British Museum. Dept. of Manuscripts.

Catalogue of manuscript music in the British museum (Volume 2) online

. (page 53 of 120)
Online LibraryBritish Museum. Dept. of ManuscriptsCatalogue of manuscript music in the British museum (Volume 2) → online text (page 53 of 120)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


King is gone." f. 23.

. presented by certaine Diuines



in way of an Enterlude before his Ma[jes]tie in Cambridge stiled ' Liber
.nouus' .... done into English .... [Written by Richard Corbet,
afterwards Bishop of Oxford, etc.] to be sung .... to the tune
[omitted] of ' Bonny Nell.' " It begins " It is not yet a ftbrtnight
since." On the margin of f. 9 is the date 1614[-5].

Additional 15118, ff. 2b-7.

Paper ; 1st quarter of 17th cent. Folio. The MS. appears to have belonged
originally to Richard Shinton, from whom it passed to his contemporary [? son]
Thomas Shinton, of Wolverhampton, co. Stafford, yeoman, who apparently
was living in 1628 (see fi. 2, 41, etc.). See also imder Lute Solos, etc., in vol. iii.

Compositions for a treble voice, with a bass written underneath
(but not in score), and possibly intended for singing.



, " Change thy mynde." [By Richard
Martin. Set for 2 voices in R.
Dowland's Musicall Banqiiet, 1610.]
f.2b.

, " Walkinge alone." Anon>TBOus. J.
Redford wrote a sacred song be-
ginning with these words, of which
latter there is a copy in Add. 15288,
f . 52b. f . 3.



, "My mynde to me a kingdom is."
Anonymous [not by Byrd]. f. 3b.

, " Sleepe, wayward thoughts." By
J. Dowland. [Prom Tlie First Booke
of Songes or Ayres, 1597.] f . 4b.

, " Wilt thou, vnkind." By the same.
[From the same work.] f . 6.

, " What are theis men." Anonymous.
f.6b.



Additional 18990, ff. 3b-30 passim.

Paper ; about 1628-1634. Oblong octavo. See also above, under Catches
(p. 26) and Duets (p. 54).

Melodies, in the treble clef, of some French songs, in the hand of,
and probably composed by, Libertus Opstraet van der JMoelen, of



SONGS.



471



Utrecht, in whose Album Amicorum, begun in 1628, they are
inserted.



1. " Viens (?a, belle sans pareille." f. 3b.

2. "0 beaux yeux." f . 4b.

3. " Venez, nymphes." f . 5b.

4. 5. " Je veux chanter mon martyre " ;
and " J'employ en ces bois." f. 6b.

6. " Mon berger souspire tousiours."

f. 7b.
7,8. "Voicy la verdure"; and "Que

te sert il." f. 9b.

9. " Tu as encor enuie." f. lib.

10. " Quand pour Phyllis." f. 12b.

11. " Ou sont maintenant." ib.

12. " Voy-ie pas vn soleil." f. 13b.

13. "Qu'estes vous, ch^re beauts."
f. 14b.

14. " Celle qui tient ma franchise."
f. 15b.

15. 16. " Le verd n'est pas espoir" ; and
"Qui aime n'a point de plaisir."
f. 16b.

17. "Quelle source de malheurs."
f . 17b.



18. " Je meurs, je languis." ib.

19. "Amour, tu as trop de soucy."
f. 18b.

20. " Quelle espoir de gu6rir." ib.

21. " Je ne puis m'entretenir." f . 19b.

22. "Changerez vous tousiours." f . 20b.

23. " H61as, doleur." f. 21b.

24. "Traitresse, Qui m'auez desrob6."
f. 22b.

25. " Phillis, qui sans dessein." ib.

26. " Non-pareil[l]e d6it6." f. 23b.

27. "Si tu as enuie." ib.

28. " Ou mesne[s] tu ce beau soleil."
f . 24b.

29. " Je n'aime rien plus que lea bois."
f, 25b.

30. " Confessez done, Cloris." f. 26b.

31. " Comme fins oyseleurs." f. 27b.

32. " Le berger, plain d'amour." f. 29b.

33. " J'endure vn fascheux ennuy."
ib.



Additional 29481, ff. 2-26 passim.

Paper ; about 1630 (see belov?). Small oblong folio. See also under Anthems
(vol. i, p. 40).

Songs or sonnets, with a bass (unless the contrary is stated), in
score. Anonymous.



1. " Sleep, waiward thoughts." [From
J. Dowland, in The First Booke of
Songes, 1597.] f. 2.

2. " let vs howle." Imperfect at the
end, and without a bass. f. 5b.

3. "As life what is so sweet." f. 6.

4. " Wee'le sing like swanes " ; without
a bass. Possibly this belongs to the
preceding song. f. 6.

5. " Cupid is Venus' onlie joie " ; with-
out a bass, f . 6b.

6. " Venus went wand'ringe." f. 7.

7. "With my flocks as walked I."
Printed in J. Stafford Smith's Musica
Antiqtia, where it is described as
" Song. Probably in praise of Queen
Elizabeth. From an ancient MS.
about the year 1600 " (probably the
present MS.), f. 8.

8. " Sweet, stale awhile." f. 9.

9. " I would thow werte not faire."
f.ll.



10. " Is't for a grace or is't for some
mislicke " ; described in Musica
Antiqtia as " From Ancient Songs
unto the VioU and Lute. Written
about the year 1620." The words
appear in Add. 30982, f. 23, where the
song is said to be written "On a
gent'woman who painted her face."
f. 12.

11. "0 bella pen' che la stella." f. 13.

12. " Eyes, look off." f . 13b.

13. "If my complaints could passions
moue." [From J. Dowland, as in
no. 1.] f. 14.

14. " Sit and dispaire." f . 15.

15. " Before the sonne had guilde the
morne." f. 15b.

10. " Downe, afflicted soule," f. 16.

17. "Whut is't you lacke." [The first
song in the "Anti-masque of Mounte-
banks." See the early 17th cent.
MS. Add. 5956, f. 74.] f. 17b.



472



VOCAL MUSIC— SECULAR.



18. " Shall I com, sweet loue, to thee."
f.20.

19. "Have you seene the white lillie
flower." The words appear in Add.
19268, te^np. Charles I. f. 21.

20. "My m"' is in musicke passinge
skillfull." f. 22.

21. " Milla, the glorie of whose bewties



raise" (cf. Add. 10309, f.59b, written
about 1630). f. 23.

22. "Shall I weepe or shall I singe."
f. 24.

23. " Fly, foule soule, to some forsaken
hill." f. 24b.

24. "'Tis late and could." Imperfect
at the end. f. 25b.



Sloane 1021, ff. 51-88 passr



TO.



Paper ; about 1640. Small quarto. The ]MS. also contains other composi-
tions, vocal and instrumental, drawings of Musical Instruments, portions of
Treatises, etc., described elsewhere.

Songs, mostly unaccompanied, from the Common-place book
of Johann Stobteus, Kapellmeister to the Elector of Brandenburg
(see f. 115), compiled at Konigsberg in and shortly before 1640.
Many of the pieces are probably his compositions.



1. "So soltu doch mein Liebchen
sein." Melody only, in lute tablature.
f.51.

2. " Ein zimlicher Herr Alter" ; with
a bass in quasi-score. f . 58.

3. "Ein Brautt wol[l]t nicht." f. 59.

4. " Soil den[n], schonste Doris " ; with
a bass. f. 59b.

5. " Auf den griin bemahlten feldern."
f.60.

6. "Soil dan[n], liebste (?) Phillis."
f . 60b.

7. "WoU dem der weit von hohen



dingen " ; with bass. f. 61.

8. " Unser felder pracht." f. 61b.

9. " Cras serum est vivere " ; with
German translation, " Ich empfinde
fast ein grawen." " Martin Opitz."
This and nos. 10 and 11 are taken
from Arien. . .von Heinrich Alberten,
1640 (?). f.61b.

10. "Cras serum est discere " ; with
German translation, "Ich empfinde
gar ein grauen." f. 62.

11. "Nimphe, gib mir selbst den
mund." f.64b.



Of nos. 12-17 only the melody, in lute tablature, is given.



12. "Ach! Wie bin ich von hertzen
betriibt." f. 75b.

13. " Von der Fortuna." f. 79b.

14. 15. " List vnd Neid," and " Miis[s]
den[n] die trewe mein." f. 81b.

16. ' ' Viel trawrens in meinem Hert-
zen." ff. 82, 83b.

17. "Ach! Soil ich nicht klagen."



ff. 87, 87b.

18. " Gretke, warumb " ; words by
Simon Dach, and music by " Klk,"
evidently the composer of the next
song. f. 87b.

19. "Nachten war ich bey ."

"— Klugkist [von] Brem[en?]."
f.88.



Additional 32343, ff. 11, 12.

Paper ; temp. Charles I, Folio. Belonged to John Payne Collier.

" London's farwell to y^ parliament," beginning " Far well to y^
parlyament " ; in twenty verses, preceded by the melody, both the words
and music by Henry Lawes. Autograph.



SONGS.



473



Additional 31432, passim.

Paper ; 1st half of 17th cent. Folio. Acquired for the IMuseum with the
Julian Marshall collection in 1881. On the cover are the arms of Charles I,
placed there no doubt by Lawes, who was in his service. Lawes gave the MS. to
Richard Gibbon, whose widow gave it to " J. R." It subsequently belonged to
Alderman — Fidge, and still later to [Rev.] William Gostling (bookplate) ; and
was purchased by [Robert] Triphook for 3 guineas in 1809.

Songs, with a thorough-bass, in score, by William Lawes.
Autograph.



1. "What's at our tongues' end";
added to a 3-part setting of " A hall,
a hall." hnperfect at the end. f. 8.

2. "Nowin thesaddeclenshion." f. 8b.

3. "Virgins, as I aduise, forbeare."
f.9b.

4. "Dost see how vnregarded now."
f. 10.

5. "If you a wrinkle ou the sea haue
scene." Imperfect at the end. f. 10b.

6. " Aske me noe more where Joue
bestowes." f. 11.

7. " thinke not, Phoebe." f. lib.

8. "Upp, Ladyes, vp." f. 12.

9. "Faith, be noe longer coy." f. 14b.

10. "Cupids, wearie of the Court."
f. 16.

11. " It tis {sic) her voice." f. 16b.

12. " Wher did you borrow that last
sigh." f. 17.

13. " Why should great bewty vertuous
fame desire." f. 17b.

14. "Come take a Carouse"; with
3-part chorus, f. 18.

15. "Pleasures, bewty, youth attend
yee." f. 19.

16. "Whieles I this standing Lake
swath up with Ewe." f. 19b.

17. "To whome shall I complaine."
f.22.

18. "Had you but herd her sing."
f. 24.

19. " Far well, faire Sainct." f. 24b.

20. " Loue's a Child." f. 25b.

21. " Erly in the morne." f. 28b.

22. " Thou that excellest." f. 29.

23. " Perfect and endles Circles are."
f. 29b.

24. "Can Bewtye's spring admitt."
f.30.



25. "Tell me noe more her eyes."
f. 30b.

26. "God of winds." f. 31.

27. "I would the God of loue would
dye." f.31b.

28. "Ah, Cruell Loue, must I endure."
f. 32.

29. " He that will not loue." f. 32b.

30. "I burne, I burne." f.33.

31. " White thou yee be." f. 33b.

32. " Gather ye Rosebuds while ye
may." Imperfect at the end. ib.

33. " I'me sick of loue." f. 34.

34. " Louers rejoice." f . 36.

35. "That flame is borne of earthly
fire." ib.

36. " Beliza, shade your shining eyes."
f. 36b.

37. "Deerest, all faire is in your
browne." f. 37b.

38. "Be not proud." f. 38.

39. "Loue I obey." f. 38b.

40. " O drawe your Curtaynes." See
also f. 25 for the words, f. 39.

41. "0 Loue, are all those Arrowes
gone." f.41.

42. "Yee Feinds and Furies, come
along." f. 41b.

43. " On, on ! Compassion shall neuer
enter heere"; with 3-part chorus,
f . 42b.

44. " Hence, flattring hopes." f. 43.

45. " Stay, Phoebus, stay." f.44b.

46. " Cloris, I wish that Envye were as
just." f. 45.

47. "Doris, see the amorous flame."
f.46.

48. "Those Louers only happy are."
f. 46b.

49. " Amarilis, teare thy haire." f . 47b.



474



VOCAL MUSIC— SECULAR.



Additional 4388, ff. 103-109 passim.

Paper; after 1653 (see below), etc. Folio. See also Duets (vol. i, p. 172),
Hymns (p. 183), Solfeggi (above, p. 461) ; and under Instrumental Music and
Treatises, in vol. iii.

Songs to English words of about the middle of the 17th century.
In nos. 2-11, the first word (intended to be written in red capitals)
has been invariably omitted.



1. " Grieue not, dear loue " ; with a
bass. Two copies. " Henry Lawes."
[Prom Ayres and Dialogues, 1653.]
n. 103, 104.

2. "[How] can the tree." The tune
has very slight resemblance to that
in Popular Music (i, p. 72). f . 105.

3. " . . . stronger Foe." ib.

4. ". . . fancy" (? a Fantasy), f. 105b.

5. " . . . sisters deere." f. 106.

6. " . . . cark and care." ib.

7. Without any words, f. 106b.



8. " . . . rock." f. 107.

9. " . . . what hap." f. 107b.

10. "... bathes." ib.

11. "... fearfull hinde." f . 108.

12. " It fell upon [an holy eve] " ; with
a refrain or chorus, " Hey ho hoUi-
day." f. 108.

13. " All hayle, all hayle, to Goddes
Junoe's grace." f. 108b.

14. Song[" Over the mountains"], with
refrain, " Love will find out y" way."
(See Pojnilar Music, i, p. 189). f. 109.



Additional 11608, jpassim.

Paper; a.d. 1656-1659 (see ff.64, 73b). Small folio. Belonged in 1760 to
B. Guise. The MS. also contains other music, sacred and secular, described
elsewhere in this volume or in vol. i.

Songs, almost all accompanied by a bass, in score ; from a collection
of vocal compositions, made apparently by T. C, who has frequently
added bass parts, gi'ace-notes, etc.



1. " Mistake mee not." " Tho. Brewer."
f.3b.

2. "If that I for thy sweet sake."
" John Hilton." f. 4.

3. "England, once Europ's envj^e " ;
with a 2-part chorus at the end.
By the same, f . 4b.

4. "How ill doth hee deserve a lovers
name." " Henry Lawes." f . 7.

5. "Hither wee come into this world
of woe." By the same. f. 9.

6. "Amarillis by a springe." By the
same. f. 10b.

7. " Swift through y° yielding Ayre."
By the same, f . lib.

8. "Sett to the sun." " Simon Ives."
f.l2b.

9. "With endles[s] teares." "Robert
Johnson." f . 15.

10. " Woods, Rocks, and Mountaynes."
By the same. f. 15b.

11. "Do not expect to heare of all



your good at once." "Nicholas
Laneir." f. 17b.

12. ' ' Wilt thou bee gon, thou h[e]artless
man." " Charles Coleman." f . 20b.

13. " When cruell tyme " ; with second
part, " Whie by such a brittle stone."
" Dr. John Wilson." f. 21b.

14. "What teares, deere Prince";
apparently written on the death of
Henry, Prince of Wales. "Robert
Ramsey." f. 26.

15. " Cloris sigh'd." "Balls." f. 26b.

16. " Qual musico gentil." "Nicholas
Laneir." f. 27b.

17. "Marke how y« blushful Morne."
The meaning of the words "By his
Majesty," which appear at the begin-
ning, is not clear. No explanation
is given in Select Ayres and Dialogues,
Book ii, 1669, where the song is
attributed to N. Lanier. The words
are by T. Carew. f . 28.



SONGS.



475



18. "Come, sylent night." "Dr. Jo.
Wilson." f. 28b.

19. "If I dye, bee this my will." By
the same. f. 29b.

20. " Sylly hart, forbeare." "Nicholas
Laneir." f. 32b.

21. "0 that mine Eyes could melt."
" Tho. Brewer." f.45b.

22. " Well, well, tis true." "Jo. Hil-
ton." f. 51.

23. "The parcht Earth drinkes the
Raine." " Dr. Charles Coleman."
f . 51b.

24. " Yee violetts, that first appeare."
"John Hilton." f.52.

25. "Yee meaner beauties of the night."
Anonymous, with bass by "T. C."
f . 52b.

26. "Victoria, il mio cor"; without
a bass. By G. Carissimi. f. 54b.

27. "If thou wilt love me." Anony-
mous, f. 55b (reversed).

28. "Take, take those Lippes away."
"Dr. Wilson." f. 56.

29. "I'le wish noe more." " Nich.
Lanier." f. 57.

30. "Howe happie art thou and I."
By H. Lawes (?). f.57b.

31. " Se voi Luci." Anonymous, f . 60.

32. "'Coelia': a Lovesong," beg. "No
more shall meades." By "Nicholas
Lanier" (see no. 47). f. 61.

33. " Per doglia infinita." Anonymous.
f.62.

84. " What means this strangnes." "P.
Blagrave." f. 63.

35. "Luce de mi' Alma." The treble
"as Mr. Thorpe sung it," the bass
by"T. C." f.63b.

36. "Love is the Sunne it selfe."
"John Hilton," 1656. The date,



1641, at the beginning, appears to be
that of the dedication of the words
to Sidney Bere. f . 64.

37. "Con pill graditi (sic) voce " ; with-
out a bass. Anonymous, f . 65.

38. "Love and I of late did parte."
" Nich. Lanier." f . 69.

89. "He that loves a rosio cheeke."
By Henry Lawes [1653]. f. 69b.

40. "When first I gaz'd on Coelia's
face." " John Hilton," 1656. f . 70.

41, 42. "0, now I finde 'tis nought
but fate " ; followed by another soug
to the same words and melody, with
a bass by T. C. "Henrie Lawes."
These two and no. 43 were originally
ascribed to Francis Smith, ff. 70b,
71.

43. " Goe, faire Inchantresse." "Hen.
Lawes." f. 72.

44. "See, Cloris, see." By the same
[1658]. f. 74.

45. "Will Cloris cast her sunbright
Eye." " Simon Ives." An air
closely resembling this is attributed
in Select Ayres and Dialogues, 1669,
to J. Goodgroome. A third part
has been added by " T. C." f. 74b.

46. "Alas, poore Cupid." "Hen.
Lawes." f . 75.

47. "Noe more shall meades be deckt " :
another version of no. 32. The air is
by "Nich. Lanier," with bass by
"T. C." The close of the third
verse is given " as Mr. EUistou sings
it." f.75b.

48. "Shee that is faire." "Hen.
Lawes." f. 77b.

49. "Beauties, have you seen a Toy."
Apparently altered by "T. C." from
the part-song on f. 81. f. 80b.



Additional 22910, £. 24.

Paper ; a.d. 1666. Small folio.

" At the nice Court I've been" : described as " A Song to Therse,
1666." The tune is given, without accompaniment, in the margin.



Harley 6947, ff. 368-408.

Paper ; about 1667 (?). Small folio.

Verses by English poets of the 17th century, each followed by its
tune, but without accompaniment. The music is by John Gamble — see



476



VOCAL MUSIC— SECULAR.



below, Add. 32339, where all are
exception of nos. 16 and 18, which

1. "Thou knowst thou loue (sic) Me."
f. 368.

2. " Loue's alcamist." f. 369.

3. "Thy nose a wafor to distill."
f. 370.

4. " Thou art Loue's Sunne." f. 371.

5. " Each jnward sigh." ib.

6. "As thow dost looke." f. 372.

7. "I loue theesoe." f . 873,

8. "What a thin, fine, coold, ayrey
loue." f. 374.

9. "Himen and I." f . 375.

10. "My fancey, not my loue." f. 376.

11. " Eatch peece of loue." f. 377.

12. " Yowth's prodigaUs." f. 378.

13. " Loue should bee jentell." f. 379.

14. "My toombe." The words are
from "The humourous lovers," about
1667, by William Cavendish, Duke
of Newcastle (d. 1676). f. 380.

15. " Sighs are turn'd inwards." f. 381.

16. " Each Pensell's tounge." f . 382.

17. " Yow yowths, the glorry of ritch
townes." f. 383.

18. " Great soomes of love." f. 384.

19. " Tho' wee enquire." f. 385.

20. "Love is a sicknes." f. 386.

21. " My loue is growne so mutch to[o]
bigg." f. 387.

22. " Prethe, oh Prethe." f. 388.

23. " Thy hayre is gould." f. 389.



to be found, with basses, with the
have been cut out, and no. 40.

24. "Loue heeretofore did make me
gladd." f. 390.

25. " I in amazment stood." f. 391.

26. ' ' So vgley makes my bludd gee
back." f. 392.

27. " Maye all fresh Joyes appeere to
you." f. 393.

28. "Weele haue loue's tryumphs."
The words are by the above Duke of
Newcastle (see Add. 32497, f.l29).
f.394.

29. "Whenpoore." f. 395.

30. "Thy absence moues the world."
f . 396.

31. " Wee'le walke vppon the high-topt
woods." f. 397.

32. " When yonge my loue I would
exspress." f . 398.

33. " My loueisgrowensoauld." f. 399.

34. "My loue simes [? = sinnes] I will
not mistake." f. 400.

35. " Loue's actuall sins." ib.

36. "To heauven once ther caime a
Poett." f.401.

37. " Bewty and fauour." f. 402.

38. " Loue's Conshens." f. 403.

39. " Lord, what a Coyle." f. 404.

40. "A hayrey sayter." f. 405.

41. "I sawe a cuntry Lass." f. 406.

42. "I loue thee longe." f. 407.

43. "The pantinge Sunne." f. 408.



Egerton 2013, passim.

Paper ; after 1669 (?). Folio. The MS. also contains sacred Duets (vol. i,
p. 172) and Songs (p. 428), secular Trios (below), and Lute Solos (described in
vol. iii).

Songs by English composers of the middle of the 17th century.
Except where the contrary is stated, they have an accompaniment for
harpsichord, in score, and are anonymous.

1. "Noe sad thought his soule affright."
" Jo[hn] Hilton." f.l.

2. " Hence, all yea vaine delights." By
the same. The words from Fletcher's
Nice Valour [? after 1624]. f. 3b.

3. "Come, all you deare delights";
with lute. f. 5b.

4. " Whither are all those falce Oathes
blowne." " Hen. Lawes." f. 8b.

5. "0 sweete delight." By T. Cam-
ion [1612]. f. 9b.



6. " Thou mays't be proude." "John
Hillton." f. 10.

7. "We must not parte." f. 10b.

8. " that this last farwell." f. lib.

9. " When Thorolis delights to walke."
"Jo. Hillton." f. 12.

10. " O Faire, sweete face." Anony-
mous. The words from Fletcher's
Women pleased, about 1620. f . 12b.

11. "Wilt thou forgive the simes [ =
sinnes]." " John Hillton." f. 13b.



SONGS.



477



12. " Howe longe, falce hope." "John
Willson." f. 14.

13. "Hither wee come." "Hen.Lawes."
Adapted from the 3-part setting in
his Ay res ami Dialogues, 1653. The
words by Fletcher, f . 15.

14. " Tell me noe more howe faire shee
is." "John Willson." Words by
Dr. H. King [about 1657]. f. 15b.

15. " Am I dispis'd." "John Hillton."
Words by Herrick. f . 16b.

16. "Hange, golden sleepe." By the
same. f. 17b.

17. " Looke, Cloris." " John Willson."
f. 18b.

18. "Shall I feare to seeme vntrue."
By the same. f. 19b.

19. "Come, come, thou glorious obiect
of my sight." "Nic. Lanneire."
Words by Sir W. Killegrew (b. 1605).
f . 20b.

20. "I'me sicke of love." "Will.
Lawes." f. 21b.

21. " Amarillis by a springe " [c/. Add.
29396, f. 27b]. " Jo. Willson." f. 22.

22. "I sawe faire Cloris." "John
Hillton." Words by Edmund Waller.
f . 23.

23. " faire content." f . 24.

24. "Harke, harke how my Coelia."
Words by [Thomas] Carew. Two
copies, the second with lute accom-
paniment. This and nos. 25-27 are
by " Hen. Lawes." ff. 24b, 46b.

25. "Loue, chill with cold." f.25b.

26. " Reade in these roses." Words by
Carew. f. 26b.

27. "Gaze not on thy beautie's pride."
Words by the same. f. 27 b.

28. "Yf, when at Noone." "Will.
Lawes" (published as by H. Lawes
in his Ayres and Dialogues, 1653).
Words by Carew, addressed to Anne,
Queen of James I. f. 28b.

29. "Goe, turne away those cruell



Eyes." This and nos. 30-32 are by
" John Willson." f . 29b.

30. "Tell me not I my time mispente
(sic)." Words by Sir John Eaton.
Two copies. This and nos. 31 and 32
are also in Add. 29396. ff. 30b,
42b.

31. " doe not melt thy selfe in vaine."
f.32.

32. "There is none, none but I."
f . 32b.

33. "Mora {sc. Moro), mia vita."
f.33.

34. " Fyer, fier ! Loe, howe I burne."
"Nic. Lanmeire " {sc. Lanneire).
Published in Select Ayres and Dia-
logues, 1699. f. 33b.

35. " That fiatteringe glasse " ; without
accompaniment. Words by Carew.
f . 34b.

36. "Singe, syren." f . 35.

37. " Yf, when I dye." f. 35b.

38. "WhystayesmyFloramell." f.36.

39. "Wherefore peepst thoue " ; fol-
lowed by the melody of another
setting, ff. 36b, 37.

40. "Silly hart, f orbeare " ; with lute.
By N. Laniere. In Select Ayres and
Dialogues, 1659. f . 37b.

41. " Be not proud, pritty one " ; with-
out accompaniment. By W. Lawes
(see Add. 31432, f. 38). f. 38.

42. " Beliza, shade your shining Eyes."
f. 38b.

43. "Noe more shall meades." By
N. Laniere. In Select Ayres and
Dialogues, 1669. Words by Carew.
f. 39b.

44. " Faire and scornefull." f . 41b.

45. "Teares doe not spare mie Eyes."
" Jo. Willson." f.43b.

46. "Cupid, yf thou tell-taile proue."
f . 44b.

47. "I was not wearier"; without
accompaniment, f . 45b.



lute



From here to the end the accompaniments, where given, are for the



48. "Adeiw, fond loue." Words from
Fletcher's Lovefs progress, f. 47b.

49. " Stay, stay, ould Tyme." f.48b.

50. "Blow there, sweet Zephirus."
Two copies. 2. 52b, 53b.



51,52. " Intice not me." Two settings.

ff . 54b, 55b.
53. "Cloris, your selfe you soe excell."

Two copies. Words by E. Waller.

ff. 56b, 62b.



478



VOCAL MUSIC— SECULAR.



54. " Goe and catch a fallinge star."
Words by Dr. Donne, f . 58b.

55. " I[n] l[ove] w[ith] y[ou] " ; without
accompaniment. (Compare no. 59,
below.) f . 59.

56. " Threescore and tenn." f. 59b.

57. A song of which the first words are
apparently omitted, and only the
initials of the others given, f. 60b.

68. "Faire, will you then that I shall
dye"; without accompaniment, f. 61.

59. "In love with you." Different from
no. 55. f. 62 (reversed).



60. "Th . . . du . . . . fa. . . ." The
lute accompaniment only given at the
beginning, f . 63.

61. "Intice not me." Different from
nos. 51, 52. f. 63b.

62. "Blow there, sweet Zephirus."
Followed by a sketch of another
setting of the same words. Different
from no. 50. f . 64b.

68. " Good Susan." The melody by W.
Webb [in Catch that catch can, 1652,
where it is set for 3 voices]. Im-
XMrfect at the end. f . 65b.



Additional 10338, f. 26b.

Paper ; after 1669. Small folio. See also under Motets (vol. i, p. 283).

" Coy Ccelia, dost thou see " ; with 3-part chorus and basso continuo,
in score, in the hand of George Jeffreys, who is presumably the com-
poser of them.

Additional 10445, ff. 103b, 104b.
Paper ; after 1673 (?). Oblong octavo. See also under String Duets in vol. iii.
Melodies of two songs, with a bass, in score.



1. " Thus Cupid commences his rapes
and vagaryes." By Pelham Humfrey.
[FromChoiceAyres, e<c.,1673.] f.l03b.



2. "Depujs que i'ayme." Anonymous,
f . 104b.



Additional 29396, passim.

Paper; about 1678-1682 (see below). Folio. The MS. also contains Anthems
(vol. i, p. 27), a sacred Trio (p. 464), and other compositions described in the
present volume.

Songs, with a bass (unless the contrary is stated), for harpsichord,
in score. Those marked with an asterisk appear for the first time in
Playford's Select Musicall Ayres, 1652. Almost the whole of the MS.
is in the hand of Edward Lowe, organist of the Chapel Royal
(1661-1682), who added the bass to some of the songs, and was
probably the composer of some of those marked below anonymous.



Online LibraryBritish Museum. Dept. of ManuscriptsCatalogue of manuscript music in the British museum (Volume 2) → online text (page 53 of 120)