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Note 2: Classes up to and including Russian 301 may be waived for students
who demonstrate proficiency in the foreign language. The department chair-
man will attest such proficiency in a written statement to the Teacher Clear-
ance Office.

Sociology

Teaching Major (30-hour list)

Sociol. Ill, 112, 200, 205 or 206, 211, 526, and three of the following: 320,
330, 350 or 380. The remaining hours are to be selected from the fol-
lowing: Sociol. 115, 223, 245, 330, 340, 352, 357, 370, 381, 383, 386, 389,
411, 412, 471, 497R.

Teaching Minor (20-hour list)

Minor, Dominant, or Related Subject: Sociol. Ill, 112, 320, 526. The re-
maining hours are to be selected from the major list above, preferably
from the required courses.

Note: Sociol. 206 has as a prerequisite Math. 105 or its equivalent.

Spanish

Teaching Major (32-hour list)

Spanish 201*, 301*, 321, 322 or 439, 326, 377**, 441, 445, 451, plus 5 credit
hours selected from the following: 311***, 351, 454, 458, 470, 485, 490,
491, 520, 522, 556, 580, 581, 584, or Latin 621.

Teaching Minor (20-hour list)

Spanish 201*, 301*, 321, 326, 377**, 441 or 451, 445.

*Note: Classes up to and including Spanish 301 may be waived for students
who demonstrate proficiency in the foreign language. The department
chairman will attest such proficiency in a written statement to the Teacher
Clearance Office.

**Note: Spanish 377 is required for both majors and minors and must be
taken prior to student teaching. It is part of the education requirement
for certification and does not count as language credit. This requirement



EDUCATION 243



will be waived for students majoring in another language who have had
the course in that language.

***Note: It is strongly recommended that teaching majors and minors who
have not had foreign residence or participated in a semester abroad pro-
gram take Spanish 311. This course may not be counted for elective credit
by natives or returned Spanish-speaking missionaries.

Speech and Dramatic Arts

Teaching Major (34|^-hour list)

Speech and Dram. Arts 101, 111, 115, 121, 123, 305, 309, 319, 325, 371,

401, 460, 461R, 521; P.E. 183.
Electives: Select three hours from the following courses: 126, 311, 402, 403,

491, 523, 525, 564, 565.

Teaching Minors

A. Speech and Dramatic Arts (21-hour list — for those planning to teach
both subjects on a secondary level: 101, 111 or 305, 115, 121, 319, 325,
371, 460, 461R.

B. Dramatic Arts (19 J hour list — for those planning to teach only dra-
matic arts on a secondary level): 101, 115, 121, 123, 126, 319, 460, 461R;
P.E. 183.

Electives: Select 2-3 hours from the following courses: 333, 360, 362,
572, 578R.
C Speech (20-hour list — for those planning to teach only speech on a
secondary level) 101, 111, 121, 305, 309, 371, 401, 491, 521.



Department of Educational Administration

Professors: Burrup, Christensen, ([Jlarke, Morrill, Ovard, Smith (Chairman, 207

MCKB), Van Alfen.
Associate Professors: CJottrell, Hyatt, Wasden.

The Department of Educational Administration offers graduate programs only
leading to the Master of Education (M.Ed.), Educational Specialists (Ed.Sp.), and
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) degrees. The department has assumed responsibility
for the training and preparation of elementary, secondary, £ind junior college ad-
ministrators and educational supervisors. Students who intend to pursue an ad-
vanced degree in the Department of Educational Administration are advised to
consult the Graduate School Catalog for admission and general degree require-
ments, and the department for detailed requirements of degree programs.



Department of Educational Psychology

Professors: Bauer, Black, Downing, Harris, Jensen, Merrill.

Associate Professors: Brown, Crandell, Gale (Chairman, 180 CHLC), B. Harrison,

G. Harrison, Kelly, Moses, Pinegar, Snow, Thomas, Van Mondfrans, Wilson.
Assistant Professors: Bingham, Buckner, Card, Hammond, Heaps, Hendrix,

Johnson, Keele, Walton, Wooton.
Instructor: Craig.

The Department of Educational Psychology offers programs leading to the
bachelor's degree in special education, and to graduate degrees — M.A., M.Ed.,
Ed.D., Ph.D., and Sixth- Year Specialist — in the areas of school psychology, in-
structional psychology, counseling and guidance, instructional media, and special
education. Programs leading to certification in the above areas are also offered.



244 EDUCATION



The programs in school psychology, instructional psychology, counseling and
guidance, and instructional media are graduate programs, and those interested
should refer to the current issue of the Graduate School Catalog.

The Institute for Special Education, as a part of the Department of Educa-
tional Psychology, offers programs in preparation of teachers of mentally handi-
capped, learning disabled, visually handicapped, and emotionally handicapped
children. For information on specific requirements, the student should contact
the program chairman of special education, 245 CHLB, or the program coordi-
nator in the specific area of exceptionality.

Courses

200. Educational Exploration. (2:2:1) (m)

An examination of the challenges of the teaching profession, focusing on
an evaluation of one's self as a potential teacher.

206. Material Preparation and Equipment Operation in Instructional Media.

(2:1:3)

Designed for teachers' aides, media-support personnel, and library tech-
nicians and other noneducation majors.

260. Education of Exceptional Children. (2:2:1) Home Study also.

A general course designed to acquaint the student with the causes, rec-
ognition, incidence, and characteristics of all types of exceptional children.
Designed to meet needs of both classroom teacher and person going into
special education.

300. Teacher Assistant Experience. (8:Arr.:Arr.) (m) Prerequisite: Ed. 200.
Learning theory, teaching techniques, and principles of child development
applied in a public school setting.

301A. Basic Concepts and Principles of Teaching. (2:2:1) Home Study also. Pre-
requisite: GPA 2.25. Person must have passed Grammar and Spelling Test
for Teachers or English ACIT with a score of 20 or above.

For potential elementary teachers. An exposition of a simple and opera-
tional concept of teaching, consisting of three elements: the objective, the
learning experience, and receptiveness to learning.

301B. Basic Concepts and Principles of Teaching. (1-2:1-2:1) Home Study also.
Prerequisite: GPA 2.25. Persons must have passed Grammar and Spelling
Test for Teachers or English ACT with a score of 20 or above.

For potential secondary teachers regardless of level or field. An ex-
position of a simple and operational concept of teaching, consisting of
three elements: the objective, the learning experience, and receptiveness to
learning.

310. The State, the School, and the Teacher. (2:2:0) Home Study also.

Understanding the school and its relationship to the community, the
state, and the nation; how schools are organized and administered, with
emphasis on Utah school organization and Utah school laws.

330. Teaching Foreign Language in the Elementary School (FLES). (2:2:Arr.)
Prerequisites: Ed. 301A, and a modern language course 322 or equivalent
in the language minor.

Second-language learning, methods and techniques, preparation and
use of audio-visual media, use of television, evaluation of student progress,
articulation, current research, and literature.

340. Children's Literature. (2:2:0) Home Study also.

Evaluation of significant books, past and present, that meet children's
needs.

350. Methods and Strategies of Teaching. (8:Arr.:Arr.) (m) Prerequisite: Ed.
300.

Principles and methods of teaching math, reading, science, social studies,
and language arts and the utilization of instructional media.



I



EDUCATION 245



361. Introduction to Teaching the Mentally Retarded. (2:2:1) Home Study also.
Prerequisite: Ed. 260.

Identification, classification, and characteristics of the retarded and gen-
eral problems in their care, management, and education.

362. Introduction to Teaching the Visually Handicapped. (2:2:0)

Study of the identification, classification, and characteristics of visually
handicapped children, and general problems in their care and education.

363. Introduction to Teaching the Physically Impaired. (2:2:1) Prerequisite:
Ed. 260.

Types and causes of physical impairment in children and implications
for their care and education.

371. Arts and Crafts for the Handicapped. (2:2:1)

Basic principles of and experience with craft activities, with emphasis on
adaptations to meet the needs of individuals with disabilities.

372. Eklucational Implications of Visual Impairment. (2:2:0) (m) F*rerequisite:
Ed. 260.

Structures, functions, and impairments of the organs of vision; educa-
tional implications of visual loss.

373. Standard English BraUle. (3:3:0)

Systematic presentation of Standard English Braille for those who intend
to teach the visually handicapped or do volunteer transcribing. Not a
course in touch reading.

377. Secondary Teaching Curriculum and Methods. (3:3:1) Prerequisite: Ed.
301B.

Identification of teacher and pupil activities required for conceptual
learning and for each of the following types of subject matter and teaching:
symbolic, performance ability, and habit. Lectures, demonstrations, and
participation in noninstructional activities at a high school. (Students
should arrange their class schedules to permit approximately 14 hours
for directed observation and participation during the 8:00 A.M. hour
through the 3:15 P.M. hour.) Students interested in Indian education
should register in a specially designated section.

381. Introduction to Teaching Children with Learning Disabilities. (2:2:1) (m)
Prerequisite: Ed. 260.

Classroom identification, diagnosis, and adjustment of curriculum for
special and regular classroom teachers to meet the needs of children with
learning disabilities.

400. Classroom Teaching Experience. (14:Arr.:Arr.) Prerequisite: Ed. 350.

Field-oriented experiences, including student teaching, diagnostic and pre-
scriptive techniques in reading and mathematics.

402. Educational Psychology. (2:2:0) Home Study also. Prerequisites: Ed. 420,
449; C:DFR 210.

Psychological facts, principles, and concepts related to the teacher-learn-
ing situation are covered.

403. Development and Learning. (4:4:0) Home Study also. Prerequisite: Ed.
449 or 479.

Designed to give the student an understanding of the psychological
facts, principles, and concepts related to the teaching-learning situation.
Attention is given to such topics as the learning process, readiness, individual
differences, motivation, and evaluation.

406. Introduction to Production and Utilization of Instructional Media. (2:1:3)

415. Educational Values. (2:2:0) Home Study also.

An analysis of educational values and how teachers can help students
clarify what they value and why.



246 EDUCATION



420. Curriculum and Methods in the Elementary School. (4:4:0) Prerequisite:
Ed. 301A.

Content, practices, and classroom procedures in the modern elementary
school.

421. Teaching Reading in the Elementary School. (3:3:1) Prerequisites: Ed.
301A, 420, 449.

Foundations in reading instruction, methods, materials, and aids for
teaching reading in the elementary school. Lab required.

423. Teaching Science and Social Studies in the Elementary School. (2:2:0)
Prerequisites: Ed. 301B, 420, 449.

Materials and methods used in teaching science and social studies in
the elementary schools.

424. Teaching Language Arts in the Elementary Schools. (2:2:0) Prerequisites:
Ed. 301B, 420, 449.

The place of language arts in the elementary school curriculum, with
the materials and techniques necessary for teaching them.

425. Methods and Procedures of Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary
School. (2:2:0) Home Study also. Prerequisites: Ed. 301A, 420, 449.

Attention is directed to the mathematical ideas which underlie the pro-
gram. Particular stress is given to effective experience for teaching mathe-
matical concepts and skills, including procedure for attacking mathematical
and word problems.

427. Readiness and Beginning Reading. (2:2:0) Prerequisites: Ed. 301A, 420,

449.

431. Learning Abilities of Exceptional Children. (2:2:1) (m) Prerequisites: Ed.
260 and consent of instructor.

Learning as it relates to specific characteristics of exceptional children.

449. Elementary Student Teaching. (2-10:0:20-40) Prerequisites: Ed. 301A,
Ed. 340; Math. 305; Art 326; Music 226, 337.

Designed to develop readiness for full comprehension of the principles
of teaching and the remaining subject-matter and education courses. Special
attention to on-the-job lesson planning and unit organization. Seminar on
student teaching problems is held weekly. (A laboratory fee of $45 is
charged, payable upon application for student teaching.)

An application for a specific assignment must be filed with the Student
Teaching Office one semester in advance of receiving an assignment. Stu-
dent teachers are expected to do responsible teaching, participate in cocur-
ricular activities, and keep in close contact with the faculty and students
in a public school, as well as to participate in seminars and conferences
with their supervisors. During this period of student teaching, the stu-
dent must limit his load to the student teaching registration only.

450. Analysis of Teaching Seminar. (2:2:0) Prerequisite: Ed. 400.

Analysis and synthesis of elementary school curricula, with attention to
innovation, organization, trends, and problems in elementary education.

468A,B,C,D,E. Fracticum in Special Education. (2-4:0:5-10 ea.) Prerequisite: con-
sent of instructor.

A — Mentally Retarded; B — Orthopedically Handicapped; C — Visually
Handicapped; D — Emotionally Disturbed; E — Hearing Impaired. A labora-
tory fee of $15 is charged, payable upon application for student teaching.

470. Education-Community Relationships for Exceptional Children- (2:2:1)
Prerequisite: Ed. 260.

A course designed to acquaint the student with problems of exceptional
children. Vocational planning and school, commimity, and parent rela-
tionships are considered.



EDUCATION 247



471. Problems in the Education of Mentally Retarded Children. (3:2:2) Pre-
requisite: Ed. 361.

Problems of identification, diagnosis and placement, organization of edu-
cational programs, curriculum development, and teaching methods for
classes for mentally retarded students.

475. Secondary Teacher Education I. (16:Arr.:Arr.) Prerequisite: acceptance to
enter certification program in College of Education.

Professional education certification experiences for students who have
completed the methods course (377) in the academic department. A lab
fee of $45 is charged, payable upon application for students teaching.

476. Secondary Teacher Education II. (21:Arr.:Arr. ) Prerequisite: acceptance
to enter certification program in College of Education.

Professional education certification experiences for social studies majors
and departmentally approved secondary teacher candidates. A lab fee of
$45 is charged, payable upon application for student teaching.

477. Microteaching (Secondary), (1-4:0:2-8) Prerequisite: Ed. 301B.

Use of and practice in the techniques of microteaching. A methods
course to complement student teaching and other secondary methods.

479. Secondary Student Teaching. (2-8:1:20-40) Prerequisites: Ed. 301B, 377.

Designed to develop readiness for full comprehension of the principles
of teaching and the remaining subject-matter and education courses. Special
attention to on-the-job lesson planning and unit organization. A laboratory
fee of $45 is charged, payable upon application for student teaching.

An application for a specific assignment must be filed in the Student
Teaching Office one semester in advance of receiving an assignment. Stu-
dent teachers are expected to do responsible teaching, participate in
cocurricular activities, and keep in close contact with the faculty and stu-
dents in a public school as well as to participate in seminars and confer-
ences with their supervisors. During this period of student teaching, the
student must limit his load to the student teaching registration only.

481. Curriculum and Methods for Children with Learning Disabilities. (3:3:0) (m)
Prerequisites: Ed. 260, 364, or consent of instructor.

Organization of educational programs, curriculum development, and
teaching methods for children with learning disabilities.

482R. Undergraduate Seminar in Educational Research. (2:2:10 ea.) Prerequisite:
consent of instructor.

Introduction to applied behavioral science research, as related to teaching.

490, 491. Seminar. (1-2:1-2:0 ea.)

493, 494. Independent Reading. (1-2:1-2:0 ea.)

500. Fundamentals in Adult Education. (3:3:0) (m) Prerequisite: student
teaching, teaching certificate, or departmental approval.
Principles and practices of adult education.

506. Instructional Media in the School Program. (3:2:3)

Introduction to application of instructional media. Principles of evalu-
ation, selection, utilization of instructional media. Develops skills in
materials production. Attention given to utilization of instructional media
centers.

510. Media Production Techniques. (2:1:3) Prerequisite: Ed. 506.

An in-depth exploration of the various tools and techniques appropriate
to the production of instructional materials.

514R. Analysis of In-Service Problems. (1-3:1-3:1 ea.)

Designed to provide professional assistance to in-service teachers in ana-
lyzing and solving educational problems. (Content for a specific semester's
offering will be selected from a range of possible emphases.



248 EDUCATION



520. Photography in Instruction. (2:1:3) Prerequisites: Ed. 506; Comms. 363 or
equivalent.

The processes, techniques, and equipment applicable to the preparation
of photographic instructional materials.

524. Art and Graphic Processes in Instruction. (3:2:3) Prerequisite: Ed. 506
or consent of instructor.

Preparation of instructional materials or reproduction masters using art
and graphic processes.

526. Instructional Use of Audio Programs. (2:1:3)

Design, development, and utilization of audio materials and systems for
large- and small-group and individual learning.

533. Kindergarten Education. (2:2:0) Prerequisite: CDFR 321 or consent of
instructor.

Theory, practices, issues, and trends in kindergarten education.

534. Innovative Practices in the Elementary School. (3:3:1)

536. Secondary Curriculum and Methods: Introduction. (3:3:0)

Analysis of differences among the various curriculum and instructional
patterns, emphasizing their impact on individualized learning.

547. Foundations in Reading. (3:3:0)

A consideration of the various approaches to reading. A detailed study
of readiness for reading and the different techniques of word recognition
as developed in kindergarten through grade twelve.

549. Directed Observation in the Schools. (2:0:4)

Directed observation with secondary school pupils. Required for speech
therapists who do not have secondary certificates; recommended for teach-
ers who are recertifying and others.

550. Introduction to Guidance Services. (2:2:0) Home Study also.

Principles and practices of pupil personnel services in the public schools.
Designed for prospective teachers of both elementary and secondary levels.
Required, but may not be counted as part of the 30 hours for the mas-
ter's degree by students majoring in this area of specialization.

551. Research Design in Education. (3:3:0)

Research literature in education and psychology, with emphasis on inter-
pretation. Application of nonempirical techniques by preparing prospectus
for field project.

560. Educational Tests and Measurements. (3:3:0) Home Study also. Prerequi-
site: Stat. 552 or 501, or Psych. 670.

Principles of test construction and use. Interpretation of standardized
tests.

562. Problems and Methods in the Education of the Visually Handicapped.

(3:3:0) Prerequisites: Ed. 362, 373.

Problems confronting administrator and teacher in the different tjT)es
of school programs now available for the visually handicapped. Specialized
teaching methods and materials.

563. Advanced Braille. (2:2:0)

Study of the "Nemeth Code of Braille Mathematics and Scientific No-
tation" and of transcription formats and techniques.

565. Problems in the Education of Emotionally Handicapped Children. (3:3:1)
Prerequisites: Ed. 260 and consent of instructor.

Organization of educational programs, curricular development, and teach-
ing methods for students with emotional problems.



EDUCATION 249



566. Problems in the Education of Orthopedically Handicapped Children. (3:3:1)
Prerequisites: Ed. 260, 363.

Problems of identification, diagnosis and placement, organization of edu-
cational programs, curriculum development, and teaching methods for
students with orthopedic handicaps, including the homebound and hospi-
talized.

568A,B>C,D,E. Observation and Participation in Special Education. (2:1:4 ea.)
Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

A — Mentally Retarded; B — Orthopedically Handicapped; C — Visually Handi-
capped; D — Emotionally Disturbed; E — Hearing Impaired. Observation and
participation in classes for handicapped children. Designed to develop
readiness for practicum experience. A laboratory fee of $15 is charged,
payable upon application for student teaching.

570. Problems in Education of Children with Neurological Impairment. (3:3:0)
Prerequisite: Ed. 260 or consent of instructor.

Principles, special techniques, and materials for teaching children with
learning disabilities related to neurological impairment.

572. Eklucational Evaluation of Communication Disabilities. (2:2:4) Prerequi-
site: Ed. 570.

Principles and practices of evaluating communication disabilities of chil-
dren, with emphasis prescribing education-habilitation procedures. Designed
for graduate students in special education, speech pathology-audiology, and
other school spjecialists.

573. Workshop for Teachers of Bilingual Children. (2:8 hrs./day for 2 weeks)

Study of educational needs, materials, and methods appropriate to the
background and language problems of bilingual students.

578. Practicum for Elementary Teaching. (2-4-8:2-4-8:5-10-20)

579. Practicum for Secondary Teaching. (2-4-8:2-4-8:5-10-20)

581R. Proseminar in Instructional Psychology. (3:3:0) (m) Prerequisite: consent
of coordinator.

An interdisciplinary survey of topics in instructional psychology. Lec-
tures by several different faculty members.

601. Comparative Current Educational Philosophy. (3:3:0) (m)
603. Educational Classics and Contemporary Issues. (3:3:0) (m)

606. History of Education in Europe and America. (4:4:0) (m)

607. Education in a World Setting. (2:2:0)

An examination of the historical, economical, psychological, and political
foundations of contemporary international education.

608. Social Foundations of Education. (3:3:0) (m)

A study of social institutions and the effects they have on the education
of young Americans.

609. Selection and Utilization of Audiovisual Materials. (2:2:0)

Students are taught the unique contributions of each audiovisual ma-
terial, methods of selecting nonbook materials, proper utilization of the
items of a teaching situation, and familiarity with various types of in-
structional materials. The building of a proper collection of audiovisual
materials for a school media center is also examined.

610. Designing and Producing Instructional Materials. (2:2:1) Prerequisites: Ed.
510, Psych. 460, and one of the following: Ed. 520, 524, or 526; or consent
of instructor.

Designing and producing instructional media kits or projects.



250 EDUCATION



611. Administering Instructional Media. (2:2:0)

Explores the history of the media fields and examines their relationships,
current trends, philosophy, and their roles in education today. The various
administrative techniques and actual practices in the media field are
examined. Students are required to develop and outline a media program
for a local school and typical school district.

612. Supervision of Student Teachers. (2:2:0)

For those desiring a well-rounded view of the student-teaching program.

622. Advanced Study in Childhood Education. (2:2:0)

Educational theory and analysis of current practices in schools, as
related to the significance and problems of early childhood education.

623. Science in the Elementary School. (2:2:0)

Teaching of modern elementary science, with emphasis on individualized



Online LibraryBrigham Young UniversityGeneral catalog (Volume 1972-1973) → online text (page 28 of 67)