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495. Individual Readings. (1-3:2-8:0)

Directed reading for majors and for students on foreign tours. Available
only through approval of adviser and department chairman.

500R. Eminent American Writers. (1-3:1-3:0 ea.)

Different writers are treated each semester in this series.

510R. Eminent English Writers. (1-3:1-3:0 ea.)

Different writers are treated each semester in this series.

518R. Advanced Creative Writing. (2:2:0 ea.) Prerequisite: Engl 318, 319 or
consent of instructor. ' Lar'gon

A seminar in the writing of fiction, poetry, drama, and the essay; in-
dividual consideration of manuscripts; professional orientation May be
repeated for credit with the consent of the instructor.

520R. Studies in Theme and Form. (2-3:2-3:0 ea.)

An intensive study of limited literary topics (the theory of myth
gothic fiction, Utopian literature, etc.). Varies according to instructor.

527. Phonology of Modem English. (3:3:3) (m) Prerequisites: Engl 321 325-
Ling. 325; or equivalent. Luthy Cox

For English language and TESL students. Covers articulatory phonetics
phonemics, and intonation of English. Provides contrastive analysis of
English sounds and those of a second language.

528. Phonology of Modern English TESL Laboratory. (2:3:0) Luthy Cox

Practical experience in developing aural discrimination and accent cor-
rection skills. Extensive work with bilinguals.

529. Structure of Modern English. (3:3:0) Prerequisites: Engl. 321- Ling 325-
or consent of instructor. Luthy Cox

Application of the methods of linguistic science to the description of the
phonology, morphology, and syntax of modern English.

577. Procedures in Teaching English as a Second Language. (3 3 3) Prereaui-
sites: Engl. 321, 529; or Ling. 423. Madsen S

Methods and materials used in teaching English as a second language-
observation, discussion, and some teaching. '

578. TESL Materials Selection and Development. (3:3:0) (m TESL) Prerequi-
site: completion of or concurrent registration in Engl. 577. Madsen King

For TESL students. Evaluation and adaptation of texts, creation of
tests, tapes, exercises, games, supplementary aids and texts.

579. TESL Student Teaching. (4-8:0:4-8) Prerequisites: Engl. 577 and consent
of instructor. Madsen, King

Teaching practice in a TESL settmg. On-the-job training in planning
instruction, preparing materials, and conducting actual classes.

582. Extended Readings in Shakespeare. (3:3:0) Famsworth, Hart, Young

Extensive study of the body of Shakespeare's works.
615. Bibliography and Methods of Research. (2:2:0) Gassman, J. Thomas

Ihe use of library resources as tools for literary study and an intro-
duction to various areas in which literary research may be pursued To be
taken m the first regular semester of graduate study.



276 ENGLISH



621. Problems in the English Language. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Engl. 421.

Cox, McKendrick
The study of a particular period in the English language or a particular
aspect of the language, such as the study of morphology or syntax.

624. Old English. (3:3:0) McKendrick, Young

A study of Old English grammar and vocabulary in order to understand
traditional syntactical patterns and to read various types of Old English
prose and poetry.

625. Beowulf. (2:2:0) Prerequisite: Engl. 624. McKendrick, Young

A close reading of the poem in the original, with emphasis upon literary
and cultural values.

626. Middle English. (3:3:0) McKendrick

A detailed study of the principal Middle English dialects as illustrated
in the literature of the period.

631. The English Novel. (3:3:0) Prerequisites: Engl. 332, 333, or consent of
instructor. Brady, B. Clark. Gassman

An intensive analysis of literary values and techniques in selected
novels. Not a survey course.

635. The American Novel. (3:3:0) Blanch, M. Clark, Jacobs

Various approaches to the novel, with emphasis on the formal. Focus
may vary according to the instructor and the needs of students.

641. The English Drama. (3:3:0) Craig

A short intensive survey of English drama from its beginning, followed
by independent research.

650. Literary Criticism. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Engl. 351 or equivalent.

M. Clark, Hart, Larson
An examination of modern critical theory and practice and application
by students to specific literary works.

651R. Studies in Poetry. (3:3:0) Hart, Larson

652R. Studies in Prose Nonfiction. (3:3:0) Famsworth, Hart,

J. Thomas, Thomson

661. Colonialism and Puritanism in American Literature. (3:3:0) Prerequisite:
Engl. 361 or consent of instructor. Jacobs, Thomson, Williams

Intensive readings in major writers of the emerging American literary
and cultural traditions before 1800.

662. Romanticism in American Literature. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Engl. 361 or
consent of instructor. EUsworth, Jacobs, Thomson

The rise and fruition of the romantic movement in American literature
from Freneau to Lowell.

663A,B,C,D,E. Studies in Regional American Literature. (3:3:0) (m) Prerequi-
site: a general background in American literature.

Cracroft, Jacobs, Lambert, Thomson
Focus on a different region each time offered.

664. Realism and Naturalism in American Literature. (3:3:0) Prerequisite:
Engl. 362 or consent of instructor. M. Clark, Jacobs, Lambert

Dominant cultural and aesthetic trends since the Civil War.

666, American Literature, 1900-1950. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Engl. 380 or other
course in modern American literature. M. Clark, Evans, Larson

667, Folklore. (2:2:0) Prerequisite: Engl. 391 or consent of instructor. Cheney

Directed study in folklore and folkways, with emphasis on the Mormon
heritage and tradition. Collecting, analyzing, and editing.



ENGLISH 277



669. Teaching English in the Secondary Schools. (2:2:0) Prerequisite: Engl. 377

or consent of instructor. West

Intensive consideration of literature, writing, grammar, and reading

materials appropriate to English courses, and the effective use of these

materials.

671. The Medieval Period in English Literature. (2:2:0) McKendrick

A close reading in the original of a principal work such as "Troilus and
Criseyde," "Piers Plowman," or "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight," with
emphasis upon its relation to the other literature, culture, and history of
the period.

672. The Renaissance in English Literature. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Engl. 372
or consent of instructor. Larson, J. Thomas, Wood, Young

Research in individual authors, styles, influences, and trends. Emphasis
will vary according to instructor.

673. Classicism in English Literature. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Engl. 373 or con-
sent of instructor. Gassman, Hart

A study in depth of selected writers from the period 1660-1780.

674. Romanticism in English Literature. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Engl. 374 or con-
sent of instructor. Cheney, B. Clark, J. B. Harris

An intensive review of the major figures and trends in the romantic
period (1780-1832), along with individual research.

675. The Victorian Age in English Literature. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Engl. 375
or consent of instructor. Brady, B. Clark, Farnsworth

A detailed analysis of literary genres, values, and techniques in repre-
sentative works of the period. Not a survey course.

676. British Literature, 1900-1950. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Engl. 380 or other
course in modern British literature. Hart, Larson

680. Contemporary Literature. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: at least one course in
twentieth-century literature or consent of instructor. M. Clark, Hart, Larson
Study of specific trends in literature and criticism. Students may select
areas of interest.

682. Problems in Shakespearean Scholarship and Criticism. (3:3:0) Prerequi-
site: Engl. 382, 582, or consent of instructor. Farnsworth, Hart

695. Individual Readings in English. (l-2:Arr.:0)

Intended for investigation beyond course work offered, not for filling
minimum required hours.

696. TESL Field Study. (1-2:1-2:0) Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent
registration in Engl. 577 and 578, or consent of instructor. Madsen, King

Individual research projects for TESL Graduate Certificate candidates,
culminating in a practical paper.

699. Thesis for Master's Degree.* (6-9:Arr.:Arr.)

728R. Studies in Rhetoric and Style. (3:3:0 ea.)

729. Advanced Study in English Grammars. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Engl. 529. Cox

755R. Studies in the Tragic Mode. (3:3:0 ea.) Craig, Hart

756R. Studies in the Comic Mode. (3:3:0 ea.) Evans, Farnsworth,

Gassman, Thomson
777. Problems in Teaching English as a Second Language. (3:3:0)

799. Dissertation for the Ph.D. Degree. (Arr.) Prerequisite: approval of the
candidate's chairman.

*With reference to continuous registration for this course, see the current
Graduate School Catalog.



278 ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN



Environmental




Assistant Professor: Baughman (Chairman, 233 BRMB).

Instructors: Alguire, Allen, Dansie, Kent, Kindateder, Maas, Millard, Morgan,
Nackos, Viehweg, Wyss.

At the beginning of this new decade, our society is in a self-critical and re-
flective mood. We are particularly concerned about our environment. An ex-
tended period of technological advances and unprecedented affluence has not
brought us the quality of life we had hoped for. We are discovering that it is
not the things of progress nor the symbols of affluence that bring us satisfaction,
but it is the environment-— natural and man-made — that ultimately determines
the quality of our life and, to an ever-increasing degree, the stability of our
society.

We have become aware — almost too late — that through neglect or inexpert
planning we have made an ugly tragedy of much of our man-made environment,
and we have been shockingly indifferent to our responsibilities as stewards of
the natural environment. The Department of Environmental Design at BYU
is dedicated to doing something about all this. It proposes to train young people
to set forth to improve the quality of environment, not only in our own land,
but also in others.

As the word "design" implies, we are particularly concerned with what is
man-made, but our consciousness of the importance of relating the structured
environment harmoniously to the natural environment leads us to an inter-
disciplinary approach in which all related sciences are employed. Finally, in
all our undertakings human considerations come first: design forms at BYU
evolve from this guiding premise. The faculty emphasizes human concern as
thoroughly as superlative design. The students in Environmental Design become
involved in practical projects in our community that make them acutely aware
of the needs of our society and of the emotional and social needs of the in-
dividual. The responsibility of the designer to his society to design well — to
avoid perpetuating the blight of mediocre design that has so long prevailed —
is also stressed in every assignment.

Environmental design, defined in this way, is a vital and exceedingly im-
portant field. The professional opportunities are many, as are the opportunities
to serve humankind — a matter that should be of considerable interest to the
graduates of BYU, who are, above all else, concerned Christian people.

The Department of Environmental Design at BYU offers six specializations:

1. Pre-landscape architecture and environmental planning

2. Pre-urban design

3. Prearchitecture

4. Environmental design generalist

5. Pre-interior architecture

6. Interior design



ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN 279



The Core Program*

All environmental design students are required to take the two-year core
program, which provides the basics in theory of design as well as skills in en-
vironmental analysis. On this solid basis, the student can then proceed in his
last two years to specialize in one of five fields: pre-landscape architecture; pre-
urban design; prearchitecture; pre-interior architecture, or interior design.

"Environmental design generalist" is a specialization that utilizes courses from
all the other specializations. Individual programs are worked out through con-
sultation with the department chairman and other faculty members.



Freshman Hours

General Education Requirements

Dev. Assy 1

Religion 4

P E 1

Engl, nf 'I!""'"'"""''"'"'"'""" 3

Math. 105 3

Health 130 2

Bot. 460 2

Theory and Visual Studies

Art 412 2

Env. Des. Ill 3

Env. Des. 113 2

Env. Des. 120 3

Env. Des. 160 1

Env. Des. 201 3

Environmental Analysis

Env. Des. 102 3



Sophomore Hours

General Education Requirements

Dev. Assy 1

Religion 4

P.E 1

Engl. 215 3

Physics 100 3

Micro. 311 2

Theory and Visual Studies

Env. Des. 211 3

Env. Des. 221 3

Env. Des. 313 2

Env. Des. 321 2

Env. Des. 333 3

Environmental Analysis

Env. Des. 219 2

Env. Des. 315 or

Engineering elective 2



Total hours 33 Total hours

*For all specializations except interior design.



31



Fre-Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning

This curriculum is designed to prepare the student who wishes to go on to an ad-
vanced degree in landscape architecture. It will also serve the student well
who wishes to complete his education in four years for work in these fields.
Emphasis will be placed on the multidiscipline approach in recognition of the
need to synthesize studies relevant to landscape, regional, and urban design.



Junior Hours

General Education Requirements

Dev. Assy 1

Religion 4

Physics 177 3

Phil. 101 3

Hum. 201 3

Landscape Design

Env. Des. 319 3

Env. Des. 364 3

Env. Des. 365 3

Env. Des. 375 3

Env. Des. 433 3

Env. Des. 478 3

Hort. 103 3



Senior Hours

General Education Requirements

Dev. Assy 1

Bio. Agr. Ed. 250 3

Hist. 170 3

Sociol. Ill 3

Hum. 202 3

Engineering elective 3

Landscape Design

Env. Des. 479 3

Hort. 430 3

Env. Des. 485 2

Geog. 522 3

Env. Des. 499 3



Total hours



Total hours



35



30



280 ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN



Pre-Urban Design

This curriculum is designed to prepare the student for the graduate work that
is normally required in this field, in the areas of regional and city planning as
well as in spatial design.



Junior Hours

General Education Requirements

Dev. Assy 1

Religion 4

Physics 177 3

Phil. 101 3

Hum. 201 3

Sociol. Ill 3

Pre-Urban Design

Env. Des. 319 3

Env. Des. 350 or

Engineering elective 2

Env. Des. 364 3

Env. Des. 365 3

Env. Des. 375 3

Env. Des. 433 3



Senior Hours

General Education Requirements

Dev. Assy 1

Bio. Agr. Ed. 250 1

Hist. 170 3

Engineering elective 3

Geog. 522 3

Sociol. 426 3

Pre-Urban Design

Art 303 2

Env. Des. 478 3

Env. Des. 485 2

Env. Des. 499 3



Total hours



26



Total hours



34



Prearchitecture Program

Brigham Young University does not have a school of architecture. It does,
however, provide opportunities for the prearchitecture student to take basic re-
quired courses in English, foreign language, history, art, sociology, mathematics,
physics, chemistry, graphic communication, engineering, and environmental de-
sign that are normally acceptable at all accredited schools of architecture with-
out loss of credit. Prearchitecture students at BYU receive their design core
training in the Department of Environmental Design.

Contact Milo Baughman, chairman of the Environmental Design Department,
for further details.

Pre-Interior Architecture

This curriculum has been designed to prepare the student for a fifth-year degree
in interior architecture. This course is only for the student who plans to work
as a professional in the field. His aim will be to work as director of interior
design in a major architect's office, in a space design office, or as a freelancer.



Junior Hours

General Education Requirements

Dev. Assy 1

Religion 4

Physics 177 3

Phil. 101 3

Hum. 201 3

Design Studies
Env. Des. 350 or

Art 303 2

Env. Des. 325 3

Env. Des. 326 3

Env. Des. 330 3

Env. Des. 332 3

Env. Des. 375 3

Env. Des. 433 3



Senior Hours

General Education Requirements

Dev. Assy 1

Art 301 3

Bio. Agr. Ed. 250 3

Sociol. Ill 3

Hist. 170 3

Sociol. 426 3

Design Studies

Env. Des. 319 3

Env. Des. 425 3

Env. Des. 427 3

Env. Des. 430 3

Env. Des. 431 2

Env. Des. 485 2

Env. Des. 499 3



Total hours



34



Total hours



35



ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN 281



Interior Design

This curriculum is designed for the student who wishes to work in the interior
design field. Graduates will qualify as assistants to interior designers or as
salesmen/decorators in the interior design department of a home furnishings
store. Such training will also be valuable to the individual in making his own
home more attractive and conducive to pleasant and enriched family living.



Freshman Hours

General Education Requirements

Forum and Devotional 2

Religion 4

P E 1

Engl.' lir and 215 """!!!!'""!I" 6

Sociol. Ill 3

Health 130 2

Social science elective 3

Design Studies

Art 412 2

Env. Des. Ill 3

Env. Des. 120 3

Env. Des. 160 1

Env. Des. 201 3



Total hours



33



Sophomore Hours

General Education Requirements

Forum and Devotional 2

Religion 4

P.E 1

Art 301 3

Hum. 202 3

Physical science elective 3

Biological science elective 3

Design Studies

Clo. and Text. 260 3

Env. Des. 221 3

Env. Des. 240 3

Env. Des. 321 2

Elective 3

Elective 2



Junior Hours

General Education Requirements

Forum and Devotional 2

Religion 4

Physical science elective 3

Hist. 170 3

Biological science elective 3

Design Studies

Env. Des. 325 3

Env. Des. 326 3

Env. Des. 430 3

Env. Des. 432 3

FEHM 435 3

Elective 2

Elective 2



Total hours



34



Senior Hours

General Education Requirements

Forum and Devotional 2

Math., stat., logic 6

Design Studies

Env. Des. 333 3

Env. Des. 330 3

Env. Des. 425 3

Env. Des. 485 2

Env. Des. 499 3

Elective 3

Elective 3

Elective 3



Total hours



31



Total hours



35



Courses

102. Introduction to Environmental Design. (3:3:0)

Man in his environment, the preservation of natural ecology, and urban
planning; problems and solutions.

111. Basic Design I. (3:2:3)

Foundation course in principles and practice of two-dimensional design
and color theory.

113. Applied Design (Two-Dimensional). (2:1:2)

The principles of two-dimensional design as applied to environmental
settings and objects.

120. Environmental Design Drafting. (3:2:3) Prerequisite: Env. Des. 111.

Basic course in drafting for environmental designers, including multi-
view, isometric, and persi>ective drawing.



282 ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN



160. Perspective Practicum. (1:1:1) (m) Prerequisites: Env. Des. Ill and com-
pletion of or concurrent registration in Env. Des. 120.

Instruction and laboratory practice in one-, two-, and three-point per-
spective in regard to interior and exterior space.

201. Philosophy of Contemporary Architecture and Design. (3:3:0) Prerequisite:
Env. Des. 102.

A survey of contemporary architecture and design, and implications for
environment.

211. Basic Design II. (3:2:3) Prerequisite: Env. Des. 120.

Foundation course in principles and practice of three-dimensional design.

219. Environmental Design Field Studies I. (2:2:2) Prerequisite: Env. Des. 102.

Environmental problems in the community will be researched, solutions
proposed and, where possible, implemented.

220. The Psychology of the Environment. (2:2:0) (G-SS m)

A study of the effects of the physical and aesthetic setting on behavior
and attitudes.

221. Basic Drawing and Rendering. (3:2:3) (m) Prerequisites: Env. Des. 120
and 160.

Freehand perspective and drawing, with an introduction to rendering
techniques. Emphasis on interior, architectural, and product presentation.

240. Introduction to Interior Environment. (3:3:0) Home Study also. Prerequi-
site: all core courses.

Principles of psychology, design, color, and furnishings applied to the
residential environment.

313. Applied Design II (three-dimensional). (2:2:2) Prerequisite: Art 256.

Application of three-dimensional design principles to objects in the en-
vironment. Scale models and full-size mockups will be constructed.

315. Synthesis of Environmental Studies and Design. (2:2:0) (m)

A discussion of the interrelatedness of environmental studies and design
and the professional specializations that are emerging.

319. Environmental Field Studies II. (3:2:3) Prerequisites: Env. Des. 219, 201.
Problems in private and public environments are presented for student
solutions. Some implementation of solutions will be attempted.

321. Rendering II. (2:2:2) Prerequisites: all core courses.

Opaque and other more advanced techniques of environmental render-
ing will be taught.

325. Interior Ebivironment Laboratory I. (3:2:3) Prerequisites: all core courses.

A studio class in residential environment, with emphasis on the psycho-
logical requirements of the occupants.

326. Environmental Textiles. (3:2:2) Prerequisites: all core courses.

Study of the new textile technology, synthetic and natural fibers, and
comparative design and techniques.

330. Materials and Components of the Interior Environment. (3:3:0) Prerequi-
sites: all core courses.

The study of the ingredients in the interior environment: floor and wall
materials, hardware, lighting, fabrics, furnishings, etc.

332. Principles of the Interior Environment. (3:2:2)

Problems in interior planning and design, color, arrangement of elements,
and traffic patterns (for professional students only).

333. Basic Architecture I. (3:2:3) Prerequisites: all core courses (except for in-
dustrial education majors).

An introduction to architectural planning and design, structural design,
construction, and materials.



ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN 283



350. Experimental Environments. (2:1:2) Prerequisites: Env. Des. 211, 221, and
consent of department chairman or instructor.

Experimental studies in the effects on individual emotions and sensi-
bilities produced by the colors, forms, and materials used in creating envi-
ronments, both visual and tactile.

355. Furniture Design and Construction I. (3:2:3) Prerequisites: all core
courses.

Furniture design as evolved from functional purpose and method, ma-
terials of construction, and from emotional requirements of environment.

364. Introduction to Regional and Urban Planning. (3:2:3) Prerequisites: all
core courses.

The history of environment, survey of contemporary schools of design,
and thought relevant to urban and regional planning.

365. Urban Design Laboratory I. (3:2:3) Prerequisite: Env. Des. 364.

Planning of grounds and building complexes of business and civic devel-
opments on an introductory level.

375. Environmental Presentation I. (3:2:2) Prerequisite: Env. Des. 321.

Rendering and model-making techniques for the landscape and urban
designer.

380. Environmental Graphics I. (2:2:2) Prerequisites: all core courses.

The application of graphic design to interior architecture, both functional
and decorative.

387. Communications in the Public Environment I. (2:1:5) Prerequisites: all
core courses.

Principally exhibit design — structure, graphics, and psychology of human
visual response; traffic studies; message content.

425. Interior Environment Laboratory 11. (3:2:3) Prerequisite: Env. Des. 325.
More advanced problems in planning and design; residential emphasis
for interior environment; business and public interiors will be stressed
for interior architecture students.

427. Interior Environment Laboratory III. (3:2:3) Prerequisites: Env. Des.
425, concurrent registration in Env. Des. 431.

Public and institutional environments: schools, hospitals, low-cost hous-
ing, etc., with emphasis on the psychological requirements.

430. History of the Interior Environment. (3:3:0) Prerequisites: all core
courses.

Historic domestic architecture and interiors, classic principles and ele-
ments of design, and significance of taste variables in history.

431. Space Planning. (2:2:2) Prerequisite: Env. Des. 425.

Study of circulation patterns in commercial, public, and business envi-
ronments. Will include office "landscaping."

432. History of the Contemporary Interior Environment. (3:3:0) Prerequisites:
all core courses.

Study of the contemporary interior environment, 1925 to present.

433. Architectural Studies 11. (3:2:3) Prerequisite: Env. Des. 333.

More advanced architectural design and planning, and remodeling of resi-
dential, business, and public buildings, interior and exterior.

455. Furniture Design and Construction II. (3:1:4) Prerequisite: Env. Des. 355.
More advanced problems; full-scale drawings and mockups in wood,
metal, and plastic.

478. Environmental Landscape Design I. (3:2:3) Prerequisite: Env. Des. 364.



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