Benson John Lossing.

Harper's encyclopdia of United States history from 458 A.D. to 1905 (Volume 3) online

. (page 1 of 76)
Online LibraryBenson John LossingHarper's encyclopdia of United States history from 458 A.D. to 1905 (Volume 3) → online text (page 1 of 76)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


REFERENCE
& BIBLIOG



Qfrihwt*



EDITION



HARPER S ENCYCLOPEDIA

of

UNITED STATES HISTORY



FROM 458 A.D. TO 1905



BASED UPON THE PLAN OF

BENSON JOHN LOSSINQ, LL.D.

SOMETIME EDITOR OF "THE AMERICAN HISTORICAL RECORD" AND AUTHOR OF
"THE PICTORIAL FIELD-BOOK OF THE REVOLUTION " THE PICTORIAL FIELD-
BOOK OF THE WAR OF l8l2 " ETC., ETC., ETC.

WITH SPECIAL CONTRIBUTIONS COVERING EVERY PHASE OF AMERICAN HISTORY AND
DEVELOPMENT BY EMINENT AUTHORITIES, INCLUDING



JOHN FISKE.

THE AMERICAN HISTORIAN

WM. R. HARPER, Ph.D., LL.D., D.D.

PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO

ALBERT BUSHNELL HART, Ph.D.

PROF. OF HISTOR Y AT HARVARD

JOHN B. MOORE.

PROF. OF INTERNATIONAL LAW AT COLUMBIA

JOHN FRYER, A.M., LL.D.

PROF. OF LITERATURE AT UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA

WILLIAM T. HARRIS, Ph.D., LL.D.

U. S. COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION



WOODROW WILSON, Ph.D., LL.D.

PRESIDENT OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY

GOLDWIN SMITH, D.C.L., LL.D.

PROF. OF HISTORY UNIV. OF TORONTO

MOSES COIT TYLER, LL.D.

PROF. OF HISTORY AT CORNELL

EDWARD G. BOURNE, Ph.D.

PROF. OF HISTORY AT YALE

R. J. H. GOTTHEIL, Ph.D.

PROF. OF SEMITIC LANGUAGES AT COLUMBIA

ALFRED T. MAHAN, D.C.L., LL.D.

CAPTAIN UNITED STATES NAVY (Retired)



ETC., ETC., ETC., ETC.
WITH A PREFACE ON THE STUDY OF AMERICAN HISTORY BY

WOODROW WILSON, PH.D., LL.D.

PRESIDENT OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY

AUTHOR OF

"A HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN PEOPLE* ETC., ETC.

WITH ORIGINAL DOCUMENTS, PORTRAITS, MAPS, PLANS,^

COMPLETE IN TEN VOLUMES /0-






VOL. HI



UNIVERSITY )



HARPER & BROTHERS PUBLISHERS
NEW YORK - 1905 - LONDON



Copyright, 1905, by HARPER & BROTHERS.
Copyright, 1901, by HARPER & BROTHERS.

All rights restrved.



LIST OF PLATES



PRESIDENT MILLARD FILLMORE Frontispiece

FAC-SIMILE OF THE ORIGINAL DRAFT OF THE DECLA
RATION OF INDEPENDENCE Facing page 40

READING THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE,

CITY HALL SQUARE, NEW YORK CITY .... 38

INDEPENDENCE HALL, PHILADELPHIA ..... 48

PONTIAC S ATTACK ON FORT DETROIT ..... 108

ADMIRAL GEORGE DEWEY "112

ADMIRAL DAVID G. FARRAGUT ....... 318

THE BATTLE OF FREDERICKSBURG VOLUNTEERS

CROSSING THE RIVER ... " " 430




HARPER S ENCYCLOPEDIA

OP

UNITED STATES HISTORY



D.



Dablon, CLAUDE, Jesuit missionary;
born in Dieppe, France, in 1618; began a
mission to the Onondaga Indians in New
York in 1655, and six years afterwards he
accompanied Druillettes in an overland
journey to the Hudson Bay region. In
1668 he went with Marquette to Lake
Superior, and in 1670 was appointed su
perior of the missions of the Upper Lakes.
He prepared the Relations concerning New
France for 1671-72, and also a narrative
of Marquette s journey, published in John
Gilmary Shea s Discovery and Explora
tion of the Mississippi Valley (1853). He
died in Quebec, Canada, Sept. 20, 1697.

Dabney, RICHARD HEATH, educator;
born in Memphis, Tenn., March 29,
1860; graduated at the University of Vir
ginia in 1881; Professor of History in the
University of Virginia in 1897. He is the
author of John Randolph; The Causes of
Hie French Revolution, etc.

Dabney, EGBERT LEWIS, clergyman;
born in Louisa county, Va., March 5,
1S20; graduated at the University of Vir
ginia in 1842; ordained a Presbyterian
minister in 1847; and became Professor
of Church History in Union Seminary, Vir
ginia, in 1853. When the Civil War broke
out he entered the Confederate army as
chaplain, and later became chief of staff to
(Jen. Thomas J. Jackson. His publica
tions include Life of T. J. Jackson, and
Defence of Virginia and the tiouth. He
died in Victoria, Texas, Jan. 3, 1898.

Dabney, WALTER DAVID, lawyer; born
in Albemarle county, Va., in 1853; grad-
in. A



uated at the law department of the Uni
versity of Virginia in 1875; appointed
legal secretary of the United States in
ter-State commerce commission in 1890.
and, later, solicitor of the State Depart
ment. In 1895 he became Professor of
Common and Statute Law in the Univer
sity of Virginia. He died in Charlottes-
ville, Va., March 12, 189!).

Dabney s Mills, Va. See HATCHER S
RUN.

Dacres, JAMES RICHARD, naval officer ;
born in Suffolk, England, Aug. 22, 1788;




JAMKH KlfHAKL) KACRI



DADE DAHLGREN



son of Vice-Admiral Dacres, who was a
commander in the battle with Arnold on
Lake Champlain in 1776. The son en
tered the royal navy in 1796, and, being
placed in command of the frigate Guer-
riere in 1811, was sent to fight the Amer
icans. He proudly boasted that he would
" send the Constitution to Davy Jones s
locker " when he should be so fortunate
as to meet her. She had escaped him in
her famous retreat, but willingly met and
fought the Ouerriere afterwards. Dacres
was then captain. He attained the rank
of flag-officer in 1838, and in 1845 was
vice-admiral and commander - in - chief of
the fleet at the Cape of Good Hope. He
was presented with a gratuity from the
" Patriotic Fund " at Lloyd s, in con
sideration of his wound. He was mar
ried, in 1810, to Arabella Boyd, who
died in 1828. He died in Hampshire,
England, Dec. 4, 1853. See CONSTITUTION
( frigate ) .

Dade, FRANCIS LANGHORN, military
officer ; born in Virginia ; entered the army
as third lieutenant in 1813. During the
war with the Seminole Indians, while on
the march to Fort King, he, with almost
the entire detachment, was destroyed by
a treacherous attack of the Indians, Dec.
28, 1835. A monument at West Point was
erected to the memory of Major Dade and
the men in his command, and Fort Dade,
35 miles from Tampa, Fla., is named in
his honor.

Daggett, NAPHTALI, clergyman; born
in Attleboro, Mass., Sept. 8, 1727; grad
uated at Yale College in 1748; ordain
ed pastor of a Presbyterian church at
Smithtown, Long Island, in 1751; and
in 1755 was chosen professor of divinity
at Yale, which place he held until his
death, in New Haven, Conn., Nov. 25,
1780. In 1766, on the resignation of
President Clap, he was chosen presi
dent of the college pro tempore and
officiated in that capacity more than a
year. He was an active patriot when
the War of the Revolution broke out; and
when the British attacked New Haven, in
1779, he took part in the resistance made
by the citizens and surrounding militia.
Dr. Daggett was made a prisoner, and the
severe treatment to which he was sub
jected so shattered his constitution that
he never recovered his health. After the



famous DARK DAY (q. v.) , in 1780, he
published an account of it.

Dahlgren, JOHN ADOLPH, naval officer;
born in Philadelphia, Nov. 13, 1809; en
tered the navy in 1826, and was made rear-
admiral in 1863. He was the inventor of




JOHN ADOLPH DAHLGREX.

the Dahlgren gun, which he perfected at
the navy-yard at Washington, and in 1862
he was made chief of the bureau of ord
nance. In July, 1863, he took command
of the South Atlantic squadron, and, with
the land forces of General Gillmore, capt
ured Morris Island and Fort Wagner,
and reduced Fort Sumter to a heap of
ruins. He conducted a successful ex
pedition up the St. John s River, in
Florida, in 1864, and co-operated with
General Sherman in the capture of Savan
nah. After the evacuation of Charleston
he moved his vessels up to that city.
Admiral Dahlgren, besides being the in
ventor of a cannon, introduced into the
navy the highly esteemed light boat-
howitzer. He was author of several
works on ordnance, which became text
books. He died in Washington, D. C.,
July 12, 1870.

Dahlgren, MADELEINE VINTON, author ;
born in Gallipolis, 0., about 1835; widow
of Rear-Admiral John A. Dahlgren. She
established and was the vice-president for
several years of the Literary Society of
Washington; was opposed to woman suf
frage, against which she published a
weekly paper for two years, and also sent



DAHLGREN DAIQUIRI



u petition bearing many signatures to Con
gress, requesting that women should not be
given the elective franchise. Popes Pius
IX. and Leo XIII. several times thanked
her for the various services she had ren
dered to the Roman Catholic Church. Her
publications include Thoughts on Female
Suffrage; Memoirs of John A. Dahlgren,
etc. She died in Washington, D. C., May
28, 1898.

Dahlgren, ULRIC, artillery officer ; born
in Bucks county, Pa., in 1842; son of
Rear- Admiral Dahlgren. At the outbreak
of the Civil War he became aide first to
his father and later to General Sigel, and
was Sigel s chief of artillery at the second
battle of Bull Run. He distinguished
himself in an attack on Fredericksburg
and at the battle of Chancellorsville, and
on the retreat of the Confederates from
Gettysburg he led the charge into Hagers-
town. He lost his life in a raid under
taken for the purpose of releasing Na-



Huguenot faith in 108. }, and removed to
New York to work among the French
under the Reformed Church. In 1688 the
French erected their first church in
Marketfiekl Street, between Broad and
Whitehall streets; in 1692 Daille narrowly
escaped imprisonment because he had de
nounced the violent measures of JACOB
LEISLER (q. v.) ; and in 1696 he became
pastor of the School Street Church in
Boston. He died in Boston, Mass., May
21, 1715.

Daiquiri, a sea-coast town in the
province of Santiago, about 15 miles east
of Santiago, Cuba. It was here that the
American army of invasion disembarked
after the declaration of war against Spain
in 1898. After GEX. WILLIAM RUFUS
SH AFTER (q. r.) , commander of the expe
dition, had accepted the offer of the services
of the Cuban troops under General Garcia,
he furnished them with rations and am
munition. A number of sharp-shooters,




DAIQUIRI, WHERE THE AMERICAN ARMY OF INVASION" DISKMHARKED.

tional prisoners at Libby prison and Belle machine - guns, and mountain artillery

Isle, near King and Queen s Court-house, were landed to aid the Cubans in clear-

Va., March 4, 1864. ing the hills, after which 6,000 men were

Daille , PIERRE, clergyman; born in put ashore on June 22. The landing was

France in 1649; banished because of his difficult on account of the defective trans-



DAKOTADALE



port facilities, but still the Spaniards
could offer no serious opposition, as they
were held ill check by the Cubans and the
shells of the American warships, and also
by the feint of Admiral Sampson to bom
bard Juragua. On June 23, 6,000 more
troops were landed, and a division under
Maj.-Gen. HENRY W. LAWTON (q. v.)
inarched to SIBONEY (q. v.) in order to give
place to the division of Maj.-Gen. JACOB
F. KENT (q. v.) While General Shafter
conducted the disembarkation, Maj.-Gen.
Joseph Wheeler directed the operations
ashore. The only losses sustained in this
landing were one killed and four wounded.

Dakota, originally formed a part of
Minnesota Territory. It was a portion
of the great Louisiana purchase in 1803.
The Nebraska Territory was formed in
1854, and comprised a part of what be
came Dakota. The latter Territory was
organized by act of Congress, approved
March 2, 1861, and included the present
States of Montana and Washington. In
1863 a part of the Territory was included
in Idaho, of which the northeastern part
was organized as Montana in 1864, and
the southern part was transferred to
Dakota. In 1868 a large area was taken
from Dakota to form W T yoming Territory.
The first permanent settlements of Euro
peans in Dakota were made in 1859, in
what were then Clay, Union, and Yank-
ton counties. The first legislature con
vened March 17, 1862. Emigration was
limited until 1866, when settlers began to
flock in, and population rapidly increased.
In 1889, two States were created out
of the Territory of Dakota, and ad
mitted to the Union as NORTH DAKOTA
and SOUTH DAKOTA (qq. v.}.

Dakota Indians. See Sioux IND
IANS.

Dale, RICHARD, naval officer; born
near Norfolk, Va., Nov. 6, 1756; went
to sea at twelve years of age, and at
nineteen commanded a merchant ves
sel. He was first a lieutenant in the
Virginia navy, and entered the Con
tinental navy, as midshipman, in 1776.
He was captured in 1777, and confined
in Mill Prison, England, from which
he escaped, but was recaptured in Lon
don and taken back. The next year
he escaped, reached France, joined
Paul Jones, and soon became lieu



tenant of the Bon Homnic Richard, receiv
ing a wound in the famous battle with the
Herapis. He continued to do good service




RICHARD 1JALK.



to the end of the war, and in 1794 was
made captain. He commanded the squad
ron ordered to the Mediterranean in 1801,
and in April, 1802, returning home, he
resigned his commission. He spent the
latter years of his life in ease in Phila
delphia, where he died, Feb. 24, 1826.
The remains of Commodore Dale were
buried in Christ Church-yard, Philadel
phia, and over the grave is a white marble
slab with a long inscription.




DALE S MONCMKXT.



DALE DAL 1 ?

Dale, SAMUEL, pioneer ; born in Rock- He was appointed secretary of state ot
bridge county, Va., in 1772. His parents Pennsylvania in 1701, and was engaged as
emigrated to Georgia in 1783. In 1793, paymaster of a force to quell the WHISKEY
after the death of his parents, he enlist- INSURRECTION (q. ?;.). In 1801 he was ap
ed in the United States army as a scout, pointed United States attorney for the
and subsequently became well known as Eastern Department of Pennsylvania, and
" Big Sam." In 1831 he supervised the re- he held that place until called to the cabi-
moval of the Choctaw Indians to the Ind- net of Madison as Secretary of the Treas-
ian Territory. He died in Lauderdale ury in October, 1814. In 1815 he also
county, Miss., May 24, 1841. performed the duties of the War Office,

Dale, SIR THOMAS, colonial governor ; and was earnest in his efforts to re-
was a distinguished soldier in the Low establish a national bank. He resigned
Countries, and was knighted by King in November, 1816, and resumed the prac-
James in 1606. Appointed chief magis- tice of law. He died in Trenton, N. J.,
Irate of Virginia, he administered the gov- Jan. 16, 1817.

ernment on the basis of martial law; Dallas, GEORGE MIFFLIN, statesman;
planted new settlements on the James, born in Philadelphia, July 10, 1792; a
towards the Falls (now Richmond) ; and sou of the preceding; graduated at the
introduced salutary changes in the land College of New Jersey in 1810, and ad-
laws of the colony. He conquered the Ap- mitted to the bar in 1813. He went
pomattox Indians. In 1611 Sir Thomas with Mr. Gallatin to Russia as private
Gates succeeded him, but he resumed the secretary, and returned in 1814, when
office in 1614. In 1616 he returned to he assisted his father in the Treasury
England; went to Holland; and in 1619 Department. In 1828 he was mayor of
was made commander of the East India Philadelphia; United States Senator from
fleet, when, near Bantam, he fought the 1832 to 1833, and declined a re-election.
Dutch. He died near Bantam, East Indies, He was ambassador to Russia from
early in 1620. 1837 to 1839, and Vice-President of the

Dall, WILLIAM HEALEY, naturalist; United States from 1845 to 1849. From

born in Boston, Mass., Aug. 21, 1845; took 1856 to 1861 he was American minister

part in the international telegraph ex- in London. Mr. Dallas was an able

pedition to Alaska in 1865-68; appointed lawyer and statesman. He died in Phila-

assistant in the United States coast sur- delphia, Dec. 31, 1864.

vey of Alaska in 1871, where he spent Dallas-Clarendon Treaty, a convention

several years in various kinds of work, negotiated in 1856 for the adjustment of

which included the geography, natural his- difficulties between the United States and

tory, geology, etc., of Alaska and adjacent Great Britain arising under the CLAY-

islands. Among his books are A laska and TON-BULWER TREATY (q. v.). It was re-

its Resources; Tribes of the Extreme jccted by the Senate.

\orthwcst; Scientific Results of the Ex- Dalton, a city in Georgia, strongly

ploration of Alaska, etc. fortified by the Confederates under Gen.

Dallas, a city in Georgia, where, dur- Joseph E. Johnston, who checked the ad-
ing the Atlanta campaign, Sherman s ad- vance of General Sherman until forced to
vance under General Hooker was tempo- evacuate by a flank movement by General
rarily checked, May 25, 1864. Three days McPherson, May 12, 1864.
later Hardee attacked McPherson on the Daly, CHARLES PATRICK, jurist; born
right, with great loss. The Confederates in New York City, Oct. 31, 1816; ad-
retired May 29. mitted to the bar in 1839; elected to the

Dallas, ALEXANDER JAMES, statesman; New York Assembly in 1843; became jus-
born in the island of Jamaica, June 21, tice in 1844, and chief-justice of the
i7oU; leu nome in 1/83, settled in Phila- Court of Common Pleas in 1871; presi-
delphia, and was admitted to the bar. dent of the American Geographical So-
He soon became a practitioner in the Su- ciety for more than forty years. Amons;
pi-erne Court of the United States. He his writings are History of Natural-
wrote for the newspapers, and at one time i~ation ; First Settlement of Jeira in
was the editor of the Columbian Magazine North America : What We Know of Maps

5



DALZELL DANA



and Map-Making before the Time of Mer-
cator, etc. He died on Long Island,
N. Y., Sept. 19, 1899.

Dalzell, JAMES, military officer ; was in
early life a companion of Israel Putnam.
He marched to the relief of the garrison
of Detroit with 260 men in 1763; and on
July 30, the day after his arrival, he led
a sally against the Indians, in which they
were badly defeated. During the struggle
Dalzell was killed. The rivulet which was
the scene of this defeat is known to this
day as " Bloody Run."

Dalzell, ROBERT M., inventor; born
near Belfast, Ireland, in 1793; was driven
into exile with his family by the Irish
Rebellion of 1798, and came to New York.
In 1826 he settled in Rochester, N. Y.,
where he became a millwright. Later he
invented and introduced the elevator sys
tem for handling and storing grain. He
died in Rochester. N. Y., Jan. 22, 1873.

Dames of the Revolution, a patriotic
organization established in the United
States in 1896. The qualifications for
membership are that applicants be above
the age of eighteen years, of good moral
standing, and descended in their own
right from a military, naval, or marine
officer, or official, who aided in founding
American independence during the Revo
lutionary War. Local chapters may be
formed when authorized by the board
of managers of the society. The presi
dent in 1900 was Mrs. Edward Pan let
Steers, and the secretary and historian
Miss Mary A. Phillips. The headquarters
were at 64 Madison Avenue, New York.

Dana, CHARLES ANDERSON, journalist;
born in Hinsdale, N. II., Aug. 8, 1819;
was for a time a student in Harvard
College; joined the BROOK FARM ASSOCIA
TION (q. v.) in 1842; and, after two years
of editorial work in Boston, became at
tached to the staff of the New York
Tribune in 1847. In 1848 he went to
Europe as correspondent for several
American newspapers, dealing particu
larly with the numerous foreign revolu
tions. Soon after his return to New
York he became managing editor of the
Tribune, and held the place till 1862,
when he was appointed assistant Secre
tary of War. In 1866 he organized the
stock company which bought the old New
York Sun, of which he became editor-



in-chief, continuing so till his death. In
addition to his work as a journalist, in
conjunction with the late George Ripley,
he planned and edited the New American




CHARLES AM>KI;S<>.\ DANA.



Cyclopaedia (16 vols., 1857-63), which
they thoroughly revised and reissued
under the title of the American Cyclopaedia
(1873-76). In 1883, in association with
Rossiter Johnson, he edited Fifty Perfect
Poems, and subsequently, in association
with Gen. James H. Wilson, he wrote the
Life of Ulysses 8. Grant. In 1897 his
Reminiscences of the Civil War and East
ern Journeys were published posthumous
ly; he was also the compiler of House
hold Book of Poetry. He died on Long
Island, N. Y., Oct. 17, 1897.

Dana, FRANCIS, jurist; born in Charles-
town, Mass., June 13, 1743; son of Rich
ard Dana; graduated at Harvard in
1762. He was admitted to the bar in
1767; was an active patriot; a delegate
to the Provincial Congress in 1774; went
to England in 1775 with confidential let
ters to Franklin ; was a member of the
executive council from 1776 to 1780;
member of the Continental Congress from
1776 to 1778, and again in 1784; member
of the board of war, Nov. 17, 1777; and
was at the head of a committee charged
with the entire reorganization of the
army. When Mr. Adams went on an em
bassy to negotiate a treaty of peace and
commerce with Great Britain, Mr. Dana
was secretary of the legation. At Paris,



DANA



early in 1781, he received the appointment
from Congress of minister to Russia,
clothed with power to make the accession
of the United States to the " armed neu
trality." He resided two years at St. Pe
tersburg, and returned to Berlin in 1783.
He was again in Congress in the spring of
1784, and the next year was made a justice
of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts.
In 1791 he was appointed chief- justice of
Massachusetts, which position he held
fifteen years, keeping aloof from political
life, except in 1792 and 1806, when he was
Presidential elector. He retired from the
bench and public life in 1806, and died in
Cambridge, Mass., April 25, 1811.

Dana, JAMES DWIGHT, mineralogist;
born in Utica, N. Y., Feb. 12, 1813;
graduated at Yale College in 1833; went
to the Mediterranean in the Delaicare as
teacher of mathematics in the United
States navy, and was mineralogist and
geologist of Wilkes s exploring expedi
tion, 1838-42 (see WILKES, CHARLES).
For thirteen years afterwards Mr. Dana
was engaged in preparing the reports of
this expedition and other scientific labors.
These reports were published by the gov
ernment, with atlases of drawings made by




Mr. Dana. He was elected to the chair of
Silliman Professor of Natural History
and Geology in Yale College in 1850,
entered on his duties in 1855, a place he



held till 1890, and was for many years
associated with his brother-in-law, Ben
jamin Silliman, Jr., in editing and pub
lishing the American Journal of Science
and Art, founded by the elder Silliman in
1819. Professor Dana contributed much
to scientific journals, and was a member
of many learned societies at home and
abroad. In 1872 the Wollaston gold
medal, in charge of the London Geologi
cal Society, was conferred upon him. He
died in New Haven, April 14, 1895.

Dana, NAPOLEON JACKSON TECUMSEH,
military officer ; born in Fort Sullivan,
Eastport, Me., April 10, 1822; gradu
ated at West Point in 1842; served in the
war with Mexico; resigned in 1855; and
in October, 1861, became colonel of the 1st
Minnesota Volunteers. He was in the bat
tle at BALL S BLUFF (q. v.) ; was made
brigadier-general early in 1862; was ac
tive throughout the whole campaign on
the Peninsula, participating in all the
battles; and at Antietam commanded a
brigade, and was wounded. A few weeks
later he was promoted to major-general
of volunteers; was with the Army of the
Gulf in 1863; commanded the 13th Army
Corps a while; and had - charge of the
district of Vicksburg and west Tennes
see in 1864. From December, 1864, to
May, 1865, he was in command of the
Department of the Mississippi. He re
signed in 1865, and was reappointed to
the army with the rank of captain, and re
tired in 1894.

Dana, RICHARD, jurist ; born in Cam
bridge, Mass., July 7, 1699; graduated
at Harvard in 1718; and was a leader of
the bar in the Revolutionary period. He
was a member of the Sons of Liberty, and
also a member of the committee to in
vestigate the incidents of the Boston
massacre in 1770. He died May 17, 1772.

Dana, RICHARD HENRY, poet and essay
ist; born in Cambridge, Mass., Nov. 15,
1787; son of Francis Dana; chose the
profession of law, but his tastes led him
into literary pursuits. In 1814 he and
others founded the North American Re
view, of which he was sole conductor for
a while. He closed his connection with
it in 1820. It was while Dana was editor
of the Review that Bryant s Thanatopsis
was published in its pages, the author
being then unknown. In 1821 the first



DANA DANENHOWER



volume of The Idle Man was published.
It was unprofitable, and Mr. Dana
dropped it. In it he published stories
and essays from his own pen. In the
same year he contributed to the New
York Review (then under the care of Mr.
Bryant) his first poem of much preten
sion, The Dying Raven. In 1827 his most
celebrated poetical production, The Bucca



Online LibraryBenson John LossingHarper's encyclopdia of United States history from 458 A.D. to 1905 (Volume 3) → online text (page 1 of 76)