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Personal Development Center. Interpersonal Communication. (0:0:2)

A practical, experiential course conducted on a small group basis, de-
signed to develop interpersonal skills and train group leaders. Includes
the communication process, expression of needs and feelings, active listen-
ing, influences of varying personal motivational systems, and interpersonal
problem solving.



PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM 433



Personal Development Center. Personal and Social Development. (0:0:2)

A course designed to enhance understanding of self and others and to
improve skills in such areas as dating, interpersonal communication, recre-
ation, social conversation, poise, dress, and manners.

Personal Development Center. Educational and Vocational Development. (0:0:2)
A practical program designed to help students obtain the knowledge and
experience important in making educational -vocational plans. Students
will have an opportunity to learn more about their own aptitudes, in-
terests, and abilities as well as educational and vocational opportunities.

□ Physical Education 176. Activities for Fitness. (2:0:2-3)

□ Physical Education 180. Social Dance. (i:0:2-3)

□ Physical Education 192. Outing Activities. (1:0:3-5)

Selected seasonal activities.

□ Psychology 240. Personal and Social Adjustment. (2:2:0)

Study of the prevention and amelioration of mental and personal diffi-
culties.

□ Psychology 357 (also Sociology 357). Group Relations and Leadership. (3:2:2)

Prerequiste: Psych. Ill or Sociol. 111.

Designed to help the individual participate effectively in groups and to
assist leaders to become efficient in role performance.

□ Recreation Education 123. Introduction to Outdoor Recreation. (1:0:3) (m)

□ Recreation Education 371. Family Recreation. (2:2:0) (m)

Social activities for small groups and families.

□ Recreation Education 387. Planning for Social Recreation. (2:2:0)

□ Religious Instruction 231, 232. The Gospel in Principle and Practice. (2:2:0

ea.)

A consideration of the basic principles of the gospel of Jesus Christ in
the light of the practical needs and problems of today's youth.

□ Speech and Dramatic Arts 101. Speech Communication. (3:3:1)

The theory, philosophy, and application of the contemporary communi-
cation process, with emphasis on interpersonal communications. Rec-
ommended for prospective teachers and those who desire to improve their
speaking effectiveness. Required for majors.

□ Youth Leadership 480. Youth Acculturation through Outdoor Survival. (3-5:5

per week/3 weeks:70 per week/3 weeks)

A living experience course in physical and emotional stress situations
designed to produce interpersonal commitments.



434 PHILOSOPHY



D



hiosopry



Professors: Madsen, Riddle, Yarn.

Associate Professor: Warner.

Assistant Professors: Rasmussen, Reynolds (Chairman, 121 JSB).

No major in philosophy is available. An undergraduate minor requires a mini-
mum of 15 semester hours of course work, which may include any of the
courses listed below. Graduate minor requirements are listed in the Graduate
School Catalog.

No philosophy course carries general education credit in religion.

Courses



101. Logic and Language. (3:3:0) (G-ML m)
Principles of correct reasoning.



110. Introduction to Philosophy. (3:3:0) Home Study also. (G-HA m)

Development of analytical skills through study of basic philosophical
fields and issues.

211. Theory of Knowledge. (3:3:0) (G-HA m) Prerequisite: Phil. 110.

Basic issues in the justification of knowledge claims and in the philoso-
phy of perception.

212. Metaphysics. (3:3:0) (m)

The categories in terms of which reality is conceived, including time,
space, substance, existence, causation, and process.

213. Ethics. (3:3:0) (G-HA m)

Basic issues concerning the justification of moral standards and moral
decisions.

214. Aesthetics. (3:3:0) (G-HA m)

Significance and response in the arts; standards of criticism; creativity;
art and morality.

215. Philosophy of Religion. (3:3:0) (G-HA m)

Alternative views of the grounds of religious belief and their moral and
social implications.

311. Philosophy of Language. (3:3:0) (m)

Traditional and contemporary theories of meaning and truth and their
bearing on philosophical issues.

312. Philosophy of Mind. (3:3:0) (m)

The concepts of mind and brain and their relationship; the self and
self-knowledge; action and free agency.

316. Philosophy of Science. (3:3:0) (G-ML m) Prerequisite: Phil. 110. Recom-
mended: Phil. 101.



PHILOSOPHY 435



318. Social and Political Philosophy. (3:3:0) (m)

Philosophical analysis of economic, legal, social, and political issues, e.g.,
conditions of liberty, moral status of economic systems, and models of in-
dividual and state.

321. History of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. (4:4:0) Prerequisite: Phil
110.

Major systems of thought in the Western tradition from the sixth century
B.C. to the fourteenth century A.D.

322. History of Modern Philosophy. (4:4:0) (m) Prerequisite: Phil. 110.

Major systems of thought in the Western tradition from the fifteenth
century to the nineteenth century.

323. Contemporary Anglo-American Philosophy. (3:3:0) (m) Prerequisite: Phil.
110.

Pragmatism, positivism, and various linguistic approaches to philosophical
problems.

324. Contemporary Continental Philosophy. (3:3:0) (m) Prerequisite: Phil. 110.

Existentialism, phenomenology, and Marxism.

413R. Topics in Ethics and Value Theory. (2-3:2-3:0 ea.)

Intensive study of selected issues in ethics, aesthetics, or theory of value.

421R. Topics in Ancient Philosophy. (2-3:2-3:0 ea.) Recommended: Phil. 321.
Intensive study of a selected figure, theme, or movement in the ancient
period.

422R. Topics in Medieval Philosophy. (2-3:2-3:0 ea.) Recommended: Phil. 321.
Intensive study of a selected figure, theme, or movement in the medieval
period.

423R. Topics in Modern Philosophy. (2-3:2-3:0 ea.) Recommended: Phil. 322.
Intensive study of a selected figure, theme, or movement in the modern
period through the nineteenth century.

424R. Topics in Contemporary Philosophy. (2-3:2-3:0 ea.)

Intensive study of a selected figure, theme, or movement in the twentieth
century.

448R. Readings in Philosophy. (1-4:1-4:0 ea.)

□ Mathematics 508. Mathematical Logic. (3:3:0)

515. Seminar in the Philosophy of Religion. (2:2:0)

516. Seminar in the Philosophy of Science. (2:2:0)

530. Seminar in Philosophical Analysis. (2:2:0)

Intensive application of philosophical method.

648R. Directed Readings in Philosophy. (1-4:1-4:0 ea.)



436 PHYSICAL EDUCATION



Ph\Gical
Education



Professors: Allsen, Bangerter, Call, Hartvigsen, Holbrook, Jarman, C. Jensen,

E. Kimball, Roundy (Chairman — Men, 270 SFH).
Associate Professors: Fisher, Jacobson (Chairman — Women, 296 RB), Johnson,

Jones, Robison, Watts.
Assistant Professors: Barker, Bestor, Cryer, Dixon, Francis, Gibb, Hawkes, Hirst,

J. Jensen, Leishman, Michaelis, Moe, Olsen, Tucker, Tuckett, Valentine,

Vickers, Wallace, Winterton, Witbeck.
Instructors: Allen, Apostol, Bunker, Chamberlain, Davis, Dismer, Edwards, Felt,

Harrison, Helm, Hyatt, Ipson, R. Kimball, Kragthorpe, Miller, Morgenegg,

Potter, Roberson, Rowland, Silvester.

Each student registered at the University is required to complete one physical
education activity course in the 100-199 series during each semester of his
freshman and sophomore years. Men physical education majors and minors
fulfill this requirement by completing courses 231 to 237. Women majors and
minors fulfill the requirement by completing courses 103, 105 (or equivalent),
108, 187, 188, 244 and 247.

A large variety of activity courses is available. Participation in these courses
provides students with increased sports knowledge, organic development, neuro-
muscular skill, and social contact in game situations. Most of the activities
have great carry-over value in later life.

Men students are required to make a $5 deposit on a towel and a padlock,
$4 of which is refundable at the close of the school year upon return of pad-
lock and the last towel issued.

Exceptions: (1) Students who will complete a major in engineering science
together with requirements for a commission in either the army or the air force
on the basis of a four-year program as outlined on pages 107 and 410 are not
subject to the physical education requirement. (2) Engineering science students
who complete one of the outlined two-year programs and receive a commission
or who withdraw from either of the four-year programs after a minimum of
two years are exempt from one credit of physical education.

Any student desiring exemption from physical education for medical reasons
must obtain an excuse from a Student Health Center physician and present it
to the chairman of the physical education department. Adaptive physical edu-
cation courses are held each semester for handicapped students. Students with
handicaps are encouraged to contact the department for special counseling.

Undergraduate Requirements (Men and Women)
I. Physical Education — Men

A. It is recommended that all students majoring in physical education com-
plete the following courses in fulfilling their general education require-
ments:



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 437



1. Biological Science: Hours
Zool. 261, 262 6

2. Physical Science:

Chem. 102 5

Physics 100 or 105 3

3. Social Science:

Psych. Ill 3

Sociol. Ill or 112 3

4. Humanities:

Sp. and Dram. Arts 102 2

5. Mathematics - Science - Language:

Math. 105 3

P.E. 462 3

6. Religion:

Relig. 365 2

B. Physical Education Major Requirements.

Students may major in physical education by completing 38-40 credits as
follows:

1. Twenty-nine credit requirements of the following (core):

P.E. 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 236, 237, 238, 239, 240, 279, 280, 330, 341,
344, 378, 413, 446, 464, and two of the following: 370, 371, 372, 373,
374.

2. Ten credits are required from the following list in addition to the
above requirements:

P.E. 182, 250, 264, 265, 280, 286, 314; no more than two of the follow-
ing: 370, 371, 372, 373, 374; any of the following: 406, 411, 449, 474,
547, Rec. Ed. 570; Health 381 (strongly recommended, especially for non-
health minors planning to teach junior high school).

3. D or E Credit in Major:

A student cannot qualify for graduation with any D or E credit in his
major.

4. Skill Tests:

All majors will be required to pass a skills test in 10 of the following
13 activities before being allowed to do their student teaching:

Soccer Volleyball Track or Field

Gymnastics Golf Baseball

Swimming Wrestling Archery

Tennis Football

Badminton Basketball

Membership on an intercollegiate team or participation on an extra-
mural team will be accepted as adequate skill in that activity. Ski
or bowling team members will receive credit for one of their 10 activ-
ities. Rugby team members can substitute this activity for football.
Water polo, swimming, or diving team membership will fulfill the
swimming requirement.

5. Twelve-Minute Run:

All majors are required to qualify in the "good" or "excellent" cate-
gory of the 12-minute run. This test must be passed during the se-
mester they plan to graduate.

6. Exemption Tests:

It is possible to have the requirement for the sports fundamental
classes waived by passing a special examination. This consists of
skills tests and a written test. A special fee will be charged.



438 PHYSICAL EDUCATION



C. Physical Education Minor Requirements.

Students may minor in physical education by completing the following:

1. Secondary (19-20 credit hours):

P.E. 180, 181, 235, 330, 341, 344; two hours from the following: 231,
232, 233, 234, 236, 237, 238, 239, 240; two of the following: 370,
371, 372, 373, 374; and one of the following: 314, 413, 446, 464.

2. Elementary (17 credit hours):

P.E. 181, 182, 235, 237, 330, 341, 372 or 373, 375, 376; Health 121.

D. Composite Major Requirements — Secondary.

Students may choose a composite major by having a dominant area in
physical education with related areas in health education and recreation
education; or by choosing a dominant area in health education with re-
lated areas in physical education and recreation education. Students
who choose dominance in physical education must also fulfill the general
education requirements specified in section "A" above. The require-
ments for a composite major are as follows:

1. Dominant Area in Physical Education:

P.E. 180, 181, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 236, 237, 238, 239, 240, 330, 341,
344, 378, 413, 446, 464; and two of the following: 370, 371, 372,
373, 374. In addition, all students must complete requirements 3, 4,
and 5 in section "B" — Physical Education Major Requirements.

2. Related Areas in Physical Education:

P.E. 330, 341, 344; two hours from the following: 231, 232, 233, 234,
235, 236, 237, 238, 239, 240; and two of the following: 370, 371, 372,
373, 374.

II, Physical Eklucation — Women

Candidacy Test: All prospective sports and dance emphasis major and minor
students are assigned to physical education classes on the basis of performance
on the candidacy test.

A. Physical Education Major Requirements (Certification).

All women students majoring in physical education are to take the courses
listed in the following core program:

P.E. 103, 105, 279 or 280, 330, 341, 344, 378W, 388, 446; either 375,

or 376; Health 121 (total 20 hours).

In addition, women physical education majors must choose either a sports
emphasis or a dance emphasis.

1. Sports Emphasis:

Swimming (1 credit); P.E. 108, 233, 236, 238, 240, 241, 242, 243,

244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 461, 407 or 474; two of the following: P.E.
314, 413, Youth Ldr. 378, CDFR 130. (Total 20.5 or 21.5 hours.)

2. Dance Emphasis:

P.E. 185, 186, 202, 287, 288, 380, 382, 383, 385, 387, 389, 486, and six
hours from the following: P.E. 233, 236, 238, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244,

245, 246, 247, 248, 249. (Total 21.5 hours.)

Note: The following courses (which will help fulfill the general education
requirements of the University) are prerequisites to required major courses
in women's P.E.: P.E. 187, 188; Chem. 100; Physics 100; Zool. 261, 262. (Sp.
and Dram. Arts 102 and 121 are recommended by the State of Utah
for certification. They will fill the general education humanities require-
ments.)

B. Dance Specialty Major (Certification).

P.E. 108, 180, 181, 183, 185, 186, 187, 188, 202, 279, 280, 287, 288,



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 439



290, 330, 341, 378W, 380, 382, 383, 385, 446, 480, 481, 486, 490, 587,
588, 589; Health 121.

C. Composite Major Requirements (Secondary Certification).

A composite major consists of 28 semester hours in physical education
and 16 hours in each of two of the following fields: health education,
driver and safety education, recreation, and dance. The courses for the
composite major are as follows:

1. Dominant Area in Physical Education (28 hours):

P.E. 108, 233, 236, 238, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248,
249, 279 or 280, 330, 341, 344, 376, 378W, 446, 461.

2. Related Areas (16 hours):

a. Sports Emphasis (16 hours): P.E. 279 or 280, 330, 341, 376, and

seven hours from the following: 233, 236, 238, 240, 241, 242, 243,
244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249.

b. Dance Emphasis (16 hours): P.E. 180, 183, 185, 186, 279 or 280,
287, 288, 380, 383, 387, 388, 389, 486.

D. Composite Major Requirements (Elementary Certification).



Freshman Hours

Ed. 200 2

Chem. 100 3

Physics 100 3

Health 130 2

Geog. 120 3

Sp. and Dram. Arts 101

or 121 3

Engl. Ill 3

Relig. 121, 122 4

Soc. sci. elect 3

P.E. 173 h

187 i

242 i

244 i

247 h

248 i

Health 121 2

Dev. Assy 1



Total hours



32



Sophomore Hours

Ed. 300 8

Zool. 261 4

Math. 305 3

Engl. 212 3

Music 226 2

Art 326 5

Religion 4

P.E. 330 3

103 i

184 h

241 i

245 i



246 I

249 i

Dev. Assy 1

Total hours 36

Junior Hours

Ed. 350 8

Ed. 400 14

P.E. 375 2

P.E. 376 2

Religion 2

Music 2

Ed. 340 2

P.E. 378 1

Zool. 262 2



Total hours



35



Senior Hours

Ed. 450 2

Bio. Agr. Ed. 351 3

Math. sci. pref 3

Soc. sci. elect 6

Religion 4

Hum. 101 elect 3

Health 361 2

P.E. 478 4

341 3

233 i

236 i

238 i

240 i



Total hours



32



E. Physical Education Major Requirements with Dance Professional Major
(Noncertification) .

P.E. 180, 181, 182, 183, 185. 186, 187, 188, 202, 287, 288, 290, 380,
383, 387, 486, 490; and 7 hours from the following: P.E. 279, 280,



440 PHYSICAL EDUCATION



282, 283, 284, 285, 291, 292, 381 (teacher's permission), 382, 385,
386, 388, 389, 480, 481, 587, 588, 589.

F. Physical Education Minor Requirements.

1. Sports Emphasis (Certification):

P.E. 279 or 280, 330, 341, 376; swimming (1 hour); Health 121 or Youth
Leadership 378 if health major; 8 hours of the following: P.E. 108, 233,
236, 238, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249. P.E. 378W
must be successfully completed if a physical education-sports emphasis
minor is to be assigned to student teaching in this minor.

2. Dance Emphasis (Certification):

P.E. 185, 186, 279 or 280*, 287, 288, 330, 380, 383, 387, 388, 389, 486;
two hours from the following: P.E. 108, 233, 236, 238, 240, 241, 242,
243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249. (Total 20 hours.)
*Physical education-sports emphasis majors substitute P.E. 283, 284, or
285. P.E. 378W must be successfully completed if a physical education-
dance emphasis minor is to be assigned to student teaching in this
minor.

3. Dance Emphasis (Noncertification) :

P.E. 180, 183, 185, 186, 202, 286, 287, 288, 380, 383, 387, 389, 486.
(Total 16 hours.)

4. Elementary Curriculum Minor (Certification):

P.E. 173, 187, 188, 241, 242, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249; three of

the following: 233, 236, 238, 240, 330, 341*; Health 121. (Total 15

hours.)

* Prerequisites: Zool. 261, 262, or equivalent.

Note: In addition, the College of Education requires of all students

P.E. 103, 184 plus two courses selected from the list of service courses

and P.E. 375 or 376.

5. Dance Specialty Minor (Certification): See departmental adviser.

III. Frephysical Therapy — Men or Women:

Prephysical therapy is a preprofessional program designed to prepare the stu-
dent for acceptance into a school of physical therapy. The student should
keep in mind that this is a preprofessional program designed for that pur-
pose only.

Students transferring into prephysical therapy must have a cumulative
GPA of 2.50 or better. If a student is to remain competitive with regards
to acceptance into physical therapy school he should maintain a 3.0 or better
GPA.

Prephysical therapy students may follow one of two plans to prepare them-
selves for professional schools.

Plan A — Four-Year Preprofessional Program (128 hours)

Freshman Hours Sophomore Hours

Religion 4 Religion 4

English composition 3 P.E 1

Health 130 2 Sp. and Dram. Arts 102 2

P.E 1 Humanities 6

Math. (101), 111 or . *Chem. 102 5

105 and 106 6 *Chem. 103 (lab) 1

Micro. 121 3 *Zool. 261, 262 6

Sociol. 112 3 *Physics 105 and 107 (lab) 4

Psych. Ill 3 *Physics 106 and 108 (lab) 4

Hist. 170 3

Zool. 203 4 Total hours 33

Total hours 32



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 441



Junior Hours

Religion 4

Health 121 2

**Engl. 316 3

Zool. 276 3

Psych. 385 3

Psych. 320 or 321 3

Health 451 or

Micro. 311 2

*P.E. 341 3

*P.E. 344 3

Electives 5



Senior Hours

Religion 4

*P.E. 462 3

*Psych. 440 3

*P.E. 446 3

*Rec. Ed. 370 or 570 3

*Health 561 3

*Health 660 2

*P.E. 368 3

*P.E. 449 1

*P.E. 645 3

*Zool. 583 or 584 2

Electives 2



Total hours



31



Total hours



32



* Course has prerequisites.
**Satisfies general education requirement in English.

Upon completion of Plan A, a student graduates with a B.S. degree with a
major in physical education (prephysical therapy emphasis). A student would
then be eligible to enter one of a number of approved schools, located
throughout the United States, offering a certificate or master's degree pro-
gram. The length of physical therapy programs is approximately 14 months
for a certificate and two years for a master's degree.

Plan B — Two-Year Preprofessional Program (66 hours)



Freshman Hours

Religion 4

English composition 6

Health 130 2

Math. (101), 111 or

105 and 106 6

Microbiology 3

P E 1

Hist. 170 "''!"!'"^^"^^";!'..'' 3

Zool. 203 4

Psych. Ill 3



Sophomore Hours

Religion 4

Humanities 6

Chem. 102, 103 6

Zool. 261, 262 6

Sociol. 112 3

P.E 1

Physics 105 and 107 (lab) 4

Physics 106 and 108 (lab) 4



Total hours



34



Total hours



32



Upon completion of Plan B, a student would be eligible to enter one of a num-
ber of approved schools offering a bachelor's degree in physical therapy. The
length of course is two years plus clinical affiliations.



Courses

103. Skill Analysis and Application. (^:0:3) Hirst

Instruction and drill in basic skills.

104. Recreational Sports. (*:0:2-3)

105. Basic Skill in Individual Sports. (J:2-3:0) Prerequisite: consent of in-
structor.



108. Precision Marching, Beginning. (^:0:3)



Hyatt



109. Precision Marching, Intermediate. (2:0:3) Prerequisite: P.E. 108 and con-
sent of instructor. Hyatt



110. Fencing, Beginning. (5:0:2-3)
113. Wrestling, Beginning. (5:0:2)



DeHoyos
Davis



442 PHYSICAL EDUCATION



114. Wrestling, Intermediate. (^:0:2) Prerequisite: P.E. 113 or equivalent. Davis

115. Squash, Beginning. (J:0:2-3)
117. Paddleball, Beginning. (i:0:2-3)
119. Handball, Beginning. (^:0:2-3)

121. Track and Field, Beginning. (^:0:2) James, Robison

122. Track and Field, Intermediate. (i:0:2) James, Robison

123. Badminton, Beginning. (i:0:2) Valentine

124. Badminton, Intermediate. (J:0:2-3) Harrison

126. Archery, Beginning. (J:0:2-3) Harrison

127. Archery, Intermediate. (i:0:2-3) Prerequisite: P.E. 126 or equivalent.

Harrison

128. Bowling, Beginning. (5:0:5) Fee. Dixon, Valentine

131. Golf, Beginning. (5:0:2) Tucker

132. Golf, Intermediate. (J:0:2) Prerequisite: P.E. 131 or equivalent. Tucker

133. Tennis, Beginning. (5:0:2) Valentine

134. Tennis, Intermediate. (5:0:2) Prerequisite: P.E. 133 or equivalent.

Valentine

135. Rugby, Beginning. (5:0:2-3) Seggar

136. Rugby, Intermediate. (5:3:15) Prerequisite: P.E. 135. Seggar

Offered 1970 and alternate years.

140. Basketball, Beginning. (5:0:2) Michaelis, Witbeck

141. Basketball, Intermediate. (5:0:2) Prerequisite: P.E. 140 or equivalent.

144. Volleyball, Beginning. (5:0:2) Michaelis

145. Volleyball, Intermediate (Men). (5:0:2-3)

146. Team Handball. (5:2-3:0) Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

Individual skill and technique, with team strategy for play in team hand-
ball as an international sport.

147. Soccer, Beginning. (5:0:2-3)

148. Soccer, Intermediate. (5:0:2-3)

149. Field Sports. (5:0:2-3)

152. Softball. (5:0:2-3) Michaelis

154. Football, Beginning. (5:0:5) Felt

155. Football, Intermediate. (5:0:5)

156. Baseball, Beginning. (5:0:5) Tuckett

157. Baseball, Intermediate. (5:0:5) Tuckett

160. Swimming, Beginning. (5:0:2-3) Hirst, Wallace

161. Swimming, Intermediate. (5:0:2-3) Prerequisite: P.E. 160. Cryer, Wallace

162. Synchronized Swimming, Beginning. (5:0:2-3) Vickers



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 443



16S. Synchronized Swimming, Intermediate. (^:0:2-3) Prerequisite: P.E. 162.

Vickers

164. Water Polo. (1:0:2-3) Cryer

165. SCUBA Diving, Beginning. (J:0:2-3) Prerequisite: P.E. 161 or equivalent.

Cryer

166. Canoeing. (1:0:4) Prerequisite: pass swimming test. Skinner
168. Diving, Beginning. (i:0:2-3) Wallace
169R. Swimming for the Handicapped. (J:0:2 ea.) Chamberlain

171. Trampoline and Tumbling. (5:0:2) Wallace

172. Rhythmic Gymnastics. (i:0:2-3) Rowland

173. Gymnastics, Beginning. (J:0:2) Morgenegg, Wallace

174. Gymnastics, Intermediate. (1:0:2) Prerequisite: P.E. 173 or equivalent.

Morgenegg, Wallace

175R. Adapative Physical Education. (2:0:2 ea.) Prerequisite: consent of in-
structor or referral by Health Center.

176. Activities for Fitness. (1:0:2-3) Allsen, Hirst

178. Progressive Weight Training, Beginning. (i:0:2-3) Silvester

179. Jogging. (i:0:2) Johnson

180. Social Dance. (1:0:2-3) Home Study also. A. Heaton

181. Folk Dance. (1:0:2-3) M. Jensen

182. Square Dance. (1:0:2-3) M. Jensen

183. Specialty Dance-Theatre. (i:0:2-3) Winterton

184. Rhythm and Dance. (1:0:2-3) S. Davis, Rasmus

American and foreign dance forms, with their application and organiza-
tion in folk, round, and square dance sequences.

185. Ballet Technique, Beginning. (1:0:2-3) Allen, Gibb



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