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Technical Electives

The student has a choice of three technical electives in the B.S. program and
six technical electives in the M. Eng. program. Under the guidance of his adviser
the student may choose technical electives to meet his particular educational
goals. The technical electives may be chosen from any of the Mechanical En-
gineering 500-level or 600-level (graduate students only) courses. Selected
courses taught by other departments may be chosen with the approval of the
student's adviser. The student may select courses from several areas in mechani-
cal engineering to obtain a broad background, or he may choose to align himself
with one of the specialized options of mechanical engineering listed below.



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SCIENCE 397



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398 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SCIENCE



Specialized Options

Aerospace. An aerospace engineer is concerned with the design of aircraft and
spacecraft or the components that make up aerospace systems. Courses in air-
plane performance, stability and control, jet and rocket engines, automatic
control systems, aerospace structures, fluid flow, heat transfer, celestial me-
chanics, and space physics provide background for work in aerospace engineer-
ing.

Students who wish to specialize in the aerospace option should take Mech.
Eng. 515 for the bachelor's degree, Mech. Eng. 511, 515, and 585 for the mas-
ter's d^ree, and additional electives chosen from Mech. Eng. 512, 531, 533, 535,
541, 585, and Physics 536 and 537.

Automatic Controls and Systems Analysis. Automatic control systems are essen-
tial elements in the manufacturing and processing industries and are extensively
used in aerospace applications. The methods of modeling and computer simula-
tion used in control system design may be generalized to a broader discipline
called systems analysis, which is interdisciplinary in nature.

Students wishing to specialize in this area for the B.S. degree should take
Mech. Eng. 531 and 534. Master's candidates should also take Mech. Eng. 631.
Both may select electives from the following: Mech. Eng. 535, 572; Elec. Eng. 513,
517, 617, 618; Math. 411, 385, 512, 585.

Bioengineering and Premedicine. Bioengineering combines the skills of the
engineer with a knowledge and imderstanding of biological systems to obtain
solutions of engineering problems associated with living systems. The necessary
background in life science can be obtained by a careful selection of generad
education courses prerequisite to more advanced courses that can be used as
technical electives. It is suggested that the biological science area of the general
education requirements be filled with courses such as Zool. 202, 203, 261, 262;
and Bio. Agr. Ed. 201. Technical electives may be selected from Zool. 465, 662;
P.E. 341, 344, 645; Chem. 351, 352, 384, 385, 581, 584.

A premedicine option may be completed with approximately 18 hours of
work beyond the B.S. degree by making a careful selection of general education
and technical elective courses in consultation with the student's adviser.

Manufacturing and Industrial Engineering. The areas of memufacturing and in-
dustrial engineering are related to the manufacture of products. An engineer
working in these areas is required to make engineering decisions, to provide
supervision to insure product reliability, function, economical fabrication, en-
vironmental and ecological suitability, and also to plan the proper application
of manpower, materials, equipment, and processes.

A student may specialize in these areas by taking Mech. Eng. 552, 554, and
selected courses chosen from Mech. Eng. 531; Bus. Mgt. 341, 461, 462, 463;
Tech. 332, 338, 430, 431; Org. Behav. 321.

Materials and Metallurgy. A materials engineer must obtain msiximum use and
benefit from materials to produce the best products consistent with minimvmi
cost and depletion of natural resources. The study of materials includes the
fundamentals, control, and design of heat treating, welding, forming, and machin-
ing processes as well as the fundamentals of plastics, crystals, corrosion, etc.

A student may specialize in materials by taking Mech. Eng. 552 (or Civ. Eng.
501, 502), 554 and selected courses chosen from Civ. Eng. 307; Chem. Eng. 378;
and Physics 581, 582.

Mechanical Design. A mechanical designer plans the detailed shapes of all the
parts of a machine so that each part can be economically manufactured and fit
together as required by the function of the machine, and so that the machine
can be economically assembled and serviced. Good design makes a functional
machine into a marketable product. A good designer needs to know material
properties, manufacturing processes, and assembly techniques, as well as graphic
presentation.

A student wishing to specialize in mechanical design should take Mech. Eng.
554 and 572 and should select additional electives from Mech. Eng. 533, 534,
537, and 552.



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SCIENCE 399



Nuclear Engineering. A nuclear engineer is primarily concerned with the design
of nuclear reactors for p>ower generation. With the addition of courses in nuclear
reactor physics, the mechanical engineering curriculum provides the necessary
background for work in nuclear engineering.

Undergraduate students may specialize in nuclear engineering by taking Chem.
Eng. 582; Mech. Eng. 540; and a technical elective chosen from Chem. Eng. 583;
Physics 555, 557; Mech. Eng. 510, 531, 534, 541; and Math. 323. Students work-
ing toward a master's degree may obtain a minor in nuclear engineering by
taking Chem. Eng. 582, 583; and Physics 555, 557. Additional electives from the
above list and certain 600 level courses may be included to strengthen the pro-
gram.

Solid Mechanics. Solid mechanics is a discipline employed in the design of
machines and structures of all types. Students working in this field will be con-
cerned with experimental and theoretical stress analysis of structures under
static or vibrating loads.

Students planning to specialize in this area may select courses in the following
subareas: static design of structures — Mech. Eng. 533, Civ. Eng. 527; djoiamics of
structures — Mech. Eng. 535, 635, Civ. Eng. 615; mechanics of materials — Mech.
Eng. 552, Civ. Eng. 501, 502; experimental and theoretical stress analysis — Mech.
Eng. 552, 661, Civ. Eng. 503.

Thermoscience. Thermoscience is an area of mechanical engineering which in-
cludes thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer and their applications.
This area is basic to most processes involving energy conversion or transfer. A
specialist in this area has the skills to analyze heat transfer and fluid flow in
particular processes and support the design of equipment used in power plants,
air conditioning, engines, industrial processing, aircraft, spacecraft, and other
fields.

The specialized courses in this area build upon several thermoscience classes
required of all mechanical engineers. A student planning to specialize in this area
should take Mech. Eng. 510, 540 and additional courses selected from the follow-
ing subareas: thermodynamics — Mech. Eng. 521, 522, 523, 581, 585, 621, Chem.
Eng. 674; fluid mechanics — Mech. Eng. 511, 512, 583, 585, 611, 612, Chem. Eng.
672, 673; heat transfer — Mech. Eng. 541, 641, 642, Chem Eng. 673.

Vibrations and Dynamics. A specialist in vibrations and dynamics is concerned
with the dynamic behavior of mechanical systems, especially with the effect of
mechanical vibrations on the performance of machinery. A machine that is de-
signed to withstand static loads may fail with the addition of dynamic loads.

To specialize in the study of dynamic phenomena, a student should take
Mech. Eng. 535 and 635, with additional electives selected from Mech. Eng. 534,
537, 637; Civ. Eng. 615; Math. 332, 385, 411, 512, 585; Physics 561, 562, 621.

Courses

101. Introduction to Mechanical Engineering Systems. (2:1:3)

Introduction to the mechanical engineering profession through elementary
design problems and basic computation techniques.

151. Introductory Metallurgy. (2:1:3)

Nature of metals; metallurgical examination and testing; phase diagrams;
metal production and heat treatment; foundry processes; forming and weld-
ing processes; powder metallurgy; and associated laboratories.

201. Introduction to System Design. (2:1:3)

Synthesis and analysis of elementary engineering systems. The digital
computer as a design tool. Emphasis on creative aspects of design through
student projects.

301, 302. Elements of Thermoscience I, II. (3:3:0 ea.) Prerequisites: Mech.
Eng. 301— Physics 122; Mech. Eng. 302— Mech. Eng. 301, Civ. Eng. 304, and
Math. 321.

First and second laws of thermodynamics; fluid statics; incompressible



400 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SCIENCE



and compressible fluid flow; heat transfer by conduction, convection, and
radiation, with applications to electrical equipment.

321. Thermodynamics. (3:3:0) Prerequisites: Physics 122 and concurrent regis-
tration in Mech. Eng. 363.

A first course in fundamentals of classical thermodynamics for mechanical
engineering majors. Emphasis is on the macroscopic approach. Covers
cycles as well as an introduction to combustion.

322. Thermodynamics. (4:3:3) Prerequisite: Mech. Eng. 321.

Continuation of Mech. Eng. 321.

351. Principles of Applied Metallurgy. (3:2:3)

Control of physical properties by strain, solution and precipitation harden-
ing, recrystallization, and multiphase alloying. Emphasis on quantitative
properties predictions based upvon microstructures.

363. Mechanical Engineering Instrumentation. (2:1:3) Prerequisites: Stat. 332;
Physics 221; and concurrent registration in Mech. Eng. 321.

An introduction to theory and application of static and dynamic measure-
ments, including displacement, acceleration, temperature, pressure, strain,
high-speed photography, etc.

412. Fluid Mechanics I. (3^:3:2) Prerequisite: Math. 321.

A study of fluid statics, viscous flow; dimensional analysis; incompressible
flow, compressible flow; fluid meters; lift and drag; dynamic similarity;
momentum; potential theory; fluid machinery.

431. Kinematics. (3:2:3) Prerequisites: Civ. Eng. 102, 304.

Relative motion of links in mechanisms; velocities and accelerations of
machine parts; rolling contact; cams; gearing; synthesis of mechanisms. In-
cludes computer-aided design techniques.

454, Analysis and Manufacture of Machine Components. (3:2:3) Prerequisites:
Mech. Eng. 431; Civ. Eng. 201 and 303.

Theory, design, and manufacture of machine components.

471. Mechanical Design I. (3:2:3) Prerequisites: Mech. Eng. 363, 412, 454.

Application of mechanical engineering theory to specific design problems,
with emphasis on group projects. Philosophy of design.

□ Civil Engineering Science 501. Advanced Mechanics of Materials.* (3:3:0)

□ Civil Engineering Science 502. Advanced Properties of Materials.* (3:3:0)

510. Fluid Mechanics II. (3i:3:2) Prerequisites: Math. 321; Mech. Eng. 412.

Compressible flow; shock effects; Fanno and Rayleigh lines; generalized
one-dimensional flow.

511. Intermediate Gas Dynamics. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Mech. Eng. 510.

Potential theory and Euler's equations. Supersonic and subsonic multi-
dimensional flow. Method of characteristics; small perturbation theory;
Hodograph theory. Theoretical airfoil coefficients, etc.

512. Boundary Layer Theory. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Mech. Eng. 412.

The stress tensor; Navier-Stokes equations; exact solutions for parallel
flow; lubrication theory; Prandtl's equations; separation; Karman-Pohl-
hausen integral methods; applications.

515. Applied Aerodynamics and Flight Mechanics.* (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Mech.
Eng. 322.

An integrated picture of modern applied aerodynamics up to and including
performance, stability, and control of aerospace vehicles.

521. Advanced Thermodynamics.* (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Mech. Eng. 322.

Extended treatment of the fundamentals of thermodynamics, including
transient conditions, direct energy conversion, and current topics.



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SCIENCE 401



522. Combustion.* (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Mech. Eng. 322.

Mass balance and chemical structure; chemical equilibrium and kinetics,
as applied to combustion; burning models — solid, liquid, and gaseous.
Deflagration and detonation-type burning; properties of fuels and combus-
tion hardware.

523. Statistical Thermodynamics.* (2:2:0) Prerequisites: Mech. Eng. 321; and
Stat. 321.

Methods of statistical inference; Jaynes formalism; statistical treatment
of perfect gases; discussion of thermal properties from a molecular (micro-
scopic) point of view.

531. Principles of Automatic Control.* (3:3:0) Prerequisites: Mech. Eng. 412,
534; Math. 321.

Transfer functions applied to mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, and
electrical components and their combination. Block diagrams; Nyquist and
Routh criteria. Bode's and root locus plots; integral and error rate com-
pensation. Nonlinear systems.

533. Stress Analysis of Aerospace Structures.* (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Civ. Eng. 303.

Particular emphasis is given to analysis of aircraft and missile-type
structures; buckling of columns and compression panels; shear and tension
field panels; curved beams and rings; semimonocoque structures.

534. Dynamic System Analysis and Modeling. (3i:3:2) Prerequisites: Math. 321;
Civ. Eng. 304.

Lumped models of mechanical, electrical-mechanical, fluid, and thermal
systems; graphic models; physical system response; digital and analog
simulation.

535. Advanced Vibration Analysis.* (3:3:0) Prerequisites: Math. 321; Civ.
Eng. 304.

Vibrations of systems with multiple degree of freedom; vibrations of
elastic bodies; random vibrations; simple nonlinear systems.

537. Advanced Kinematics.* (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Mech. Eng. 431.

Geometry of constrained motion, with application to point paths; kine-
matic synthesis; types of mechanisms.

540. Heat Transfer. (3^:3:2) Prerequisites: Mech. Eng. 321, 412; Math. 321.

Fundamentals of heat transfer; basic laws; conduction; convection; change
of phase; radiation.

541. Advanced Heat Transfer. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Mech. Eng. 540.

Heat transfer analysis by numerical and analog methods. Emphasis on
radiation and conduction. Use of digital and analog computers, passive
analogs.

552. Design and Materials Applications. (3:3:0) Prerequisites: Mech. Eng. 351,
454.

Applied and residual stresses; materials selection; static, impact, and
fatigue strength; fatigue damage; surface treatments; elastic deflection and
stability — all as applied to mechanical design.

554. Advanced Manufacturing Processes.* (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Mech. Eng. 351
or consent of instructor.

Basic analysis of forming, machining, welding, and casting processes, with
emphasis on microstructures. Selection of process parameters, with con-
sideration of economics and material properties.

572. Interdisciplinary Systems Design. (3:1:6) Prerequisite: Mech. Eng. 471.

Design projects, emphasizing group project attack on contemporary
problems. Interdisciplinary faculty and student participants.

581. Internal Combustion Engines.* (3:2:3) Prerequisite: Mech. Eng. 322.

Basic principles of spark ignition and compression ignition engines; actual
cycles; performance characteristics; carburetion and ignition principles;



402 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SCTENCE



detonation and combustion. Laboratory work with three advanced engine
testing cells.

583. Principles of Turbomachinery.* (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Mech. Eng. 412.

Dimension analysis; stator and rotor energy and momentum transfer;
radial and axial flow machines; system component matching; Reynolds
number and Mach number effects; applications.

585. Jet Propulsion Power Plants.* (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Mech. Eng. 322.

Synthesis course in thermal propulsion systems. The rocket, ramjet, and
turbojet are used as vehicles for teaching propulsion fundamentals and
system interactions.

591R. Seminar.* (5:1:0 ea.) Prerequisite: senior standing.

Student and faculty presentation of topics of special and current interest.

595R. Special Problems.* (Arr. ea.) Prerequisite: consent of department chair-
man.

597R. Undergraduate Research.* (Arr. ea.) Prerequisite: consent of department
chairman.

611. Theories of Fluid Turbulence.* (3:3:0) Prerequisites: Mech. Eng. 412; Math.
322, 323.

612. Principles of Ideal-Fluid Dynamics. (3:3:0) Prerequisites: Mech. Eng. 412;
Math. 322, 323.

621, 622. Thermodynamics Theory I, II.* (3:Arr.:Arr. ea.) Prerequisite: Mech.
Eng. 322.

631. Mechanical Control Systems.* (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Mech. Eng. 531.

635. Advanced Vibration Analysis II.* (3:Arr.:Arr.) Prerequisite: Mech. Eng.
535.

637. Advanced Dynamics of Mechanical Elements.* (3:3:0) Prerequisites: Math.
322, 323; Mech. Eng. 534.

641, 642. Heat Transfer Theory I, U* (3:3:0 ea.) Prerequisite: Mech. Eng. 540.

661, 662. Elasticity in Engineering.* (3:Arr.:Arr. ea.)

697R. Research.* (Arr. ea.)

698. Project for Master of Engineering. (3-5:0:Arr.) Prerequisite: fifth-year
standing in mechanical engineering program.

A design or research project in support of the Master of Engineering
program. To be completed in one semester.

699R. Thesis for Master's Degree.* (6-9:Arr.:Arr. ea.)

791R. Seminar for Doctoral Students. (1:1:0 ea.)

795. Selected Topics in Mechanical Engineering. (l-3:Arr.:Arr.)

797R. Research for Doctoral Students. (Arr. ea.)

799. Dissertation for Doctoral Students. (Arr.)

*Electives offered on demand.



MICROBIOLOGY 403




Professors: Beck, Bodily, Donaldson (Chairman, 775 WIDB), Larsen, North, R.

Sagers.
Associate Professors: Bradshaw, Burton, Jensen, Wright.
Special Instructors: Allman, Anderson, Call, G. Sagers.
Laboratory Supervisor: Chase.
Medical Technology Coordinator: Richards.

The Microbiology Department offers programs leading to the B.S., M.S., and
Ph.D. degrees. Some fields of specialization are: food microbiology, immunology,
industrial microbiology, medical microbiology, microbial ecology, microbial ge-
netics, microbial physiology, and virology. Graduates are employed in a wide
variety of positions in industry, hospitals, government agencies, and universities.
For details concerning programs for graduate study, students should con-
sult the Graduate School Catalog. Four major areas of emphasis, each leading
to a Bachelor of Science degree in microbiology, are listed below.

Microbiology and Preprofessional

This emphasis is recommended for students who desire excellent preparation for
graduate study in microbiology and for students who plan to attend medical,
dental, or osteopathic schools. Minimum requirements: Bio. Agr. Ed. 201; Math.
105, 106 (or 111), 109; Chem. 105, 106, 223, 351, 352, 353; Physics 201, 202;
Zool. 376; Micro. 331, 491R (2 credits), 501, 511, and 531. Students who gain
admission to an accredited professional school after completion of their jimior
year may substitute credit received in pathology and microbiology at the pro-
fessional school for Micro. 511, 531, and 491R. The student can then, by trans-
fer of credit, receive a B.S. degree, providing all general education requirements
have been met.

Medical Technology (with internship)

Through a cooperative agreement with various hospitals, provision has been
made for training medical technologists. The program leads to certification as
a registered medical technologist by the American Association of Clinical Pa-
thologists. The curriculum consists of 6 semesters of resident study on the Brig-
ham Young University campus followed by 12 months of internship at an ap-
proved hospital. During the internship year, the student will register for Micro.
401 through 406 and pay tuition and fees to the University. Minimum require-
ments: Bio. Agr. Ed. 201; Math. 105; Chem. 105, 106, 151, 223, 384, 385; Physics
100; Zool. 261, 317, 376 (or Bot. 376); Micro. 331, 391, 491R (2 credits), 501,
511, and completion of Micro. 401 through 406 during the hospital internship.

Medical Technology and Laboratory Science

This program is for students in medical technology who elect to complete re-
quirements for a B.S. degree prior to the hospital internship and for micro-
biology majors who plan to obtain employment at the Bachelor of Science level
as biomedical technicians at laboratories in industry and in government agencies.



404 MICROBIOLOGY



Minimum requirements: Bio. Agr. Ed. 201; Math. 105; Chem. 105, 106, 151, 223,
384, 385; Physics 100, Micro. 331, 451, 491R (2 credits), 501, 511, and 7 ad-
ditional credit hours selected from Micro. 361, 371, 381, 391. 411, 521, 522, 531
or 581. Students planning a hospital internship must include Micro. 391 and
Zool. 261, 317, and 376 in their programs.

Environmental Health Science

This program is designed to prepare students for employment in a variety of
environmental-health-related positions in government agencies and private in-
dustry. Graduates are also well prepared to pursue graduate work in schools
of public health. Minimum requirements: Bio. Agr. Ed. 201, 250; Math. 105, 106
(or 111); Stat. 221; Chem. 105, 106, 151, 384; Physics 105, 106, 107, 108; Health
451; Sociol. 329; Zool. 317, 331; Civ. Eng. 550; Micro. 311, 331, 361, 371, 381,
411, 491 (2 semesters), and 501. Recommended additional courses: Geog. 101;
Geol. 104; Health 551; Micro. 511, 531; Zool. 376, 535.



Suggested Course Outline — Microbiology and Preprofessional



First Year F W

Chem. 105. 106 4 4

Math. 105, 106 (or 111) 3 3

Bio. Agr. Ed. 201 4

Health 2

P.E. i i

Religion 2 2

Engl. Ill 3

Hist. 170 3

Electives** 3

Total hours 17 1 16^

Second Year F W

Chem. 351, 352 3 3

Chem. 353 2

Math. 109 4

Zool. 203**. 376 4 3

Physics 201 5

P.E. h I

Religion 2 2

Electives* 4 2



Third Year

Micro. 331, 501
Physics 202
Chem. 223
Engl. 316
Religion
Electives*

Total hours

Fourth Year

Micro. 511, 531
Micro. 491R
Religion
Electives*

Total hours



W

5



17 17



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4
1
2



15 15



Total hours



111 17i



*Electives should include humanities and social science general education re-
quirements.
**Required only of students who plan to enter a professional school.

Suggested Course Outline — Medical Technology



First Year


F


W


Second Year


F


W


Math. 105


3




Micro. 331




5


Chem. 105, 106


4


4


Chem. 151; 384, 385






Engl. Ill (115), Hist.


170 3


3


(or 223)


5


5


Health 130




2


Physics 100


3




Social science


3




Zool. 376 or Bot. 376


3




Bio. Agr. Ed. 201




4


Zool. 261




4


Religion


2


2


Humanities


3




Dev. Assy.


1


I


Religion


2


2


P.E.


1


I


Dev. Assy.


1

•2


i








P.E.


i


i


Total hours


16


16














Total hours


17


17



MICROBIOLOGY 405



Third Year




F


W


Dev. Assy.


3


Mirro .391






2






Micro. 491R




1


1


Total hours


16 i


Micro. 501, 511




5


4






English






3


Fourth Year




Zool. 317




3




(Hospital Internship)


F


Chem. 223 (or


384-5)


5




Micro. 401, 402, 403


16


Humanities






3


Micro. 404. 405, 406




Social science






2






Religion




2


2


Total hours


16



171

W

14



Courses

101. Introduction to Medical Technology. (1:1:0)

Introduction to the field of medical technology through lectures, films,
and observation at hospital laboratories.

121. Introductory Microbiology. (3:3:2) (G-BS) Recommended for students
seeking a liberal education in microbiology who do not have the prerequi-
sites to take the more advanced courses.

A survey of fundamental biological processes observed in microorganisms;
growth, reproduction, genetic changes, and metabolism, together with bene-
ficial and harmful activities. Only one of the two courses 121, 321 may be
taken for credit.

311. Sanitation and Public Health. (2:2:0) Home Study also. (G-BS m)
The role of the individual and the community in maintaining a healthful



Online LibraryBrigham Young UniversityGeneral catalog (Volume 1972-1973) → online text (page 43 of 67)