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THE

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

PART X

GE EN FELL AND HUNT



■ ΡΑ
33(S



EGYPT EXPLORATION FUND

GRAECO-ROMAN BRANCH



THE

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

PART X

EDITED WITH TRANSLATIONS AND NOTES

BY

BERNARD P. GRENFELL, D.Litt.

HON. LITT.D. DUBLIN; HON. PH.D. KOENIGSBERG; HON. lUR.D. GRAZ

FELLOW OF queen's COLLEGE, OXFORD; FELLOW OF THE BRITISH ACADEMY

CORRESPONDING MEMBER OP THE ROYAL BAVARIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

AND

ARTHUR S. HUNT, D.Litt.

HON. PH.D. KOENIGSBERG ; HON. LITT.D. DUBLIN ; HON. lUK.D. GRAZ; HON. LL.D. ATHENS AND GLASGOW

PROFESSOR OF PAPYROLOGY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD, AND FELLOW OF QUEEN'S COLLEGE

FELLOW OF THE BRITISH ACADEMY ; CORRESPONDING MEMBER OF THE ROYAL BAVARIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

MEMBER OF THE ROYAL DANISH ACADEMY OF SCIENCES AND LETTERS

WITH SIX PLATES



LONDON

SOLD AT

The Offices of the EGYPT EXPLORATION FUND, 37 Great Russell St., W.C.

AND 527 Tremont Temple, Boston, Mass., U.S.A.

KEGAN PAUL, TRENCH, TRUBNER & CO., 68-74 Carter Lane, E.C.

BERNARD QUARITCH, ii Grafton St., New Bond St., W.

ASHER & CO., 14 Bedford St., Covent Garden, W.C, and 56 Unter den Linden, Berlin

C. F. CLAY, Fetter Lane, E.C, and 100 Princes Street, Edinburgh ; and HUMPHREY MILFORD

Amen Corner, E.C, and 29-35 West 32ND Street, New York, U.S.A.

1914

All risihts reserved



ΒΜΘΗΑΜ YOUN'G UNlVERSiTC

LIBRARi'

PROVO. UTAH



OXFORD

HORACE HART PRINTER TO THE UNIVERSITY



PREFACE

Of the new literary pieces here published, 1231 and 1233-5 pro-
ceed from the second of the large literary finds of 1906, with some
small additions from the work of the next season. The remainder,
with the extant and non-literary papyri, were for the most part found
in 1903-4.

It is a great pleasure to be able to restore to the title-page of this
volume the name of the friend and colleague whose absence during the
last five years has been so much regretted. The earlier portion of the
book was already in shape when Dr. Grenfell came back to Oxford, but
he has shared in the editing of the non-literary texts, besides helping
materially in the revision of the whole. In future we hope to return to
the old division of labour, and so by degrees to reduce the arrears in
the publications of the Graeco- Roman Branch.

To Professor U. von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff I am under fresh
obligations for most generous assistance in connexion with the new
classical texts, 1231-41. Professor U. Wilcken has repeated his kind
service of reading the non-literary documents in proof and affording the
benefit of his criticism ; and Professor L. Mitteis, as on many previous
occasions, has given valuable advice on some points of Graeco-Roman
law. To these scholars, as to one or two others from whom occasional
welcome contributions have been received, belong the hearty thanks of
both the editors of this volume and its readers.

ARTHUR S. HUNT.

Queen's College, Oxford,
Jan.; 1914.



CONTENTS



PAGE

Preface .............. v

List of Plates viii

Table of Papyri ............ ix

Note on the Method of Publication and List of Abbreviations . . xiii



TEXTS

I. Theological Fragments (1224-1230)
IL New Classical Texts (1231-1242)
IIL Extant Classical Authors (1243-1251)
IV. Documents of the Roman and Byzantine Periods :
(a) Official (1252-1257)
(i) Declarations to Officials (1258-1269)
(c) Petitions (1270-1272)
{d) Contracts (1273-1282) .
(e) Taxation (1283-1285) .
(/) Accounts and Lists (1286-1290)
(g) Private Correspondence (1291-1300)
(Λ) Miscellaneous Minor Documents (1301-1350)



1X9

162

178
200
207
227
236

243
256



INDICES

I. New Literary Texts:

(a) 1231-4 (Sappho and Alcaeus) ....... 265

{&) Other Texts 273

II. Emperors 280

IIL Consuls, Eras, Indictions . .282

IV. Months and Days 283

V. Personal Names 283

VI. Geographical . 291

VII. Religion 293



viii CONTENTS

PAGE

VIII. Official and Military Titles 294

IX. Weights, Measures, Coins 295

X. Taxes ............. 296

XI. General Index of Greek and Latin Words ..... 297

XII. Index of Passages discussed 311



LIST OF PLATES



I. 1224 Fr. I recto, Fr. 2 verso, 1232 Fr. i. Cols, ii-iii

II. 1231 Frs. i, 10, 56

III. 1233 Fr. i. Col. ii, Frs. 2,8

IV. 1234 Fr. 2

V. 1225, 1238, 1249, 1271

VI. 1250 Cols, i-ii



- at the end.



TABLE OF PAPYRI

{A)i asterisk denotes texts not printed in full)



1224. Uncanonical Gospel

1225. Leviticus xvi

1226. Psalms vii, viii .



1227.
1228.
1229.
1230.
1231.
1232.
1233.
1234.
1235.
1236.
1237.



St. Matthew's Gospel xii

St. John's Gospel xv, xvi

St. James's Epistle i

Revelation v, vi .

Sappho, Book i .

Sappho, Book ii

Alcaeus

Alcaeus

Arguments of Menandei's Plays

Menander, Epiirepoiites

Menander, Colax



1238-40. Fragments of Comedies

1241. Chrestomathy

1242. Greeks and Jews before Trajan

1243. ApoUonius Rhodius, Argonautica

1244. Herodotus i

1245. Thucydides i

1246. Thucydides vii

1247. Thucydides viii .

1248. Plato, Politicus .

1249. Babrius, Fables .

1250. Achilles Tatius, Cliiophon and Leucippe i

1251. Cicero, In Verrem II. ii and Pro Caelio

1252. OfBcial Correspondence and Declaration

1253. Military Requisitions ....



A.D.


PAGE


4th cent.


I


4th cent.


10


Late 3rd or early 4th




cent.


II


5th cent.


12


Late 3rd cent. . .


14


4th cent.


16


Early 4th cent.


18


2nd cent.


20


3rd cent.


44


2nd cent.


50


2nd cent.


70


Early 2nd cent. .


8i


4th cent.


88


3rd cent.


93


ist-3rd cent.


95


2nd cent.


99


Early 3rd cent.


112


2nd cent.


119


Early 2nd cent.


120


4th cent.


122


Early 2nd cent.


125


2nd cent.


126


Late 2nd cent.


129


2nd cent.


133


Early 4th cent.


• 135


5th cent.


. 142


288-95


. 162


4th cent. .


. 168



TABLE OF PAPYRI



1254. Publication of an Appointment .

1255. Affidavit of Comarchs .

1256. List of Priests under age

1257. Statement concerning a Decaprotus

1258. Promise of Attendance

1259. Declaration of a Shipper

1260. Declaration of a Shipper

1261. Declaration concerning Commissariat

1262. Receipt of Seed-corn .

1263. Announcement concerning Practice of

1264. Notification of Inviolability

1265. Affidavit of Priestly Rank .

1266. Examination for Membership of the Gy

1267. Registration of a Child

1268. Registration of a House after Purchase

1269. List of Property . . . .

1270. Notification through the Archidicastes

1271. Petition to the Praefect

1272. Complaint of Theft .

1273. Marriage-contract . . .

1274. Appointment of a Representative

1275. Engagement of Musicians .

1276. Sale of House-property

1277. Sale of a Triclinium .

1278. Division of Usufruct of a Pigeon-house

1279. Lease of State Land .

1280. Partnership in a Lease

1281. Loan

1282. Repayment of a Loan

1283. Revenue-return ....

1284. Receipt for Tax on Sales .

1285. List of Village Payments .

1286. Account of Receipt and Expenditure

1287. Survey-list

1288. Private Account .

1289. Private Account ....

1290. List of Articles ....

1291. Letter of Zois ....

1292. Letter of Hermogenes

1293. Letter of Theon ....



Trade



A. D.


PAGE


260 . . . .


170


292 . . . .


172


282 .


174


3rd cent.


176


45 ■ • • ■


178


211-12


180


286 .


182


325 •


184


197 .


185


128-9 . . . .


186


272 . . . .


187


336 •


189


98 . . .


191


209


194


3rd cent.


196


Early 2nd cent. .


198


159 .


200


246


204


144 .


205


260


207


3rd cent.


211


3rd cent.


213


249 .


215


255 •


217


214 .


219


139 •


221


4th cent.


223


21 . . .


. 224


83 . . .


• 225


219


227


250 .


• 230


3rd cent.


• 232


253 •


• 236


Early 3rd cent.


• 237


4th cent.


• 239


5th cent.


. 241


5th cent.


. 242


30 . . .


• 243


About 30


• 244


117-38


• 245



TABLE OF PAPYRI



1294.


Letter to Didj'me




1295.


Letter of Tasois


1296.


Letter of Dius ....


1297.


Letter of Sarmates . • .


1298.


Letter of Ammon


1299.


Letter of Psai's and Syra .


1300.


Letter of Peter ....


1301.


Application to a Strategus .


1302.


Title (.?)


*1303.


Declaration on Oath .


*1304.


Application for Payment .


1305.


Report of a Public fleeting


*1306.


Application for ΐπίκρισκ


1307.


Response to a Petition


1308.


Receipt issued to a Tax-collector


*1309.


Receipt for Payment of Dues


1310.


Memorandum of Clothes .


1311.


Memorandum of Payment of Oil


1312.


Memorandum . . . .


1313.


Fragment concerning a Praefect


*1314


Latin Writing-exercise


*1315.


Graeco-Latin Alphabets .


1316.


Fragment of a Contract


*1317.


Contract of Loan


*1318.


Contract of Loan




1319.


Date of a Contract




1320.


Fictitious Loan




*1321.


Receipt for Rent




1322.


Receipt for Wine




*1323.


Receipt for Rent




*1324.


Receipt for Wine




1325.


Receipt for Wine




1326.


Receipt for Wine




*1327.


Receipt for Wine




1328.


Receipt for Rent




1329.


Receipt for Dues




1330.


Receipt for Dues





Late 2nd or early 3rd

cent.
2nd or early 3rd cent
3rd cent.
4th cent.
4th cent.
4th cent.
5th cent.
Late 3rd or early 4th

cent.
208 (?)
About 355
169-177 (?)
Late 3rd cent.

214-15 (?)

3rd cent.

Late 2nd or early 3rd

cent.
198 .
3rd cent.
5th cent.
5th cent.
3rd cent.

4th or 5th cent. (?
5th or 6th cent.

57
91

About 305
403 •
497 •
48-9 .

413 •

6th cent.

301 .

5th cent.

gth or 6th cent.

5th or 6th cent.

4th or 5th cent.

399 •

Late 4th or 5th cent.



247
249
250

251
252

254
255

256
257
257
257
257
257
257



258
258
258
258
258
258
258
258
259
259
259
259
259
259
260
260
260
260
260
260
260
261



TABLE OF PAPYRI















A. D.


PAGE


1331.


Receipt for Dues 5th cent.


. 261


1332.


Receipt for Corn








5th cent.


. 261


1333.


*Account : Order for Payment








Late 2nd
cent.


early 3rd

261


1334.


Order for Payment of Chaff








416 .


. 261


1335.


Order for Payment of Meat








482 .


261


^336.


Order for Payment of Money








5th cent.


. 261


1337.


Order for Payment of Money








5th cent.


. 261


1338.


Order for Payment of Cheese








5th cent.


261


1339.


Account of Expenses








3rd cent.


262


1340.


Account : List of Names










I St cent.


262


1341.


Account .










4th cent.


. 262


1342.


Account of Payments










5th cent.


. 262


1343.


Account .










6th cent.


262


1344.


Account .










4th cent.


. 262


*1345.


Fragment of a Letter










Late 2nd or


3rd cent. . 262


1346.


Fragment of a Letter










2nd cent. (?)


■ 263


1347.


Fragment of a Letter










. 3rd cent.


• 263


1348.


Beginning of a Letter










Late 3rd cent. . . 263


1349.


Letter of Sarapion .










4th cent.


. 263


1350.


Letter










. 5th or 6th cent. . . 263



NOTE ON THE METHOD OF PUBLICATION AND
LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS

The general method followed in this volume is the same as that in
Parts I-IX. Of the new literary texts, 1224 and 1231-4 are printed in a dual
form, a literal transcript being accompanied by a reconstruction in modern style ;
1242 is given in modern form only. In the others, and in the fragments of
extant authors, the originals are reproduced except for division of words, capital
initials in proper names, expansion of abbreviations, and supplements of lacunae.
Additions or corrections by the same hand as the body of the text are in small
thin type, those by a different hand in thick type. Non-literary documents are
given in modern form with accentuation and punctuation. Abbreviations and
symbols are resolved ; additions and corrections are usually incorporated in the
text, their occurrence being recorded in the critical apparatus, where also faults
of orthography, &c., are corrected if they seemed likely to give rise to any
difficulty. Iota adscript has been printed when so written, otherwise iota
subscript is employed. Square brackets [ ] indicate a lacuna, round brackets ( )
the resolution of a symbol or abbreviation, angular brackets ( ) a mistaken
omission in the original, braces { } a superfluous letter or letters, double square
brackets [[ ]] a deletion in the original. Dots placed within brackets represent
the approximate number of letters lost or deleted ; dots outside brackets indicate
mutilated or otherwise illegible letters. Letters with dots underneath them are
to be considered doubtful. Heavy Arabic numerals refer to the texts of the
Oxyrhynchus papyri in this volume and in Parts I-IX, ordinary numerals to
lines, small Roman numerals to columns.

The abbreviations used in referring to papyrological publications are
practically those adopted in the Archiv fiir Papyrtisforschung, viz. : —
P. Amh. = The Amherst Papyri (Greek), Vols. I-II, by B. P. Grenfell and

A. S. Hunt.
Archiv = Archiv fiir Ρ apyrusforschung.

B. G. U. = Aeg. Urkunden aus den K. Museen zu Berlin, Griechische Urkunden.
P. Brit. Mus. = Greek Papyri in the British Museum, Vols. I-II, by F. G. Kenyon ;

Vol. Ill, by F. G. Kenyon and H. I. Bell ; Vol. IV, by H. I. Bell.

C. P. Herm. = Corpus Papyrorum Hermopolitanorum, Vol. I, by C. Wessely.



xiv LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS

C. P. R. = Corpus Papyrorum Raineri, Vol. I, by C. Wessely.

P. Cairo Cat. = Catalogue des Antiquites ^gyptiennes du Musee du Caire,

Papyrus grecs d'epoque byzantine, Vols. I-II, by J. Maspero.
P. Cairo Preis. = Griechische Urkunden des Aeg. Museums zu Kairo, by

F. Preisigke.
P. Fay. = Fayiim Towns and their Papyri, by B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, and

D. G. Hogarth.
P. Flor. = Papiri Fiorentini, Vol. I, by G. Vitelli ; Vol. Π, by D. Comparetti.
P. Gen. = Les Papyrus de Geneve, Vol. I, by J. Nicole.
P. Giessen = Griechische Papyri zu Giessen, Vol. I, by E. Kornemann, O. Eger,

and P. M. Meyer.
P. Goodsp. = Greek Papyri from the Cairo Museum, by E. J. Goodspeed

(University of Chicago Decennial Publications).
P. Grenf = Greek Papyri, Series I, by B. P. Grenfell, and Series Π, by B. P.

Grenfell and A. S. Hunt.
P. Hamburg = Griechische Urkunden der Hamburger Stadtbibliothek, Parts i-a,

by P. M. Meyer.
P. Hibeh = The Hibeh Papyri, Part I, by B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt.
P. Leipzig = Griechische Urkunden der Papyrussammlung zu Leipzig, Vol. I,

by L. Mitteis.
P. Munich = Veroffentlichungen aus der Papyrussammlung zu Miinchen, Part i,

by A. Heisenberg and L. Wenger.
P. Oxy. = The Oxyrhynchus Papyri, Parts I-VI, by B. P. Grenfell and A. S.

Hunt ; Parts VH-IX, by A. S. Hunt.
P. Par. — Les Papyrus grecs du Musee du Louvre, Notices et Extraits, t. xviii. 3,

by W. Brunet de Presle and E. Egger.
P. Petrie = The Flinders Petrie Papyri, Parts I-II, by J. P. Mahaffy ; Part III, by

J. P. Mahaffy and J. G. Smyly.
P. Reinach = Papyrus grecs et demotiques, by Theodore Reinach.
P. Rylands = Catalogue of the Greek Papyri in the Rylands Library, Manchester,

Vol. I, by A. S. Hunt ; Vol. II in the press.
P. S. I. = Papiri della Societa italiana. Vols. I-II, by G. Vitelli and others.
P. Strassb. = Griech. Papyrus der K. Universitatsbibliothek zu Strassburg im

.Elsass, Vol. I, by F. Preisigke.
P. Tebt. - The Tebtunis Papyri, Part I, by B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, and

J. G. Smyly ; and Part II, by B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, and E. J.

Goodspeed.
P. Thead. = Papyrus de Theadelphie, by P. Jouguet.
P. Tor. = Papyri Graeci Regii Taurinensis Musei Aegyptii, by A. Peyron.
Wilcken, Ost. — Griechische Ostraka, by U. Wilcken.



I. THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS



. 1224. UNCANONICAL GOSPEL.

Fr. 2 6-3 X 13-1 cm. Fourth century. Plate I

(Fr. I recto, Fr. 2 verso).

These small but highly interesting fragments from a papyrus book are
written with care in an upright uncial hand of medium size. The contrast
between dark and light strokes is well marked, and the frequent thickening at
the tops of letters gives a somewhat ornate effect ; cf. 1229. ο varies in size,
being sometimes quite small, sometimes on the same scale as the other letters ;
μ also is inconsistent, the internal part being either angular or curved ; υ generally
has a long tail, whereas ρ is shorter and sometimes does not descend at all below
the line. Hands of this type are commonly assigned to the fourth century, and
to that period the present example may also be attributed, though it is likely to
have been written early in the century rather than late, and a third century date
is not out of the question. Ίησοΰί is abbreviated ϊη, as in 1079, a papyrus of
about the same age. ν at the end of a line sometimes appears as a horizontal
stroke over the preceding vowel ; an angular sign to fill up a short line is once
used. Both fragments are from the tops of leaves, and the columns or pages
were numbered, in one place (a verso i) certainly, in another (3 recto ii) probably,
in the formal script of the text below. In Fr. i recto and 2 recto i, on the
other hand, the figures are more negligently written, but since an intermittent
numeration would be inconvenient, they are likely, nevertheless, to have
proceeded from the pen of the original scribe.

Fr. 2 contains two columns on recto and verso, and the question arises
whether this is to be regarded as a single leaf with double columns, or as two
leaves with a single column to the page. Since Col. i of the verso is numbered
174 and Col. i of the recto [i]76, it is clear that verso i, ii, recto i were consecu-
tive ; but if the fragment consists of two leaves, recto ii immediately preceded
verso i, instead of following recto i, as it would if a single leaf with double
columns be supposed. The latter hypothesis is supported by the narrow space
between the columns and the absence of a strongly marked crease down the



2 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

middle of it. But the space is not narrower than in P. Rylands 38, a certain
instance of a double leaf, though no doubt the book to which that belonged was
not nearly so bulky as the one under consideration ; moreover, there is a crease,
though not a deep one, in this space, and the fold is in the right direction, i. e.
it would make the verso lie uppermost in the quire. Several other considerations
support the theory of the double leaf as against the double column, (i) Single
columns were apparently customary in papyrus books in Egypt. (2) In a book
composed of leaves with double columns, the second column on every page
should have an even number ; but here the number of the second column would
be odd. (3) Col. i of the recto stands higher by nearly a line than Col. ii.
Contiguous columns were not, indeed, always kept parallel, but an inequality
would be more liable to occur if the columns did not stand side by side on the
same page. The balance of probability, therefore, inclines to the supposition
that Col. ii recto is the page preceding Col. i verso. If this be correct, it is likely
that the column was of no great height, and it may be estimated at about twenty
lines at most.

In Fr. I, numbered on the recto 139, so little is preserved that no recon-
struction is practicable. On the recto the words άμην ν{μΙν λίγω show that the
Saviour is speaking, and a similar inference is probably to be drawn from the
second person plural ΰμεΐ?, which is the only complete word on the verso.
Between this leaf and Fr. a there was a wide interval, the next pagination number
preserved being 174, at the top of Fr. 2 verso i. If, as we have supposed, this
page was preceded by Col. ii of the recto, the number to be restored there is
i[73]. The subject of that column is again not clear. Seemingly it describes
an appearance in a vision of Jesus, who speaks words of comfort or exhortation,
but the occasion and the person addressed remain in doubt. That the incident
to which the passage relates is the walking on the sea (Matt. xiv. 35 sqq.,
Mark yi. 48 sqq.) seems unlikely, and the reference is perhaps to something not
reported in the Canonical Gospels. Dr. Bartlet, after suggesting that the lines
expand the account of the Call of Peter contained in Luke v. i-io by a descrip-
tion of a supplementary commission given in a nocturnal vision, now inclines to
the view that they relate to a vision of consolation and encouragement following
Peter's Fall, Either of these explanations, if adopted, would have an important
bearing on the problem of the identity of the work to which the fragment
belongs ; see below, pp. 4-5. The next column (a verso i) is not more extensive,
but enough is preserved to indicate that questions were being addressed to
Christ concerning the nature of His mission and teaching. Apart from the
phrase 'new doctrine ', however (cf Mark i. 37), the language finds no evident
parallels in the pages of the Evangelists.



1



1224. THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS 3

In the two following columns firmer and more familiar ground is reached.
Fr. a verso ii describes in language similar to that of the Synoptists, though
more concisely, the offence taken by the scribes, Pharisees, and priests at seeing
Jesus consorting with sinners, with His answer, which appears to have been in the
form given it by St. Luke. Col. i of the recto contains two recorded Sayings '
put in a novel relation. The injunction to pray for enemies found in Matthew
and Luke is followed by the sentence ' For he that is not against you is with
you ' (so Luke : ' us ' Matt.) ; and this line of thought is carried on, if the restora-
tion is correct, by an otherwise unrecorded Saying that the man who to-day is
afar off will to-morrow be near at hand. The mention of ' the adversary ' in the
next line suggests a further development of the same idea.

How are these fragments to be classified ? Are they part of an uncanonical
Gospel covering much the same ground as the Synoptic Gospels, or do they
come from a collection of Sayings of Jesus like that of which portions have been
previously recovered (l, 654, possibly also, as some think, 655 and the Vienna
fragment from the Fayum) ? The latter hypothesis may be supported by more
than one argument. In the first place it is to be remarked that, in these muti-
lated remains of six columns, Jesus is always either actually speaking or about to
speak. Moreover, the discourse here attributed to Him shows the same admixture
of novel and familiar elements as the two Oxyrhynchus fragments of collected
Sayings (1,654) and the so-called fragment of an uncanonical Gospel (655) which
has been referred by some critics to tl^e same collection. Again, in each of those
three papyri there were certain special points of contact with St. Luke's Gospel ;
in 1224 specific Lucan affinities may again be observed (i verso ii. 5-6, a recto
i. 3). But there is at any rate one notable divergence from 1 and 654: the
formula 'Jesus saith', which there introduced the various Sayings, is here absent.
Instead of this, in Fr. a verso ii. 4-5 the words addressed to the murmuring
scribes and Pharisees are preceded by ό δέ Ίησοΰϊ άκουσα? [eluev (or λίγη), just as
in the parallel passages of the Synoptists. There is thus good reason for
declining to refer 1225 to the same collection as 1 and 654. Possibly other
collections differently put together were in circulation ; but the alternative view,
that our fragments belong to an uncanonical Gospel, is the more natural. In
such scanty remains as these the absence of pure narration is an extremely
precarious argument ; and it may be held that the introductions to the Lord's
words in Fr. 3 verso are more in the manner of a connected narrative than
a collection of Sayings as such. There is indeed the analogy of 654. ^%-6, where
a series of questions from the disciples are quoted ; but nowhere else in that
papyrus or in 1 was the context of a Saying given, and the occurrence here of
two or, including Fr. a recto ii, even three instances within so small a compass

• Β a



4 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

thus affords a distinct point of contrast. Stress will perhaps be laid. on the
brevity of the introduction to the reply to the scribes and Pharisees in Fr. a
verso ii, as compared with the corresponding accounts of the Evangelists.



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