Arts United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Labo.

Education's impact on economic competitiveness : hearing before the Subcommittee on Education, Arts, and Humanities of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources, United States Senate, One Hundred Fourth Congress, first session ... February 2, 1995 online

. (page 12 of 15)
Online LibraryArts United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on LaboEducation's impact on economic competitiveness : hearing before the Subcommittee on Education, Arts, and Humanities of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources, United States Senate, One Hundred Fourth Congress, first session ... February 2, 1995 → online text (page 12 of 15)
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Cambridge, Mass: John F Kennedy School of Government, 1990, 1-35.

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years after High School Graduation." Sodologv of Education . July 1977, Jfl, 182-206.

Hotchkiss, Lawrence. Effects of Schooling ( ?" (;"*AtM«lll.iiMmil lllnchmnn mmI UnlfTn9r>)«nl xfNiiMr^ hy Knwwleiffr Ikmmk



Mr. Lloyd. If we look at industry and manufacturing, again we
can see how it is shrinking, so that by the year 2000, only 10 per-
cent of the American work force will be in manufacturing.



89

The service industry bobs up and down, but for the most part,
the low wage service industry is also shrinking.

The one industry that is gp-owing like gangbusters is the informa-
tion knowledge economy, and as I said, by the year 2000, in just
5 years, two out of three of our workers will be in the information
knowledge economy.

Vince Lombardi, the popular "American philosopher," has said:
"If you don't measure and keep score, you are only practicing." It
is past time we started to measure our student performance
against world-class standards, if we are to become individually and
nationally competitive in today's global knowledge economy.

For the past century, contrary to today's political rhetoric, our K-
12 public school system has been largely fiinded and operated by
State and local governments. While States have the primary re-
sponsibility under the Constitution to finance and operate public
schools, national economic competitiveness and security demand
that educational competitiveness also become a top Federal priority
before it is too late for our children and grandchildren.

Despite the courageous efforts of dedicated educators, American
student performance is rapidly becoming an international embar-
rassment and a failed democratic promise to at least one-half of
America's children. We have had slight improvements over the last
few years, but today only one of two American youth between the
ages of 17 and 21 is developing the competitive knowledge to suc-
ceed in college, hold a productive job, and participate responsibly
as a citizen, parent or consumer.

This chart again graphically shows that — 50 percent of our stu-
dents go on to college £ind hold a good job, becoming lifelong learn-
ers, accountable citizens, informed consumers, responsible parents,
productive and highly-paid workers, and get success and satisfac-
tion out of their lives. On the other hand, we are paying a terrible
price for the results of ignorance in crime and prison, poverty and
welfare, irresponsible parents, low-skill, low-paid workers, frustra-
tion, anger and fear for those who are not sharing the American
dream.

[The chart referred to follows:]

.III American Catasliophe: The Groniiig Cap

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Online LibraryArts United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on LaboEducation's impact on economic competitiveness : hearing before the Subcommittee on Education, Arts, and Humanities of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources, United States Senate, One Hundred Fourth Congress, first session ... February 2, 1995 → online text (page 12 of 15)