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in 1877, and 86| days from Port Phillip Heads to East
India Dock on her homeward run.



THE CARLISLE CASTLE 289

On the passage out Carlisle Castle sank the Lizards
on 11th July, 1877, the same day that Loch Garry left
Queenstown, and the two ships were in company till
the 22nd.

On the homeward passage Carlisle Castle was amongst
the wool fleet, having been dry-docked and otherwise
carefully prepared for the race home. She passed
through Port Phillip Heads at 7 a.m. on 23rd
November, 1877, rounded the Horn with skysails,
topmast and lower stunsails set on 20th December,
Mermerus, Miliiades and Salamis being in company,
crossed the equator 21st January, 1878. Sighted the
Bishops at 2 a.m. on 16th February, and docked on
the 18th.

The result of the race between the four vessels was
as follows : —

Miltiades left Melbourne Nov. 16 arrived London Feb. 21 — ST days

Carlisle Castle ,, „ ,, 23 ,. ,, ,, 18 87

Salamis ,, ,, ,, 24 ,, ,, ,. 19 S7

Mermerus „ ,, ,, 24 ., ,, ,, 12 — 80

Carlisle Castle's best run was 270 miles, but she never
had a really good chance. In the spring of 1880 she
went out to Melbourne from the Lizards in 74 days.

Green's sold her in the nineties, and soon afterwards
she was wrecked with all hands on the West Coast of
Australia.

The P. & O. Oceana, Captain L. H. Crawford, C.B.,
passed under her stern when it was noticed that she was
carrying a very heavy press of sail for a vessel on a lee
shore with heavy weather coming on, and she was
never seen again. Some wreckage was afterwards
picked up which identified her, but none of the crew
escaped and she probably struck and went down with
all hands that night, 12th July, 1899.



290 THE BLACKWALL FRIGATES

"Macquarie" (ex -" Melbourne "), the last of
the Blackwallers,

The last of Green's Blackwall Line of sailing
ships was the Melbourne, better known as the Macguarie,
to which her name was changed when Devitt & Moore
bought her and transferred her from the Melbourne to
the Sydney run.

The success of their two previous iron ships, the
Superb and Carlisle Castle, made Messrs. Green decide
to build the very finest iron passenger sailing ship in
their power; and the result was called the Melbourne.
She was undoubtedly one of the strongest merchant
ships ever launched, for she was built from the surplus
plates of a man-of-war which happened to be under
construction in the Blackwall Yard at the same time.

The Melbourne measured 1857 tons, 269.8 ft. long,
40.1 ft. beam, 23.7 ft. depth with a 42 ft. foc's'le and
69 ft. poop. Her cabins were larger than those of any
earlier passenger ship, at the same time they were
completely furnished. Like all the Blackwall ships,
where the comfort of passengers was the first consider-
ation, the Melbourne was more noted for freedom from
accident and dry decks than for record passages, yet she
was driven hard with good results on many occasions.
She had a beautifully carved figurehead of Queen
Victoria, was launched in June, 1875, and when ready
for sea cost £42,000.

On her maiden voyage the Melbourne left the East
India Docks, drawing 19 ft. 11 in. forward and 20 ft. 2 in
aft in tow of the tugs Prince and Rienzi on Monday,
16th August, 1875.

She was commanded by Captain Marsden, her com-
plement included 4 officers and 6 midshipmen and she
had a full passenger list.




MELBOURNE" (AFTERWARDS " MACQUARIE ").




• CAKLISLK CASTLE. ■



[To fare I'aije 290.



THE MELBOURNE 291

The new ship was swung at Greenhithe for compass
adjustment and then proceeded.

The passage down Channel was slow, she was off the
Start in company with the well-known iron clipper
Duntrune, bound to Sydney, on 22nd August. She had
very light winds to the trades. The South Australian
clipper St. Vincent was in company on 1st September in
45° 51' N., 10° 47' W., also on the 8th, 14th and 15th.

On 16th September in 161° N., 26° 17' W., the wind
hauled from east to S.E. and began to freshen with
threatening appearance of weather. The flying jib,
royals and topgallant staysails were taken in, and the
crossjack and driver furled, and the men were lavin»
forward to clew up the fore topgallant sail, when the
fore topmast went by the cap, taking the main topgallant
mast with it. All night the hands were employed
clearing away the wreck: at 7 a.m. on 17th they were
piped down for two hours, then at it they went again.
At 6 p.m. on the 17th the barque Ithuriel, of Swansea,
was supplied with a cask of pork.

18th September the stump of the fore topmast was
sent down, the carpenter being at work on a new fore
topmast; the ship running before a irnoderate trade
under courses, lower fore topsail, jib and main and
mizen topsails.

The new fore topmast was fidded on the 20th and the
new main topgallant mast sent up on the 24th. On
the following day the upper main topgallant yard was
crossed and both topgallant sails set.

On 28th September the Melbourne crossed the line
in 2G° 3' W., 37 days out from the Start.

On 23rd October the Melbourne made her best mn,
286 miles, in 43'' 43' S., 24° 23' E., a hard westerly gale
blowing with terrific squalls and heavy sea.



292 THE BLACKWALL FRIGATES

On 4th, 5th and 6th November, the ss. Northumberland
was in company, on 4th on starboard quarter, 5th
starboard beam and 6th starboard bow, the wind
moderate from west to N.W. and the Melbourne's runs
for those days 239, 238 and 268, from 78"^ 51' E. to 95" 20'
E. in lat. 43° 50' S.

16th November at 2 p.m. the Melbourne was off the
Heads and at 7 p.m. she anchored in Hobson's Bay,
84 days out, her passage being spoilt by the dismasting
and poor run to the line.

On 8th January, 1876, the Melbourne passed through
the Heads, homeward bound. Her best run 292 miles
was made in 50° 58' S., 125° 55' W. before astrongN.W.
wind on 29th January. On 10th February at 4 a.m.
she passed outside the Diego Ramirez, 33 days out.
Fernando de Noronha was sighted on 10th March and
the equator crossed on the 12th.

On 18th April the little St. Vincent was met in the
mouth of the Channel, homeward bound from Adelaide.
The two ships had seen each other last on 15th September
when both were outward bound.

On 19th April the Melbourne passed the Start, and
at 9 p.m. on 20th took steam, arriving in the East India
Docks on 22nd April, 104 days out.

The Nautical Magazine gave an account of the
Melbourne's second passage to Melbourne, which was
as follows: —

The Melbourne left the East India Docks on 10th June, 1876, and
Gravesend on 12th June, the pilot leaving her off the Start at 6 p.m. on
15th June and a departure from the land being taken on the following
day. Ordinary winds and weather prevailed to the tropics, which were
entered on 2nd July, and after a tedious drag through the N.E. trades^
which were exceedingly light, the equator was crossed at midnight on
14th July in long. 30° 30' W. The tropics were quitted on 24th July_
and so little easting was there in the S.E. trades, that the ship had to
tack three times before clearing the South American coast.



THE MELBOURNE 293

The meridian of Cape Agulhas was crossed on 10th August, and
after that the ship had it all her own way, strong fair winds prevailing.
In running down the easting she sailed 5129 miles in 17 consecutive days
or an average of about 300 miles a day, the best runs being 374, 305 and
352 miles a day. Cape Otway light was sighted at 3 a.m. on Thursday,
31st August, and the Heads were entered at 11.30 a.m. and but for the
bad northerly wind which headed her coming up the bay she would have
reached the anchorage on the evening of the same day. She was taken
alongside the Sandridge railway pier to discharge her cargo on 1st
September.

The three 24 -hour runs mentioned arc very big runs
for a vessel of the Melbourne's speed, and I should
have considered them beyond her capabilities, if
this newspaper account had not been taken, as was
usual with Australian reporters, straight from her
log book.

The Melbourne sailed regularly to Melbourne until
1887, during which time her outward passages averaged
82 days. She was then bought by Devitt & Moore to
replace their S3^dney passenger ship, the old Parramatta,
whose commander, Captain Goddard, transferred to the
Melbourne and took her out to Sydney with 50 passengers.
She arrived in Port Jackson on the 27th December,
1887, for the first time, 94 days out from London; and
henceforward she sailed as regularly to Sydney as she
had done to Melbourne.

In 1888, w^hen she was about to sail on her second
voyage to Sydney, Messrs. Devitt & :\Ioore changed her
name to Macquaric.

In 1897 she succeeded the Harbinger as one of Devitt
«& Moore's cadet ships and Captain Corner received the
command. In 1903, after six successful voyages as a
cadet ship, her owners, to their subsequent regret,
sold her to the Norwegians, who renamed her Fortium,
and stripped the yards off her mizen mast. Her
first passage under the new flag was from Frederickstadt to



294 THE BLACKWALL FRIGATES

Melbourne, where she arrived on the 13th January, 1906,
after an absence of more than nineteen years.

After running her for five or six years, the Norwegians
sold the staunch old ship to Messrs. Lund, who moored
her in an Australian port as a store hulk.

The grand old Macquarie was perhaps the best known
of all the Blackwall frigates to the present generation,
for magnificent photographs of her under sail were very
common not many years ago in every marine optician's
shop window. These photographs were taken by
Captain Corner and reproduced by Messrs. Hughes, of
Fenchurch Street, and they not only show one the beauty
of the old sailing ship, but at the same time they clearly
indicate the majestic appearance of the old Blackwall
frigates.

Yet a photograph can tell one very little, and the
world will never again know the exhilaration of watching
a Blackwaller under sail, bowing in stately fashion to
the short Channel seas as she surges along, the sprays
flying over her foc's'le, the wind making music in her
rigging and a white bone of foam spread on either side of
her cutwater.

Imagination can only carry us a little way; it cannot
put the whole picture together from the few striking
pieces in its possession, such as the sheen of wet wood
in the sun, the creamy iridescent sparkle of the foam to
leeward and the swirling wake, the lights and shades
and shadows on the sails, the curves and lines of standing
and running rigging, the varnish of blocks and paint of
spars and such bright patches of colour as the transparent
green of the curling sea, the yellow glint of copper
against the bow wave, the flash of gaudy bunting and
the red jackets of troops dotting along the snow-white
hammock nettings.



.!v-J^




FINIS 295

The modern eye has no knowledge of this vanished
wonder of sea life except from pictures. Nor can the
modern ear vibrate with the thunder under the forefoot ;
the sharp flogging clap of shaking canvas; the hiss of
the surges and the suck and gushing through clanginfr
deck-ports and gurgling scuppers; the rattle of sprays,
like small shot on the deck: the singing of the shrouds
and the whining hum of the backstays; nor yet with
all the groans and creaks and cries of the wooden ship
in a seaway.

The old Blackwall frigate has followed Nelson's
wooden walls into the mists of the past. The lithograph
and the faded photograph, the sea stained log-book, and
the letters of a few dead and gone shellbacks — letters
with a foreign aroma and world-wide postmarks — are
all that remain to us of a period which no sailor can
think of except with a sigh of regret and a hope that, in
the Port of Kingdom Come, he will find

" . . . . riding in the anchorage the ships of all the world.
Having got one anchor down 'n' all sails furled."



Finis.



APPENDIX



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304 THE BLACKWALL FRIGATES

APPENDIX II.



OLD STATION LISTS.



(1) Watch List. 1858.
Port.

1 boatswain's mate

3 able and 1 ordinary)

seamen /

2 able and 1 ordinary)

seamen j

2 able seamen

4 able seamen •>
2 ordinary seamen >
1 boy J
Midshipmen of the \

watch and 1 boy J



forecastle men

foretop men
maintop men

after-guard
mizentop men



Starboard.

1 boatswain's mate

( 3 able and 1 ordinary
^ seamen

( 2 able and 1 ordinary
(^ seamen

2 able seamen
,'4 able seamen

I 2 ordinary seamen
M boy

j midshipmen of the
)^ watch and I boy



Fore topsail yard men



(2) Stations for Reefing Topsails and Shortening Sail.

On the Forecastle.

Second Officer and Boatswain.

Boatswain's mate of the starboard watch.
Forecastle men of both watches.
Foretop men of both watches.
Sailmaker.

Carpenter and his mate to the fore topsail
^ hallyards.

In the Maintop.

Third Officer.

Boatswain's mate of the port watch.

Maintop men of both watches

After-guard of both watches.

Two quartermasj'ers.

Baker and butcher to main topsail halyards

In the Mizentop.
Fourth Officer.



Main topsail yard men



Mizen topsail yard men



All the midshipmen and boys of both
watches.



(3) Stations for Man overboard.

Volunteers for



Boat s Crew.



All others -^ ^^ °^ ^ wind, to their stations for working ship
t If running, to their stations for shortening sail



APPENDIX



305



(4) Signals to Boats.

In the daytime
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dant I

2nd distinguishing pen- )

dant J

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Blue Peter

J



r



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■{ 2 lights vertical at peak

( 2 lights horizontal at
j peak.

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pull towards the ship °^^^

give way as you head

r 2 blue lights fired to-
return to the ship I gether — 1 from for-



puU more to

starboard

pull more to
port



ward, 1 from aft.



(5) Stations for Working Ship.

On the Forecastle.
Second Officer and Boatswain.

c Let go headsheets



Forecastle men of the lee watch



Forecastle men of the weather
watch



Foretop men of the lee watch



Foretop men of the weather
watch



Brace main3^ard round.

Board foretack.

Pull forelift up.

Let go breast backstays.

Overhaul foretack.

Haul over headsheets.

Board foretack.

Set up breast backstays.
( Raise lee fore clue-garnet.

Haul forvs^ard maintop bowline, and
brace round mainyard.

Brace round fore topgallant
I royal yards,
j Raise weather fore clue-garnet.
■ Let go mainbrace and bowline.



and



I Haul aft foresheet

In the Waist

Third Officer.

Boatswain's mate of the star- ^

board watch I

Sailmaker, baker, carpenter and j

mate, butcher and mate j

On the Quarter-deck.
Fourth Officer.

Haul aft mainsheet



Work maintack and foresheet.



Maintop men of both watches
One of the lee watch
Boatswain's mate of port watch

After-guard of both watches



and brace
'i round foreyard.

Letting go mainsheet.
\ Check headbraces, and attend
( main topsail brace.

Raise main clue-garnets.
•' Brace round main topsail yard.
V Brace roui^d {orevard-



306 THE BLACKWALL FRIGATES

After-guard of lee watch Pull up mainlift.

After-guard of weather watch Set up breast backstays.

Two midshipmen work the poop, boom topping lift and main topgallant
braces.

/ Brace round crossjack yard.
All other midshipmen and boys < Take in slack of breast backstays.

V Brace round fore topsail yard.
One boy of lee watch Overhaul mainsheet

(6) Stations for Quarters, 1858.

To command, captain; A.D.C.'s, two midshipmen.

On quarter-deck, first officer; To work guns, second officer.

1st gun and opposite.
(Carronade)

Boatswain's mate




0-S. ^

Handspike



D <===» D LO A D



One boy Serve Cartridge



2nd gun and opposite.
(Long gun).



N?

A. B. 2 ^ ^ I A.B,

Match \ T vent




, O.S. 4 i ' 3 O.S.

'Handspike \ j hanospikb



A.B. 6 J ( 5 A.B

SPOiJCE t:-=i LOAD

ONE BOY SET5VE Cartridge



APPENDIX 807

3rd gun and opposite

(Carronade).

Boatswain's mate.



^ NO
A B. '2 >Z— X , A.B.

'.MATCH ^ T^ T VENT



A.B. „ _J ,.. A.B



"Handspike



4 I "I 3 Handspike




O.S. 6 «^==t 5 O.S.



A.B: ft LJ 7 A.B.

SPONGE « I [ ' LOAD,

ONE Boy Serve caRiTridce

N.B. — Boys to stand on the side of the deck opposite to that engaged.


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