposing
soap in lavatory waste-pipes ; hence, when several basins are
connected with a common waste-pipe, the angles of junction
shmld he very obtuse. In addition, the waste-pipe from each
basin should have a syphon-bend close under the basin, to
prevent offensive smells from decomposing soap in the waste
pipe, and a ventilating pipe from this to prevent the water in
the bend being exliausted by svphon-action. (Fig. 12.) Tiie
preceding plan is the best where there is not frequent danger
of the water freezmg in the gully-trap, {b. Fig. 12.) In the
States, however, this is so common an event m winter that the
46



DRAINAGE ARRANGEMENTS.



47



gully-trap has to be abandoned ; and the lavatory waste-pipe
must be directly connected with other waste-pipes which dis-
charge into the drain. In this case the syphon-bend shown at
c, and the ventilation shaft shown at d^ must be insisted on.
(Fig. 12.)




Fig 12. — Lavatory wa^h-bnsin.
a. Waste-pipe, emptying over waier seal o guily trap (3) ;


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Online LibraryArthur NewsholmeSchool hygiene: or, The laws of health in relation to school life → online text (page 4 of 10)