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Timpanogos Federated Women's Club Scholarship. The sum of $100.00
toward tuition will be awarded to a junior of high scholastic standing in
the college, good character and professional promise, and whose home is in
the Timpanogos area.



116 COLLEGE OF FAMILY LIVING

Gamma Phi Omicron Alumnae Scholarship. The sum of $100.00 toward
tuition will be awarded to a deserving junior who is a member of Gamma
Phi Omicron, has a scholastic average of 3.0 or higher, is in financial need,
and shows professional promise.

Elizabeth Cannon Sauls Scholarship. The sum of $25.00 will be awarded
to a deserving junior in the College of Family Living. The award is based
on good grade point average, need, good character, and professional poten-
tial.

Senior Awards. For many years recognition awards have been given
annually to members of the senior class:

The Leah D. Widtsoe silver loving bowl to a senior of sterling
character who has made marked progress during her years of study,
and who at the same time has rendered service to her classmates, her
college, and the university.

The Hazel Noble medal to an outstanding graduating senior with
fine womanly qualities and commendable professional attitude who
applies to her daily living the knowledge acquired in her studies in
the college.

The Gamma Phi Omicron award to a senior of high scholastic
standing and good character who, as indicated by her accomplish-
ments and services during her college career, shows promise of be-
coming a credit to her college and her profession.



117



College of Fine Arts

Gerrit de Jong, Jr., (240 C)

The following departments are in the College of Fine Arts:

Art

Music

Speech and Dramatic Arts

The policy of the university has always provided for a liberal patronage
of the fine arts. The organization of the College of Fine Arts in 1925 was the
result of desire to offer students greater opportunities for better coordinated
academic and professional growth.

With exceptionally well-prepared faculties, who have received the benefits
of extended study in recognized schools and art centers, and adequate physical
equipment in all departments, the College of Fine Arts has become favorably
known for the artistic and academic work done under its direction.

Any course offered in this college that leads to the baccalaureate degree
is the cultural equivalent of other college courses offered in the university,
differing from them mainly in respect to the emphasis placed on the study of
the fine arts.

The Art Department offers curricula in painting, sculpture, crafts, interior
design, commercial art, graphics, and art for teachers in the elementary and
secondary schools.

The Music Department lists courses in theory of music; musicology; applied
music, both instrumental and vocal; music education for elementary and second-
ary school teachers; and general music for non-music majors.

The DepEirtment of Speech and Dramatic Arts lists courses of study in
public address and forensics, radio and television, theatre and dramatic arts,
speech and hearing rehabilitation, speech education for elementary and second-
ary school teachers, and general speech for non-majors.

MAJORS AND MINORS

Majors are selected from the work offered in the above-mentioned de-
partments; minors may be selected from them or from other departments in
the university which offer allied work.



I



118

General College

Wayne B. Hales, Dean (280 ESC)

The General College is separated into three areas:

The Division of Provisional Registration

The Technical and Semi-Professional Institute

The Department of Industrial Education

The General College has been added to the academic structure of Brigham
Young University to meet more adequately the changing educational demands
of the university and to achieve more perfectly the objectives of the university.
The General College works to help students develop responsible citizenship in the
Church and state, to acquaint them vi^ith their cultural heritage, and to lay the
foundations for useful and productive lives in a democratic society. To achieve
these objectives, the General College has been organized to take care of the
educational needs of the following types of students.

Each year a large number of students come to the university undecided on
a major field. These students will register in the Division of Provisional Regis-
tration. In this division the student is assigned a registration adviser who serves
as his adviser on academic problems during the one or two years he is in Pro-
visional Registration. These students will pursue outlined courses in general
education. At the end of one or two years of study, they must select a major,
transfer to the appropriate college, and continue studies toward a baccalaureate
degree.

Ten curricula are provided for students who may have interests in given
fields. These curricula are as follows:



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE, PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE-DENTAL

A student having an interest in the fields of botany, bacteriology and
zoology or the pre-dental and pre-medical areas should register for the fol-
lowing courses. He may transfer to the major of his choice at any time during
his freshman or sophomore year and continue his work toward a baccalaureate
or other professional degree.

Freshman Year Sophomore Year

Course Credit Hours Course Credit Hours

A W S A W S

Religion 2 2 2 Religion 2 2 2

English 111, 112, 113 3 3 3 Physics 111, 112, 113 5 5 5

Physical Education Ill Chemistry 221 5

Chemistry 111, 112, 113 5 5 5 Social Science or Humanities 5 5

Mathematics 111. 112. 231 ..555 Zoology or Botany or Bact. .. 55

Health 130 2 History 170 5

16 16 18 17 17 17

BUSINESS

The following is a suggested two-year program for students who have a
general mterest m business but are undecided about the particular area in which
to major. With the exception of English composition and physical education.
Which must be taken the first year, the freshman and sophomore courses shown
may be taken interchangeably. Students may transfer to the College of Business
at any time.



I



GENERAL COLLEGE



U9



Freshman Year
Course Credit Hours

A W S

English 111, 112, 113 3 3 3

Religion 2 2 2

Physical Education Ill

Physical Science*** 3 3 3

Economics 101, 102*, 274 .... 5 3 5

Biological Sciences 3 5

English (literature) 3

17 17 17



Sophomore Year
Course Credit Hours

A W S

Accounting 201, 202 5 5

Business Mgt. 203 5

Mathematics 101** 5

Accounting 230, 231 3 3

Religion 2 2 2

Humanities 3 5

History 170 5

Social Science 3

Health 130 2

Elective 3

18 17 18



*Economics 111, 5 hours credit, may be taken in place of Economics 101 and
102.

**With IVz years of high school algebra this course may be omitted.

***Any of the courses listed under Physical Science of the General Education
Requirements will be approved.

EDUCATION

A student having an interest in elementary education should register for
these courses. At the end of his freshman or sophomore year he may transfer
to the College of Education without loss of credit and continue his studies to-
ward a Bachelor of Science or Arts Degree.

A student having an interest in secondary education should register for
the appropriate courses in other areas of Provisional Registration. For example,
a person wishing to teach biological science in the secondary schools should
register in courses under biological science, pre-medical, and pre-dental. Or, if
a person wishes to teach industrial arts, he should register in the Department
of Industrial Education. At the end of his sophomore year, he may transfer to
the appropriate college or to the College of Education without loss of credit and
continue his studies toward a Bachelor of Arts or Science degree.



Course



Freshman Year

Credit Hours Course

A W S

Religion 2 2 2

English 111, 112, 113 3 3 3

Physical Education 181, 182,

and elective Ill

Health 130 2

Geology 101, 102 4

Zoology 105 5

Speech 121 3

Art 110 2

Social Science Elective* 5

Elective 5 4 4



17 18 17



Sophomore Year

Credit Hours
A W S



Religion 2 2 2

Physical Education 375

or 376 2

Instruction 324 or 325 2

History 366 3

Health Education 361 3

Physical Science Elective* .... 3

History 360 3

Sociology 460 3

Biological Science Elective* .. 3

Social Science Elective* 3

History 170 5

Bacteriology 121 4

Botany 112 4

Electives 2 4 2

17 18 17



*These courses must be selected from those listed under "Arts and Sciences
Major for Elementary Teachers," shown above in the section on "Preparation of
Elementary School Teachers" in the College of Education.



120



GENERAL COLLEGE



FAMILY LIVING

Students in the General College may take any courses from the 100 and
200 series in the various departmental offerings for which there are no pre-
requisites or for which they have already taken the prerequisites. This pro-
gram is designed to help students prepare for marriage and/or to count toward
a baccalaureate degree in the major of their choice. It is not designed as a voca-
tional program.



Freshman Year



Course



Credit Hours
A W S



Religion 2

English 111, 112, 113 3

Physical Education 1

Health 130

Food and Nutrition 110 4

Chemistry 101, 102 5

Clothing and Textiles

110, 115

Art 110

Physics 104

Bacteriology 121

Family Living 101 1



Sophomore Year



Course



Credit Hours
A W S



Religion 2

Clothing and Textiles

255 and 260 3

Nursing 288

Psychology 111 5

H.D.F.R. 210, 211

H.D.F.R. 160 2

Housing and Design 120, 135
Food and Nutrition 255, 256
Food and Nutrition 264. 265

Zoology 105 and 164 5

Economics 101



2 2

3
2



16 16 16



17 17 15



FINE ARTS

The following is a suggested sequence of courses for students who have
interests in the fields of art, music, and speech and dramatic arts. At the con-
clusion of the freshman or the sophomore year, the student should transfer to
the College of Fine Arts and continue his work toward a baccalaureate degree.



Sophomore Year
Course Credit Hours

A W S



Religion 2

Foreign Language, first year 5

Psychology 111 5

Sociology 111

History 170

Fine Arts Electives 5



17 17 17



Freshman Year

Course Credit Hours

A W S

Religion 2 2 2

English 111, 112, 113 3 3 3

Physical Education Ill

Health 130 2

Physical Sciences* 3 3 3

Fine Arts Electives** 7 5 7

16 16 16



*Any of the courses listed under Physical Science of the General Education
Requirements will be accepted.

**Art 101, 111, 121. Music 101, 102, 105 (or private lessons). 170 (or private
lessons or other choral group). Speech 101, 121, 241. It is strongly recom-
mended that a student decide whether or not to major in music not later than
the end of his first year.



HUMANITIES

It is anticipated that the student who selects the program suggested below
will have a general interest in the field of humanities but will be undecided
about a subject in which to major. Completion of this two-year program will
fiU all general education group requirements and should permit a generous
enough samplmg of humanities courses to assist the student m selecting a major.



A W S



GENERAL COLLEGE 121

Freshman Year Sophomore Year

Course Credit Hours ^""""^^ Credit Hours

A W S

Religion 2 2 2

English 111, 112, 113 3 3 3 Foreign Language 5 5 5

Physical Education Ill English 250 4

Religion 2 2 2 "^^^ ^^ f^ following

,_ . . ^_H , . courses from

Humanities 101 or elective different areas:

in humanities 5 5 Economics 101; Geo-

History 170** 5 graphy 105 or 110;

Humanities elective 6 Pol- Sci. 112 or 115;

Physical Sciences*** 5 4 Psychology HI; So-

„ ^,^, „ ciology 111 or 112 ..5 5

^^a^*^ _ 2 Biological Sciences .... 4-5 3-4

TZ ~ ~ Humanities and

16 17 17 Aesthetics 5-6 2-3

16 16-18 17-19

*Students who anticipate majoring in a foreign language should register for
a foreign language during the three quarters of their freshman year and move
some of the courses listed to the sophomore year.

** Students who anticipate majoring in economics, history, journalism, or politi-
cal science, should take History 120 or History 121 or Political Science 110
instead of History 170.

***Any of the courses listed under Physical Science of the General Education
Requirements will be approved.

NURSING

Any student who is interested in Nursing and trying to determine her
major should confer with the Dean of the College of Nursing or an adviser in
the College of Nursing regarding the program and opportunities. Only one year
of courses are offered in the General College for those who are interested in
Nursing.

Freshman Year
Course Credit Hours

A W S

Religion 2 2 2

English 111, 112, 113 3 3 3

Physical Education Ill

Chemistry 101, 102, 103 .... 5 4 3

Psychology 111 5

Sociology 111 5

Zoology 109 5

Food and Nutrition 115 3

16 15 17



PHYSICAL EDUCATION

The following is a suggested sequence of courses for students who have in-
terests in the fields of recreation, physical and health education, athletics, and
youth leadership. At the conclusion of the freshman or the sophomore year, the
student should transfer to the College of Recreation, Physical and Health Edu-
cation, and Athletics and continue his work toward a baccalaureate degree. He
should consult the sections of the catalog dealing with those departments for
details for majors in health education, recreation, and youth leadership.



122



GENERAL COLLEGE



Men



Freshman Year
Course Credit Hours

A W S

Religion 2 2 2

English 111, 112, 113 ..3 3 3

Phys. Ed. 221,

222, 223 Ill

Phys. Ed. 224 1

Physical Sciences* 3

Sociology 111 5

History 170 5

Health 130 2

Humanities 5

Minor Subject area .... 5

Bacteriology 121 or

Zoo. 105 4-5



Sophomore Year
Course Credit Hours

A W S

Religion 2 2 2

English (literature) 2 2 2

Phys. Ed. 226, 225, 227 Ill

Phys. Ed. 228 1

Phys. Ed. 180, 181, 330 113

Zoology 164 5

Food and Nutrition 115 3

Physical Sciences* 3 3

Psychology 111 5

Health 121 2

Humanities 3

Minor Subject Area 2 4

16 18 17



16



16 16-17



*Any of the courses listed under Physical Science of the General Education Re-
quirements will be approved.



Women



Freshman Year
Course Credit Hours

A W S

Religion 2 2 2

English 111, 112, 113 3 3 3

Phys. Ed. 241, 242, 243 2 2 2

Phys. Ed. 187, 188. 189 Ill

Physical Sciences* 3 3 3

History 170 5

Health 130 2

Humanities 3

Electives 4

16 16 15



Sophomore Year
Course Credit Hours

A W S



Religion 2 2

Phys. Ed. 244, 245, 246 2 2

Phys. Ed. 181, 182, 183 1 1

Phys. Ed. 180, 160 1

Zoology 105, 164 5 5

Psychology 111 5

Humanities 3

Minor 2

Health Education 362

English (literature)

Electives (P.E.) 1

Elective



16 16 17

*Any of the courses listed under Physical Science of the General Education Re-
quirements will be approved.



PHYSICAL AND ENGINEERING SCIENCES

The following course of study is recommended for one or two years. At the
end of either the student may choose a major, transfer into the College of Physi-
cal and Engmeering Sciences and pursue his education to the completion of
Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry, mathematics, physics, geology, or en-
gmeermg sciences.

Freshman Year Physical Education Ill

Course Credit Hours Health 130 2

A W S Electives 2 2

Mathematics 111, 112, 231* 5 5 5 English 111, 112, 113 3 3 3

Chemistry 111, 112, 113 5 5 5

^elig^o^ 2 2 2 18 18 18



GENERAL COLLEGE 123



Sophomore Year Religion 2 2 2

Course Credit Hours ?f *°?"y ^]%.-" ■ 5

Electives (Biology and

A W S Humanities) 5 5

Mathematics 232, 233, 234 ..555

Physics 211, 212, 213 5 5 5 17 17 17

*Mathematics 101 or third semester in high school is a prerequisite for this
series,

SOCIAL SCIENCE

It is anticipated that the student who selects the program suggested below
will have a general interest in the social sciences but will be xmdecided about
a subject in which to major. Completion of this two-year program will fill al-
most all general education group requirements and should permit a generous
enough sampling of social science courses to assist in selecting a major.

Freshman Year Sophomore Year

Course Credit Hours Course Credit Hours

English 111, 112, 113 3 3 3 A W S

Religion 2 2 2 Religion 2 2 2

Physical Education i ^ ^ Economies' ioi'or'iii." 5

Health 1^0 2 Geography 105 or 110 5

Sociology 111 or 112 5 Pol_ Science 111,

Psychology 111 5 112, or 115 5



History 170* 5



English (literature) ....2-3 2-3 2-3



Physical Sciences** ^ 2 o Foreign Language or

Electives 3 ^ Electives in

Humanities 3-5 3-5 3-5

lb 17 17 Bacteriology 121 or

Botany 101 or

Zoology 105 4-5

Biological Sciences .... 3-4

Social Sciences 3-5

16-18 15-18 15-18

*Students who anticipate majoring in economics, history, journalism, or poli-
tical science should take History 120 or History 121 or Political Science 110
instead of History 170.

**Any course listed under Physical Science of the General Education Require-
ments will be approved.

If a student completes one of these curricula, he may transfer into one of
the other colleges of the University without loss of time, credit, or standing
and will advance as a junior in the college of his choice without professional
handicap.

The same entrance requirements as have been set up for the rest of the
university are required in Provisional Registration.

Other students come to the university with a desire to obtain technical
training in special fields of engineering, business, and agriculture. To satisfy
these needs, the university has established a Technical and Semi-Professional In-
stitute. Prescribed semi-professional and technological courses have been organ-
ized on a two-year level at the completion of which students will receive suitable
terminal certification. Employabiiity of graduates is the major objective of the
Technical and Semi-Professional Institute.

Students interested in industrial arts will register in the Department of
Industrial Education which will be administered through the General C!ollege.
A major student in this department is offered a rich variety of courses in drawing.



]^24 GENERAL COLLEGE

metalwork woodwork and related vocational industrial-educational subjects.
A terminal Bachelor of Science degree is granted at the completion of prescribed
general education and major and minor requirements.

The same standards of excellence in scholarship and moral behavior will
be expected of students in all areas of the General College.



125



College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Leonard W. Rice, Dean (329 McK.)

The following departments are in the College of Humanities and Social
Sciences:

Archaeology

English

Geography

History

Journalism I

Languages

Political Science

Psychology

Sociology

The most fascinating study has always been man — what he has done, what
he has thought, what he has said and how he has reacted to problems confront-
ing him.

The humanities seek to discover, preserve, and disseminate the best of man's
thoughts and creations. The social sciences study the activities and relationships
of man: his nature, his power to communicate, his environment, what motivates
him, how his activities progress, the institutions he has created, and the impor-
tant social and governmental problems with which he must deal. The humanities
and the social sciences are therefore related disciplines whose purpose is to help
man live in the most intelligent and satisfying manner.

The humanities are the study of what man has created, including his lan-
guage, literature, art, and the record of his activities as revealed in archaeology
and history. The social sciences are younger disciplines utilizing the modern
methods of science: controlled observation, laboratory experimentation whenever
possible, statistics, and analytical reasoning. Their potential significance for a
troubled world is tremendous.

There are two large purposes for which the instructional program of the Col-
lege of Humanities and Social Sciences is designed. One is the provision of a
broad and liberal education, to assist those who obtain it to receive in the fullest
measure the values to be found in the complex civilization of today and to con-
tribute to the enlargement of those values in an effective and acceptable mian-
ner. Thd other is the preparation of a more limited group as qualified contri-
butors to the discovery of additional truth to add to our present heritage and as
capable professional participants in the productive affairs of daily living.

Courses intended to contribute to the first purpose are offered as a service
to all students in the university. Career programs for those who choose to do
their major work in this college are offered in each department. Advisers stand
ready to consult with students in the selection of studies that will contribute
most effectively to a broad education and to specialized training in each depart-
ment.

Pre-Legal Course

There is no single prescribed pre-law program. A student may major in any
one of several fields as basic preparation for law school. The prime requisite of
a successful lawyer is a well-disciplined mind. It must be readily capable of em-
bracing complex situations — identifying subtle distinctions and appraising argu-
ments. It must be able to weigh opposing considerations and be capable of sus-
tained effort over long periods of time. To produce such a mind, the college
schedule should include courses intended to expand the mental powders of a stu-
dent to the utmost and to bring about precision of thought.

The following important advice given by a leading law school may well be
noted by pre-legal students:



126 COLLEGE OF HUMANITIES AND SOCTAL SCIENCES

"Few ideas are more fallacious or harmful than the notion that it is possible
to dawdle through high school and college and then make the adjustment to
higher standards promptly upon entering the professional school. Essential habits
of concentration and effective methods of study must be acquired and developed
during the pre-legal years."

In addition to the courses in general education prescribed by the university,
it is suggested that a satisfactory pre-legal course might be selected from the fol-
lowing fields: English, political science, history, economics, accounting, psychol-
ogy, speech, sociology, and mathematics.

Because of the growing tendency of law schools either to recommend or de-
mand that the entering student have a B.A. or B.S. degree, the pre-legal student
should plan his freshman and sophomore programs toward the acquisition of a
bachelor's degree.

Hispanic American Studies Major

Supervisor: Lee B. Valentine (341 McKay)

The Hispanic American Studies Program is an interdepartmental program
within the College of Humanities and Social Sciences which provides a major or a
combined major and minor leading to the A.B. degree; it does not provide a
minor alone. The program is designed to meet the professional and cultural
goals of persons especially interested in Latin America whose needs are not
served by a major in one department. The Language Department offers training
in the literature and language of Latin America; the Geography Department,
the geography and economy of the area; the Political Science Department, the
governments and political institutions. Certain persons who seek employment
in business or governmental agencies in Latin America, or who for other reasons
are interested in the area, may best prepare themselves professionally by broad
study in the literature, language, culture, geography, politics and economy of the
region. Such persons may enroU in the Hispanic American Studies Program.
They cannot expect to receive the depth in one subject which a conventional
major would give them, but the greater breadth and the comprehensive under-
standing of the area itself will compensate for the sacrifice of depth in a single
subject.

Requirements for a major:

(1) 34 hours in Spanish language courses from the "A" lists given be-
low, 9 of which must be upper division.

(2) 6 hours of specified upper division courses in Spanish-^American
or Spanish literature.

(3) 6 hours of specified upper division courses in each of three of the
following subjects: archaeology, geography, history, and political
science.

Of the required 58 hours, 33 must be upper division.

Requirements for a major and a minor:

(1) Completion of the above requirements for a major.

(2) 6 hours of specified upper division courses from the "A" list of



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