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OMPLIMENTARY



. . Til THE



(Uafionaf Confecfionere' (^eBOCiation



OF THE .



UNITED STATES



Boston, Mass.



. July 10, 11, 12. 1894



73,5 l?{|lksm OF CALffOWOA

r BANTA BARBARA

P^^jj^O tl?e ni<?fnber5 of tl?e JNfatioQal Qo9fe(:tioQer5' /^ssoeiatioQ
w.Jllb\\ aijd tl7(^ir repri^sei^tatiues uisitir^^ Boston 09 \.\)<i oeeasior^
of tl?e Eli^uer^tl? /^99ual Qoi^ue^tioi^ tl^is little soijuei^ir of
ttpi^ jHub is off(?red, ii; tl^e l?ope tl?at tl;?e r(?eolle(:tio9 of tl^is
C^or^ue^tioi; u/ill i^ot be for^otte^, but ri^mai^ oi^e ^0x9^ existii^^
proof ti^at our b(^autifijl eity sustains its tifT)e-l709or(^d reputa-
tion for l^ospitality, apd tl?at lul^i^tl^er from tl^e U/e5t, Soutl?, or
florti;, tl?e visitor may feel assured of a l^earty u/(^leome.




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OFFICERS

OF THE

NATIONAL CONFECTIONERS' ASSOCIATION



UNITED STATES

11893-1894.



^rcsttirnt. I Secrctarg.

ALBERT F. HAYWARD . . Boston F. D. SEWARD St. Loiis



lJicc=Pr£0ili£nt.



H. D. SMITH



Extamxtx.

Cincinnati i HENRY HEIDE New York



lExECutibE Committee.

GEORGE W. JENKINS Philadelphia

JOHN C. NEEMES Chicago

JAMES HOLMWOOD Biffalo

J. B. FARMER St. Louis

D. M. HAZEN Cambridgeport

P. ECHERT Cincinnati

A. JEWELL . New York



N4EIVIBERS



NATIONAL CONFECTIONERS' ASSOCIATION



United states



THE liRElSCH-HINK CO.
CKOKT & Ar.r.EN CO.
C.KO. W. JENKINS
WM. r.ANG it SON
C.KO. MILLER & SON CO.
ROBERT J. MILLER
J C. McCooK CO.

s. f. whitman & son
ph. winderle .
geor(;e anspach
d. arnoild .
j. h. p.arker & co.

<;. CELLA

A. E. COHEN & CO.
EUOENE \V. DUNSTAN
THE CARDINER-LUCAS CO.
E. GREENFIELD'S SON & CO.



Philadelphia



New



York



CY. GOUSSET New York

P. HAGGITIRIS

HAWLEY & HOOPS

HENRY HEIDE

G. HELMSTETTER

HESS BROS

I'.ENNO HORWITZ

A. JEWELL

A. LERTORA

\VM. LIIFT

H. MAILLARD . . . . •

JAMES J. MATCHETT & CO

ODE & GERBEREUX

A. M. POWELL

E. C. RICH CO

A. SLAUSON & CO

A. STEVANE



WALLACE & CO.

G. A. BRENNER

DOSCHER BROS. .

THE P. ECHERT CO. .

P. HUBER & CO.

JOHN J. PERKINS & CO.

REINHART & NEWTON

H. D. SMITH & CO. . .

THE STANDARD CANDY CO.

JOHN BERRY ....

BUNTE, FRANK & CO.

BUNTE BROS. & SPOEHR .

THE MARTIN DAWSON CO.

FRITSCH & WILLIAMS

FRYE & KLEINBECK CO. .



Cincinnati



Chicago



PAN CONI'KCTION CO.
JOHN KRANZ ....
k. A. MORRIS & CO.
JOHN C. XEKMES .'v: CO.
y. \V. RCKCKHF.IM S: BRO.
M. SHKH.nS & CO.
TORMOEHLKN BROS. .
IM.ANKK & BRO. CANiJY CO.
H.OHR-WALTKR CANDV CO
COKI.ITZ BROS. CANDY CO.
MlRl'HV S: SWnZER CANDY CO.
o. H. PECKHAM CANDY MFG. CO
K. D. SEWARD CONFECTIONERY C(
ST. LOUIS CANDY CO. .
WENNEKER-MORRIS CANDY CO.
CHASE & CO. CORPORATION
FOBES, HAYWARD & CO. .
H. KRIKORIAN

THE WALTER M. LOWNEY CO.
THE PERKINS & MUNDY CO.
WRICHT & MOODY
THE LUTTED CANDY CO
SIP.LEY & HOLM WOOD
HALL it HAYWARD CO.
FRANK A. MF,NNE CANDY CO
(;E0. BLO.ME & SON
THE DARBY MFG. CO. .
FRED. E. FOOS . .

AMERICAN CANDY CO.
MILWAUKEE CANDY CO.
l'FLr(;RADT & CO.

i;kok(;e ziegler co. .



Chicago



St. Louis



Buffalo
Louisville
Baltimore

Milwaukee



S. D. ACHE & CO

JAMES McCLURG & CO

REYINIER & BROS

WEAVER, COSTELLO & CO

CKEEN & BLACKWELL CO

ESTATE OF MARIA HOELDEREIN ....
MASON, AU & MAGENHEIMER CONF'Y MFG. CO.

r.. P. CLARK & CO

DHO. CLOSE



Pittsburgh



Brooklyn



Cambridgei'ort



UAYWARD CONFECTIONERY CO

D. M. HAZEN & SONS

H. F. SPARROW

O. BARKENOWITZ

DETROIT CONFECTIONERY AND FRUIT TABLET CO.

GRAY, TOYNTON & FOX

McKUSICK-COPELIN CO

PARIS-MURTON CO

C. HORNUNG & CO.

J. W. SMITHER

A. E. BROOKS & CO

THE PUTNAM CANDY CO

L. SARONI & CO

ADOLPH HROMADA

AMERICAN BISCUIT AND MFG. CO



Detroit

MiNNEArOLIS

ukungton, Iowa
Grand Rapids



JACOB KREISCHER
SMITH BROS. .
PETTIT 1\IFG. CO. .



San Francisco

Sioux City

Kansas City

St. Joseph

Milwaukee

St. Paul

Memphis

Albany

poughkkepsie

Canajoharie



JOS. WAI.IER Syracuse

ROCHESTER CANDY WORKS Rochester

W. F. PARKER & CO Oxford P\

THE P. C. WIEST CO York

LANCASTER CARAMEL CO I ^nc^stek

W. H. LUDEN Rg'^o,,,^

ESTATE OF D. BACON Harkishlrg

WILLL\>LSPORT CANDY MFG. CO Willi amsport

COUDY & KENT (Inc'd) Portland

CHARLES HOLMAN N vshua

ARBUCKLE&CO '.'.'.'. ' BrRUNGTON.' Vt.

GEO. W. SMITH & SON W„„e River Jinction

B. H. DOUGLASS & SONS New Haven

MORAN BROS Pawtucket

KIBBE BROS. CO Springfield, Mass.

JOHN W. LELL Lexington

KEMKER-WOOLWINE CANDY AND CRACKER CO Nashville

«• I- HEISEI Cleveland

S. B. LAFFERTY Akron

^"•J.BANTA L,,,^

THE DAYTON CARAMEL CO Davton

WORTS, KIRK & BIGELOW BRANCH, United States Baking Co. . ..." Toledo

ANDERSON, LITTLEFIELD & STEERE Knoxville

G. .A. DUERLER j . San Antonio

HEWITT CANDY CO Denver

WM. LAWTHER D .^

REIMERS & FERNALD CO Davenport

LUTZ & IFFLAND CO p^„,, ,

A. B. MEWHINNEY & CO Terre Haute

G. MARSICANO Evansville

J. P. ANNEN CANDY CO Green Bay

BISHOP & CO Los Angeles



ASSOCIAI^E IVIEMBERS



NATIONAL CONFECTIONERS' ASSOCIATION



UNITED STATES.



F. M. BOWER & CO New York

COLEMAN PATENT CANDY MOULD MFG. CO

CONFECTIONERS' GAZETTE

CRAVE & MARTIN

\V. G. DEAN & SON

A. K. GARDINER & BRO

HAMMERSCHLAG MFG. CO

WM. HERRON & CO

ROBERT B. HERRON

HICKOK. & JOHNSON

H. KOHNSTAMM & CO

MAAS & WALDSTEIN

BERNARD MEYER .



M. MICHAEI.IS is: SONS New York

NATIONAL STARCH MFG. CO

SHEVILL, HOWLBY & SHEYILL

ROCKWOOD & CO

RUNKEL BROS

SCHALL & CO

SPENCER & CO

THE WALTER-CHAURANT CO

ADAMS & SONS CO Brooklyn

BLAUYELT & CO

THOS. BURKHARD

S. V. & F. P. SCUDDER

YOUNG & SMYLIE

J. P. ANDERSON & CO Philaueuhia

CONFECTIONERS' JOURNAL PUBLISHING CO

FRANK H. FLEER & CO

FRANKLIN SUGAR REFINING CO

JESSE JONES & CO

THE MELLOR & RITTENHOUSE CO

THOS. MILLS & BRO

J. C. RUBY & SON

S. THANHAUSER

H. O. WILBUR & SONS

JAS. A. HAYES & CO Boston

McLELLAN, STARR cS: BRIGHAM

WAYERLY MFG. CO

M. L. BARRETT Chicago

F. BORG •

BROOKS CHOCOLATE CO

CHAPMAN & SMITH CO

CHICAGO SUGAR REFINING CO

C. F. GUNTHER



THE HK.LPEK Chicago

INTERNATIONAL CONFECTIONER

J. P. PRIM LEY

WETMORE & PRIDE MFG. CO

BEEMAN CHEMICAL CO Cleveland

C. T. HEISEI "

W. J. WHILE

GEO. H. BERRY & CO St. Louis

DUNHAM MFG. CO •

F. T. KUEHNE & CO

ST. LOUIS CONFECTIONER AND BAKER

AMERICAN GLUCOSE CO Buffalo

E. L. GAGER

KINGERY MFG. CO Cincinnati

J. J. MULLANE

S. C. & L. A. RANSLEY

WALTER BAKER & CO Dorchester, Mass.

JOSIAH WEBB & CO Milton, Mass.

COLLUM CANDY COOLER CO Hartkord

H. F. KINGINGER Nazareth, Pa.

THE CHUDDY MFG. CO Pittsrirgh

THE NATIONAL CANDY MOULD CO Dayton

W. F. ARNOLD ' • Terre Haute

COLGAN & McAFEE Louisville

ALBERT M. TODD Kalamazoo

CHAS. POPE GLUCOSE CO Geneva, III.

GEO. S. McCONKEY Toronto

ROBERTSON BROS

R. & T. WATSON

D. S. PERRIN & CO London, Ont.

BURGLAND & SHEAD Defiance, Ohio

HAUSNER & GOOD Atchison



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PAUL REVERES HOME, BOSTON, MASS.



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QUINCY MARKET



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CUSTOM HOUSE




STATE HOUSE




POST- OFFICE




Old corner book store




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KINGS CHAPEL



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OLD ELM, BOSTON COMMON





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ODD FELLOWS' BUILDING, BOSTON




YOUTHS COMPANION BUILDING




BRONZE STATUE OF WASHINGTON, PUBLIC GARDEN




TRINITY CHURCH




MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS




NEW PUBLIC LIBRARY




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HOTEL VENDOME







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PUBLIC LIBRARY, CAMBRIDGE, MASS.




HARVARD GATE, HARVARD COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE, MASS.




AUSTIN HALL, HARVARD COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE, MASS.




MEMORIAL HALL, HARVARD COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE, MASS.




WASHINGTON ELM, CAMBRIDGE, MASS.



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LONGFELLOW'S HOME, GEN, WASHINGTON'S HEADQUARTERS.




GATEWAY, CHESTNUT HILL RESERVOIR




PUMPING STATION, CHESTNUT HILL RESERVOIR




WOODLAND PARK HOTEL, AUBURNDALE, MASS.




ALBERT F. HAYWARDS RESIDENCE, NEWTON HIGHLANDS, MASS.




FOREST HILLS CEMETERY GATES




STEAMER MAYFLOWER




NIX'S MATE, BOSTON HARBOR




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EGG ROCK LIGHT, OFF NAHANT, MASS.




SURF AT NAHANT, MASS.




SURF, MARBLEHEAD NECK, MASS.




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BOSTON LIGHT, BOSTON HARBOR



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HOTEL PEMBERTON, BOSTON HARBOR




HULL YACHT CLUB HOUSE, BOSTON HARBOR




HOTEL NANTASKET, BOSTON HARBOR





BUG LIGHT, BOSTON HARBOR




HERE is no city in the United States contaiiiint;" within its holders so
much to interest and entertain the visitor as Boston ; and whether
one's stay be long or short, eaeh day may be as varied in its enter-
tainment as desired.
From Phmouth on the south, the landing place of the Pilgrims, to
Salem on the north, famous for its witches, Boston and its surroimding
cities and towns are replete with historical exents well repa\ing tiie \ isitor
his time and attention.

One of the first places of interest is Bunker II ill Monument; while the
Old North Church, — or, as it is often called, Christ Church, — on .Salem
Street, is of value to the sightseer as the church from whicli were hung the
lantern signals warning Paul Revere and sending him on his famous ride,
immortalized by the poet.

The home of Paul Revere may be found in North Stpiare, just oil' of
North Street; and in fact the whole North End is filled witii old Imildings,
possessing historical value, and streets and lanes, once cow jiaths, l)ut now
the despair of the traveller as he vainly seeks his destination, wandering about
aimlessly and finally returning unexpectedly to his starting i)oint, certain that
only in Boston could exist such a maze of alleyways.



Faneuil Hall, the " Cradle of Liberty," claims the attention of every
visitor for its historic interest; while the adjacent and newer Qiiincy Market
is also interesting for its attention to the interior wants of all good livers.

Not far from the Markets stands the Custom House; while just beyond
is the Chamber of Commerce, a handsome building from every standpoint.

At the head of State Street stands the solitary sentinel, the Old State
House, restored to almost its identical condition in the time of the Revolution.
Just in front of this building was the massacre of Crispus Attucks, the spot
being marked in the street as well as by a tablet on the nearest building.
The visitor in his wanderings will find many of these tablets about the older
portions of the cit}-, commemorative of some historical event.

At the corner of School and Washington Streets stands the Old Corner
Book Store, built in i/i^, a noted resort for authors for many years. In
sight from this store is the Old vSouth Church, known to every school-boy
in the land. Passing down Milk Street past the llirthplace of Benjamin
Franklin, you are soon in Post-office Square, where, facing the Post-office,
you find yourself surrounded by fine mercantile buildings.

On School Street, almost facing the Parker House, stands the City Plall,
a handsome building in the Renaissance style of architecture, but now rapidlv
becoming too small for the needs of the citv. On the corner of School .Street,
directly opposite the Parker House, stands King's Chapel, another of the older
and historical churches of Boston ; while a short distance south is Park Street
Church.



The visitor, having stiuHcd the oUlcr aiul liistorical paits of Boston,
naturally desires to see the newer and more fashionable sections of the city ;
and, while cars may be found at hand to take one in almost every direction,
a carriage ride over roads not traversed by the omnipresent car will all'ord a
better idea of the growth and wealth of the city.

Starting from a point opposite Boston Common and our i)resent State
House, and driving down Beacon Street past residences and clubhouses
of the wealthy, along the Public Garden with its wealth of llowers and
plants, you soon find yourself on Commonwealth Avenue, one of the finest
boulevards in the country. Past the Vendome, vine-clad residences, elegant
family hotels, past the Leif Ericsson Statue to Harvard Bridge, — connecting
the Athens of America with the classic shades of Cambridge and Harvard
College, — the visitor rides, pausing on the bridge to look back, obtaining a
superb view of the residential section. Once over the bridge you arc in
Cambridge, the seat of the famous Harvard College and the home of men
famous in literature and art — a city of beautiful homes.

The College grounds comprise many acres, and the various buildings
range from the older and plainer HoUis and ISIassachusetts to the Hemenway
Gymnasium and the newer dormitories. A day could well be spent here
among the buildings, not only of the College but those l)elonging to the citv,
and in which the residents take great and just pride.



Not far from the College grounds stands the Washington Elm, under
which General Washington took command of the American Army in 1775,
ha\ing his headquarters in what is now known as the Longfellow mansion.
On Brattle Street stand many of the finest Cambridge residences.

A short ride from the College and you are at Mount Auburn Cemetery,
the resting place for the remains of many of our distinguished men; and a
visit to this "City of the Dead" would well repay one who has the inclina-
tion and time to de\ote to it.

A return to Bos.on over one of the many bridges spanning the Charles
and we soon find ourselves again on the lioulcvard, and by and by at the
gateway of Chestnut Hill Reservoir. This reservoir is the objective point for
much of the pleasure driving and bicycle riding, and it is beyond dispute one
of the choicest breathing spots about the Hub. Passing through the gateway
and between the two sections of the reservoir, a short drive and we are in
the Newtons, the "Garden City" of the East, and well named.

In Auburndale is to be found the Woodland Park Plotel, famous alike
for its cuisine and its homelike attractions.

In Newton Highlands may be seen the handsome residence of Albert F.
Hayward, President of the National Confectioners' Association ; and a glance
at this very attractive place, with its carefully-trimmed lawn, greenhouse and
tont ensemble will give one an excellent idea of the homes of our Boston
business men.



In returning to the city a variety of drives is j^iescnted ; but one of the most
satisfactory is by returning to the Reservoir and taking the boulevard to the
Back Bay Fens, which is one of a chain of parks encircling our city from
Marine Park at City Point to the Blue Hills of Milton, and with the systems
begun or contemplated by our sister cities, combine to render the Hub one
of the most complete and attractive cities to reside in or to visit.

These drives may be extended almost indefinitely north, south and west
from the city; and the visitor may feel assured that, whatever direction may
be taken, his time and trouble will be well repaid.

To the eastward extends the Harbor and Massachus(iits l?ay ; and the wearv
traveller surfeited with land travel, or the business man seeking relaxation
from the cares of business, may turn his face to the east and, taking one of
the many steamers plying in these waters, soon be well away from his cares
and troubles and sure to return feeling well compensated for his brief res])ite
and anxious for a return of the time when he may again turn his steps
towards Old Father Neptune and brush the cobwebs from his brain.

Even the waters of Boston Harbor ha\e their historic interest, and a
perusal of the early history of our city and its "Tea Party" will repay one.

Sailing down the Harbor past Forts Winthrop and Independence, now
mere names, past Nix's Mate and Boston Light and turning northward, one
finds it to be an interesting and beautiful sail past Nahant, Egg Rock, L\-mi
and Swampscott, the home of the fisherman and the summer resitlent, to
Marblehead or beyond to Gloucester or Isles of Shoals.



But there is that of interest to the south as well ; so we reluctantly put
about and run for Minot's Light, known the world over to mariners as
marking one of the danger spots of our coast and one of the sights shown
to every visitor to Nantasket Beach. To reach this Nantasket it is neces-
sary to return to the harbor, passing between Fort Warren and Pemberton
through Hull Gut, famous for its swift tides, into Qiiincy Bay and up the
beautiful winding Weir River. Once at the wharf the visitor may take one
of the many carriages to be found and enjoy the beauties of the famous
Jerusalem Road and its millionaire "cottages"; or, if appealed to by Dame
Nature, he can partake of one of Nantasket's famous fish dinners, and with
the inner man well refreshed return to the city a better and a wiser man in
the knowledge that what man has done man can do again when he has the
opportunity.

We trust we have not wearied the reader in our desire to awaken his
interest in our city, in which every Bostonian, whether by birth or adoption,
takes a just and honest pride ; but hope he may feel with us that it is good
to be here and that the outline given of the city's many beauties may incite
him to return again, and again to receive a new welcome and carry home
a stronger and everlasting recollection of the Hub.




I 5



Officers and Executive Committee



Confecttonere' Cfu6*



frtsibtnf. t?icr-p«8ibtnt.

EDWARD C. WHEELER. GEORGE CLOSE.

SCrtasurcr. Srcrctaru.

CHARLES A. MAYO. HERBERT F. SPARROW.

EDWARD McLELLAN.



MEMBERS OF CONFECTIONERS' CLUB.



Aldrich, E. H.
Alexander, Charles
Alley, Wm. F.
Brighani, A. W.
Cahors, H. L.
Chaffee, H. B.
Clark, F. E.
Clement, W. B.
Close, George
Crosby, VV. E.
Dennis, W. E.
Drown, T. P.
Ellis, F. E.
Fobes, Edwin F.



Graham, H. W.
Hayward, Albert F.
Hay ward, H. S.
Hazen, D. M.
Hobbs, John
Rowland, J. Frank
Krikorian, H.
Lewis, Edgar P.
Lowney, Walter M.
Mayo, Charles A.
McLellan, Edward
Miller, F. L.
Moody, A. J.
Place, Charles
Poison, Richard



Porter, P. G.
Schraftt, G. F.
Simes, C. F.
Smith, Thos. P.
Sparrow, H. F.
Spaulding, G. H,
Stahl, Wm. C.
Starr, Charles E.
Symonds, S. L.
West, J. Wm.
Wheeler, Edw. C.
White, J. A.
Whitmarsh, H. P.
Woodward, F. H.



Committees appointed l)y the Confectioners' Club to serve durinj^ the

Convention of the National Confectioners' Association of

the United States, July lo, ii and 12, 1S94 :

Conunittcc on Finance.
Albert ¥. Hayward. A. J. Moody. T. P. Drown.

Coinnii/tce on Printing.
Charles A Mavo. Edward McLellan. F. H. Woodward.

Committee on Banquet.
H. F. Sparrow. Edward C. VVjieeler. F. E. Clark.

Committee on Carriages.
J. Frank IIovvland. Edwin F. Foues. D. M. Hazen.

Committee on Steamboat.

George Close. Walter M. Lownky.

P. G. Porter. Richard Polson. II. W. Graham.

Committee on Reception.
Every Member of Confectioners' Club.



fK^



THE LIBRARY
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

Santa Barbara



THIS BOOK IS DUE ON THE LAST DATE
STAMPED BELOW.




3 1205 00463 4521




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AA 000 936 207 o





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Online LibraryBoston Brown (Charles E.) and CompanySouvenir of the [Hub] → online text (page 1 of 1)