Brigham Young University.

General catalog (Volume 1972-1973) online

. (page 4 of 67)
Online LibraryBrigham Young UniversityGeneral catalog (Volume 1972-1973) → online text (page 4 of 67)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Agricultural Economics.

112 (3) Economics and Agriculture
Anthropology. All courses.
Archaeology. All courses.
Asian Studies. All courses.
CDFR.

210 (3) Child Development

360 (3) Achieving Success in Marriage

361 (3) Family Relationships
Economics. All courses.
Geography. All courses.
History. All courses.

Political Science. All courses.

Psychology. All courses except 370 and 374.

Recreation Education.

337 (2) Philosophy of Recreation
Sociology. All courses except 220 and 320.

Other Requirements

Each student must complete one of the two following options:

1. Language. Twelve semester hours in any foreign language (8 hours beyond
the introductory 101 courses).

2. Mathematics, Statistics, Logic. Six semester hours selected from the following:
Mathematics. All courses numbered 105 or higher.

Statistics. Any statistics course having a prerequisite of Math. 105 or higher.



THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 29



Logic. Any formal course in deductive or inductive logic or in the philosophy
of science (Phil. 101, 316).

Other basic courses especially suited to develop the capacity of the student to
apply mathematics to scientific problems (must have a prerequisite of Math.
105 or higher). The following BYU courses are accepted in this area:

Biological and Agricultural Education.

201 (4) Introduction to Biology

321 (3) History and Philosophy of Biology
Botany.

376 (3) General Genetics
Chemistry.

105 (4) General College Chemistry

111 (3) Principles of Chemistry
Geology.

311 (3) Structural Geology
Economics.

488 (3) Introduction to Economics
Microbiology.

331 (5) Microbiology
Physics.

105 (3) Introductory Physics
Psychology.

374 (3) Experimental Psychology
Zoology.

376 (3) General Genetics

Certain courses peculiarly suited to illustrate the application of formal logic in
the development of a discipline or tool area. BYU courses in this category are:

Computer Science.

130 (3) Introductory Computing
Physics.

110 (3) The Development of Scientific Thought

300 (3) Philosophical Foundations of Modern Physics

Transfer Credit Evaluation

All transfer credit that represents college-level work from accredited institutions
will be accepted. Students who transfer to BYU will have their transcripts
evaluated by the Transfer Evaluation Office and will be notified in writing of
the general education requirements remaining to be completed.

BYU has generally followed a pattern of course-for-course equivalency evalua-
tion, evaluating credits on the basis of BYU general education programs and
accepting all transfer credit for courses reasonably equivalent to BYU courses.
In this area-by-area evaluation it is important to note that when a student
takes a course at another accredited institution that counts in a given educational
area at that institution, we, in our evaluation for general education credit, allow
that course to count in the same area. The chairman of the student's major
department evaluates other transfer credit for classes that may be used to meet
major or minor requirements.

Policy on Holders of the Associate Degree. The University's policy on students
with associate degrees who transfer to BYU is as follows: If the procedure for
earning general education credit at his junior college is similar to that followed
by BYU, and if the student has fulfilled some requirements in all areas and
does not lack more than 5 hours in reaching the BYU total-hour requirements
in general education, the student will be admitted to BYU with his general
education requirements considered completed.



30 THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM



Recognition of Outstanding Scholarship

In acknowledgment of outstanding scholarship, academic recognition is granted
to certain bachelor-degree candidates. The announcement of such awards is
made at commencement exercises.

There are two designations in recognition of high scholarship: graduation
"magna cum laude" and graduation "cum laude." These awards are made on
the basis of excellence shown in work up to, but not including, the second
semester of the senior year.

"Magna cum laude" is awarded those students who have earned at least 45
hours of credit at Brigham Young University and achieved an overall grade-
point average of 3.80 or higher. "Cum laude" is awarded those students who
have earned at least 45 hours of credit at Brigham Young University and
attained an overall grade-point average of 3.50 to 3.79.

The University will post and publish at the close of each semester of the
regular school year the names of students who have carried a minimum of 15
credit hours and earned grade-point averages of 3.50 or higher in all classes.
Those with grade-point averages of 3.80 and higher will be given special
recognition.



The Graduate School

Chauncey C. Riddle, Dean (D-208 ASB)

Admission to the Graduate School is contingent upon the holding of a bachelor's
degree and the meeting of high academic standards. All students having bache-
lor's degrees and who are not seeking second bachelor's degrees register as
graduate students.

Degree-seeking Status

Admission to the Graduate School does not automatically admit a person to a
degree program. Graduate students may register on either a degree-seeking or a
non-degree-seeking basis. Degree-seeking status is granted to students who
meet the standards and requirements of the department to which they apply.

Application Deadlines

Applications for degree-seeking and non-degree-seeking admission — be sure to
specify which — may be obtained from the Admissions Office, A-153 ASB, or from
the University Mail Answering Service, 268 UPB. All application materials must
be received by the Admissions Office on or before the following deadline dates:

Deadline for — Degree-seeking Nondegree

Fall Semester, 1972 June 30, 1972 July 31, 1972

Winter Semester, 1973 December 17, 1972 January 8, 1973

Spring or Summer Terms, 1973 April 30, 1973 May 31, 1973

Continuous Registration

All degree-seeking students must register for a minimum of two semester hours
in each semester during which they are actively working on their degree pro-
grams — ideally, this would be every semester — or pay an equivalent service fee.
In addition, every degree-seeking student must complete at least six hours of
credit approved on his course outline during each academic year (September 1
to September 1 ) or pay an equivalent service fee.

Credit for Graduating Seniors

Seniors in their last semester of undergraduate work may apply graduate credit
taken that semester in excess of the requirements for the bachelor's degree
toward a graduate degree if they file a Senior Form with the Graduate School
at the time of registration.



THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 31



Preparation for Graduate Study

The wise undergraduate who intends to pursue a graduate degree will prepare
himself in the following areas:

1. Writing ability. Since the ability to write clearly and correctly is of para-
mount importance to the graduate student, every undergraduate should seek
to develop ready facility and confidence in English.

2. Foreign languages. Any foreign language important to a student's particular
discipline should be mastered as early as possible. Mastery, not just a mini-
mal reading ability, should be sought.

3. Mathematics, statistics, and computer science. Serious students will achieve
skill in these areas appropriate to the natures of their particular disciplines.

4. Scholarly skills. Each student should thoroughly understand the organization
of the library and should be proficient in evaluating sources, in documenting
ideas, in preparing bibliographies, and in writing in the scholarly format
of his area or specialty.

5. Scientific research. Any student who participates in or who must speak in-
telligently about science should gain an understanding of the intellectual
nature of science, that is, the essence of scientific experimentation, the
nature and uses of hypotheses, controls, etc.

6. Research experience and publication. Practical experience in scholarly and/or
scientific research procedures under the close supervision of a skilled re-
searcher is very useful to prospective graduate students. Also, at least one
publication resulting from such experience would be most valuable.

7. Becoming known. In honorable and unobtrusive ways, the student should
become well-known to faculty members from whom he will want letters of
recommendation. Unusual originality, insight, and energy are very impres-
sive, discipline being the key.

8. Knowing your field and defining your interests. Every student should know
the leading world figures in his particular field, the leading current issues,
and the publications which keep one abreast of progress. Each student should
also have his own interests well mapped. He should know where, precisely
what, and under whom he wishes to study on the graduate level, and why.
He should have clear and realistic professional goals.

Graduate School Catalog

For further information, consult the Graduate School Catalog, which may be
obtained from the Graduate School Office, D-208 ASB.



Graduate Degrees Offered



Doctor of Philosophy

Botany and Range Science
Botany

Chemistry

Analytical-Physical Chem-
istry
Biochemistry
Inorganic Chemistry
Organic Chemistry
Physical Chemistry

Child Development and
Family Relationships
Child Development
Family Relationships
Marriage and Family
Counseling

Educational Psychology
Counseling and Guidance
Educational Psychology
Instructional Psychology

( Interdepartmental )
Special Education

Engineering

Chemical Engineering

Science
Civil Engineering Science



Electrical Engineering
Science

Mechanical Engineering
Science
English

American Literature

English Literature
French and Italian

French
Geology

Economic Geology

Mineralogy, Geochemistry,
and Petrology

Paleontology

Stratigraphy and Sedi-
mentation

Structural and Field Geology
Germanic Languages

German
History
Microbiology
Music

Music Education

Musicology

Music Theory



Physics and Astronomy

Acoustics

Astronomy

Astrophysics

Space and Planetary Physics

Biophysics

Nuclear and Particle
Physics

Physics of the Solid State

Plasma Physics

Spectroscopy

Theoretical Physics
Psychology

Clinical Psychology

Instructional Psychology
( Interdepartmental )

Social Psychology
Sociology
Spanish and Portuguese

Spanish
Speech and Dramatic Arts

Dramatic Arts
Zoology

Entomology

Zoology



32 THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM



Doctor of Education

Educational Administration
Elementary School

Administration
General School Adminis-
tration
Junior College Adminis-
tration
Secondary School Ad-
ministration
Educational Psychology
Counseling and Guidance
Educational Psychology
Instructional Psychology

( Interdepartmental )
Special Education
Elementary Education

Curriculum and Instruction
Physical Education
Secondary Education and
Foundations
Curriculum and Instruction

Master of Arts

Ancient Scripture
Anthropology and Archaeology

Archaeology
Art

Painting and Sculpture

Design
Asian Studies
Biblical and Classical
Languages

Latin
Chemistry

Analytical-Physical
Chemistry

Inorganic Chemistry

Organic Chemistry

Physical Chemistry
Church History and Doctrine
Communications
Educational Administration
Educational Psychology

Counseling and Guidance

Educational Psychology

Instructional Media

Instructional Psychology
( Interdepartmental )

School Psychology (Inter-
departmental )

Special Education
Elementary Education



Political Theory and
Philosophy
Recreation Education
Secondary Education

Curriculum and Instruction

International and Com-
parative Education
Spanish and Portuguese

Portuguese

Spanish
Speech and Dramatic Arts

Dramatic Arts

Interpretation

Speech

Master of Science

Agronomy and Horticulture

Agronomy
Animal Science
Botany and Range Science

Botany

Range Science
Business Education
Chemical Engineering Science
Chemistry

Analytical-Physical
Chemistry

Biochemistry

Inorganic Chemistry

Organic Chemistry

Physical Chemistry
Child Development and
Family Relationships

Child Development

Family Relationships
Civil Engineering Science
Economics

Electrical Engineering Science
Food Science and Nutrition
Geography
Geology

Economic Geology

Mineralogy, Geochemistry,
and Petrology

Paleontology

Stratigraphy and Sedi-
mentation

Structural and Field
Geology
Health Science
Home Economics Education
Industrial Education
Mathematics



Curriculum and Instruction Mechanical Engineering



Reading
English

American Literature

English Literature

English Language
French and Italian

French
Germanic Languages

German
History

Humanities and Comparative
Literature

Comparative Literature
Latin-American Studies
Linguistics
Music

Music Education

Musicology

Music Theory
Organizational Behavior
Physical Education
Physics and Astronomy
Political Science

American Political Systems

Comparative Political
Systems

International Politics



Science
Microbiology
Physical Education
Physics and Astronomy
Psychology

General Psychology

School Psychology (Inter-
departmental)
Sociology
Speech and Dramatic Arts

Communicative Disorders
Statistics
Zoology

Entomology

Zoology

Master of Accountancy

Accounting

Master of Business Adminis-
tration

Business Management

Master of Communicative
Habilitation

Speech and Dramatic Arts
Communicative Disorders



Master of Education

Educational Administration
Educational Psychology
Counseling and Guidance
Educational Psychology
Instructional Media
Instructional Psychology

( Interdepartmental )
School Psychology (Inter-
departmental )
Elementary Education

Curriculum and Instruction
Reading
Special Education

Curriculum and Instruction
International and Com-
parative Education
Master of Fine Arts
Art

Master of Engineering
Chemical Engineering Science
Civil Engineering Science
Electrical Engineering Science
Mechanical Engineering Science

Master of Engineering Science

Chemical Engineering Science
Civil Engineering Science
Electrical Engineering Science
Mechanical Engineering Science

Master of Health Education

Health Science

Master of Industrial Education

Industrial Education

Master of Library Science

Graduate Department of

Library and Information

Sciences
Master of Music
Music

Orchestral Instruments

Organ

Piano

Voice
Master of Public Adminis-
tration

Institute of Goverrunent
Service

Public Administration

Master of Recreation Education

Recreation Education

Community School Leader-
ship
Recreation Education

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
Sixth-Year Specialist

Educational Administration

Educational Administra-
tion

Supervision
Educational Psychology

Counseling and Guidance

Special Education
Elementary Education

Curriculum and Instruc-
tion

Reading
Secondary Education and

Foundations

Curriculum and Instruc-
tion

Teaching English As a Second
Language (TESL)

English
French
German
Portuguese
Spanish



FEES AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 33



Fees and

Financial

Assistance




University Fees

The University reserves the right to change these figures without notice.

All students who register will be expected to pay tuition and fees prior to or
at the time of registration. Students are held responsible to pay the correct
amount of tuition and fees.

Approximately seventy percent of the cost of operating the University is paid
from the tithes of the LDS Church. Therefore, students who are Church mem-
bers, or their families, have already made a monetary contribution to the
operation of the University. To equalize this burden somewhat, it is necessary
to charge nonmembers a higher tuition. Even this higher total payment, how-
ever, does not cover the total educational cost of nonmembers of the Church.

Tuition and General Fees (Effective Fall Semester 1972).

Full-time students (91 hours or more for undergraduate students; 9 hours or
more for graduate students)

First Semester Second Semester School Year

LDS Church Members $300 $300 $600

Nonmembers $450 $450 $900

Part-time students (9 hours or fewer for undergraduate students; Si hours or
fewer for graduate students)

(The tuition and fees paid as a part-time student do not entitle one to
health service, student activity privileges, or physical education suit and
faciUty privileges.)



34 FEES AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE



LDS Non-
Members Members

Minimum tuition and fees $ 60.00 $ 90.00

3 credit hours 85.00 130.00

4 credit hours 110.00 170.00

5 credit hours 135.00 210.00

6 credit hours 160.00 250.00

7 credit hours 185.00 290.00

8 credit hours 210.00 330.00

9 credit hours 235.00 370.00

A fraction of an hour is counted as a full hour for assessing fees.

Part-time students enrolled in one or more of certain physical education classes
must pay an additional $5. Students should check with the Cashier's Office for
applicable classes.

The charge for noncredit courses or for auditing courses is the same as for
credit courses. Noncredit courses taken by part-time students will be assessed
on the basis of hours involved in lecture classes. For example, three hours of
lecture a week would be considered three semester hours and would be charged
for accordingly. Therefore, if a student were taking 8 credit hours plus a non-
credit class involving two or more lecture hours per week, he would be consid-
ered a full-time student and must register as a full-time student. For courses
in which no lecture hours are involved — for example, dissertations and theses —
tuition and fees will be charged based on hours being carried during the semes-
ter, as determined by the supervising professor.

Registration in Evening Classes. All daytime students will be required to pay
an additional fee of $3 per credit hour (credit, noncredit, and audit) for
all hours carried under the Evening Classes program. Failure to pay this fee
on the day of registration or the day on which an Evening Class is later added
will result in a $2.50 late-fee charge.

Late Registration Fee

Late registration fees will be assessed all full-time and part-time students for
failure to complete registration on scheduled dates. No exception is made, re-
gardless of reason for being late.

1. First five regular school days following the scheduled

registration date $ 5.00

2. After the fifth day following scheduled registration date 10.00

Late fees for part-time students will be assessed at 50 percent of the rate for
full-time students.

Any student whose check is dishonored by his bank will be charged a han-
dling fee of $5. If the check is for tuitibn, there will be an additional charge
of the late fee in effect at the time the check is redeemed.

Tuition Refunds — College Students

In the event of withdrawal by a student, a refund will be made on the basis
of a charge of $10 ($5 for a part-time student) even though the student does
not complete registration or attend school, plus a per-day charge of 3 percent
of the total tuition and fees paid or payable for the semester. The days
charged for will be the school days beginning with the first day of the semester
in which classes were held following the date on which the student registered,
to the day on which the student reported his withdrawal to the Office of the
Dean of Students, both days inclusive.

Late fees are not refundable.

Any refund due a student because of withdrawal from school will be made
only by check, through the mail, three weeks from the date on which the stu-
dent reported his withdrawal and surrendered his receipt or activity card to the
Office of the Dean of Students.



FEES AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 35



No refund will be granted to a student who is asked to withdraw for scholar-
ship or other reasons.

No refunds will be made directly to an unmarried student under twenty-one
years of age unless the student has the written permission of his parents or
legal guardian.

No refund will be made after August 31 of the school year in which payment
was received by the University.

Miscellaneous General Fees and Fines

Admissions evaluation fee (nonrefundable) $15.00

Automobile and motorcycle registration* and parking fee:

Zone B Academic year 12.00

Second semester or Spring and Summer Terms 6.00

Spring Term or Summer Term 3.00

Zone C Academic year 6.00

Second semester or Spring and Summer Terms 3.00

Spring Term or Summer Term 1.50

Zone D Academic year 6.00

Second semester or Spring and Summer Terms 3.00

Spring Term or Summer Term 1.50

*Registration is mandatory and no fee is charged if the student

elects NOT to park on campus.

Bicycle Registration 1.00

Change of grade fee ( unless the change is the responsibility of the

University) 3.00

Change of registration fee (for each change slip presented after the

first two weeks of each semester) 5.00

Duplicate activity card 4.00

Exemption examination to exempt a student from taking a required class:

If examination is taken with a group 2.00

If examination is taken alone 5.00

Examination, " special equivalency:

Nonrefundable fee to take exam 10.00

Per-credit-hour charge upon successful completion of exam (The

maximum fee in any one subject shall not exceed $60, but will be

reassessed for each additional credit authorization form.) 10.00

Examination, repeat foreign language, for advanced degree 10.00

Graduation fee, bachelor's degree (only 50 percent refundable if degree

is not obtained) 12.00

Graduation fee, master's or doctor's degree (only 50 percent refundable

if degree is not obtained) 20.00

Graduation reevaluation fee (for graduate students who defer graduation

beyond the graduation date originally applied for) 2.00

Late application for graduation (for those who apply after December 15
for April commencement or after February 15 for August
commencement) 3.00

Graduate student service fee (for graduate students using University
facilities without formal registration for University classes)
per semester Minimum Tuition

General College two-year terminal certificate 6.00

Hold placed on records for unpaid bill 2.00

Identification photo (payable at Photo Studio) 2.00

Nursery School:

Smith Family Living CJenter, with lunch 49.50

Smith Family Living Center, no meals 30.00

Records search fee 1.00



36 FEES AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE



Spouse activity card (nonrefundable) per semester 10.00

Thesis binding (4 copies) 11.00 to 15.00

Traffic violation fines Variable, according to violation

Transcript fee 1.00

($1.00 for first copy on each order, plus $.50 for each additional copy)

Fees for Instruction in Music

Music 159R (30-minute lessons) $55.00

Music 160R, 360R, 660R (45-minute lessons) 75.00

Solo or joint recital fee 25.00

Refunds — Fees for Instruction in Music

Students who withdraw from registration for private instruction before the
semester begins or during the first week of the semester will receive a refund
of the total amount paid.

Students who withdraw after they have begim their private instruction will
be charged 10 percent of the total fee, the full cost of each lesson taken or each
lesson missed without notifying the teacher, and one-half the cost of the re-
maining lessons in the course.

Applications for refunds are made at C-550 HFAC.

Class Fees

Business Management 380 and 381 $ 5.00

Education 449, 479 — 8 to 10 credit hours* 45.00

Education 449, 479 — 4 credit hours* 25.00

Education 449, 479 — 2 credit hours* 15.00

Education 569, 673 — 4 credit hours 25.00

Education 568, 569, 673 — 2 credit hours 15.00

Housing and Home Management 370:

Resident students for one-half semester 70.00

Married nonresident students for one-half semester 40.00

(Resident students must pay a $25.00 nonrefvuidable deposit
prior to registration, the balance of the fee to be paid at the
time of registration.)

Horticulture 112 (flower arrangement) 10.00

Music 105, 107, 108 (piano) 5.00

Music 106 (group organ instruction) 10.00

Music 368, 370, 372 (woodwind, brass, and string workshops) 5.00

Physical Education 128 (bowling) 10.00

Physical Education 165 (SCUBA diving) 10.00

Physical Education 195, 196 (skiing, nonrefundable) 15.00

Recreation Education 502 (camping) 10.00

ROTC leadership laboratories (Air Force and Army)

Academic year 14.00

Winter Semester 7.00

Speech and Dramatic Arts 485, 487 if not concurrently enrolled in

Education 449 25.00

Student teaching 479 of any department Same as Education 479



Online LibraryBrigham Young UniversityGeneral catalog (Volume 1972-1973) → online text (page 4 of 67)