Augustus Griffin.

Griffin's journal : first settlers of Southold, the names of the heads of those families, being only thirteen at the time of their landing; first proprietors of Orient, biographical sketches online

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GIFT OF
Mr. Ralph Ellis








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GRIFFIN S JOURNAL.



Jftrat Settlers of S

THE NAMES OF THE HEADS OF THOSE FAMILIES,

$ewg onlg ijjirtem at % ttrrn of fym lanbittg;

FIRST PROPRIETORS OF ORIENT;

Biographical Sketches,



BY AUGUSTUS GRIFFIN



rtent, C. J.

PUBLISHED BY AUOUSTUS GRIFFIN

1857.



F i-



Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1857, by
AUGUSTUS GRIFFIN,

>rk s Office of the District Court of the United States, (or the Southern
District of New York.














C. *.. AJ.V ORD, PRINTER

.M.KWA.TER STRKKT N. V.



Dedication.



To my Son, Sidney L. Griffin; and good friend,
Nathaniel T. Hvfobard, Esq.

Having had it in contemplation for some years to
leave to posterity some memorial of its ancestry in this
my native town; and having, with much labor, collected
many facts and incidents together for the purpose of
publication, unvarnished as they are ; and being near
the end of my earthly sojourn, I now submit them to
the public.

It has pleased my Creator to prolong my life beyond
the ordinary age of man ;* and this favor I interpreted
as a design of His will that I should live to see my de
sire, respecting this work, fulfilled. To you, my son,
and to you, my excellent friend and nephew, by per
mission, I dedicate this production, the fruit of many
days of anxious toil and research. It is but an inade-

* In my ninety first year.

* M120352



6 DEDICATION

quate return for your marked attentions and numerous
expressions of friendship. And may that Power who
has preserved me so long, and surrounded me with so
many blessings, attend us to that world that knows no
change or sorrow, but peace and love forever more.

AUGUSTUS GRIFFIN.
Orient, January, 1857.



Preface.



The statistics collected in this biographical and chro
nological history, is the work of our aged inhabitant of
Southold, now living, well known for his literary tastes
and indefatigable application to the subject. It is an
invaluable repository of facts, connected with the early
settlement, character, and actions of our ancestors. The
descendents of those ancestors are inhabitants of every
section of the country, and it is natural they should
trace their lineage to the graves of their fathers. It is
incumbent on us, therefore, who live around them, to
preserve the record of the facts in our possession for
future reference, as evidence of their nativity. To fu
ture generations, this sketch must be most acceptable
and gratifying. It abounds with anecdote, incident,
and narrative, enlivening the tediousness of genealo-
gous detail with many interesting and pertinent descrip
tions, more valuable to the native, but not the less



3 PREFACE.

agreeable to the general reader. The volume may not
possess the fascination of fiction or the gravity of pole
mics ; but more than these, it appeals to that earnest
desire, which every one possesses, of knowing the his
tory of his origin, and the vicissitudes of his race.

JOHN O. TERKY,
Orient, December, 1856.



Contents.





PAGE.


Brewster Anna,


192.


Akerly Robert,


15, 16.


Beebee Joseph & family,


200


Arnold Isaac,


do.


Boiseau Jean,


205.


Adams Rev. Mr.,


39.


Browns Israel, &c.,


208


Anderson Rev. Mr.,


41.


Brown John,


224.


Amerman, Rev. Mr.,


56.


Booth, family,


226.


Auction at Sterling,


51.


Beebee Daniel,


239


Arnot, Dr. D. R.,


169.


Brown Robt.,


241.


Aldridge Ezekiel,


216.


do. Edwin P.,


do


Anecdote, Baptist minister,


257.










C




B












Corwin Matthias, 15, 16,


225.


Budd John ST., 15, 16.


Corey Jacob,


16


Brown Richard Sr.,


19.


Conkline John, 16,


238


do. Samuel,


19.


Caddie Rev. Mr.,


40


do. Israel,


19.


Cook Rev. Mr.,


do.


do. Joseph,


19.


Cram Rev. Mr,,


do.


do. Richard Jr.,


20.


Clark Rev Mr.,


43


Beebee Noah G.,


20.


Church Methodist,


53.


Barber Rev. Mr.,


37.


Christmas Storm, 1811,


154.


Beers Rev. Mr.,


43.


Chase Frederick,


175


Blakeman Rev. Mr.,


43.


Champlin George,


183


Booth Constant Jr.,


52.


Corwin Mrs. John,


185


Bouton Rev M.,


57.


Clergymen of Upper Aque-




Brown Hannah.


135.


bogue,


199.



10



CONTENTS.



Case Col. Benjamin,


PAGE.

206.


Clark Dr. Joshua,


207.


do. John,


217.


Case Moses,


236.


Carl Silas,


244.


D




Davenport Hev. Mr.,


40.


Dickerson Rev. Mr ,


41.


Deverel Rev. Mr.,


do.


Dyer Caleb,


240.


E




Edwards Lewis A..


20, 238.


" Enterprise" Schooner,


239.


F




Fisher s Island.


33.


Foster Rev. Mr..


40.


Finnegan Rev. Mr..


54.


Foss, Rev. Mr .


55.


Friendship,


155.


Fanning Edmond,


206.


Franklin Dr. at Southoid


228.







Gardiner s Island,


15.


Glover Samuel,


28.


do. Grover,


29.


Gull s Islands,


33.


Ground for Church,


37.


Gamage. Rev. Mr.,


43.


Greenport.


53.


Griffin Augustus,


67.



do. Jasper & others 84 to 101
inclusive.



Griffin Samuel and

others, 114 to 116.

do. Peter, 125.

Gillet Rev. Elisha, 102.

Goldsmith Zacheus, 114.

Gardiner Dr. John, 127
Griffin Daniel & Brothers. 168

do. Joseph, 170.

Genin John N., 183.

Griffin Amon T.. 186

Griswold Wareham. 203.

Glover family, 217 ; 218.

Goldsmith Jos. H . 233.

do. Addisou. do.

Gardner Lion, 242,

H

Horton Barnabas, 15, 16.

Hallock Peter, 17

Haynes Rev. Mr.. 41.

Benson, Rev. Mr., 56,

Hollis, Rev. Mr.. do

How Rev. Mr.,, do

Hill Rev. Mr., 57.

Havens Dr. Jonathan, do,

do. Gabriel, do,

Horton Silas, 147

do. Bethia, 152.
Ho well Jonathan, 157.
Hill, Ithuel, 167,
Hubbard Mrs. Harriet ML, 180:
Hovton Johathan G. ? 192, 229,
Hobart Rev. Peter & family, 201
Horlow Robert, 224,
House, first meeting in South-
old 259.
Hubbard family, 2.34-



CONTENTS.



11



King John,



fc

PAGE

19, 22, 26, 30, 103.



do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.



William,

Rev. Saml. W.,

Benjamin Jr.,

Edward C.,

Benjamin,

Joseph,

Abner,

Frederick,

John Sr. & family,

Henry,

Elisha,



Latham Jonathan F.
Lee Rev. Mr.,
Lucky Rev. Mr.,
Lester Thomas S.

H

Mapes Thomas,
Mulford Elisha,
Moore Thomas Sr.,
1st Meeting House*
2nd do.
3d do.

1st Mill at Orient,
Moore Abigail,
do. John,
do. Usher H.,



30.

53.
132,

do.
133.
148.
150.
151.
216.
223.
224.



34.
39.
56.
113.



15, 16.

28, 237.

28, 215.

38.

43.

44.

134,

138.

215.

226.



Oysterponds, 18, 31.

do. Families in 1700, 35.
do. do 1752, 36.

do. do. 1855, 45.



Oysterponds residents of 90

years old,
Overton Rev. Mr.,
Ordnance,
Osborne, Rev. Mr.j
Overton Isaac,
Old Burying ground, Orient, 187



PAGE.

45.
40.
50.
56.
153.



Peter s Neck, 24.
Pathway or lane to the Harbor 25.

Plumb Island, a rock on, 32.

Payne Pears, 34;

Porter, Rev. Mr., 42.

Portrait of my wife, 192

Partridge Asa, 203.

Peterson Mrs. Emma, 205.

Penny Wid. Esther, 208,

Petty Family, 219.

Paine John, 224.

Prince James and John 233



R

Robertson Rev. Mr.,
Rawson Rev. Mr.,
Racket Noah,

do. Deacon John

family,

Rudd Rev. John C.,
Reeve Family,



42.
56.

128.
and
128 to 130.

195.

195



Southampton, 15.

Southold, 16.

Smith Rev. Mr., 41.

Snow Storm, 47.

Shaw Richard, 49.

Sing Rev. Mr., 56.
September, Storm, 1815, 160.



CONTENTS.



PAGE.

Sickness at Orient, 1849, 177,

Sweezy Rev. Moses, 198.

Sigourney Mrs. L. H., 204.

Seaman John, 243.



Tuthill John Sr., 15, 16, 19,21, 58.

do. John Jr., 21, 59.

Terry Richard, 16, 213.
Tuthill Peter V.,

do. Jeremiah, 26.

Tibbals Rev., Mr., 57.

Tuthill John 3d, 60.

do. do. 4th, 62.

do. Samuel, 63.

do. James, do.

do. Nathaniel Sr., 65, 234.

do. Mary,

Terry Jonathan, 101, 116, 239.

do. Daniel T., 121.

do. Noah, H8.

do. Thomas, 120, 225.

Tuthill Noah, HI-

do. Adjutant Daniel, 113.

do. Henry 3d of John Jr., 163.

Townsend Deborah, 141.

Tabor Amon, 143.

do. Frederick, 147.
Tuthill, Judge W. H.,

Terry John 0., 165.

Tuthill Rufus, 172.

do. Capt. Rufus, 200.

Terry Samuel H., 205.

do. Joseph Jr., 214,

do. David, 224.

Tuthill Ira, 231.

do. Matthew, 238.

Thompson B. F., 247.



PAGE.

Vail Jeremiah Jr., 28.

do. do. 3d, 29.

do. do. 3th, 29.

do. Jeremiah Sr. 30, 218,220,232.

do. Stephen Sr., 156.

do. Dr. Thomas, 104.

Vail Silas, 173.

do. Elizabeth, 193.



Well, William Esq.,


15, 16.


Wooster Gen.,


21.


Wharf,


49.


Webb David,




Whitfield Rev. Mr.,


52.


Webb Rev. Mr.,


57.


Webb Orange Sr.,


110.


do. David,


124.


do. Silas,


do.


Wiggins Family,


130.


Wells, Harriet L.,


164.


Woodhull John,


171.



Women Physicians in South-
old, 180.

Wells John C., 184.

Wickham Family, 222.

Washington at Sterling, 227.

Wells Rev. Timothy 230.

do. Benjamin 242.



Youngs Jonathan Jr., 158.

do. Henry, 160.

do. Jeremiah, 190.

do. Rev. Daniel, 197.

do. Rev. John &c., 211.



JOURNAL.



A company, consisting of thirteen men, with their
families, left their mother country (old England) about
the year 1638, for the newly-discovered World, known
as America. After a passage of some weeks, they ar
rived at ISTew Haven, then a small village in the then
colony of Connecticut. At this place they stopped un
til early in the autumn of 1640, having made their stay
there ahout two years. Until this last date they had
not fully decided where to make their permanent abode,
or settle themselves and families for life. They now all
agreed to charter a vessel and embark on hoard, with
their families, effects, and provisions sufficient to carry
them through the then coming winter. All things ready,
the sails were hoisted, with a propitious breeze. They
requested the captain to direct his course for the east
end of Long Island. After sailing about forty miles,
they rounded the point which terminates the northeast
branch of this island, then directing their course south
erly about five miles, to what is now known as Long
Beach Point ; doubling* this point, they steered west
about two miles to Shelter Island Ferry. J^ow the
2



14 GRIFFIN S JOURNAL.

course was southwest, to a harbor or bay about six miles
farther, now known as Southold. Here they cast anchor
near the shore, on which they could see a number of
natives, whose movements betokened much curiosity
and amazement.

After returning thanks to the Great Disposer of all
things for his goodness in aiding them in a safe pas
sage to this new and uncivilized place, several of them
entered the long boat and rowed for the shore. As
they rowed with their backs towards the shore, the na
tives, who awaited their landing, appeared astonished
to see men coming towards them backwards. They
were received with tokens of friendship. Tradition
says that the first man of these bold adventurers to set
his foot 011 the shores of this town, was a Mr. Peter
Hallock. This, however, it is said, was accorded him
by lot. The place where he stepped on the beach is,
to this day 1856 (two hundred and sixteen years
since) pointed out, and called Hal lock s Landing. It is
some seventy rods south the foot of land af

terwards owned by the Hon. Ezra Lhommodieu. South
west of said spot, along the beach, about sixty rods far
ther, is a creek called Town Creek, which you can cross
at low water to Hogi.

After they had all safely landed and cultivated ji peace
able intercourse with the astonished natives, they set
for a suitable site whereon to erect booths,
or tents, to protect their wives and children from the
storms and t< of the coming The lot

which they selected was about eighty rods west from
where iliey landed it is now owned by the parish or
town of Southold on which is a house where the poor



GRIFFIN S JOURNAL. 15

are kept, and, we hope, are well attended to. There
is still remains of holes in the earth pointed out where
these first settlers kept their provisions from the frost.

The names of these adventurers to this new region
with their households, were : 1st. Rev. John Youngs ;
2d. Barnabas Horton ; 3d. William Wells, Esq. ; 4th.
Peter Hallock; 5th. John Tuthill; 6th. Eichard Terry;
7th. Thomas Mapes; 8th. Matthias Corwin ; 9th. Ro
bert Akcrly ; 10th. Jacob Corey; llth. John Conkline;
12th. Isaac Arnold; 13th. John Budd.- Twelve of
these had their wives and children with them, Peter
Hallock s wife and children were at the time* in Eu
rope.

These men, with their families, were the first of any
civilized nation that had made the attempt to settle on
the east end of Long Island. This took place in the
early part of September, 1640. Southampton was set
tled in the November following. Gardiner s Island was
purchased of the natives the year previous viz : 1639
by Lion Gardiner, who, at the time, was a lieutenant
in a fort then at Saybrook, Connecticut.

As winter was approaching, as far as their means
would admit, every laudable effort to meet and endure
it with composure and resignation as Christians and
pilgrims, were made use of. The Rev. John Youngs
cheerfully shared with them every privation and diffi
culty allotted to this his charge. The greater part, or
all the heads of these families, were members of his
church in Hingham, England, which is about one hun
dred miles from London ; there lie had been a minister
some year- previous to his coming to this New World.

By the opening of spring they had formed a friendly



16 GRIFFIN S JOURNAL.

intercourse with tlie natives, purchased land on which
to erect suitable booths for their present residences, and
commenced, as would seem, a revolution in their event
ful career in life. These families, it appears, for the
first year or so, settled down within the bounds of the
present town of Southold. Rev. John Youngs, their
worthy pastor, continued in their midst to dispense the
word of life. Barnabas Ilor ton s first tenement was
erected near or on the site where his descendant,
Jonathan G. Ilorton, now lives, he being the sixth ge
neration. William Wells, a lawyer, located on the land
part of which is now occupied by his descendant of the
seventh generation, William II. Wells. John Tuthill,
in the course of a year or so, went east some nine miles,
to what was afterwards called Oysterponds now,
Orient. Two of his sons afterwards settled at Cutcho-
gne; Richard Terry, located near where Mr. Cady now
lives ; Thomas Mapes, a little west of the meeting
house ; Matthias Corwin, on the north side of the road,
on lands now owned by the heirs of the late Lazarus Gen-
iiing ; Robert Akerl v purchased where Win. C. Coch-
ran now resides ; Jacob Corey, on the land now owned
by the heirs of the late Dr. Micah Moore; John Conk-
line, a little to the east of Corey ; Isaac Arnold, just
east of Conkline ; John Budd near where Moses C.
Cleveland owns and resides.

As they had now formed themselves into a society,
it was deemed proper to give a name to the place
chosen for their residence. The majority were for
naming it " Southold ;" and so it was set down, and so
it yet remains. Its Indian name was Toyony.



GRIFFIN S JOURNAL. 17

There is a place in England about one hundred
miles from London called South wold, and it is thought
some of these families came from that village or town,
and so recommended the name, which has continued in
favor over two hundred years.



Mr. Peter ILillock, as before noticed, was the first to
set foot on the shores of this town. His family was
not with him ; he had left them in Europe, living near
London viz: a wife and two step-daughters. Mr.
Iliillock continued at Southold not more than a year.
Some suppose that Oyster Ponds was not visited by any
of these first men to Southold under two or more years ;
but I am fully of the opinion, after my ii-. ions,

and as Mr. Hallock was situated, that IIG went to
Oysterponds the next year after his arrival at Soiifhold.
As it was, Mr. Hallock traveled east to a neck of iund,
called by the Indians who possessed it, PequaiiiGk^ Dm&
miles. This isolated spot then a fores : appeared to
Mr. Hallock as most delightful. Its locality, ;
and many natural advantages, rendered ii r.u obj.
interest to purchase. He soon concluded, a bp.rgain
with its native owners for the enlire nock, Lncl, rs he
conceived, a safe and good one. He r.ov
Southold, arranged his affairs, an;

New York for where ho i: il ^J>

well, and greatly rej.

Mr. Hal lock w3

a picturesque d j.seripi IiMi of . -de

previous to his leaving the I ce of

2*



18 GRIFFIN S JOURNAL

land on the extreme east and north part of a beautiful
island ; said piece of land containing about two thou
sand acres, with its bays, beaches, &c., &c. This de
lightful neck of land lie informed Mrs. Hallock should
be a present to her two daughters, if she and they would
accompany him to America. Whether they were some
time making up their minds we know not, but tradi
tion says his stay was rather long in England, and as it
has been said, " procrastination is the thief of time,"
in this case Mr. Hallock found it so to his sad disap
pointment.

At his return to take possession of his in valuable selec
tion, lo ! to his sorrow, it had been conveyed away, and
actually taken possession of by Tuthill, Youngs, and
others.

It does not appear after this transaction of Mr. Hal-
lock,- from any information or record that I have found,
that he was the purchaser or owner of any lands or
tenements in Oysterponds. It is believed he subse
quently settled some twenty miles west of the village
of Southold, near what is now called Acquebogue,
where there is now many of his descendants living.

Mr. Thompson in his excellent histoiy of Long Island,
says Oysterponds was purchased of the natives about
1646, six years after the first settlement of Southold.
If this was so, and Hallock went home to England after
this, his bargain, and was absent two or more years, as
tradition informs us, it is not much to be wondered at
that the Indians were so doubtful of his return as to
make a second conveyance of the : neck of

land.

From the above circumstances relating to Oyster-



GRIFFIN S JOURNAL. 19

ponds, as totlie time of its settlement, I should suppose
that John Tuthill, with the Rev. John Youngs, or his
son John, junior, (at the time, 1650,) twenty-live or more
years old, came down to Qysterponds, and with a Mr.
John King, Israel and Richard Brown, bought all the
west part of said land, from the east part of what is now
called Truman s Beach, to the east bounds of what is
called the Manor and Parsonage, with the late Captain
Christopher Brown s farm to the bay, making the east
line ot this first purchase, beginning at the bay and
running about a north course to the Sound.

JSTow, it is as w^ell ascertained as perhaps it ever can
be, and I am satisfied from the strictest researches I
*have made, that after Peter llallock s first visit to
Oysterponds, in 1641, (Pequatuck, as the natives called
it,) John Tuthill, John Youngs, Jr., Israel Brown,
Richard Brown, Samuel Brown, and John King, were
the first six men to settle in this place with their fami
lies, and the first owners of its lands from the natives.

From our fathers fathers, we are informed that the
first rude dwelling built on this peninsula, or neck of
land, was put up on the south side of the road, a rod or
two west of where Israel or his son Joseph Brown some
years after, built a good sized house on the north side
of the road. This last house was built about the year
1670. About the year 1829 it was taken down and a
small one erected instead, on the same site. When
taken down it must have stood more than one hundred
and fifty years. It was situated about one-third of a
mile east of the foot of Truman s Beach.

This house, as I have noticed, was near the spot
opposite where the first rude hut or shelter from the



20 GRIFFIN S JOURNAL.

inclemency of the weather for civilized man, in this
place was put up. That, as said, was on the south side
of the road, where there yet remains the sign of a well,
which, no doubt, was dug by those first civilized set
tlers about the year 1645 or 1646. In 1782 or 1783,
this property passed out of the Brown family, who had
been its owners since 1646 or 1647, or near that date,
being about 130 years.

The next house was east of Joseph Brown s some
forty rods, built by Samuel Brown. It stood on or
near the spot where William T. Conkline has erected a
barn. This house was burned down not far from 1730.
A little west of this another wn.^ soon erected, which is
yet standing, owned by Andrew Jackson Racket. w

About twenty rods east of Samuel s house, Richard
Brown with his son Richard Brown, Jr., built them
selves a large double dwelling. When this house was
repaired with an addition, there was a vane to show the
point of the wind, at the time put up on the peak of the
roof, marking the date of the repairing of said house and
the year the vane w r as put up, viz. : 1691. It reads the
same up or down. This house stood about one hundred
and iifty years, when it was taken down, and on its site
Noah G. Beebe in 1837 erected a handsome two story
single house. This venerable old homestead went out
of the Brown family in 1829, or near that date, when
Mr. Noah G. Beebe purchased it. Mr. Beebe died in
the autumn of 1849. His widow, Mrs. Charlotte Beebe,
sold it in 1852 to Mr. Lewis A. Edwards, in whose pos
session, it now remains. In the winter of 1855 and 1856
Mr. Edwards sold the Beebe house to Dr. E. E. Skin-



GRIFFIN S JOURNAL. 21

ner, who moved it to Greenport. Mr. Edwards lias
built a superb mansion house near where the Beebe
house stood, perhaps the largest and most expensive in
this county.

The next house east, about twenty-five rods distant,
was erected by John Tuthill, Jr., or more likely by his
father, John Tuthill, Sr., who at the time when this
house was put up, in about 1666, was near seventy years
old, and his son John T., Jr., about thirty years old,
who came in possession of it at his father s death. The
father, John Tuthill, Sr., with the Browns, Youngs,
and Kings, made his choice of this location for his stop
ping place. Where this ancestor of all the Tuthills in
this and the neighboring towns died, and his age, at
the time of his death, no one can inform us.

It is very reasonable to suppose he occupied this
house while lie lived, and after him his son John, Jr.,
who died in 1717, aged eighty-two years. At this
period Henry Tuthill, Sr., grandson of John Tuthill, Jr.,
was fifty-two years of age. The house, it is believed,
was the oldest frame one in this place. It was double,
with two small front rooms, a narrow entry between
them, a story and a half high, near thirty feet front and
twenty-three feet rear ; the roof the steepest I ever
knew. In this antique house Henry Tuthill, Jr., died
at the age of about eighty-five. This took place while
General David "Wooster with his brigade was stationed
at Oysterponds, in the summer of 1775. This old relic
of ancient days was moved off the premises, converted
into a barn, in or near 1800, and about 1822 taken
down, having stood one hundred and sixty or more



22 GRIFFIN S JOURNAL.

years. Peter Y. Tuthill now owns and occupies the
lands of this old homestead. He is the seventh genera
tion from John Tu.thill,the first proprietor.

John King, who had purchased the lands adjoining
John Tnthill s east line, Imilt for himself and his son
Samuel a house, about twenty .five rods east of said Tut-
hilFs. His and Tutliill s were of similar draft and con
struction -roofs steep to a fault. These five houses
were all "built between the years 1660 and 1690. As
these men with their families came to this place find
settled on these locations, some fifteen or twenty years
earlier than those dates, they must have had some kind
of tenements to dwell in previous to having put up
their more comfortable situations ; but what they were
we are not informed. When these first fathers came
to Southold their average age was about forty years,
which would make them at the time of constructing
those residences near three score and ten years of
age. As we have observed, John Tuthill, Jr. assisted
in taking an interest with his father, so it must have
been witli the Browns, Kings, and Youngs. As has
been said of Brown s homestead, so likewise luith the
place of John King gone out of his name. His house
which was built about 1670 was taken down in 1816,


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Online LibraryAugustus GriffinGriffin's journal : first settlers of Southold, the names of the heads of those families, being only thirteen at the time of their landing; first proprietors of Orient, biographical sketches → online text (page 1 of 20)