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V





PRINCESS IDA




PRINCESS IDA



Uniform edition. With Special Decorated Cover,
and % full-page Colour-Plates by W. RUSSELL
FLINT. Price ST. 6d. net each.

THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE

PATIENCE

IOLANTHE

PRINCESS IDA

THE MIKADO

RUDDIGORE

THE YEOMEN OF THE GUARD

THE GONDOLIERS



IF IT BE WELL TO DROOP AND PINE AND MOPE,
TO SIGH 'OH, IDA! IDA!' ALL DAY LONG,
THEN PRINCE HILARION IS VERY WELL"

(P- 33)



THE GEORGE E. LASK COLLECTION



PRINCESS IDA

OR

CASTLE ADAMANT



BY

W. S. GILBERT

WITH COLOURED ILLUSTRATIONS BY

W. RUSSELL FLINT




LONDON

G. BELL AND SONS, LTD,

1912



CHISWICK PRESS: CHARLES WHITTINGHAM AND CO.
TOOKS COURT, CHANCERY LANE, LONDON.



LIST OF COLOUR PLATES



" IF IT BE WELL TO DROOP AND PINE AND MOPE,

To SIGH ' OH, IDA! IDA! ' ALL DAY LONG,
THEN PRINCE HILARION is VERY WELL "

Frontispiece

" I CAN TELL A WOMAN'S AGE IN HALF A MINUTE
AND I DO"

" MUST WE, TILL THEN, IN PRISON CELL BE
THRUST? "

ENTER THE PRINCESS, READING

ENTER THE " DAUGHTERS OF THE PLOUGH,"
BEARING LUNCHEON

THE GATE YIELDS. HILDEBRAND AND SOLDIERS
RUSH IN

"THOUGH I AM BUT A GIRL,
DEFIANCE THUS I HURL "

" WHERE ARE YOUR RIFLES, PRAY? "



2013894



Produced at the Savoy TJieatre, Saturday, $th January, 1884.



DRAMATIS PERSONAE

KING HILDEBRAND MR. RUTLAND BARRINGTON

HILARION (his Son) MR. H. BRACY

CYRIL 1 / __*. fMR. DURWARD LELY

\ (Hilanons Friends) \ ,.

FLORIAN) v (MR. CHAS. RYLEY

KING GAMA MR. GEORGE GROSSMITH

ARAC 1 | MR. RICHARD TEMPLE

GURON \ (his Sons) -! MR. WARWICK GRAY

SCYNTHIUsJ (MR. LUGG

PRINCESS IDA (Gama's Daughter) Miss LEONORA BRAHAM

LADY BLANCHE (Professor of Abstract Science) . Miss BRANDRAM
LADY PSYCHE (Professor of Humanities) . . . Miss KATE CHARD
MELISSA (Lady Blanche's Daughter) .... Miss JESSIE BOND

SACHARISSA^J f Miss SYBIL GREY

CHLOE j- (Girl Graduates) -I Miss HEATHCOTE

ADA [MISS LILIAN CARR

SOLDIERS, COURTIERS, " GIRL GRADUATES," " DAUGHTERS OF THE PLOUGH," ETC.

ACT I ... Pavilion in King Hildebrand's Palace (Emden)
ACT II . . Gardens of Castle Adamant (Hawes Craven)
ACT III . . Courtyard of Castle Adamant (Emden)



PRINCESS IDA

OR

CASTLE ADAMANT
ACT I

SCENE. Pavilion attached to KING HILDEBRAND'S Palace. Soldiers
and Courtiers discovered looking out through opera glasses,
telescopes, etc., FLORIAN leading.

CHORUS

Search throughout the panorama
For a sign of royal Gama,

Who to-day should cross the water
With his fascinating daughter
Ida is her name.

Some misfortune evidently

Has detained them consequently
Search throughout the panorama
For the daughter of King Gama,
Prince Hilarion's flame!

SOLO

Flor. Will Prince Hilarion's hopes be sadly blighted?
All. Who can tell?

Flor. Will Ida break the vows that she has plighted?
All. Who can tell?

Flor. Will she back out, and say she did not mean them?
All. Who can tell?

Flor. If so, there'll be the deuce to pay between them!

i B



2 PRINCESS IDA

AIL No no we'll not despair,

For Gama would not dare
To make a deadly foe
Of Hildebrand, and so,
Search throughout the panorama, etc.



Enter KING HILDEBRAND with CYRIL

Hild. See you no sign of Gama?

Flor. None, my liege!

Hild. It 's very odd indeed. If Gama fail

To put in an appearance at our Court

Before the sun has set in yonder West,

And fail to bring the Princess Ida here

To whom our son Hilarion was betrothed

At the extremely early age of one,

There's war between King Gama and ourselves!

[Aside to CYRIL.] Oh Cyril, how I dread this interview!

It 's twenty years since he and I have met.

He was a twisted monster all awry

As though dame Nature, angry with her work,

Had crumpled it in fitful petulance!
Cyr. But, sir, a twisted and ungainly trunk

Often bears goodly fruit Perhaps he was

A kind, well-spoken gentleman?
Hild. Oh, no!

For, adder-like, his sting lay in his tongue.

(His " sting" is present, though his "stung" is past.)
Flor. [Looking through glass.] But stay, my liege; o'er yonder
mountain's brow

Comes a small body, bearing Gama's arms;

And now I look more closely at it, sir,

I see attached to it King Gama's legs ;

From which I gather this corollary

That that small body must be Gama's own.
Hild. Ha! Is the Princess with him?

Well, my liege,

Unless her highness is full six feet high,



PRINCESS IDA

And wears moustachios too and smokes cigars
And rides en cavalier in coat of steel
I do not think she is.
Hild. One never knows.

She 's a strange girl, I've heard, and does odd things!

Come, bustle there!

For Gama place the richest robes we own

For Gama place the coarsest prison dress

For Gama let our best spare bed be aired

For Gama let our deepest dungeon yawn

For Gama lay the costliest banquet out

For Gama place cold water and dry bread!

For as King Gama brings the Princess here,

Or brings her not, so shall King Gama have

Much more than everything much less than nothing!



SONG AND CHORUS

Hild. Now hearken to my strict command

On every hand, on every hand



CHORUS

To your command,
On every hand,
We dutifully bow!



Hild. If Gama bring the Princess here

Give him good cheer, give him good cheer.

CHORUS

If she come here
We'll give him a cheer,
And we will show you how.
Hip, hip, hurrah! hip, hip, hurrah!
Hip, hip, hurrah! hip, hip, hurrah!
We'll shout and sing
Long live the King,
And his daughter, too, I trow!



4 PRINCESS IDA

Then shout ha! ha! hip, hip, hurrah!
For the fair Princess and her good papa,

Hip, hip, hurrah!

Hip, hip, hurrah!
Hip, hip, hurrah! hurrah!

Hild. But if he fail to keep his troth,

Upon our oath, we'll trounce them both!

CHORUS

He'll trounce them both,
Upon his oath.
As sure as quarter day!

Hild. We'll shut him up in a dungeon cell,

And toll his knell on a funeral bell.

CHORUS

From dungeon cell,
His funeral knell,
Shall strike him with dismay!
And we'll shout ha! ha! hip, hip, hurrah!
Hip, hip, hurrah! hip, hip, hurrah!
As up we string,
The faithless King,
In the old familiar way!
We'll shout ha! ha! hip, hip, hurrah!
As we make an end of her false papa.
Hip, hip, hurrah!
Hip, hip, hurrah!
Hip, hip, hurrah! hurrah!

[Exeunt all.



Enter HILARION

RECIT.
Hil. To-day we meet, my baby bride and I

But ah, my hopes are balanced by my fears!
What transmutations have been conjured by
The silent alchemy of twenty years!



PRINCESS IDA

BALLAD
Hil, Ida was a twelvemonth old,

Twenty years ago!
I was twice her age, I'm told,

Twenty years ago!
Husband twice as old as wife
Argues ill for married life
Baleful prophecies were rife,
Twenty years ago!

Still, I was a tiny prince

Twenty years ago.
She has gained upon me, since

Twenty years ago.
Though she 's twenty-one, it 's true,
I am barely twenty-two
False and foolish prophets you,

Twenty years ago!

Enter HILDEBRAND

Hil. Well, father, is there news for me at last?

Hild. King Gama is in sight, but much I fear

With no Princess!
Hil. Alas, my liege, I've heard

That Princess Ida has forsworn the world,

And, with a band of women, shut herself

Within a lonely country house, and there

Devotes herself to stern philosophies!
Hild. Then I should say the loss of such a wife

Is one to which a reasonable man

Would easily be reconciled.
Hil. Oh, no!

Or I am not a reasonable man.

She is my wife has been for twenty years!

{Looking through glass. \ I think I see her now!
Hild. Ha! let me look!

Hil. In my mind's eye, I mean a blushing bride,

All bib and tucker, frill and furbelow!



PRINCESS IDA

How exquisite she looked, as she was borne,
Recumbent, in her foster-mother's arms!
How the bride wept nor would be comforted
Until the hireling mother-for-the-nonce,
Administered refreshment in the vestry!
And I remember feeling much annoyed
That she should weep at marrying with me.
But then I thought, "These brides are all alike.
You cry at marrying me? How much more cause
You'd have to cry if it were broken off ! "
These were my thoughts ; I kept them to myself,
For at that age I had not learnt to speak.



Enter Courtiers, with CYRIL and FLORIAN

CHORUS

From the distant panorama
Come the sons of royal Gama.

Who, to-day, should cross the water
With his fascinating daughter
Ida is her name!



Enter ARAC, GURON, and SCYNTHIUS

SONG

Arac. We are warriors three.

Sons of Gama, Rex.
Like most sons are we,
Masculine in sex.

All Three. Yes, yes,

Masculine in sex.
Arac. Politics we bar,

They are not our bent;
On the whole we are

Not intelligent.
All Three. No, no,

Not intelligent.



PRINCESS IDA

A rac. But with doughty heart,

And with trusty blade
We can play our part
Fighting is our trade.
All Three. Yes, yes,

Fighting is our trade.
All Three. Bold, and fierce, and strong, ha! ha!

For a war we burn,
With its right or wrong, ha! ha!

We have no concern.
Order comes to fight, ha! ha!

Order is obeyed :
We are men of might ha! ha!
Fighting is our trade.

Yes yes,

Fighting is our trade, ha! ha!
Fighting is our trade.

CHORUS

They are men of might, ha! ha I
Order comes to fight, ha! ha!
Order is obeyed, ha! ha!
Fighting is their trade!

Enter KING GAMA

SONG GAMA

If you give me your attention, I will tell you what I am,
I'm a genuine philanthropist all other kinds are sham.
Each little fault of temper and each social defect
In my erring fellow creatures, I endeavour to correct.
To all their little weaknesses I open people's eyes
And little plans to snub the self-sufficient I devise:
I love my fellow creatures I do all the good I can
Yet everybody says I'm such a disagreeable man!
And I can't think why!

To compliments inflated I've a withering reply,
And vanity I always do my best to mortify ;



8 PRINCESS IDA

A charitable action I can skilfully dissect;
And interested motives I'm delighted to detect;
I know everybody's income and what everybody earns;
And I carefully compare it with the income-tax returns;
But to benefit humanity however much I plan,
Yet everybody says I'm such a disagreeable man!
And I can't think why!

I'm sure I'm no ascetic; I'm as pleasant as can be;
You'll always find me ready with a crushing repartee;
I've an irritating chuckle, I've a celebrated sneer,
I've an entertaining snigger, I've a fascinating leer.
To everybody's prejudice I know a thing or two;
I can tell a woman's age in half a minute and I do.
But although I try to make myself as pleasant as I can,
Yet everybody says I'm such a disagreeable man!
And I can't think why!

Gama. So this is Castle Hildebrand? Well, well!

Dame Rumour whispered that the place was grand :

She told me that your taste was exquisite,

Superb, unparalleled!

Hild. [Gratified.] Oh, really, king!

Gama. But she's a liar! Why, how old you've grown!

Is this Hilarion? Why, you've changed too

You were a singularly handsome child!
[To FLORIAN.] Are you a courtier? Come then, ply your trade,

Tell me some lies. How do you like your king?

Vile rumour says he 's all but imbecile.

Now, that 's not true?
Flo. My lord, we love our king,

His wise remarks are valued by his court

As precious stones.
Gama. And for the self-same cause,

Like precious stones, his sensible remarks

Derive their value from their scarcity!

Come now, be honest, tell the truth for once!

Tell it of me. Come, come, I'll harm you not.

This leg is crooked this foot is ill-designed

This shoulder wears a hump! Come, out with it!



I CAN TELL A WOMAN'S AGE IN HALF A MINUTE
AND I DO"

(P. 8)



PRINCESS IDA

Look, here 's my face ! Now, am I not the worst

Of Nature's blunders?
Cyril. Nature never errs.

To those who know the workings of your mind,

Your face and figure, sir, suggest a book

Appropriately bound.
Gama. [Enraged.] Why, harkye, sir,

How dare you bandy words with me?
Cyril. No need,

To bandy aught that appertains to you.
Gama. [Furiously.] Do you permit this, king?
Hild. We are in doubt

Whether to treat you as an honoured guest,

Or as a traitor knave who plights his word,

And breaks it.
Gama. [Quickly.] If the casting vote's with me,

I give it for the former!
Hild. We shall see.

By the terms of our contract, signed and sealed,

You're bound to bring the Princess here to-day:

Why is she not with you?
Gama. Answer me this :

What think you of a wealthy purse-proud man,

Who, when he calls upon a starving friend,

Pulls out his gold and flourishes his notes,

And flashes diamonds in the pauper's eyes?

What name have you for such a one?
Hild. A snob.

Gama. Just so. The girl has beauty, virtue, wit,

Grace, humour, wisdom, charity, and pluck.

Would it be kindly, think you, to parade

These brilliant qualities before your eyes?

Oh no, King Hildebrand, I am no snob!
Hild. [Furiously.] Stop that tongue,

Or you shall lose the monkey head that holds it!
Gama. Bravo! your king deprives me of my head,

That he and I may meet on equal terms!
Hild. Where is she now?
Gama. In Castle Adamant,

c



10



PRINCESS IDA



One of my many country houses.

She rules a woman's University,

With full a hundred girls, who learn of her.

Cyril. A hundred girls! A hundred ecstacies!

Gama. But no mere girls, my good young gentleman!
With all the college learning that you boast,
The youngest there will prove a match for you.

Cyril. With all my heart, if she 's the prettiest!

[To FLO.] Fancy, a hundred matches all alight!
That's if I strike them as I hope to do!

Gama. Despair your hope; their hearts are dead to men.
He who desires to gain their favour must
Be qualified to strike their teeming brains,
And not their hearts. They're safety matches, sir,
And they light only on the knowledge box
So you've no chance!

Flo. Are there no males whatever in those walls?

Gama. None, gentlemen, excepting letter mails
And they are driven (as males often are
In other large communities) by women.
Why, bless my heart, she 's so particular
She'll scarcely suffer Dr. Watts's hymns
And all the animals she owns are " hers "!
The ladies rise at cockcrow every morn

Cyril. Ah, then they have male poultry?

Gama. [Confidentially.] Not at all,

The Growing's done by an accomplished hen!



Gama.



All.



DUET

Perhaps if you address the lady
Most politely, most politely
Flatter and impress the lady,

Most politely, most politely
Humbly beg and humbly sue
She may deign to look on you,
But your doing you must do
Most politely, most politely!

Humbly beg and humbly sue, etc.



PRINCESS IDA i,

Hild. Go you, and inform the lady,

Most politely, most politely,
If she don't, we'll storm the lady,

Most politely, most politely!
[To GAMA.] You'll remain as hostage here:

Should Hilarion disappear,
We will hang you, never fear,
Most politely, most politely!
r He'll 1
All. \ I'll I remain as hostage here, etc.

lYou'llJ

[GAMA, ARAC, GURON, and SCYNTHIUS are marched off
in custody, HILDEBRAND following.

RECIT.
Hit. Come, Cyril, Florian, our course is plain

To-morrow morn fair Ida we'll engage;
But we will use no force her love to gain,
Nature has armed us for the war we wage!

TRIO

Hil. Expressive glances

Shall be our lances,

And pops of Sillery
Our light artillery.
We'll storm their bowers
With scented showers
Of fairest flowers

That we can buy!

CHORUS

Oh dainty triolet!
Oh fragrant violet!
Oh gentle heigho-let

(Or little sigh)
On sweet urbanity,
Though mere inanity,
To touch their vanity

We will rely!



12 PRINCESS IDA

Cyr. When day is fading,

With serenading

And such frivolity
We'll prove our quality.
A sweet profusion
Of soft allusion
This bold intrusion
Shall justify.

CHORUS
Oh dainty triolet, etc.

Flo. We'll charm their senses

With verbal fences,

With ballads amatory
And declamatory.
And little heeding
Their pretty pleading
Our love exceeding
We'll justify!

CHORUS
Oh dainty triolet, etc.



Re-enter GAMA, ARAC, GURON, and SCYNTHIUS heavily ironed

RECIT.

Gama. Must we, till then, in prison cell be thrust?
Hild. You must!

Gama. This seems unnecessarily severe!
Arac, Guron, and Scynthius. Hear, hear!

TRIO ARAC, GURON, and SCYNTHIUS
For a month to dwell
In a dungeon cell;

Growing thin and wizen

In a solitary prison,
Is a poor look out
For a soldier stout,



"MUST WE, TILL THEN, IN PRISON CELL BE THRUST?"

(P. 12)



PRINCESS IDA I3

Who is longing for the rattle

Of a complicated battle
For the rum-tum-tum
Of the military drum,

And the guns that go boom ! boom !

AIL Boom! boom! boom! boom!

Rum-tummy-tummy-tum !
Boom! boom!

Hild. When Hilarion's bride

Has at length complied

With the just conditions

Of our requisitions,
You may go in haste
And indulge your taste

For the fascinating rattle

Of a complicated battle
For the rum-tum-tum,
Of the military drum,

And the guns that go boom ! boom I

All. Boom-boom, etc.

AIL But till that time j we J 1 \ here remain,

I you 11 )

And bail j y 1 will not entertain,
I we j

Should she -j 1S j- mandate disobey,
-! __ u > lives the penalty will pay !
[GAMA, ARAC, GURON, and SCYNTHIUS are marched off.

END OF ACT I



14 PRINCESS IDA



ACT II

Gardens in Castle Adamant. A river runs across the back of the
stage, crossed by a rustic bridge. Castle Adamant in the
distance.

Girl graduates discovered seated at the feet O/"LADY PSYCHE.

CHORUS
Towards the empyrean heights

Of every kind of lore,
We've taken several easy flights,

And mean to take some more.
In trying to achieve success

No envy racks our heart,
And all the knowledge we possess,

We mutually impart.

SOLO

Mel. Pray what authors should she read

Who in Classics would succeed?

Psy. If you'd cross the Helicon,

You should read Anacreon,
Ovid's Metamorphoses,
Likewise Aristophanes,
And the works of Juvenal :
These are worth attention, all ;
But, if you will be advised,
You will get them Bowdlerizeu!

CHORUS

Yes, we'll do as we're advised,
We will get them Bowdlerized !



PRINCESS IDA 15

SOLO
Sack. Pray you tell us, if you can,

What's the thing that's known as Man?

Psy. Man will swear and Man will storm

Man is not at all good form
Man is of no kind of use
Man 's a donkey Man 's a goose
Man is coarse and Man is plain
Man is more or less insane
Man 's a ribald, Man 's a rake,
Man is Nature's sole mistake!

CHORUS

We'll a memorandum make
Man is Nature's sole mistake !

And thus to empyrean height

Of every kind of lore,
In search of wisdom's pure delight,

Ambitiously we soar.
In trying to achieve success

No envy racks our heart,
For all we know and all we guess,

We mutually impart!

Enter LADY BLANCHE. All stand tip demurely

Bla. Attention, ladies, while I read to you

The Princess Ida's list of punishments.

The first is Sacharissa. She 's expelled !
All. Expelled !
Bla. Expelled, because although she knew

No man of any kind may pass our walls,

She dared to bring a set of chessmen here !
Sack. [Crying.} I meant no harm; they're only men of wood!
Bla. They're men with whom you give each other mate,

And that 's enough! The next is Chloe.
Chloe. . Ah!

Bla. Chloe will lose three terms, for yesterday,



16 PRINCESS IDA

When looking through her drawing-book, I found

A sketch of a perambulator !
All. [Horrified.} Oh!

Bla. Double perambulator, shameless girl!

That 's all at present. Now, attention, pray !

Your Principal the Princess comes to give

Her usual inaugural address

To those young ladies who joined yesterday.

Enter the PRINCESS

CHORUS

Mighty maiden with a mission!
Paragon of common sense!
Running fount of erudition!

Miracle of eloquence!
We are blind, and we would see;
We are bound, and would be free;
We are dumb, and we would talk;
We are lame, and we would walk.
Mighty maiden with a mission!
Paragon of common sense!
Running fount of erudition!
Miracle of eloquence !

Prin. {Recit.} Minerva! hear me:

ARIA
At this my call,

A fervent few

Have come to woo
The rays that from thee fall.

Oh, goddess wise

That lovest light,
Endow with sight
Their unillumined eyes.

Let fervent words and fervent thoughts be mine,
That I may lead them to thy sacred shrine !



PRINCESS IDA 17

Women of Adamant, fair Neophytes

Who thirst for such instruction as we give,

Attend, while I unfold a parable.

The elephant is mightier than Man,

Yet Man subdues him. Why? The elephant

Is elephantine everywhere but here [tapping her forehead],

And Man, whose brain is to the elephant's

As Woman's brain to Man's (that 's rule of three)

Conquers the foolish giant of the woods,

As Woman, in her turn, shall conquer Man.

In Mathematics, Woman leads the way

The narrow-minded pedant still believes

That two and two make four ! Why we can prove,

We women household drudges as we are

That two and two make five or three or seven ;

Or five and twenty, if the case demands!

Diplomacy? The wiliest diplomat

Is absolutely helpless in our hands ;

He wheedles monarchs woman wheedles him !

Logic ? Why, tyrant Man himself admits

It 's waste of time to argue with a woman !

Then we excel in social qualities :

Though Man professes that he holds our sex

In utter scorn, I venture to believe

He'd rather spend the day with one of you,

Than with five hundred of his fellow men !

In all things we excel. Believing this,

A hundred maidens here have sworn to place

Their feet upon his neck. If we succeed,

We'll treat him better than he treated us:

But if we fail, why then let hope fail too !

Let no one care a penny how she looks

Let red be worn with yellow blue with green

Crimson with scarlet violet with blue!

Let all your things misfit, and you yourselves

At inconvenient moments come undone !

Let hair-pins lose their virtue : let the hook

Disdain the fascination of the eye

The bashful button modestly evade

D



i8 PRINCESS IDA

The soft embraces of the button-hole !
Let old associations all dissolve,
Let Swan secede from Edgar Cask from Gask,
Sewell from Cross Lewis from Allenby !
In other words let Chaos come again !
[Coming down.] Who lectures in the Hall of Arts to-day?

Bla. I, madam, on Abstract Philosophy.

There I propose considering, at length,

Three points The Is, the Might Be, and the Must.

Whether the Is, from being actual fact,

Is more important than the vague Might Be;

Or the Might Be, from taking wider scope,

Is for that reason greater than the Is;

And lastly, how the Is and Might Be stand

Compared with the inevitable Must !

Prin. The subject's deep how do you treat it, pray?

Bla. Madam, I take three possibilities,

And strike a balance, then, between the three;
As thus: The Princess Ida Is our head,
The Lady Psyche Might Be Lady Blanche,
Neglected Blanche, inevitably Must.
Given these three hypotheses to find
The actual betting against each of them !

Prin. Your theme's ambitious: pray you bear in mind
Who highest soar fall farthest. Fare you well,
You and your pupils ! Maidens, follow me.

[Exeunt PRINCESS and MAIDENS singing refrain of chorus,
"And thus to empyrean heights" etc. Manet LADY
BLANCHE.

Bla. I should command here I was born to rule,
But do I rule? I don't. Why? I don't know.
I shall some day. Not yet. I bide my time.
I once was Some One and the Was Will Be.
The Present as we speak becomes the Past,
The Past repeats itself, and so is Future !
This sounds involved. It 's not. It 's right enough.



PRINCESS IDA 19

SONG
Bla. Come, mighty Must !

Inevitable Shall !
In thee I trust.

Time weaves my coronal !
Go, mocking Is \

Go, disappointing Was!
That I am this

Ye are the cursed cause !
Yet humble second shall be first,

I ween;

And dead and buried be the curst
Has Been !

Oh weak Might Be !

Oh May, Might, Could, Would, Should !
How powerless ye

For evil or for good !
In every sense

Your moods I cheerless call,
Whate'er your tense

Ye are Imperfect, all !
Ye have deceived the trust that I've shown

In ye!

Away ! The Mighty Must alone
Shall be !

{Exit LADY BLANCHE.

Enter HILARION, CYRIL and FLORIAN, climbing over wall, and
creeping cautiously among the trees and rocks at the back of the
stage

TRIO HILARION, CYRIL, FLORIAN
Gently, gently,
Evidently

We are safe so far,
After scaling
Fence and paling,

Here, at last, we are !



2 o PRINCESS IDA

In this college
Useful knowledge

Everywhere one finds,
And already
Growing steady,

We've enlarged our minds.

Cyr. We've learnt that prickly cactus

Has the power to attract us

When we fall.

All. When we fall !

Hil. That nothing man unsettles

Like a bed of stinging nettles,

Short or tall.

All. Short or tall!

Flo. That bull-dogs feed on throttles

That we don't like broken bottles


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Online LibraryArthur SullivanPrincess Ida; or, Castle Adamant → online text (page 1 of 3)