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Study of the natural environment and the ingredients of landscape de-
sign structures, various hard surfaces, and botanical and natural materials.



284 ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN



479. Environmental Landscape Design II. (3:2:3) Prerequisite: Env. Des. 478.

Landscape design in relation to architecture and planning, transportation
studies, and suburban developments.

480. Environmental Graphic Design II. (3:2:3) Prerequisite: Env. Des. 380.

Problems in the application of graphics to exterior situations, with
emphasis on institutional and business environments.

485. Senior Fieldwork. (2:1:3)

487. Communications in the Public Environment II. (2:1:4) Prerequisite: Env.
Des. 387.

Typographical design and the use of graphic symbols in environmental
communication.

490. Introduction to Urban Graphics. (3:2:3) Prerequisites: Env. Des. 364, 387.
Graphic design as related to urban planning, signage for highways, and
public and recreational areas.

499. Senior Thesis and Seminar (All Specializations). (3:1:3)



EUROPEAN STUDIES 285



:uropean
Studies



Associate Professor: Edwin B. Morrell (Coordinator, 112 FOB).

Committee Members: Hans Railing — Germanic Languages; Harold Dawdle — Span-
ish and Portuguese; Gary Lambert — French and Italian; Thomas F. Rogers —
Slavic; Mae Blanch — English; Roland Koller — Economics; Edwin B. Morrell — Po-
litical Science; Dale Stevens — Geography; Louis Cardon — History.

European Studies is designed to prepare students for careers and advanced
study which require a broad understanding of modern and contemporary
Europe. As an interdisciplinary program, it provides for two majors, or a major
and minor combination, leading to the B.A. degree.

Students in the European Studies Program combine the depth of a major
in a regular academic discipline with the breadth of related study in European
culture, history, politics, geography, economics, etc. They also acquire a work-
ing competency in one of the key languages of Europe — French, German, Italian,
Russian, or Spanish. An area of specialization within the program may be
designated, such as European Studies — Russia. The concurrent major proves
useful to students contemplating careers in teaching, academic research, business
law, or government service.

Students may enter the program with the permission of the coordinator and
should register each semester thereafter under his direction. As the program
develops, European Studies majors will undertake integrated interdisciplinary
study, such as a senior seminar.

Requirements for a Major

A total of 28 hours ( in addition to a regular major and 12 hours of French,
German, Italian, Russian, or Spanish language instruction, equivalent to the
bachelor's degree requirement) divided as follows:

1. Core courses, starred in the list below, from three fields outside

the departmental major 14 hrs.

2. Elective courses, any in the list below outside the departmental
major, including for non-language majors an additional seven hours
(making a total of 19) in their language and literature of emphasis .. 14 hrs.

Requirements for a Minor

A total of 17 hours (in addition to a regular major and 12 hours of one of the
listed European languages, equivalent to the bachelor's degree requirement)
divided as follows:

1. Core courses (starred) chosen from two fields outside the depart-
mental major 12 hrs.

2. Elective courses, including two additional hours of language study ...- 5 hrs.

List of Courses

Art

301 (3) Art History and Appreciation



286 EUROPEAN STUDIES



406 (2) Renaissance Art

407 (2) Northern Renaissance Art

408 (2) Baroque Art

*411 (2) Nineteenth-Century European Art

*412 (2) Contemporary Art

Comparative Literature

310 (3) Introduction to Comparative Literature
*338 (3) European Novel

340 (2) Masters of Russian Literature

355 (3) World Classics I

356 (3) World Classics II

471 (3) Literature of the Middle Ages

472 (3) Literature of the Renaissance

473 (3) Literature of the Enlightenment
*474 (3) The Romantic Movement

*475 (3) Realism and the Modern Age

Economics

241 (3) Comparative Economic Systems

315 (3) History of Economic Thought

358 (3) International Trade and Finance
*441 (3) Advanced Comparative Economic Systems
*471 (3) European Economic History

590R (1-3 ea.) Advanced Economic Problems (Directed Readings in Europe)

English

270 (3) Masterpieces of English Literature

282 (2) Shakespeare

301 (4) Early Masters of English Literature

302 (4) Later Masters of English Literature

332 (3) The English Novel from Defoe Through Dickens

333 (3) The English Novel from Eliot to 1950

341 (3) English Drama

367 (2) English and American Folk Ballads

371 (3) English Literature to 1500: The Medieval Period

372 (3) English Literature from 1500 to 1660: The Renaissance Period

373 (3) English Literature from 1660 to 1780: The Classical Period

374 (3) English Literature from 1780 to 1832: The Romantic Period
*375 (3) English Literature from 1832 to 1890: The Victorian Period
*376 (3) English Literature from 1890 to 1950

381 (3) Chaucer

382 (3) Shakespeare

383 (2) Milton

421 (3) History of the English Language
510R (1-3 ea.) Eminent English Writers

French

440 (4) Historical Survey of French Literature

*441 (3) Survey of French Literature and Culture

*442 (3) Survey of French Literature and Culture

445 (3) Introduction to French Civilization

446 (3) French Poetry

447 (3) French Dramatic Literature

448 (3) French Literary Prose

German

401 (3) Cultural History of German-Speaking Peoples

440 (4) Survey of German Literature and Culture

441 (3) German Literature from the Beginning to 1700

442 (3) German Literature in the Eighteenth Century



EUROPEAN STUDIES 287



443 (3) German Literature in the Nineteenth Century
*444 (3) German Literature in the Twentieth Century



Geography


120


(3)


301


(2)


441


(3)


*460


(3)


*465


(3)


490R (1


History


310


(3)


311


(3)


312


(3)


313


(3)


320


(2)


*322


(2)


*323


(3)


326


(3)


327


(3)


*329


(3)


*330


(3)


*331


(3)


*332


(3)


*333


(3)


*334


(3)


*335


(3)


410


(2)


411


(2)


415


(2)


424


(2)


425


(2)


429


(3)


*433


(2)


435


(3)


436


(3)


481


(3)


482


(3)


498


(1-2



Gef^raphy and World Affairs

Introduction to Cultural Geography (Section on Europe)

Political Geography

Europe

USSR and Its Satellites

ea.) Readings



The Early Middle Ages
The Late Middle Ages
The Renaissance: Age of Transition
The Reformation: Age of Turmoil
The Age of Enlightenment
Nineteenth-Century Europe
Europe in the Twentieth Century
Western Civilization I (Travel Study)
Western Civilization II (Travel Study)
The Austrian Empire and Eastern Europe
Tsarist Russia

The USSR and Eastern Europe
France

Modern Germany
Spain
England

The Institutions and Organization of the Medieval Church
Medieval Secular Institutions
Expansion of Europe
European Diplomatic History to 1815
European Diplomatic History since 1815
European Intellectual History
The Weimar Republic and Nazi Germany
Constitutional Foundations of English History
Tudor and Stuart England
History of Science I
History of Science II
2) Directed Readings (European History)



Italian
*440 (4) Survey of Italian Literature and Culture



Music
103
471
472
484
485



566A,B
567A,B



(2) Survey of Music Literature

(3) Sixteenth-Century Counterpoint
(3) Eighteenth-Century Counterpoint
(3) History of Music

(3) History of Music



(2 ea.) Applied Music Literature
(2 ea.) Applied Music Literature



Philosophy

321 (4) History of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy

322 (4) History of Modern Philosophy

*323 (3) Contemporary Anglo-American Philosophy
*324 (3) Contemporary Continental Philosophy
423R (2-3 ea.) Topics in Modern Philosophy
424R (2-3 ea.) Topics in Contemporary Philosophy



288 EUROPEAN STUDIES



Political Science

Introduction to Comparative Political Systems
Political Systems of the USSR and Eastern Europe
Political Systems of the United Kingdom and Commonwealth
World Communism

-2 ea.) Directed Readings in Political Science (European Politics)
Modern Political Philosophy
Contemporary Political Philosophy
Political Systems of France and Germany
Anglo-American Legal Institutions
USSR Foreign Relations
International Relations of Western Europe
Regional International Systems (Europe)

Religious Instruction — Church History and Doctrine
453B (2) Mormonism and the Christian Tradition
554 (2) Martin Luther, Forerunner of the Restoration



Cultural History of Russia

Survey of Russian Literature from the Beginning to the 18th Century

Survey of Russian Literature in the 19th Century

Survey of Russian Literature in the 20th Century



150


(3)


*350


(3)


*355


(3)


380


(3)


498R (1


502


(3)


503


(3)


550


(3)


568


(3)


*572


(3)


*573


(3)


576


(3)



345


(3)


440


(2)


*441


(3)


*442


(3)


Spanish


*441


(4)


*445


(3)


470


(3)


485


(3)



Survey of Spanish Literature

The Culture of the Hispanic World

The Narrative of the Golden Age

Introduction to Contemporary Spanish Literature



FAMILY ECONOMICS AND HOME MANAGEMENT 289




ICS



and



Home Managemen



Professor: Poulson.

Associate Professor: Hansen (Chairman, 1216-A SFLC).

Assistant Professor: Bastian.

Instructors: Garrison, Gorham, Slaugh, Vincent.

The curriculum in the Department of Family Economics and Home Manage-
ment has been developed for the following purposes:

1. To educate and train students in four major options — consumer affairs,
management, equipment, and family housing — thereby preparing them for
professional careers in private, governmental, business, and industrial or-
ganizations and for graduate study.

2. To encourage and enable all students to develop their managerial com-
petencies, which are directly related to financial security, consumer satis-
faction, and successful family living.

3. To serve students majoring in other fields, such as future home economics
teachers, marriage counselors, and social workers, who need background
and competence in management, family finance, consumer affairs, and/or
family housing and equipment.

An adviser is assigned to each student upon admission to the program.
Advisers assist the student in planning the four-year course of study that will
best serve his professional interests. Courses in the department are based on
root disciplines in the social, biological, and physical sciences and in the
humanities. Interdisciplinary study is emphasized in each option. Four major
options are available, each offering a wide range of professional opportunities.

Option One — Consumer Affairs and Family Economics

Courses Required (Total credit hours: 50)
FEHM

250 (3) Consumer Economics

335 (3) Household Equipment

350 (2) Principles of Home Management

351 (2) Family Finance

415 (2) Consumer Law and Public Policy

425 (3) Social and Economic Aspects of Housing

460 (2) Consumers in the Market

485 (3) Fieldwork in Family Economics and Home Management

590 (2) Seminar

Bus. Mgt.

241 (3) Introduction to Marketing
CDFR

361 (3) Family Relationships



290 FAMILY ECONOMICS AND HOME MANAGEMENT



440 (2) Family Life in the Middle and Later Years
461 (3) The Family and the Law
Clo. and Text.

260 (3) General Textiles
300 (2) Clothing the Family

Comms.

230 (2) Introduction to Advertising

Econ.

111 (3) Introduction to Economic Principles and Problems

112 (3) Introduction to Economic Principles and Problems

Ed.

301B (2) Basic Concepts and Principles of Teaching

FSN

160 (2) Introduction to Food Technology

Option Two — Home Management and Family Economics
Courses Required (Total credit hours: 36 plus minor)

FEHM

250 (3) Consumer Economics

335 (3) Household Equipment

350 (2) Principles of Home Management

351 (2) Family Finance

370 (2) Residence Management

415 (2) Consumer Law and Public Policy

460 (2) Consumers in the Market

480 (2) Training in Demonstration Techniques

485 (3) Fieldwork in Family Economics and Home Management

520 (2) Management of Time and Human Resources

590 (2) Seminar
CDFR

361 (3) Family Relationships

Ed.

301B (2) Basic Concepts and Principles of Teaching

Econ.

101 (3) Survey of Economics
or

111 (3) Introduction to Economic Principles and Problems
FSN

110 (2) Principles of Food Preparation

115 (2) Essentials of Nutrition

340 (2) Meal Management

Students electing option two are required to have a minor which complements
Home Management and Family Economics. Any of the following fields is recom-
mended:

1. Child Development and Family Relationships

2. Clothing and Textiles

3. Economics

4. Family Housing and Equipment

5. Food Science and Nutrition

6. Psychology

7. Social Work

8. Sociology

See an adviser in FEHM for recommended courses leading to a minor in each
of these fields.



FAMILY ECONOMICS AND HOME MANAGEMENT 291



Option Three — Equipment and Foods

Courses Required (Total credit hours: 53)

FEHM

250 (3) Consumer Economics

335 (3) Household Equipment

350 (2) Principles of Home Management

351 (2) Family Finance

370 (2) Residence Management

425 (3) Social and Economic Aspects of Housing

435 (3) Lighting and Organization of Interior Living Spaces

450 (3) Advanced Household Equipment

480 (2) Training in Demonstration Techniques

485 (3) Fieldwork in Family Economics and Home Management

Chem.

384 (3) Introductory Physiological Chemistry

385 (2) Physiological Chemistry Laboratory
Comms.

211 (3) Newswriting
Ed.

301B (2) Basic Concepts and Principles of Teaching

FSN

160 (2) Introduction to Food Technology

255 (5) Fundamentals of Nutrition

264 (3) Introduction to Food Science

265 (2) Introduction to Food Science Laboratory
340 (2) Meal Management

Sociol. /Psych.

350 (3) Introduction to Social Psychology

or
357 (3) Group Relations and Leadership

Courses Recommended

Bus. Mgt.

241 (3) Introduction to Marketing

Comms.

230 (2) Introduction to Advertising

Sociol.

125 (2) Applied Sociology
Sp. and Dram. Arts

102 (2) Introduction to Public Speaking

Option Four — Family Housing and Equipment
Courses Required (Total credit hours: 52)

Consumer Economics

Household Equipment

Principles of Home Management

Family Finance

Residence Management

Social and Economic Aspects of Housing

Lighting and Organization of Interior Living Spaces

Advanced Household Equipment

Training in Demonstration Techniques

Fieldwork in Family Economics and Home Management

Introduction to Marketing



250


(3)


335


(3)


350


(2)


351


(2)


370


(2)


425


(3)


435


(3)


450


(3)


480


(2)


485


(3)


Bus. Mgt.


241


(3)



292 FAMILY ECONOMICS AND HOME MANAGEMENT



CDFR

361 (3) Family Relationships
Ed.

301B (2) Basic Concepts and Principles of Teaching
Env. Des.

120 (3) Environmental Design Drafting

240 (3) Introduction to Interior Environment

330 (3) Materials and Components of the Interior Environment

432 (3) History of the Contemporary Interior Environment
Psych.

450 (3) Personality
Sociol. /Psych.

350 (3) Introduction to Social Psychology

Courses

170. Management of Resources. (3:2:2) Gorham

For students living at home or in group housing and for newly-married
couples. Emphasis on time, money, and energy management.

250. Consumer Economics. (3:2:2) Bastian, Gorham

Trends related to food, clothing, housing, and transportation costs.

Weekly investigation of local market goods and services, and evaluation
of information sources.

335. Household Equipment. (3:2:2) Garrison, Vincent

Principles underlying selection, construction, operation, and care of

household equipment. Laboratory experience in testing performance and
comparing costs.

350. Principles of Home Management. (2:2:0) Prerequisites: Sociol. Ill or
Psych. 111. Poulson, Slaugh

Values, decision making, human resource development, and supervision.

351, Family Finance. (2:2:0) Hansen, Poulson

Economic problems of direct concern to the family today. Types and
adequacy of income and its apportionment in terms of family needs and
interests.

370. Residence Management. (2:2:6) Prerequisites: FSN 340; FEHM 335, 351.
Application of management principles to ethnic and socioeconomic needs
of families. Practicum provides for living experience in several varying
situations.

415. Consumer Law and Public Policy. (2:2:0) Poulson

Consumer protection, rights, and responsibilities under existing laws.

Current issues, proposed legislation, deficiencies, and enforcement problems.

425. Social and Economic Aspects of Housing. (3:3:0) Hansen

Housing trends, conditions, costs, financing methods, and selection
criteria.

435. Lighting and Organization of Interior Living Spaces. (3:2:4) Garrison

Space planning, utilization, and lighting, as related to efficient, healthful,
comfortable, and aesthetically-satisfying housing. Emphasis on kitchen
planning.

450. Advanced Household Equipment. (3:2:4) Prerequisites: FEHM 335; Phys-
ics 100. Garrison, Vincent
Study and experimental problems on the performance of major types
of equipment.



FAMILY ECONOMICS AND HOME MANAGEMENT 293



460. Consumers in the Market. (2:2:0) Poulson, Hansen

Consumers' role in the marketing system; consumer decision making,
regarding market goods and services; evaluation of information sources
for consumers; consumer protection programs.

480. Training in Demonstration Techniques. (2:1:2) Prerequisite: Ed. 301B.

Garrison
Experience in planning and presenting direct audience demonstration.
Techniques for presentation before groups of various sizes.

485. Fieldwork in Family Economics and Home Management. (3:0:6)

Individually planned internship arranged through government agencies
or business concerns. Provides on-the-job experience.

520. Management of Time and Human Resources. (2:2:0) Prerequisite: FEHM
350. Poulson, Hansen

Perspectives concerning time and human resources in family life. Con-
cepts and principles related to the use of these resources for furthering
the attainment of family goals.

570. Supervision of Residence Groups. (1:1:0) Poulson

Objectives for supervision of residence groups and methods whereby
residence groups in a self-directive program under the guidance of a super-
visor achieve goals decided upon.

580R. Special Topics in Family Economics and Home Management. (1-2:1-2:0
ea.) (m) Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Hansen, Poulson

590. Seminar. (2:0:3) Hansen, Poulson

595. Readings and Projects. (1-2:1-2:0) Poulson

Consultation and directed use of library and laboratory materials.



294 FOOD SCIENCE AND NUTRITION



Food Soienoe

and

Nutrition



Professor: Bennion.

Associate Professor: Hill.

Assistant Professors: Call, Johnson, (Chairman, 2218 SFLC).

Instructors: Boyle, Franz, Turner.

The Department of Food Science and Nutrition curriculum is calculated to
prepare the student for graduate work, college teaching, and for a variety of
positions in the professional world: dietitian, food research and development
scientist, quality control supervisor, food industry administrator or inspector,
or test kitchen specialist. Departmental programs are designed to help students —

1. understand the vital role of nutrition in developing and maintaining optimum
human health;

2. apply basic principles of the biological, physical, and social sciences to the
solving of current problems that involve human nutrition and food science;

3. become scientists capable of developing new foods and food resources,
monitoring food nutrients during processing, and analyzing for environmental
contaminants;

4. prepare for a profession in food science or nutrition.

Food science and nutrition majors may register in either the College of
Family Living or in the College of Biological and Agricultural Sciences.

Students in food science may become student members of the Institute of
Food Technologists. After graduation from the University, students in dietetics
are required to complete an internship at an approved institution before they
are eligible to become registered dietitians and members of the American
Dietetics Association.

For majors in food science and nutrition, a minimum of 24 hours in depart-
mental courses are required, including FSN 235, 264, 265, and 490. A minor
in the department requires 14 hours, including FSN 235 or 255, 264, and 265.
The department offers programs for specialization in the following options: (1)
food science, (2) general dietetics, (3) clinical dietetics, and (4) nutrition.

Option One — Food Science

Freshman Hours Sophomore Hours

Religion 4 Religion 4

English 3 P.E 1

P.E. and Health 3 Chem. 151, 384, 385 10

Psych. Ill 3 Math. 109 or 112 4

Bot. 101 3 Physics 201, 202 10

Math. 105 and 106, or 111 5-6 Hist. 170 3

Chem. 105, 106 8 Electives 2-4

FSN 160 2

Electives 2-4 Total hours 34-36

Total hours 33-36



FOOD SCIENCE AND NUTRITION 295



Junior Hours

Religion 4

Engl. 316 3

Chem. 223 5

Micro. 321, 322 4

FSN 264, 265 5

FSN 235 5

FSN 350 4

FSN 461 4

Electives 2



Total hours
"Strongly recommended.



36



Senior Hours

Religion 4

FSN 450, 462. 463, 490 13

Agr. Econ. 112 3

Humanities 6

An. Sci. 328* 2

Micro. 361 2

Micro. 381 2

Electives 2-4



Total hours



34-36



Option Two — General Dietetics



Freshman Hours

Religion 4

English 3

P.E. and Health 3

Zool. 105 or equiv 3

Chem. 105, 151 9

Math. 105 3

Sociol. Ill or Psych. Ill 3

Micro. 121 3

FSN 160 2

Electives 2-3



Total hours



35-36



Sophomore Hours

Religion 4

P.E 1

Econ. 101 3

Zool. 261, 262* 6

Chem. 106* 4

Hist. 170 3

*Sociol. 210 2

FSN 235 5

FSN 264 3

FSN 265 2

Electives 3



Total hours
"Strongly recommended.



36



Junior Hours

Religion 4

English 3

Chem. 384, 385 5

Anthrop. 211 3

Sociol. 215* 3

Comput. Sci. 105 or 131 2

CDFR 210 3

Humanities 3

Org. Behav. 321 3

FSN 374 2

Electives 4-5



Total hours



35-36



Senior Hours

Religion 4

Humanities 3

Ed. 301B 2

Stat. 221 or Zool. 376 3

Acctg. 201* or FEHM 351 2-3

FSN 474 4

FSN 455 5

FSN 400* 2

FSN 490* 2

Electives 6-7



Total hours



33-35



Option Three — Clinical Dietetics

For this option, a number of changes in the general diatetics option are nec-
essary. Additional courses required are: Chem. 223; Stat. 221; Zool. 262; FSN
350, 400, 435. Courses not required are: FSN 160, 374, 474.



Option Four — Nutrition

Students may also choose a nutrition option with a strong emphasis in chemistry
as preparation for graduate work in nutrition.



296 FOOD SCIENCE AND NUTRITION



Courses

110. Principles of Food Preparation. (2:1:2)

Open to all students. Techniques of food preparation for maximum re-
tention of nutritive value are taught through lecture and laboratory
experience.

115. Essentials of Nutrition. (2:2:0) Home Study also, (m)

Basic concepts of human nutrition and their application in the achieve-
ment and maintenance of optimum health.

116. Essentials of Nutrition Laboratory. (1:0:2) (m) Prerequisite: concurrent
registration in FSN 115 or consent of instructor.

160. Introduction to Food Technology. (2:2:0) (m) Call

Food manufacturing and distribution around the world and some factors
that have contributed to the modern food industry.

235. Basic Human Nutrition. (5:4:3) (m) Prerequisites: Chem. 151; Zool. 261.

Franz
For majors only. Basic principles of human nutrition.

245. Nutrition of Mother and Child. (2:2:0) Turner

Basic human nutrition, with special emphasis on nutritional needs dur-
ing pregnancy, lactation, and childhood through adolescence. Not open to
students who have completed a basic course in nutrition.

255. Fundamentals of Nutrition. (5:4:2) (m) Prerequisites: Zool. 105; Chem.

151. Franz, Hill

For nonmajors. Majors should elect FSN 235 and 435. Human nutrition

at all ages basic to the achievement and maintenance of optimum health.

264. Introduction to Food Science. (3:3:0) (m) Prerequisites: Chem. 151;
Micro. 121 or 321; concurrent registration in FSN 265.

A study of chemical and physical properties of foods, with application
in preparation and processing.

265. Introduction to Food Science Laboratory. (2:0:6) (m) Prerequisite: con-
current registration in FSN 264.

310. Food Patterns of Various Cultures. (2:1:3) (m) Prerequisite: a college



Online LibraryBrigham Young UniversityGeneral catalog (Volume 1972-1973) → online text (page 33 of 67)