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The department also provides service courses to help nonmajors develop de-
sired communication skills, and, in addition, offers Comms. 101, Introduction to
Mass Communication, as a general education course in the field of humanities and
fine arts.

Undergraduate concentrations leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts are
offered in the following areas: advertising, broadcasting, journalism, journalism
education, photography, and public relations.

Graduate studies are offered leading to the degree of Master of Arts in
communications. Graduate students should consult the Graduate School Cata-
log for full information.

General Education

See the General Education Program section of this catalog for details regarding
the University's general education requirements. Majors in communications
must complete the following requirements as part of the general education pro-
gram and departmental general education requirements:

Health — 2 hours.

Physical Education — 2 hours.

Religion — 2 hours per semester.

American history and government — 6 hours, including Pol. Sci. 110 and either

Hist. 121 or 170.
English — Engl. Ill in freshman year and Engl. 215 in sophomore year.
Biological science — 6 hours.
Humanities — 6 hours. Majors in broadcasting should take Sp. and Dram. Arts

121 (section for broadcasting majors); majors in advertising, journalism, and

public relations should take Sp. and Dram. Arts 301.
Physical science — 6 hours. Recommended course is Physics 177 (prerequisite to

photography courses) .
Social science — 6 hours, including Psych. Ill or Sociol. Ill; Sociol. -Psych. 350.

Choice of either 6 hours from approved list in mathematics, logic, and statistics,
or 8 hours from approved list in languages.



206 COMMUNICATIONS



101


(2)


201


(2)


211


(3)


230


(2)


255


(2)


307


(3)


480


(3)



As an additional requirement in general education, each student majoring
in communications must complete one course in statistics, chosen from the fol-
lowing: Psych. 370; Sociol. 205, 206, 606; Stat. 221, 552.

Departmental Majors

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in communications must complete
a minimum of 32 hours of credit in the department, including 18 hours in the
departmental core curriculum which is listed immediately below, and 14 or
more hours as prescribed in one of the six concentrations offered. The require-
ments of these concentrations are listed in alphabetical order following the de-
partmental core, along with groups of courses from supporting areas which are
prescribed for majors in the respective sequences in lieu of academic minors. (An
exception is the concentration of Journalism Education, in which case a teaching
minor is selected from those listed in the Education section of this catalog.)

Departmental Core Curriculum (18 hours)

Communications

Introduction to Mass Communication
The Communications Process
News Writing
Introduction to Advertising
Introduction to Broadcasting
Communications Law
Senior Seminar
491R (1) Communications Symposium (J hour in each of two semesters)

Advertising Concentration

Students may not enter the advertising sequence until they have first com-
pleted Comms. 211, News Writing, and 230, Introduction to Advertising. Follow-
ing 230, they must enroll in 331, 333, and 439 in that order.

Candidates must complete 35 hours in communications, including 18 hours
in the departmental core and the following 17 hours:

Communications

331 (3) Advertising Copy and Layout

333 (3) Broadcast Advertising

334 (3) Retail Advertising

335 (3) Public Relations

439 (3) Advertising Media and Campaigns

Electives (2 or 3) Comms. 336, 363, 366, 372, 427, 433, 434, 435, 444, or 449.

Supporting Area Courses. In addition to the above, candidates in advertising
must complete the following:

Business Management

341 (3) Marketing Management (Prerequisites: Acctg. 201; Econ. 112; any
course in statistics)

442 (3) Marketing Management and the Consumer (Prerequisite: Bus. Mgt.

341)
or

443 (3) Product and Brand Management (Prerequisite: Bus. Mgt. 341)

458 (3) Marketing Research (Prerequisite: Bus. Mgt. 341. Note: Bus. Mgt. 458
must be taken in the semester just prior to Comms. 439.)

Electives — 2 or more hours of electives selected from among the following courses:

Art

120 (3) Basic Design
Computer Science

105 (2) Computers and Their Use



COMMUNICATIONS 207



English

218 (2) Creative Writing

316 (3) Technical Writing
Industrial Education

250 (3) Graphic Arts
Philosophy

101 (3) Logic and Language

214 (3) Aesthetics

316 (3) Philosophy of Science

Psychology

365 (3) Motivation

Broadcasting Concentration

Candidates must complete 41 or more hours in communications, including the
18 hours in the departmental core and the following 23 hours:

Communications

331 (3) Advertising Copy and Layout
333 (3) Broadcast Advertising
340 (3) Broadcast News

346 (2) Broadcast Practicum I

347 (2) Broadcast Practicum II

371 (2) Introduction to the Motion Picture

372 (3) Motion Picture Production

449 (3) Broadcast Programs and Audiences

Electives — 2 elective hours chosen, according to the student's specialization
interest, from the following:

Broadcast Sales and Promotion —

Comms. 444 (2) Broadcast Sales Administration

Broadcast Performance —

Comms. 453 (2) Broadcast Announcing

Production, Programming, and News —

Comms. 456 (3) Television Operations and Directing

Broadcast Management —

Comms. 510 (2) Mass Media Administration

Supporting Area Courses. In addition to the above, candidates in broadcasting

must complete the following courses:

Art

120 (3) Basic Design
Computer Science

105 (2) Computers and Their Use
Political Science

311 (3) State and Local Government and Politics
Speech and Dramiatics Arts

301 (2) Business and Professional Speaking

or
305 (2) Discussion and Conference Leadership

Journalism Concentration

Candidates must complete 32 or more hours in communications, including 18
hours in the departmental core and the following 14 hours:

Communications

312 (4) News Reporting and Editing
323* (3) Practical Reporting and Editing
420 (3) Editorial and Interpretive Writing

Communications electives — 4 hours

*A newspaper internship for one-half semester or a summer term (Comms. 495R)

may be substituted for Comms. 323.



208 COMMUNICATIONS



Supporting Area Courses. In addition to the above, candidates in journalism
must complete the following 20 hours:

Economics

111 (3) Introduction to Economic Principles and Problems

Political Science

311 (3) State and Local Government and Politics
Sociology

223 (2) Racial and Minority Group Relations

370 (3) The Sociology of Urban Life

Electives — 9 elective hours chosen from the following:

Economics

112 (3) Introduction to Economic Principles and Problems
241 (3) Comparative Economic Systems

Education

310 (2) The State, the School, and the Teacher
English

315 (2) Advanced Expository Writing
Geography

231 (3) Economic Geography

441 (3) Political Geography

552 (3) Urban Geography
History

331 (3) The USSR and Eastern Europe

379 (3) Contemporary United States History
Industrial Education

250 (3) Graphic Arts
Linguistics

325 (3) Introduction to Descriptive Linguistics
Pohtical Science

170 (3) Introduction to International Politics
The United States Political System
Introduction to Public Administration
Parties and Pressure Groups in the United States
Municipal Administration

Population Problems

Collective Behavior

Introductory Criminology and Penology

Juvenile Delinquency

Organized Crime

Social Aspects of Mental Health

Political Sociology

Seminar in Crime Causation and Treatment

Journalism Education Concentration

This concentration is for students who wish to prepare for journalism teaching
and student publication supervision in secondary schools. In addition to the
teaching major in journalism, candidates must complete the teacher education
courses prescribed for a secondary school teaching certificate and a teaching
minor selected from the minors listed in the Education section of this cata-
log.

The teaching major in journalism totals 32 hours, including 18 hours in the
departmental core and the following 14 hours:

Communications

312 (4) News Reporting and Editing

323 (3) Practical Reporting and Editing
Electives — 7 hours chosen from among Comms. 331, 335, 340, 346, 347, 363, 365,
371, 372, 420, 427, 451, 528, and 550.



310


(3)


330


(3)


510


(3)


535


(3)


Sociology


245


(3)


352


(2)


381


(3)


383


(2)


386


(2)


389


(3)


527


(3)


582


(2)



COMMUNICATIONS 209



Students who wish to specialize in educational broadcasting should consult
their departmental adviser for additional guidance.

Photography Concentration

Before acceptance as a major in the photography concentration, a student —

1. must have completed, with at least a C+ grade, a basic photography course
such as Physics 177 or equivalent and must pass a departmental examination
in photography, prior to taking Communications 363;

2. must have completed, with at least a C+ grade, Art 120 or equivalent;

3. must complete, with a B grade, Communications 363, Intermediate Photogra-
phy, before taking any other photography courses in the department.

Candidates must complete 35 hours in communications, including 18 hours in
the department core, and the following 17 hours:

Communications

363 (3) Intermediate Photography

365 (2) Press Photography

366 (2) Advertising and Illustrative Photography
368 (2) Pictorial Photography

371 (2) Introduction to the Motion Picture

372 (3) Motion Picture Production

Electives (3 hours) — Recommended: Comms. 331, 367, 373.

Supporting Area Courses. In addition to the above, cauididates in photography
must complete the following related courses (16 hours):

Art

120 (3) Basic Design

241 (2) Design in Layout and Lettering
Industrial Education

250 (3) Graphic Arts
Physics

177 (3) Physics of Light and Photography

Electives — 5 hours chosen from among the following:

Art

261 (2) Design and Crafts
Business Management

241 (3) Introduction to Marketing
Industrial Education

453 (3) Photolithography

454 (3) Photoscreen Process Printing
Philosophy

110 (3) Introduction to Philosophy
214 (3) Aesthetics

Public Relations Concentration

Candidates must complete 34 semester hours in communications, including 18
hours in the departmental core, and the following 16 hours:

Communications

312 (4) News Reporting and Editing

335 (3) Public Relations

336 (2) Public Relations Case Studies

435 (3) Public Relations Research and Projects
Electives — (3 hours) — Suggested courses are Comms. 331, 333, 340, 427, 495, and
528.



210 COMMUNICATIONS



Supporting Area Courses. In addition to the above, candidates in public rela-
tions must complete the following related courses (23 hours):

Computer Science

105 (2) Computers and Their Use

Political Science

311 (3) State and Local Government and Politics

Sociology

223 (2) Racial and Minority Group Relations
370 (3) The Sociology of Urban Life

Electives — 13 hours chosen from the following:

Business Management

241 (3) Introduction to Marketing

Economics

111 (3) Introduction to Economic Principles and Problems

English

218 (2) Creative Writing

315 (2) Advanced Expository Writing

316 (3) Technical Writing
Psychology

330 (2) Industrial Psychology

365 (3) Motivation
Sociology

245 (3) Population Problems

352 (2) Collective Behavior
Speech and Dramatic Arts

403 (2) Persuasive Speaking

Supplementary Information on Departmental Programs

In addition to maintaining the minimum grade-point average required by the
University, majors must maintain a grade-point average of 2.50 or higher in all
work taken within the department.

Course offerings are supported by laboratory facilities in the areas of adver-
tising, reporting and editing, photography, and broadcasting. Students in ad-
vertising, journalism, and photography have opportunity to combine their aca-
demic programs with staff assignments on the Daily Universe, the campus
newspaper. Students in journalism supplement their formal course work with
assignments for the Utah daily newspapers arranged by the department. Stu-
dents in broadcasting get practical experience in broadcasting operations and
opportunities on the staffs of KBYU-TV and KBYU-FM.

As a link between the student's academic preparation and his professional ca-
reer, professional internships are arranged for qualified seniors and graduates.
Through these internships, supervised experience is gained on the staffs of se-
lected newspapers, magazines, radio and television stations, and advertising agen-
cies and offices.

The department sponsors a series of lectures on communications to bring
students in contact with leading professionals and scholars in the field of com-
munications. Professional activities for students are fostered by departmental
clubs and campus chapters of a number of national organizations, including
the following: Sigma Delta Chi, professional journalistic society; Alpha Epsilon
Rho, professional broadcasting fraternity; Kappa Tau Alpha, journalism scholar-
ship society, and the Public Relations Student Society of America.

Requirements for a Minor

The general minor in communications includes a minimum of 16 credit hours se-
lected from the core curriculum and one of the concentrations listed above.
Communications 101 and 211 are required of all minors.

The teaching minor in journalism (Communications) includes 20 credit hours
and is listed in the Education section of this catalog.



COMMUNICATIONS 211



Courses

(Students should consult the department chairman regarding pending modifica-
tion of prerequisites for the following courses: Comms. 307, 331, 333, 334, 340,
435, 444, 610.)

101. Introduction to Mass Communication. (2:2:0) Home Study also. (G-HA)
A survey of the media of mass communication and their functions in
modern society: newspapers, magazines, motion pictures, radio and tele-
vision, advertising, and public relations.

201. The Communications Process. (2:2:0) Haroldsen, Rich

Introduction to the theory of communications; the meaning of meaning;
major contributors to communications theory. Sociol. 215 may be sub-
stituted for this course.

211. News Writing. (3:2:3) Home Study also. Prerequisites: Engl. Ill or equiva-
lent; score 23 on English portion of ACT or comparable achievement
on department qualifying test; ability to type 40 wpm.

Principles of gathering, evaluating, and writing news for newspapers and
broadcast media.

230. Introduction to Advertising. (2:2:0) Home Study also. Prerequisite:
Comms. 211. Barrus, G. Beckham

Principles of advertising and its role in American economy; values to ad-
vertisers and media. Newspaper and broadcast advertising emphasized.

255. Introduction to Broadcasting. (2:2:1) Prerequisite: Comms. 211.

McKinlay, Mills, Tarbox
Role of radio and television in modern society. Study of influences,
current practices, social implications of the American system of broad-
casting.

307. Communications Law. (3:3:0) Home Study also. Prerequisite: Comms. 211.

Burnett
Legal rights, privileges, and regulations of press, radio, television, and
films; libel, contempt, copyright, rights of privacy; decisions of regulatory
bodies.

312. News Reporting and Editing. (4:3:3) Prerequisites: Comms. 211. Recom-
mended: Ind. Ed. 250. Barney, Haroldsen
Evaluation of news; advanced reporting; copyreading; headline writing
and page makeup; beat reporting; practice in handling copy.

323. Practical Reporting and Editing. (3:2:5) Prerequisite: Comms. 312.

Supervised experience in reporting, copyreading, editing assignments on
the Daily Universe and other papers; individual conferences with instruc-
tor.

331. Advertising Copy and Layout. (3:3:0) Prerequisites: Comms. 230; Ind. Ed.
250. G. Barrus, Beckham, Johnson

Reader interest, sales appeal, and production techniques for advertising
in print and position media. Students design retail and product advertise-
ments for typical publications.

333. Broadcast Advertising. (3:3:0) Prerequisites: Comms. 230, 255.

G. Barrus, Beckham, Johnson
Advertising principles for broadcast media; study of research; audience
measurement. Writing commercials, programs, spot announcements; time
buying, production, transcription, and film services.

334. Retail Advertising. (3:3:3) Lab included. Prerequisites: Comms. 230, 331,
333. Johnson

Planning and preparing advertising programs, advertising layouts. Ad-
vertising philosophy of the retail market place.



212 COMMUNICATIONS



335. Public Relations. (3:3:0) Home Study also. Prerequisite: Comms. 211 or
consent of instructor. Barney, Bradley

Philosophy and practice of public relations in business, governmental,
educational, and other institutions. Study of publics, media, methods,
press relations, and publicity.

336. Public Relations Case Studies. (3:3:0)

Case studies in public relations. Cases are selected from a wide range
of actual public relations problems which have confronted business, govern-
mental, educational, and service institutions.

340. Broadcast News. (3:2:4) Prerequisites: Comms. 255, 312. Recommended:
Comms. 372. B. C^hristensen, Haroldsen

News preparation and production of newscasts and public affairs pro-
grams. Consideration of interviews, documentaries, commentaries, edito-
rials, and special events. Practical and laboratory experience provided.

346. Broadcast Practicum I. (2:2:2) Prerequisite: Comms. 255 or qualifying ex-
amination. _ Mills

Instruction and laboratory practice in planning, writing, editing, and pro-
ducing television £md radio programs.

347. Broadcast Practicum II. (2:2:2) Prerequisite: Comms. 346. Rich, Tarbox

Continuation of Comms. 346, with emphasis on more complex program
forms and on integration of program materials into station and closed
circuit systems operations.

363. Intermediate Photography. (3:2:3) Prerequisites: Physics 177; Art 120 or
Ind. Ed. 351. W. Barrus

Practicum in creative application of black-and-white and color photogra-
phy to communication and artistic expression. Advanced camera and dark-
room experiences provided.

365. Press Photography. (2:1:3) Prerequisite: Physics 177 or equivalent.

W. Barrus, Hampton
Application of photocommunications principles in designing and producing
single and multiple-picture sequences for newspapers, magazines, and other
publications.

366. Advertising and Illustrative Photography. (2:1:3) Prerequisite: Physics 177
or equivalent. W. Barrus, J. Walker

Black-and-white and color photography, using the principles of layout
and persuasive communication in the design and production of advertising
for all the media.

367. Portrait Photography. (2:1:3) Prerequisite: Comms. 363 or equivalent.

Posing, lighting, and portrait retouching and finishing, including color;
studio experience.

368. Pictorial Photography. (2:1:3) Prerequisite: Comms. 363 or equivalent.

W. Barrus
Art composition as applied to photography. Perfecting 35-mm and larger
format techniques through creative projects involving landscapes, still life,
and use of recorded sound.

371. Introduction to the Motion Picture. (2:2:1) Prerequisite: Physics 177
or equivalent. R- I- Goodman

Introduction to documentary film theory, using films to illustrate tech-
nique and content. Overview of communication aspects of the cinema.

372. Motion Picture Production. (3:2:4) Prerequisite: Comms. 371. W. Barrus

Elements of silent motion picture production, including story boards,
shot continuity, and camera and lens utilization. Laboratory projects using
8-mm and 16-mm equipment.



COMMUNICATIONS 213



373. Motion Picture Writing. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Comms. 211. S. Whitaker
Basic fundamentals of script playwriting, from synopsis through screen
treatment to final shooting script; analysis of theme and maturation action
by reviewing films; aesthetics and script mechanics treated.

377. Secondary Teaching Procedures. (3:3:1) Prerequisites: Comms. 312; Ed.
301B.

Identification of teacher and pupil activities required for conceptual learn-
ing and for each of the following types of subject matter and teaching:
symbolic, performance ability, and habit. Lectures, demonstrations, and
participation in noninstructional activities at a high school.

420. Editorial and Interpretive Writing. (3:2:3) Prerequisite: Comms. 312 or
consent of instructor. Fairbanks

Study of opinion and interpretive functions of mass media. Assignments
in editorial writing and depth reporting.

427. Magazine Writing. (3:3:0) Home Study also. Prerequisite: Comms. 211
or consent of instructor.

Planning and writing nonfiction articles for sale to periodicals. Analysis
of magazine markets and criticism of articles written in the course.

433. Retail Advertising Management. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Comms. 334. Johnson

Organizing the advertising department. Market research and advertising
campaigns.

434. Newspaper Advertising Management. (2:2:Lab. incl.) Prerequisites: Comms.
230, 331.

Principles of newspaper advertising, organizing the advertising staff,
servicing of local and national accounts, display and classified rate struc-
tures, advertising sales, promotion, and research.

435. Public Relations Research and Projects. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Comms. 335.

Observation and understanding of the public relations process of fact
finding, planning, and evaluating social interrelationships; individual proj-
ects in public relations campaigns.

439. Advertising Media and Campaigns. (3:3:0) Prerequisites: Ck>mms. 331, 333.

G. Barrus, Beckham
Research and planning of advertising campaigns as related to national
and local objectives; media selection and budgeting; individual project in
production of an advertising campaign.

444. Broadcast Sales Administration. (2:2:Lab. incl.) Prerequisites: Comms. 230,
255.

The course is designed to develop the student's understanding of the
complex interrelationships that are involved among various departments,
in order to handle professionally the sales administration of a broadcast
facility.

449. Broadcast Programs and Audiences. (3:3:0) Prerequisites: Comms. 346,
347. Rich

Observation and analysis of basic program forms used in radio and tele-
vision; examination of effective program structure and appeals; considera-
tion of audience situation and measurement.

451. Broadcast Writing. (2:2:3) Prerequisites: Comms. 211, 255, or consent of
instructor. Mills

Study of and practice in documentary, dramatic, and continuity writing
for radio and television.

453. Broadcast Announcing. (2:1:2) Prerequisites: Comms. 255 and Sp. and

Dram. Arts 121 (section for broadcasters). McKinlay

Laboratory and broadcast practice in presentation of major types of
radio and television announcing materials.



214 COMMUNICATIONS



456. Television Operations and Directing. (3:3:3) Prerequisite: Comms. 346.
Recommended: Sp. and Dram. Arts 460. Tarbox

Theories and techniques of television operations and directing.

458. Broadcasting and Film Performance. (2:1:2) Prerequisites: Comms. 255;
Sp. and Dram. Arts 121 (section for broadcasting majors), 123. McKinlay

480. Senior Seminar. (3:3:0) Prerequisites: Comms. 101 and senior standing.

Analysis of contemporary practices and problems of the mass media as

social and business institutions; introduction to communications research.

491R. Communications Symposium. (4:1:0 ea.)

Lectures by professional communicators and specialists in communica-
tions analysis.

495. Projects in Communication Practice. (1-4:0:5-20) Prerequisites: senior
standing and consent of department chairman.

Professional projects or internships for communications majors in ad-
vertising, public relations, journalism, radio, television, or photocommuni-
cations.

(Students must make application to the department chairman for as-
signment one semester in advance of the term during which assignment
to a project is desired. Internships normally will be assigned on the block
plan during the Fall or Winter semesters or during the Spring or Summer
terms. )

510. Mass Media Administration. (2:2:0) Prerequisite: Comms. 312 or 439 or
449.

Problems of organization and administration for newspapers, magazines,
radio stations, and television stations.

526. School Yearbook Production. (2:2:0)

Planning and supervising production of school yearbooks, including



Online LibraryBrigham Young UniversityGeneral catalog (Volume 1972-1973) → online text (page 24 of 67)