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Arthur W. Pinero



THE AMAZONS




A FARCE IN THREE ACTS



Walter H. Baker 6 Co.. Boston



II <a. W. linero'0 Paps



THE AMA70NS ^^'^^ *° Three Acts. Seven male*, five females.
iLu ntunM* kJ Oofitmnos, inod«5rn ; scenery, not diificulf,. Plays
fuUeTeoIng.

THP rAIWWPT MINICTPD FarcBli) Four Acta. ']en malea, i in.»

scenery, three interiors. Plays a fall evening.

BANDY DICK ^^^ ^° Three Aots. Seven males, four females.
CoBtumei^, modern ; Boenery, two interiors. Plays
two hours and a halt

THF (iAT f OfiD OIIFX comedy in Four Acts. Four males, ten
lULt u t Lr nv YUA(A fgjQjj^ Costumes, modern : eoonery,
o interiors and an exterior. Plays a full evening.;

HIC HliffCP re Al^nPIlf Oomedy in Four Acts. Isine males, tour
IID DVUDC W^ VmfCH f^^^i^ Costumes, modem; scenery,
tliree Interiors. Plays a full evening.

THF HARRY HDfiSF comedy in Three . .

inCaUDDl aViWB females. Co8tume8.mQdern;sc..n. ,,.....-,
Plays two hours and a halt

f Die I>rama in Five Acts, Seven males, seven fomaJos. Costumes,
^^^ modern ; scenery, three interiors. Plays a full evening.

LADY BODNTIFDL I'^L!'' c^l^Ti^^l'^t^'ZJt

males, costumes, modem ; scenery, loorin-
ilors, not easy. Plays a full evening.

I PTTV I^«wn» i» ^o»ir Acts and an Epilogue. Ten males, five fe-
^ males. Costumes, modem ; scenery complicated. Plays a

full cvonhu'



Sent prepaid on receipt of price by

wmn f ♦ TBafter & Company

Mo, 5 Hamiltoii Place, Boston, Massachusetts



THE AMAZONS



The Amazons



A FARCICAL ROMANCE IN
'THREE ACTS



BY

ARTHUR W. PINERO
U



All rights reserved under the International Copyright Act.
Performance forbidden, and right of representation reserved.
Application for the right of performing the above piece must
be made to the publishers.



BOSTON



d^St^^A/ydUl^ftS^



THE PERSONS OF THE PLAY.



Babrington, Viscount Litterly.
Galfred, Earl of Tweenwayes.
Andue', Count de Grival,.
Rev. Roger Minchin.
FiTTON (a Gamekeeper).
YouATT (a Servant).
Orts (a Poacher).

Miriam, Marchioness of Castlejordan.

Lady Noeline Belturbet,

Lady Wilhelmina Belturbet, y(her daughters).

Lady Thomasin Belturbet,

"Sergeant" Shuter.



The scene is laid first in " The Tangle,^' an overgrown corner
of Overcote Park, and afterivards at Overcote Hall. Great
Overcote, as everybody knoios, is a two-hours' raihvay jour-
ney from town. The events of the play occur during a
single day in a fine September.



COPYBIGHT, 1895, BY ARTHUR W. PiNERO.



All rights reserved.




INTRODUCTORY NOTE.



Although " The Amazons" was presented to the pub-
lic a couple of months earlier than "The Second Mrs.
Tanqueray," it was actually a later work; indeed, Mr.
Pinero may be said to have written this merry and fan-
tastic little play by way of relaxation after the more serious
mental effort involved in the composition of the famous
drama which told the tragic story of Paula Tanqueray.
Curiously enough, this delightful " farcical romance," in
the writing of which Mr. Pinero was apparently prompted
by no more weighty motive than the indulgence of his
own playful fancy, for all the amusement it was worth,
stands in order of composition immediately between " The
Second Mrs. Tanqueray" and " The Notorious Mrs. Ebb-
smith." It may thus be regarded as a remarkable evi-
dence of its author's versatility. Here he attempted no
criticism of life, he sought to solve no problem of morality,
sociology, or psychology ; he merely permitted himself to
dally with the "mannish woman" idea in the lightest,
gentlest spirit of satire, and in a most whimsical mood of
romance. In the Tangle of Overcote Park we seem to
hear distant laughing echoes from the Forest of Arden,
and in Lady Noehne Belturbet and Barrington, Viscount
Litterly, we fancy we recognise the descendants of Rosa-
lind and Orlando.

Mr. Arthur Chudleigh produced " The Amazons " at
the Court Theatre on Tuesday, March 7th, 1893, when



THE AMAZONS.



its reception at the hands of the public was very cordial.
The following is a copy of the first night programme : —

Programme.

ON TUESDAY, MARCH 7th, 1893,
WILL BE ACTED FOR THE FIRST TIME

THE AMAZONS
An Original Farcical Romance.

BY

A. W. PINERO.



Galfred, Earl of Tweenwayes
Barrington, Viscount Litterly
Andre, Count de Grival
Rev. Roger Minchin
FiLTON {A Gamekeeper )
You ATT {A Servant ) .
Orts {A Poacher)



Miriam, Marchioness of Castlejordan
Lady Noeline Belturbet



Lady Wilhelmina Bel-
turbet

Lady Thomasin Beltur-
bet

" Sergeant " Shuter



Mr. Weedon Grossmith;

Mr. F. Kerr.

Mr. Elliott.

Mr. J. Beauchamp.

Mr. W. Quinton.

Mr. COMPTON COUTTS.

Mr. R. Nainby.



Miss Rose Leclercq.
Miss Lily Hanbury.
( By Permission of Mr,
Beerbohni Tree.)

Miss Ellalink Terriss.

Miss Pattie Browne.
(^Her First Appearance in
England^
Miss Marianne Caldwell.



The scene is laid first in " The Tangle," an overgrown corner of
Overcote Park, and afterwards at Overcote Hall. Great Overcote,
as everybody knows, is a two-hours' railway journey from town. The
events of the play occur during a single day in a fine September.

The scenery is painted by Mr. T. W. Hall.

The music in the Play has been composed by Mr. Edward Jones.



INTRODUCTORY NOTE. 5

** The Amazons " ran at the Court Theatre until July
8th, by which date a hundred and eleven performances
had been given, a record which spells success, although
it does not equal the figures of Mr. Pinero's robuster and
less fantastic farces, such as "The Magistrate," "The
Schoolmistress," and '* Dandy Dick."

A successful tour of the provinces was made under the
auspices of Mr. Fred G. Latham and the late T. W.
Robertson, while at the Antipodes considerable pros-
perity has attended the merry little play, Messrs. Brough
and Boucicault having been its Australian sponsors.

The greatest success, however, yet achieved by "The
Amazons," has been in America. Mr. Daniel Frohman
produced it quite unostentatiously at the Lyceum Theatre,
New York, and its triumph was immediate. The fresh-
ness, delicate humour, and unconventionality of the piece,
and the quaint prettiness of the girls' masculine attire,
captivated the playgoers of New York, and " The Ama-
zons " became the talk of the town. Presented first in
February, 1894, it ran for eighteen or nineteen weeks
in New York, the demand for seats being so great as to
justify the management in raising the prices in certain
parts of the house. Similar popularity has accompanied
the piece throughout the United States, where it is about
to commence its second season " on the road."

Malcolm C. Salaman.
London, /«;2^, 1895.



THE AMAZONS.

THE FIRST ACT.

The scene represents a thickly-wooded^ overgrown
corner of Overcote Park. There is a small clear-
ing up to a dense thicket and a ragged hedge^
which is broken by an old five-barred gate y while
prominently in the foreground are, on the left the
stump of a felled tree, and on the right an old tree
with a wide hollow in its trunk. Beyond the gate
is a prospect of a woodland^ pierced by gleams of
bright light. It is a fine, warm morning in Sep-
tember ; some golden leaves are on the trees, a few
have fallen. The whole sce7ie is warmly coloured
and poetical in suggestion.

YouATT, a7i aged servant hi livery, opens the gate for
the Rev. Roger Minchin, who advances on to
the clearing. Minchin is a type of the country
parson of the old school, white-haired, red-faced^
hearty in manner.

Minchin.
No sign of her ladyship here, Youatt.

YoUATT.

We'll find her, Mr. Minchin.



8 THE AMAZONS,

MiNCHIN.

[ Wiping his browJ] Ouf !

You ATT.

[Closing the gate.'] My lady and the family are
very partial to the Tangle o' fine days.

MiNCHIN.

The Tangle ?

YOUATT.

That's what the family call this corner o' the
park, sir. [Looking off and removing his cap.] 'Ere is
my lady.

[Miriam, Marchioness of Castlejordan,
approaches^ carrying a camp-stool. She
is a tally splendidly-handsome womafi of
middle-age.

Lady Castlejordan.

[Shaking hattds heartily with Minchin.] Mr.
Minchin !

Minchin.
How are you ?

Lady Castlejordan.
You so seldom come to see me. Shall we walk
back to the Hall?

Minchin.
{_Puffi?ig.] If you don't mind, I —



THE AMAZONS. 9

Lady Castlejordan.

Get your wind — certainly. \To Youatt.] Has
Shuter gone to the station to meet Lord Noel?

Youatt.
I b'lieve so, m'lady.

[Youatt goes away through the gateway^

Lady Castlejordan.
Well ! I see what you're thinking about.

MiNCHIN.

Lord Noel — that's Lady Noeline ?

Lady Castlejordan.
From your point of view, yes.

MiNCHIN.

Oh, dear, oh, dear !

Lady Castlejordan. *

Noel has been staying with Mrs. Vipont in town
for some weeks. The Viponts have been kept in
London, you know, by the late session. I've
missed Noel sadly. \^Referring to her watch."] He
will be at the Hall in half-an-hour.

MiNCHIN.

Will he ! And your two other gir — boys ?



10 THE AMAZONS.

Lady Castlejordan.

They spent their August in Scotland ; they've
been home some days. [ Walkiiig about restlessly. ^^
It chafes me so to think I am not at the station
myself to meet my eldest son.

MiNCHIN.

You've deputed — whom did I hear you say ?

Lady Castlejordan.
Sergeant Shuter.

MiNCHIN.

Man or woman ?

Lady Castlejordan.
From your point of view, woman, I suppose.

MiNCHIN.

Why Sergeant ?

» Lady Castlejordan.

Late husband held that rank in Castle Jordan's
old regiment.

MiNCHIN.

What duties does she — he — perform here ?

Lady Castlejordan.

Teaches my boys boxing, fencing, athletics gene-
rally.



THE AMAZONS. il

MiNCHIN.

[Groaning^ Oh !

Lady Castlejordan.

A splendid fellow. At the same time, I should
dearly like to have gone to Scrumleigh station to
meet Noel.

MiNCHIN,

You're detained here, I gather ?

Lady Castlejordan.

Detained ! I don't venture beyond the park now-
a-days more than I can help. You know why,
surely ?

MiNCHIN.

H'm! Well —

Lady Castlsjordan.

You know what they call me outside, at Great
Overcote, and Little Overcote, and at Scrumleigh
— ah, even in London !

MiNCHIN.

Yes, yes.

Lady Castlejordan.

The Eccentric Lady Castlejordan. \_Scornfully.'\
Eccentric !

MiNCHIN.

My dear Lady Castlejordan, the truth is that I've
presumed to call on you this morning in the hope



12 THE AMAZONS.

that I may be permitted to modestly reason with
you on this very subject.

Lady Castlejordan.
Again ?

MiNCHIN.

Once more.

Lady Castlejordan.

Sit down.

\They sit ; she on ihe camp-stool^ he on the
stump of a tree.

MiNCHIN.

To begin with, it would be disingenuous to con-
ceal from you that I do constantly hear very severe
strictures passed upon your line of conduct.

Lady Castlejordan.

You've heard them for the last ten years, ever
since my husband died.

MiNCHIN.

But these strictures are more severe now than
ever, and with some justice. When your children
were children there was small harm in your play-
fully regarding them as boys and allowing them to
romp and riot. But to-day here are three young
women —

Lady Castlejordan.

No!



THE AMAZONS. 13

MiNCHIN.

Three strapping young women —

Lady Castlejordan.

No!

MiNCHIN.

I will repeat, I do repeat, three bouncing young
women !

Lady Castlejordan.

Well, in detail, I admit my children are perhaps
what you describe. But in disposition, in mind, in
muscle, they are three fine, stalwart young fellows.

MiNCHIN.

But Great Overcote, and Little Overcote, and
Scrumleigh do not look upon them as —

Lady Castlejordan.

Are Great Overcote, and Little Overcote, and
Scrumleigh competent judges of my bitter heart-
burnings and disappointments ? You knew Jack,
my husband ?

MiNCHIN.

Ah, yes, indeed.

Lady Castlejordan.
What was he ?

MiNCHIN.

A gentle giant. A grand piece of muscular
humanity. In frame, the Vikings must have been
of the same pattern.



14 THE AMAZONS.

Lady Castlejordan.
And you remember me as I was twenty years ago ?

MiNCHIN.

[Looking at her.'\ I've no excuse for forgetting.

Lady Castlejordan.
I was a fit mate for my husband ?

MiNCHIN.

Perfect.

Lady Castlejordan.

Even in Jack's time I never scaled less than ten
stone, and he could lift me as if I were a sawdust
doll. Old friend — ! Oh, old friend, what a son
my son and Jack's ought to have been !

[_She goes to the gate and leans upon it, turn-
ing her back to Minchin, who has also
risen.

MiNCHIN.

But — but — but it didn't please Providence to
send you a son.

Lady Castlejordan.
[Beating the gate.'] Oh! Oh!

MiNCHIN.

Come, come, do learn to view the matter re-
signedly !



THE AMAZONS. 15

Lady Castlejordan.
Girls ! girls !

MiNCHIN.

It's an old story now —

Lady Castlejordan.
Girls !

MiNCHIN.

Why despise girls ? Many people like girls. Bless
my heart, / like girls !

Lady Castlejordan.

You can recall Noeline's arrival. I was sure she
was going to be a boy — so was Jack. I knew it —
so did Jack. The child was to have been christened
Noel, Jack's second name.

MiNCHIN.

Yes, I was up at the Hall that night, smoking
with Castlejordan to keep him quiet.

Lady Castlejordan.

Poor dear, I remember his bending over me after-
wards and whispering " Damn it, Miriam, you've
lost a whole season's hunting for nothing ! " Then
the second —

MiNCHIN.

Lady Wilhelmina.



i6 THE AMAZONS.

Lady Castlejordan.

Yes, Billy came next. Jack wouldn't speak to me
for a couple of months after that, the only fall-out
we ever had.

MiNCHIN.

But your third. Lady Thomasin —

Lady Castlejordan.

Dearest Tommy! Oh, by that time Jack and I
had agreed to regard anything that was born to us
as a boy and to treat it accordingly, and for the
rest of his life my husband taught our three chil-
dren — there never was another — to ride, fish,
shoot, swim, fence, fight, wrestle, throw, run, jump,
until they were as hardy as Indians and their
muscles burst the sleeves of their jackets. And,
when Jack went, I continued their old training. Of
course, I — I recognise my boys' little deficiencies,
but I'm making the best of the great disappoint-
ment of my life, and I — well, call me the eccentric
Lady Castlejordan ! What do I care ?

\_She sits^ wiping her eyes,

MiNCHIN.

Ah, well, well ! I've great sympathy. But I
really do think that the time has arrived now —

Lady Castlejordan.

Now! Pardon me, but you can't know what
you're talking about.



THE AMAZONS. 17

MiNCHIN.

Eh?

Lady Castlejordan.

You haven't forgotten, have you, that the title
went to my husband's brother in default of my
being the mother of a — of a complete boy?

MiNCHIN.

Of course I haven't.

Lady Castlejordan.

And that this man, the present Lord Castlejor-
dan. a wizen creature without shoulders, has a son ?

MiNCHIN.

I know that.

Lady Castlejordan.

A son! And Lady Castlejordan a wisp of a
woman with a mouth like a rabbit's! And they
have a son !

MiNCHIN.

Lord Litterly. He's at Oxford.

Lady Castlejordan.

He has just come down. And what do you
think I That young man has carried everything
before him at the University — everything 1



i8 THE AMAZONS.

MiNCHIN.

Why, I heard he'd failed even to take a pass
degree.

Lady Castlejordan.

Bother his degree ! He was first string in the
mile and quarter-mile against Cambridge at Queen's
Club ; he got his cricket blue and came within two
of making his century at Lord's ; and in Rugby
football he was the best three-quarter back in the
Oxford fifteen that's been known for the last five-
and-twenty years. Oh ! the torture of it !

MiNCHIN.

Now, come, come ! I don't see — !

Lady Castlejordan.

You don't see that this is the son Jack and I
ought to have had ! No ! \ pacing to and fro] Heav-
ens, if this young man had been sickly, stunted,
freckled, weak, anaemic, red-eyed, narrow-chested — !

MiNCHIN.

Hush, hush !

Lady Castlejordan.

Or, better still, humpbacked, with one short leg,
it might have made me a more contented, gentler
woman ! But as it is —

MiNCHIN.

Now, now !



THE AMAZONS. 19

Lady Castlejordan.

And you choose this moment for suggesting that
I should look matters straight in the face and realize
the melancholy maternal muddle I've made.

MiNCHIN.

You know, I've had an idea for some time past —
but, there, you're not on friendly terms with the
present Lord Castlejordan and his family ?

Lady Castlejordan.
\_Indignantly.'\ Friendly terms !

MiNCHIN.

Because it has often struck me that it might be a
small consolation to you to know this young man —

Lady Castlejordan.
Never !

MiNCHIN.

Tut, tut ! You might grow to be fond of Lord
Litterly.

Lady Castlejordan.

Fond of him! Fond of the youth that Nature —
Nature, for whom I've done so much! — has taken
from me and given to that insignificant little woman !
No, never shall one of us exchange a word even with
one of them ! Never, I say ! Never !

MiNCHIN.

Oh, dear, oh, dear



20 THE AMAZONS.

[Lady Wilhelmina Belturbet etiters^ below the
hedge. She is a sweet-looking gij^l of nineteen,
quiet, gentle and feminifie. Her attire is a com-
promise between a bofs and a woman^s ; her " Nor-
folk " jacket reaches almost to her knees and her
lower limbs are eticased ift stout leathern gaiters.
She carries a fishing-rod in its case and, across her
shoulders, an ordinary wicker fishing-basket.

Wilhelmina.

Why, it's Mr. Minchin ! \Shaki?ig hands with him
warmly?)^ Ah, mother dear ! Mr. Minchin '

Minchin.
And, how are you, hey ? Any sport ?

Wilhelmina.

I'm on my way down. There's a little too much
wind, I fancy ; \_slipping her basket from her shoulders'^
I've turned into the s^ielter here to tie a fly.

Minchin.
[^Opening the basket. '\ Let me help you.

Lady Castlejordan.
What is Tommy doing this morning ?

Wilhelmina.
Giving the grey mare a lesson over the hurdles.

Minchin.
H'm, dangerous work !



THE AMAZONS. 21

Lady Castlejordan.
[ Walking away'^^ Please don't put such ideas
into my boys' heads.

[MiNCHiN afid WiLHELMiNA sit side-by-side
on the stump of the tree, he with her
tacklebook in his hand.

MiNCHIN.

\_Futting on his spectacles.'] Now then ! What are
your flies ?

WiLHELMINA.

Red Septembers and Mottled Spinners.

MiNCHIN.

Ah, you're a knowing one. \_Ife ties the fly,

WiLHELMINA.

Have you and mother been talking ?

MiNCHIN.

What d'ye think we have been doing — playing
leap-frog ?

WiLHELMINA.

I mean talking about us gir — boys ?

MiNCHIN.

H'm ! Pliers.

WiLHELMINA.

{Handing the pliers.] I guess you have. Mr.



22 THE AMAZON'S.

Minchin, dear, mother isn't worried about us, is she
— me particularly ?

Minchin.

I can answer that. No she isn't — / am. Silk.

WiLHELMINA.

\Giving the silk to him.'] I'm glad she's not wor-
ried. Because, do you know, I'm afraid I'm going
to be a great sorrow to her.

Minchin.
You!

WiLHELMINA.

I've a foreboding I shall turn out badly.

Minchin.
In what way ?

WiLHELMINA.

Oh, I'm getting worse every day, Mr. Minchin.
I. — I'm becoming so very effeminate. \_Ife looks at
her for a moment^ then chuckles. ^^ Hush, hush !

Minchin.
Ho, ho ! Scissors. Go on.

WiLHELMINA.

It's nice to talk to you. Shall I tell you some-
thing very — well, rather — funny about Tommy
and myself ?



THE AMAZONS. 23

MiNCHIN.

Do, if you ought to.

WiLHELMINA.

I don't think I ought to.

MiNCHIN.

{Gravely ?\^ Well then, my dear, if you are at all
uncertain about it perhaps it would be better —

WiLHELMINA.

Yes, you're right.

MiNCHIN.

Perhaps it would be better that you should tell
me.

WiLHELMINA.

Oh ! Well, you know Tommy and I have been
staying up at Drumdurris with little Lady Drum.

MiNCHIN.

Have you ?

WiLHELMINA.

There was a very large house-party, men and
women. {He glances involmitarily at her gaiters^
Oh, we always visit in our skirts, of course.

MiNCHIN.

Yes, yes, yes.



24 THE AMAZONS.

WiLHELMINA.

Well — you'll never guess ! — Tommy had an
offer of marriage.

MiNCHIN.

\_Laughing.'] Ho, ho !

WiLHELMINA.

Hush ! You'll fall off.

MiNCHIN.

That tom-boy too ! Now, if such a thing had
happened to you I —

WiLHELMINA.

Mr. Minchin !

MiNCHIN.

Eh

WiLHELMINA.

It did happen to me also. \_Looking round.']
Mother ! [Lady Castlejordan reappears.] I'm in
the way, I expect.

MiNCHIN.

[^Still laughing.'] No, no.

WiLHELMINA.

My fly, please. Thank you.

\_She takes the fly from him ; the hook runs
into his finger.



THE AMAZONS. 25

MiNCHIN.



[ Yemng:\ Yah



WiLHELMINA.

You're hooked ! \_Extractmg the hook.'\ I am sorry.

\_She gathers her tackle together and goes to
the gate.

Lady Castlejordan.

\To MiNCHiN.] I heard your laugh a long way
off. What amuses you ?

MiNCHIN.

\In pain.'] Got a hook in my finger.

Lady Castlejordan.
How good humoured you are !

WiLHELMINA.

Here's Tommy ! [CaHing.'] Tom ! Holloa — a — a !

\The call is returned and Lady Thomasin Beltur-
BET, a bright^ rosy, rather ?'ough-mannered girl of
eighteen, appears afid leaps the gate. She is in
man^s ridi?ig-dress, smartly and perfectly turned"
out from cap to boots.

WiLHELMINA.

Mr. Minchin has called to see us.

Thomasin.
\_Shaking hands heartily with Minchin.] Good



26 THE AMAZONS.

man ! How are you ? \_Kissing Lady Castlejor-
DAN.] Missed you at breakfast, mater. \_To Min-
CHiN.] How's the old horse ?

MiNCHIN.

[^Shaking his head.'] Ah !

Thomasin.

I thought he went rather gingerly on that near
fore of his when you rode over in the summer. Look
here, you come and have a spin with me round the
park one morning ; we'll give you a mount. What
d'ye say ?

MiNCHIN.

\_Looking her up and down.'] My young friend, I'm
afraid I could not ride with you while you are in
such an attire as I now see you in —

Lady Castlejordan.

\Iitterposing?\ Er — Mr. Minchin. Tommy, talk
to your brother.

[Thomasin yWV^j- Wilhelmina, afid they, talk
together.

MiNCHIN.

\_Advancing to Lady Castlejordan, speaki?ig in an
undertone.'] Lady Castlejordan, I — I must say it —
I am a little shocked.

Lady Castlejordan.
I don't understand you.



THE AMAZONS. 27.

MiNCHIN.

Pardon me, is that a proper dress for a young
woman to scamper about in ?

Lady Castlejordan.

It is all a question of environment. The poor
African in her solitary row of beads is as discreet as
the best dressed woman in town. I will not have
my boys' unconsciousness disturbed.

MiNCHIN.

I ought to tell you this. I hear that the Overcote
and Scrumleigh people spend the afternoons of their
early-closing Wednesdays in hanging about the
skirts of your park.

Lady Castlejordan.
Vulgar curiosity !

MiNCHIN.

There, I wonder your park has skirts !

Lady Castlejordan.

I have built five lodges round Overcote Park,
expressly to protect us from intruders ; with the
exception of one privileged old friend — yourself —
no one enters the park but on my fortnightly Thurs-
days.

MiNCHIN.

\_Glancing over his shoulder?^ And then — ?



28 THE AMAZONS.

Lady Castlejordan.

Then my boys disguise themselves in petticoats.
I think I may boast that no boys have sweeter
frocks than my boys.

[WiLHELMiNA and Thomasin stroll away,

MiNCHIN.

{^Seeing that he is alone with Lady Castlejordan.]
H'm ! one word more, Lady Castlejordan. Assum-
ing, just for the sake of argument, that your boys
are girls, may I ask w^hat you'd do if they should
ever be asked in marriage ?

Lady Castlejordan.
\Agitated.'\ Ah ! Oh, my dear Mr. Minchin !

MiNCHIN.

^Triumphantly?)^ Aha !

Lady Castlejordan.

Do you know you've chanced on a supposition
that has been a reality ! While Willy and Tommy
— well, Wilhelmina and Thomasin — were staying
at Drumdurris Castle, two men fell in love with
them !

Minchin.

And in the name of common-sense, why not ?

Lady Castlejordan.

Men I call them ! Insects ! Merciful Powers,
one was a Frenchman !



THE AMAZONS, 29

MiNCHIN.

Well — !

Lady Castlejordan.
A creature who has doubtless shot a fox !

MiNCHIN.

The other ?

Lady Castlejordan.
Little Lord Tweenwayes.

MiNCHIN.

Tweenwayes ! A fine race, the Fitzbrays.

Lady Castlejordan.
Fine !

MiNCHIN.

Why Godefroy de Fitz Braye was one of Rich-
ard's Knights in the Crusade.

Lady Castlejordan.

No Fitzbray has ever stood higher than five feet
five in his boots. They're a shrivelled, puny line.
The present Lord Tweenwayes inherits the accu-
mulated ailments of all his ancestors, and he pre-
sumes — !

Thomasin and Wilhelmina re-appear.


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