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copy, illustration, layout, printing, binding, and business management.

528. Magazine Editing and Publishing. (2:2:0) Prerequisite: (3omms. 312.

Haroldsen
Principles of layout and design for magazines and business publications.
Contemporary practices in content and production.

550. Problems and Practices in Educational Television and Radio. (2:2:0) Pre-
requisite: advanced standing in communications or education.

A study of current problems and practices in the utilization and admin-
istration of television and radio in education and other noncommercial
applications.

556. Advanced Program Development and Production. (2:1:3) Prerequisites: one
or more of Comms. 340, 373, 420, 451, or equivalent; plus undergraduate
supporting field requirements. Tarbox

Planning, production, and evaluation of documentary and public-affairs
informational programs for broadcast. Experimentation in design, selec-
tion, and organization of content.

580. Comparative World Communication Systems. (2:2:0)

G. Barrus, Burnett, Haroldsen
Mass media systems in developing authoritarian and free nations. Rela-
tionship of these systems to government.

581. International Communication Problems. (2:2:0)

G. Barrus, Burnett, Haroldsen
An examination of the cultural, physical, and governmental barriers
to the flow of information between nations. Role of the press in foreign
policy. International propaganda.



COMMUNICATIONS 215



610. Studies in Communication Theory. (3:3:0) Recommended: one or more
courses in philosophy, psychology, and sociology. Rich

A study of the historical and philosophical development of communica-
tions theory, with special application to problems of the mass media.

611. Research Methods in Mass Communication. (2:2:0) Prerequisites: Stat. 221,
Psych. 370, or Sociol. 606. Haroldsen, Smith

Research techniques in communication fields, including readership, read-
ability, content analysis, and audience measurement. Introduction to thesis
writing.

615. Propaganda, Public Opinion, and Communications. (3:3:0)

Barney, Burnett, Smith
Roles of the mass media as channels of propaganda and influences upon
public opinion. Effects of public opinion on mass communications.

617. Mass Communications and Government. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Comms. 307

or Pol. Sci. 361 or 563. Burnett

An examination of the contemf>orary relationship between government

and the mass media, with attention to the philosophical and historical basis

for regulation in light of constitutional guarantees.

620. Communication and Information Technologies. (2:2:0) Prerequisite: gradu-
ate standing. Mills
Systems and technologies for encoding, transmitting, processing, and
decoding information by electronic-mechanical means; analysis of computer
use in new methods of interchanging print and other messages.

630. Advertising Planning and Research. (2:2:0) Prerequisite: Ckjmms. 439.

G. Barrus
An analysis of methods employed to measure the effectiveness of adver-
tising with emphasis on pretesting techniques for advertising campaigns.
Offered 1972-73 and alternate years.

690. Seminar in Mass Communication. (1:1:0)

691, 692. Special Studies in Communication. (l-3:Arr.:Arr. ea.)

Individual work on approved problems not leading to a thesis. Projects
must be approved before registration.

694. Readings in Mass Communication. (l-2:Arr.:Arr.) Prerequisite: consent of
instructor.

699. Thesis for Master's Degree. (6-9:Arr.:Arr.)



216 COMPUTER SQENCE



Comouter




Professor: Carlson.

Associate Professors: Beus, Dean (Chairman, 222 MSCB), Gardner.
Assistant Professors: Call, Crandall, Hays, Norman, Wright.
Instructors: Daines, Engstrom, Hodson, Robinson, Roskelley.
Special Instructor: Bennett.

The Computer Science Department offers a program of studies leading to the
Bachelor of Science degree, and additional course work for a graduate minor.
The objective of this program is to train computer professionals qualified to
contribute successfully in any of the areas of computer science.

A computer professional is prepared to deal with problems in the design and
implementation of modem computer and information systems. This implies
a broad knowledge of the techniques available in the field and the skill to ap-
ply these in individual situations. The computer science program provides train-
ing in these skills through a graded series of courses ranging from basic com-
puter concepts to advanced developments in compilers, assemblers, machine or-
ganization, operating systems, and other areas.

For those who wish to minor in computer science, there are several alterna-
tives available, depending on the student's major field. In addition, service
courses are offered to meet the needs of students from other departments.

Students contemplating eventual graduate work in computer science are en-
couraged to obtain a strong mathematical background, including Math. 371
and 372.

Requirements for a Major

A bachelor's degree candidate majoring in computer science is required to com-
plete the following core courses with a grade of C or better:
Computer Science 105, 110, 130, 231, 332, 351, 380, 391R, 420, 431, 432, 492.

♦Mathematics 112, 113, 210.

♦Statistics 221.

♦General Education — Speech and Dramatic Arts 102; English 316.

In addition, five courses must be selected from the elective courses listed be-
low. At least two of these must be computer science and one a mathematics
elective.

Computer Science 436, 440, 451, 501R, 510, 531, 561, 571, 580; Psych. 570.

Mathematics 371, 372, 385, 411, 508, 512.

Other — Computer Science 233; Statistics 241, 433, 434.

♦These courses can be used to fulfill part of the general education requirements.



COMPUTER SCIENCE 217



Suggested Course Sequence for Majors

First Year F W

Math. 112, 113 4 4

Comput. Sci. 105, 110 2 2

Comput. Sci. 130, 332 3 4

*P.E i i

*General education 7 6

*Dev. Assy 4 i

Total hours 17 17

Second Year F W

Comput. Sci. 231 3

Comput. Sci. 351, 432 3 3

Math. 210 3

Stat. 221 3

*P.E i I

*General education 7 10

*Dev. Assy i |

Total hours 17 17
*General education requirements.



Third Year F W

Comput. Sci. 380, 391R 3 1

Comput. Sci. 431 3

Math, elective 3

Major elective 3

*Engl. 316 3

*General education 7 6

*Dev. Assy I J

Electives 3

Total hours 16i 165

Fourth Year F W

Comput. Sci. 420, 492 3 1

Comput. Sci. electives 3 3

*Dev. Assy J I

Major elective 3

Electives 9 8

Total hours 15* 151



Courses

105. Computers and Their Use. (2:2:0)

General introduction to computers-
modem world.



-how they work and their use in the



110. Data Processing Fundamentals. (2:2:1)

Basic familiarity with and utilization of machines used in data processing,
ranging from card punches to modern electronic computers. Emphasis on
machine operation. Intended for majors only.

130. Introductory Computing. (3:3:2) (G-ML m) Prerequisite: Math. 106, 108,
111, or 122.

An introduction to flowcharting and to FORTRAN, COBOL, and assem-
bly languages. Designed to give a broad familiarization with computing at
an exploratory level. Prerequisite to all higher-numbered computer science
courses.

131. Coding in FORTRAN Language. (2:2:1) Home Study also.

Fundamentals of FORTRAN language for nonmajors.

DMathematics 210. Introduction to Mathematical Logic. (3:3:0)

Numerical Solutions in Electrical Engi-



n Electrical Engineering Science 221
neering. (1:1:0)



231.



233.



307.



Programming Techniques Using FORTRAN. (3:3:2)
Sci. 130; Math. 109, 112, 141, or 223.

Data handling, file handling, and mathematical
FORTRAN.



Prerequisites: Comput.
applications using



Programming Commercial Applications in COBOL. (3:3:2) Prerequisite:
Comput. Sci. 130.

Computer applications in business using the COBOL programming lan-
guage; data management, sorting, and file maintenance.

FORTRAN for Engineers and Scientists. (1:1:0) Prerequisite: completion of
or concurrent registration in Math. 112.

An introduction to computer programming techniques using the FORTRAN
language.



218 COMPUTER SCIENCE



332. Computer Organization and Programming (Assembly Language). (3:3:2)

Prerequisite: Comput. Sci. 130.

Assembly language programming and functional structure of computer
hardware. Treats the language and hardware of the University's main
computer.

337. Computer Organization and Programming (Assembly Language). (3:3:2) (m)
Prerequisite: Comput. Sci. 130 or equivalent.

Assembly language programming and functional structure of computer
hardware. Treats the language and hardware of the University's auxiliary
computers.

351. Information Structure. (3:3:1) Prerequisites: Comput. Sci. 332; Math. 210.
Computer representation of information — its structure and logical or-
ganization for optimum computer processing.

D Accounting 356. Accounting Information Systems. (3:3:0)

380. Computer Architecture. (3:3:0) (m) Prerequisite: Comput. Sci. 351.

A survey of computer architectures, including memory and addressing,
arithmetic schemes, data channels, order codes, microprogramming, and
multiprocessors.

391. Seminar in Computer Science Topics. (1:2:0 ea.) Prerequisite: Comput. Sci.
351. Recommended: Math. 210.

A participation-type seminar with final examination. Reports taken from
current developments in the computer field.

DMathematics 411. Numerical Analysis. (3:3:0)

420. Computer Operating Systems. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Comput. Sci. 351.
The computer operating system in its role as coordinator and scheduler
of compiling, loading, executing, assembling, etc.

431. Algorithmic Languages and Compilers. (3:3:0) Prerequisites: Comput. Sci.
231, 332.

Formal description of algorithmic languages, e.g., FORTRAN, and the
techniques used in their compilation. Study of syntax, semantics, ambigu-
ities, procedures, replication, iteration and recursion.

432. Computer Organization and Programming (Assembly Language) n. (3:3:1)
Prerequisite: Comput. Sci. 351.

Advanced features of assembly language: macros, control sections, I/O,
processing of lists and tables, character manipulations, and floating-point
operations.

436. List Processors. (3:3:1)

List processing language development and usage. Analysis of the strengths
and weaknesses of list processors. SNOBOL, IPL-V, LISP, etc., included.

DDesign and Computer Graphics 436. Basic Computer-Assisted Part Programming.

(3:2:3)

440. Executive Programming Systems. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Comput. Sci. 351.
The structure and design of executive programming systems; in particu-
lar, input-output routines, memory allocation routines, interrupt handling,
timesharing, and partitioning.

DDesign and Computer Graphics 441, 442. Real-Time Computer Systems. (3:2:3

ea.)

451. Information Systems Analysis. (3:3:2) Prerequisite: Comput. Sci. 233. Rec-
ommended: Comput. Sci. 351.

Techniques for the analysis of information processing systems from the
viewpoint of computer implementation.



COMPUTER SQENCE 219



DAccounting 455. Data Processing Systems. (3:3:0)

DAccounting 457. Advanced Computer Programming. (3:1:3)

492. Senior Seminar. (1:1:0) (m) Prerequisites: Comput. Sci. 351 and consent
of instructor.

501R. Advanced Topics in Computer Science. (3:3:1 ea.) (m) Prerequisite: con-
sent of instructor.

Recent developments in computer science.

510. Formal Languages and Syntactic Analysis. (3:3:0) (m) Prerequisites:
Comput. Sci. 431 and Math. 210.

Definition of formal grammars and algorithms for syntactic analysis.

GMathematics 512. Introduction to Numerical Analysis. (3:3:0)

531. Compiler Theory and Design. (3:3:1) Prerequisites: Comput. Sci. 431 and
432.

Study and creation in theory and design of compilers and interpreters,
including syntax-directed compilers and metacompilers.

561. Theoretical Foundations of Computer Science. (3:3:1) (m) Prerequisites:
Math. 210 or equivalent; Comput. Sci. 231.

Study of formal languages, automata theory, sequential machines, com-
putability and undecidability, and graph theory.

DPsychology 570. Computer Use in the Behavioral Sciences. (3:3:6)

571. Discrete Simulations Languages. (3:3:1) Prerequisites: Psych. 570 or
Comput. Sci. 231 and Stat. 221, 501.

Computer simulation utilizing logical, numerical, and Monte Carlo models.
Collection and evaluation of statistics on passage times, flow volume, queue
lengths, manpower, and equipment utilization.

580. Computer Applications in the Physical Sciences. (4:4:1) Prerequisite:
Comput. Sci. 231.

The use of digital computers in the physical sciences, with particular em-
phasis on the modeling and simulations of physical structures.

GLibrary and Information Sciences 654. Seminar: Data Processing in Library and
Information Sciences. (3:3:0)



220 DEVOTIONAL ASSEMBLIES



Devotional
Assemblies



Professor: Peterson (Coordinator, C-356 ASB).

Throughout the history of Brigham Young University, students have had the
privilege of receiving special visits from General Authorities of the Church, in-
cluding members of the First Presidency and the Council of the Twelve Apostles,
who prepare messages especially for them. These devotional assemblies, held
each Tuesday morning, represent a highlight in the BYU educational experience.
Credit for attendsince at the weekly devotional assemblies may be earned at
the rate of one-half semester hovu- per semester. Up to four hours of devotional
credit may be used to fulfill the sixteen-hour religion requirement.

Courses

101, 102. Lectures in Religion. (2:1:0 ea.) Guest lecturers

Open to freshmen only.

201, 202. Lectures in Religion. (2:1:0 ea.) Guest lecturers

Open to sophomores only.

301, 302. Lectures in Religion. (5:1:0 ea.) Guest lecturers

Open to juniors only.

401, 402. Lectures in Religion. (2:1:0 ea.) Guest lecturers

Open to seniors only.



ECONOMICS 221



Economics



Professors: Bateman, Clark, Crockett, Davies, Doxey, Nelson.

Associate Professors: Dutton, Rickenbach, Wimmer (Chairman, 302 JKB), Wood.

Assistant Professors: Foster, Roller, Parsons, Pope, Pritchett.

Economics, as a social science, provides a broad background for entrance into
many professional areas; thus, a minimum of special courses are required, allow-
ing the student considerable flexibility in developing a curriculum consistent with
his desired professional goals.

Several professional possibilities may be pursued by students majoring in
economics:

1. Preprofessional training — for those contemplating entering law school, a
graduate school of business, government service, Asian studies, Latin American
studies, or similar areas of study.

2. Economic theory — for students intending to do graduate work in economics
or allied fields.

3. General business economics — for students who intend to go directly into either
domestic or international business.

4. Labor relations and labor economics — for those intending to make labor re-
lations a profession.

5. Urban economics — for those planning to enter government service or business
activities.

General Information for Majors

The bachelor's degree in economics is offered in both the College of Business (B.S.
degree) and the College of Social Sciences (B.A. degree). Specific requirements in
each college are outlined below. A number of schools recommend that those who
are contemplating an MBA program obtain their economics degree through the
College of Social Sciences.

Of the 30 semester hours of economics courses required to complete the major,
at least 9 hours must be from courses numbered 400 or above.

The department allows a maximum of 3 hours of D credit in courses used to
fulfill the major requirements.

It is recommended that students take Econ. 311 and 312 as early as possible
in their programs, since these courses are prerequisites for many upper-division
classes. Econ. 511 and 512; Math. Ill and 141 (or 112); and either Math. 142
(or 113) or Econ. 389 are strongly recommended for those contemplating gradu-
ate work in economic3 or business.

Requirements for a Major in the College of Business

Economics: 30 semester hours, at least 9 of which must be from courses num-
bered 400 or above, including the following: Econ. Ill, 112, 311, 312, 353 or
553, 315 or 515, and 448 or 588. (Math. 142, 113, or 385 may be counted for
3 of the 30 hours required.)



222 ECONOMICS



Stat. 221, 321, or 421. Stat. 321 or 421 is required for students planning to take

Econ. 588.
Math. Ill (or 108) and 141 (or 112 or 109).
Bus. Mgt. 341 and either 321 or 361.
Acctg. 201, 202, and 342.

Requirements for a Major in the College of Social Sciences

Economics: 30 semester hours, at least 9 of which must be from courses num-
bered 400 or above, including the following: Econ. Ill, 112, 311, 312, 315 or
515, and 488 or 588. (Math. '142, 113, or 385 may be counted for 3 of the 30
hours. )

Stat. 221, 321, or 421. Stat. 321 or 421 is required for students planning to take
Econ. 588.

Math. Ill (or 108) and 141 (or 112 or 109).

A minor is not required, but students who do elect to obtain a minor must have
the approval of an adviser. The minor program should include at least 14 hours
in a department in the College of Social Sciences or the Departments of Mathe-
matics or Statistics. Minors outside these areas must be approved by the depart-
ment chairman as well as the adviser.

Requirements for an Economics Minor

Students selecting economics as a minor subject must take Econ. Ill, 112, 301
or 311, 302 or 312, and 6 additional hours in economics courses numbered 300 or
above.

Courses

101. Survey of Economics. (3:3:0) Home Study also. (G-SS) Davies, Nelson

A one-semester survey course designed to familiarize students with
fundamental economic principles and to develop an understanding of the
critical economic problems facing America and the world today.

111. Introduction to Economic Principles and Problems. (3:3:0) Home Study
also. (G-SS m)

An elementary course in national income analysis, with emphasis on em-
ployment and national income analysis.

112. Introduction to Economic Principles and Problems. (3:3:0) Home Study
also. (G-SS m)

A continuation of Econ. Ill, with emphasis on the theory of price and
its effects on the household, firm, and industry.

241. Comparative Economic Systems. (3:3:0) (G-SS) Roller, Nelson

Analysis and critical appraisal of contemporary economic systems:
capitalism, socialism, and communism.

301. Income Analysis. (3:3:0) (m) Prerequisites: Econ. Ill and 112 or

equivalent; Math. 108 or equivalent. (Not open to economics majors.)

Intermediate economic theory, with emphasis on national income
analysis.

302. Price Analysis. (3:3:0) (m) Prerequisites: Econ. Ill and 112; Math. 108;
or equivalent. (Not open to economics majors.)

Intermediate economic theory, with emphasis on price and distribution
analysis.

311. Theory of Income, Employment, and the Price Level. (3:3:0) (m) Pre-
requisites: Econ. Ill and 112; Math. 108 or 111 or equivalent.

Clark, Button, Foster
An upper-division course in economic theory, with emphasis on national
income analysis.



ECONOMICS 223



312. Theory of Price. (3:3:0) (m) Prerequisites: Econ. Ill and 112; comple-
tion or concurrent registration in Math. 109 or 112.

Roller, Pritchett, Rickenbach
An upper-division course in economic theory, with emphasis on price and
distribution analysis.

315. History of Economic Thought. (3:3:0) (m) Prerequisites: Econ. Ill and
112; or equivalent. Clark, Davies

An analysis of the development of economic thought from the time of
Aristotle to the present.

330. Economic Development. (3:3:0) (m) Prerequisites: Econ. Ill and 112;
or equivalent. Bateman, Roller

The theory and experience of achieving economic growth in both under-
developed and developed economies.

334. Economic Development in Latin America. (3:3:0) (m) Prerequisites:

Econ. Ill and 112; or equivalent. Bateman

An analytical treatment of the patterns of economic growth of Latin

American countries. Attention directed to problems of resource allocation,

industrialization, inflation, rural-urban migration, etc.

352. Real Estate and Urban Economics. (3:3:0) (m) Prerequisites: Econ. Ill
and 112; or equivalent. Nelson, Rickenbach

An introduction to the principles and problems associated with real estate
decisions as they relate to valuation, financing, marketing, and economic
trends.

353. Money and Banking. (3:3:0) (m) Prerequisites: Econ. Ill and 112; or
equivalent. Button, Foster, Parsons

Principles of money and banking as related to monetary and banking
theory and policy.

358. International Trade and Finance. (3:3:0) (G-SS m) Prerequisites: Econ.
Ill and 112; or equivalent. Bateman, Doxey, Foster, Pope

An introduction to the theory and institutions of international trade and
finance, with special emphasis on applications to the United States.

361. Labor Relations. (3:3:0) (m) Prerequisites: Econ. Ill and 112; or
equivalent. Crockett, Davies

History of the labor movement, collective bargaining, and labor legisla-
tion.

374. Economic History of the United States. (3:3:0) Home Study also, (m)
Prerequisites: Econ. Ill and 112; or equivalent. Pope, Pritchett, Wimmer

376. Business and Government. (3:3:0) (m) Prerequisite: Econ. Ill and 112.

Roller
A study of the role of government in the American economy.
389. Mathematical Economics. (3:3:0) (m) Prerequisites: Econ. 311 and 312;
Math. 109 or 112; or consent of instructor. Button

An application of calculus and matrix algebra to such topics as produc-
tion, consumer choice, market equilibrium, and national income and em-
ployment.

441. Advanced Comparative Economic Systems. (3:3:0) (m) Prerequisites:
Econ. Ill and 112; or equivalent. Nelson

Through the use of economic models vigorous analyses of capitalism, mar-
ket socialism, and central planning systems are made. Emphasis is on the
application of economic principles to the problems of comparative systems.

452. Urban Economics: Theory, Problems, and Policies. (3:3:0) (m) Pre-
requisites: Econ. Ill and 112; or equivalent. Nelson, Rickenbach
Economic theory applied to contemporary urban problems. Study topics
include urban growth, community structure, location theory, valuation, and
government policies.



224 ECONOMICS



462. Manpower Economics. (3:3:0) (m) Prerequisites: Econ. Ill and 112; or
equivalent. Crockett, Davies

A study of the efforts to strengthen the economic welfare and contribu-
tions of the nation's manpower.

471. European Economic History. (3:3:0) (m) Prerequisites: Econ. Ill and
112; or equivalent. Clark

Historical development of Europe's economic institutions and their effect
on the general history of that continent.

482. Introduction to Business Fluctuations. (3:3:0) (m) Prerequisites: Econ.

311 and 312; or equivalent. Bateman, Roller

Analysis of the nature, causes, and control of business and economic

fluctuations. Identification of the problems of instability as it relates to

forecasting economic activity and growth of the economy.

488. Introduction of Econometrics. (3:3:0) (m) Prerequisites: Econ. 311 and
312; Math. 109 or 112; Stat. 221 or 321; or equivalent.

Roller, Parsons, Pritchett
Mathematical and statistical techniques employed to estimate and test
quantifiable economic relationships.

501R. Current Economic Policies and Problems. (2-3:Arr.:Arr. ea.) Davies, Nelson

511. Advanced Theory of Income, Employment, and the Price Level. (3:3:0)
(m) Prerequisites: Econ. 311 and 312; Math. 112 or 109; or consent of

instructor. Button, Foster, Parsons

An advanced course in the theory of income and employment. Con-
siderable emphasis will be placed on the most recent advances made in this
area of study. Journal articles will be extensively used.

512. Advanced Price Theory. (3:3:0) (m) Prerequisites: Econ. 312 or 302;
Math. 112 or 109; or equivalent. Roller, Pope, Pritchett, Wimmer

An advanced course in price theory which will use recent journal articles
as a frame of reference for discussion periods.

515. Seminar in the History of Economic Thought. (3:3:0) (m) Prerequisite:
Econ. 311 and 312, or equivalent. Clark, Crockett, Wimmer

An advanced course in the development and evolution of the theoretical
and institutional tools of economic analysis.

D Agricultural Economics 525. Production Economics. (2:2:0)

530. Advanced Economic Development. (3:3:0) Prerequisites: Econ. 311 and

312; or equivalent. Recommended: Econ. 488 or 588. Bateman, Roller

An analysis of the economic problems of a developing country. Computer

models are used to increase the student's awareness of the economic impact



Online LibraryBrigham Young UniversityGeneral catalog (Volume 1972-1973) → online text (page 25 of 67)