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*" Beauty and
accompaniment.



Loue " ; without
By H. Lawes.
f.8b.

*" Aurelian Townsend to his daughter
Mris. [Mary] Kirke" [b. after 1622;
m. in 1646 George Kirke, Groom of
the Bed-chamber to Charles I]. It
begins "Let not thy beautye make
thee proude." By the same. f. 10.
"Yonge Thirsis." By J. Wilson
[published with the addition of 2



parts in his Cheerfull Ayres, 1659].
f. 16.

4. " As oft I doe record." Anonymous,
f. 16b.

5. *"Come, louely Phillis"; with a
Latin version, " Philli Melita," by
Henry Jacob. "Hen. Lawes." f . 19b.

6. "He that will court a wench."
Anonymous, f. 22b.

7. " I can loue for an hower." Anony-
mous, f . 24.



SONGS.



479



8. "Noe, noel I tell thee noe." By
N. Laniere. [Published with the
addition of two other parts in
Wilson's Cheerful Ayrcs, 1659.] f . 25b.

9. "Amarillis by a springe." By J.
Wilson, f. 27b.

10. "The patterne often drawne in
minde." Anonymous, f. 28b.

11. "Here is a Bowie." Anonymous.
f.30.

12. "Fayne would I Cloris." By H.
Lawes. [In Select Aijres, 1659.] f. 30b.

13. *" Like Hermitt poore." "Nicholas
Lanier." f. 31b.

14. " Sorrowe in vaine." Anonymous.
f.33.

15. *"I loue, alas, but cannot shew
it." " John Willson." f . 36.

16. " How ill doth hee deserue." "Hen.
Lawes." f . 36b.



17. *" Why should I sweare " ; without
accompaniment. [Published in Select
Miisicall Ayres, 1652, as "French
air " ; in the following year as by
"Mr. Charles"; and in 1659 (in
Select Ayres and Dialogues) attributed
to " H. Lawes."] Followed by a reply,
"I sweare, hadst thou not bin for-
sworne " ; without music. Words by
Henry Ventrice. ff. 37b, 38.

18. *" Since loue hath in thine and
mine eye." " John Wilson." f . 39.

19. *"Clora's {sc. Cloris') falce loue."
By the same. f. 40b.

20. "All y« materialls are y* same."
By the same. f. 42.

21. "Who shall now grace our plaines,"
Anonymous, f . 45.

22. "Tell mee not I my time mis-
spend." " John Wilson." f. 45b.



A song, "'Twas not his Person," appears to have followed here, the
answer to which, "I will noe more enamoured bee," by Richard
Watkins, still remains, but without the music, f. 48b.



23. "Tell mee, ye starres." "John
Wilson." f. 49b.

24. *" Lay that sullen Garland by
thee." By J. Taylor, f. 50b.



25. " That beauteous creature."
"[Thomas] Stafford." [InNeio Ayres,
1678.] f . 52.



Words of a song, " See, these two little Brookes," by [William ?]
follow here, and the end of another song, the music to



Cart Wright,
both being lost.



f. 54b.



26. " Payrest Theina " ; with a second
part, " Laugh not, fond foole." "Dr.
[John] Wilson." fi. 57, 58b.

27. "I felt my hart." Anonymous.
f.57b.

28. " Amintor, oh thou faithless
swane " ; without accompaniment.
Anonymous, f . 60.

29. "Ah, cruell eyes " ; without accom-
paniment. Anonymous, ih.

30. "A Chine of Beefe." By E. Cole-
man. [Published, with two additional
parts, in the Musical Companion,
1673.] f. 61b.

31. " Though y° determine not to
loue." At the end of the words
Lowe has written ' ' I had this from
my Cos. Humph. Hyde, 13th Octo.,
1660 " (see also f. 65 and Diet, of
National Biography, vol. xxxiv, p.
187). f. 63.

32. " How bonney and brisk." "Rob.



Smith." [In Choice Songs, 1673.]
f . 63b.

33. "Deare Venus." At the end Lowe
has written "This and y' other page
77 (sc. f. 63) I had of my Cos. H.
Hyde at the same time. I put
y' Base for him to y" 3 songes."
f. 64b.

34. "When Aurelia first I Courted";
without accompaniment. By P.
Humfrey. [In Choice Songs, 1673.]
f.66.

35. "Like a Dogg with a Bottle."
Anonymous, f. 66b.

36. " What sighs and groans " ; without
accompaniment. By R. Smith. [In
Choice Ayres, 1676.] f. 68.

37. "I passe all my Howers " ; without
accompaniment. By P. Humfrey.
[In Choice Songs, 1673.] f. 68.

38. " Is she not wondrous fayre." " [E.]
Chilmeade." f. 70b.



480



VOCAL MUSIC— SECULAR.



39. " How happy's that Pris'ner " ; with
2-part chorus. Anonymous, f . 74b.

40. "No, no, 'tis in vain"; without
accompaniment. " Rob. Smith."
f . 76b.

41. "I lost my hart." This and nos.
42-45 are by "John Wilson." f. 79b.

42. " Vaile thou thine eyes." f. 80b.

43. "Ther is none, none, but I."
f. 81b.

44. " Let other beautyes haue y^
power." f. 82.

45. "Dry thos fayre, thos Christall
eyes." f. 82b.

46. " A vs[e]less pipe-stop I haue been."
Anonymous, f . 83b.

47. "0 doe not melt thy selfe in vaine."
" John Wilson." f.84b.

48. "See, see, my Cloris." "Hen.
Lawes." f. 89b.

49. "The nimph that vndoes mee";
without accompaniment. By T.
Stafford. [In Choice Songs, 1678.]
f . 90b.

50. "What meanes this nicenesse."
Anonymous, f. 91.

51. " the sad day." " Pell Humfrey."
f . 91b.

52. "Why should you bee soe full of
spight." Anonymous, f. 92b.

53. " Loue in thy youth, fayre mayde."
Anonymous, f. 93b.

For a further account of the
words, in this MS., see the index
of Thomas Oliphant.



54. " When cruell time enforced mee " ;
with second part, "Why by such a
brittle stone." By J. Wilson, f. 94b.

55. "Fug[g]ite, fug[g]ite gl' inganni
d' amore." By P. Reggio. [In Select
Ayres, 1669.] f. 96b.

56. " Amantj, ch' in Pianti " ; without
accompaniment. Anonymous, f. 97.

57. "Doue, done cor[r]i, mio core";
without accompaniment. Anony-
mous. [In Select Aijres,l&&9.'] f . 97b.

58. " No more, Clarinda." Anonymous,
f . 98b.

59. " Margarita first [possess'd]."
" Cap. Henry Cooke." f . 99.

60. " Forgiue me, Joue." " Tho.
Farmer." [In Choice Ayres, 1676.]
f. 100b.

61. "Chear up, my mates." "Pell
Humfrey." [In Choice Songs, 1673.]
f. 101b.

62. " Troppo e ver." This and numbers
63-66 are anonymous, f. 107.

63. " Tell me no more of Constancy " ;
without accompaniment, f. 107b.

64. "My life is now a burthen growne."
f. 109.

65. " Shall I then weep " ; without
accompaniment, f . 109b.

66. "Adeiue, fond world"; without
accompaniment, f. 111b.



Songs, etc., and especially of the
at the beginning of it, in the hand



Additional 33234, passim.

Paper; a.d. 1680-1682. Folio. Among later owners of the MS. were
P. Fussell, Organist of Winchester Cathedral, William Patten, and Vincent
Novello. The MS. includes other sacred and secular compositions described
elsewhere in this volume and in vol. i.

Songs, with a bass (unless the contrary is stated), apparently in
the hand of Charles Morgan, of Magdalen College [Oxford], who owned
the MS. in 1682 (see f. 1*).



1. "Vn jour le berger Tircis." "De-
bout." f. 3.

2. "Underneath this mirtle shade."
" Pietro Reggio." f. 6b.

3. " Here's a health to the King ; pledg'
it all in a Ring"; with a 3-part
chorus. Anonymous, f. 7b.



4. " Hercules in the cradle," beg. " The
big-limbd Babe." By the same.
f.l7.

5. " I'll sing of Heros." By the same,
f. 19.

6. " Awake, awake, my Lyre, and tell."
By the same, f . 20.



SONGS.



481



7. Dialogue (Death, Time and Phi-
lander), beg. "O Time, thy wings
are wet." Anonymous, f. 26b.

8. "The Bread is all baked." "John
Banister." f. 28b.

9. " Prom lasting and unclouded Day."
By the same. f. 30b.

10. "Yee Cats that at Midnight."
"John White." f. 34.

11. "Arise, yee subterranian Winds."
" Pietro Reggio." f. 38.

12. "You solitary deserts." By the
same, f . 40.

13. "All the foUys of love"; with
3-part chorus. " Hen. Hall."
f.46.

14. " Justly now let's Tribute pay " ;
with 3-part chorus, without a bass.
"Wise." f. 48.

15. "An amorous sigh." " S"" Est-
wich." f. 51.

16. " Hast[e], haste[e], gentle Charon" :
dialogue. "H. Purcell." f . 55.

17. "Has yet your breast no pitty
learn'd " : dialogue. By the same.
f.57.

18. " Cure, Nymph, oh cure." " Hart."
f. 59.

19. "Hark, Damon, hark": dialogue,
"PurceU." f. 59b.

20. " Come, poetry, and with you bring
along"; with 3-part chorus. "Dr.
Blow." f. 83.

21. " n Nerone " : cantata, beg. "Sopra
un' eccelsa Torre." " Stradella."
f. 118b.

22. " Lonely Silena." " D - Blow."
f. 123b.



23. " She loues and she confesses too."
" Hen. Purcell." f. 124b.

24. "Bess of Bedlam," beg. "From
silent shades." By the same. f. 125b.

25. "Nol," beg. "Hast[e], Charon,
hast[e] " : dialogue, with 3-part
chorus. "H.Hall." f. 129b.

26. "What art thou, Loue ? " " S'™
Estwich." f. 140b.

27. "When I a parting kiss"; with
3-part chorus. By H. Bowman.
f.l42.

28. "Urge me no more." "Purcell."
f. 145b.

29. "Peaceful is he and most secure."
"Blow." f. 147.

30. "Where art thou, God of dreams."
" Batteist " (? = G.-B. Draghi).
f. 149b.

31. "Alexis dear": song by "Mr.
[Thomas] Flatman on the death of
his son." " D"- Blow." f. 161b.

32. " Sciocca pur tutti." Anonymous,
f . 166.

33. "The clear Cavelier " ; without
words. Banister, f . 167.

34. " Louely Clarinda " ; with a ground
bass. Anonymous, f. 167b.

35. "A Grashopper and a fly": dia-
logue, without a bass. Anonymous.
On the Duke of Monmouth, f . 169b.

36. " The Fair Lover and his black
Mistress," beg. "0 Nigrocella."
"Blow." f.l70b.

37. "How happy 's y' lover"; with
2-part chorus. The music to the
song not filled in. " Hen. Purcell."
f . 171b.



Harley 1501, passim.

Paper; a.d. 1681. Folio. The MS. also contains a Motet (vol. i, p. 287),
sacred Songs (p. 428), Duets (above, p. 56), a Madrigal (p. 155), and numbers
from Operas (p. 229).

Songs, w^ith a figured bass for harpsichord, iii score, transcribed by
Pietro Reggio for Monsieur Didie, in London, 1681.



1. " Difenditi, o core." "Luiggi Rossi."
f. 12.



4. "Ohime, madre, aita." "Luiggi
Rossi." f. 15b.
2. "Chi d'amor diuien seguace." 5. " Sospiri ch' uscite." "Giacomo

Anonymous, f. 13. Carissimi." f. 16b.

8. " Scusateme ; non posso ": canzone, j 6. " Sta in tono." Anonymous.
Anonymous, f . 14. f . 17b.

11 2 I



482



VOCAL MUSIC— SECULAR.



7. "Pauille d' amore": canzonetta.
Anonymous, f. 18b.

8. "E gionto vn corriero " : canzone.
Anonymous, f. 19.

9. "V intendo, occhi." " Giacomo
Carissimi." f. 21.

10. " Sensi, voi." '« Padre Cesti."
f. 23b.

11. "Tumancaui." Anonymous. f.25b.

12. " Tradimento." Anonymous. f.26b.

13. " Ten pentirai." " Pietro Reggio."
f.29.

14. "Luci belle, dite " ; in two parts.
" Luiggi Rossi." f.31.

15. " Rissoluetevi, pensieri." "Bar-
bara Strozzi." f. 31b.

16. "Mioben,teco": canzone. "Luiggi
Rossi." f. 33.

17. "Air ombra d' una Speranza." By
the same, f . 34.

18. "No, miocor." "IlMiele." f . 34b.

19. "Son spezzate le Catene " : in two
parts. " Caualli." f. 35b.

20. " Chi mi credeua " ; in three parts.
" Luiggi Rossi." f. 86b.



21. " Voraggini ondose " : Venetian air.
f . 38b.

22. "Quand' hebbi d' oro il crin."
" Pietro Reggio." f. 39.

23. "No, no, mio core." "Giacomo
Carissimi." f. 40b.

24. " Non e stabile la fortuna." Anony-
mous, f . 42b.

25. " Solitudine amena." Anonymous.
f.44.

26. " Maledetta la Corte " ; in two
parts. " Francesco Lucio." f . 46b.

27. "II tempo piu non e." "Padre
Tiani (? = M. A. Ziani)." f. 57b.

28. "Amor, s' io mi querelo." "Luiggi
Rossi." f. 58b.

29. "Vo cercando la speranza." " Vin-
cenzo Albrici." f. 59.

30. " Sassi ch' hor qua." " Pietro
j Reggio." Words by " Cauaglier

Marini." f. 61.

31. "MandainobiliAllori." "Vincenzo
i Albrici." f. 66b.

32. " Non piu vilta." " Luiggi Rossi."
I f . 69b.



Additional 19759, passim.

Paper; about 1681 (in which year the 'MS. belonged to Charles Campelman).
Small Polio. It also contains an Anthem (vol. i, p. 28), sacred Songs (p. 428),
a Dance tune (after 1681) described in vol. iii, and other compositions described
in the present volume.

Songs without accompaniments. Anonymous, unless the contrary
is stated.



1. " Love you by all that's good." f. 2.

2. "I bring thee, 6 thou charming Fair."
" [James (?)] Hart." f.2b.

8. " Let's loue and let's laugh." " [J.]
Banister." f. 3.

4. " I loue and am lou'd." f. 3.

5. "To Cloris what I did pretend."
f.3b.

6. "One Night when all the village
sleep." " [L.] Grabue." f. 5.



11. " Poor Mariana." f. 7b.

12. " Strife, Hurry and Noyse." " Dr.
Blow." f. 8.

13. " Charming PhUlis." " [W. ?]
Turner." f. 8b.

14. "PastorataGalana." Words (?) by
" [Christopher ?] Fishborn." f. 8b.

15. " Song on the King's birthday : 'So
all was clear'd.' " " [N.] Stagings."
f.9.



7. "0 the sad day." By P. Humfrey. | 16. "0 the brave bloody day"; with
f . 6. chorus, f. 9b.

17. " From Celia's bright eyes."
"Stagings." f . 10.

18. " Arise, arise, ye subterranean
wind[s]." Attributed here to
"Grabue," but printed in 1680
among the compositions of P. Reggio.
f. 10b.



8. " Come, honest Sexton." " [H. ?]
Pursell." f. 6b.

9. "Let the tray tors plott " ; with
chorus. " [T. ?] Farmer." f. 7.

10. " On the King's birthday : 'Mighty
sir, 'tis alone to you.' " " Dr. Blow."
f.7b.



SONGS.



483



19. "Draw out thy Minutes." "Dr.
Blow." f. 11.

20. "Thepleasursofloue." "Stagings."
f. 12b.

21. " How peacefull the days." "Pur-
sell." f. 13.

22. "My life is now a burthen grown."
"Price." f. 13b.

23. "Alltho, Jolly Tom, much fame
thou hast wone." "Doctor Blow."
f . 14b.

24. "Let the graue fools goe preach."
"Pursell." f.l4b.

25. " Here's that will challing[e] all the
fair." By the same. This is really
a catch, written out at length, f . 15b.

26. "An Italian song to Baptista
[LvillyJ's Ground: ' Sc[i]oc[c]a pur.' "
f. 16.

27. "Life is but a measure." Words (?)
by " Fishborn." f . 16b.

28. "Hold, hold, and no further ad-
vance." f. 17.

29. " Un Berger qui se partage."
"Camber[t?]." f. 17.

30. " Fools for themselves will Treasure
prize." Words (?) by [T.] Shadwell.
f . 17b.

31. " Come, fill our glasses." "King."
f . 17b.

32. "Poor Coridon, thy flame remove."
f.l8.

33. " Kind lovers, love on." f. 18.

34. " Alass, poor Sheephard, the fault is
not mine." f. 18.

35. " No longer complaine." f. 18b.

36. "O joy, shepards." f. 18b.

37. "Since all our Greifes." "Stag-
ings." f. 18b.

38. " Lascia la spina " ; in a later hand,
with a few musical notes, f. 19.

39. " Begone, all fruitless joyes " ; with
chorus. " [J.] Banister." f . 19b.

40. "Bright was the morning."
Words (?) by Shadwell. f. 20.

41. "Spair, mighty love." "King."
f. 20.

42. "Long have I lov'd." "Pell
Humphries." f. 20b.

43. " Farwell, vngratfull Traytor."
"Gapt. Pack." f . 20b.

44. "Ah, the pangs of hopeless lovers."
f.21.

45. " Peacefull is hee and most secure."
"Dr. Blow." f.21b.



46. "Thus Mortalls must submitt too
fate." " Will Turner." f . 22b.

47. "On the Lord Rochester's death,"
beg. "As on his death bed." By
the same. Words by [T.] Flattman.
f.23.

48. " Hide, 6 hide, thou charming
Creature." "Stagings." f.23b.

49. " Since other Beautys." Words (?)
by " Fishborn." f. 2.3b.

50. "A pox upon this needless scorn."
"Capt. Pack." f.24.

51 . " Phillis has such charming graces."
f. 24b.

52. "I only tell you this." "King."
f . 25b.

53. "Wee've raised an Army." "Dr.
Blow." f. 26b.

54. "The Concealment," beg. "Some
others may with saf[e]ty tell." Words
by Cowley, f . 26b.

55. "While on those louely look[s] I
gaze." f . 27b.

56. "Ambitious Man, why dost thou
rayse." f. 27b.

57. "I have languisht so long." f. 28.

58. " How happy and free." f. 28.

59. " Beneath a dark and mellen-
cholly grove." "Henry Pursell."
f. 30b.

60. " A thousand seuerall wayes I tryd."
"Pursell." f.31.

61. " Silvia, forgiue mee my pass[i]on."
f.31b.

62. " The bright Clarinda." f. 31b.

63. "High states and honers." "[John]
Abell." f. 32b.

64. " Gon are my happy days." "J.
Hart." f. 33.

65. "Now ev'ry place fresh pleasure
yeilds." By the same. f. 33.

66. "Phillis, lay aside your thinking."
By the same, f . 33b.

67. "May th' ambitious ever find."'
By the same. f. 34.

68. " Prophanely I swore." "Taylor."'
f. 34b.

69. " See that silent blushing creature."'
"C'Pack." f.34b.

70. ' ' She who my poor heart possesses."
"Pursell." f. .35.

71. "In a dark shady Cypris groue."
f. 36b.

72. "I am a wretched louer." "Len-
tall." f. 37.

2 I 2



484



VOCAL MUSIC— SECULAR.



73. "As I went over Tawny Marsh."
f.37.

74. "When first I heard my Cloe's
voice." f. 40b.

75. " Beneath this gloomy shade."
"James Hart." f. 41b.



76. " Adiew to the course of a country
life." By the same. f. 42b.

77. " Tell mee, ere I'm gone to[o] far."
By the same, f . 42b.

78. "When, louely Phillis, thou art
kind." "Lentall." f.44.



Additional 22100, ff. i&h-lUh passim.

Paper; about 1682. Folio. See also under Anthems (vol. i, pp. 28-9).
Songs, with a bass, in score.



1. "These two full howres now have I
gazing bin." " [William] Hall." f.46b.

2. "Sc[i]occa pur tutti tuoi strali."
" [Jean] Baptist[e Lully]." 77b.

3. "Ah, Alexander, rowse." "James
Hart." f. 84.

4. "The Despondent Lover," beg.
"Divinest Syren." " M" Lock."
f. 92b.



5. "Prepare, prepare! New guests
draw near " : described as "Song of
Devills " ; with 4-part chorus.
"Turner." Words from Thomas
Shadwell's Libertine, 1676. f. 103.

6. "Hark, Damon, hark 1 What
Musick's this I hear " : dialogue,
vnth instrumental symphony, etc.
"Purcell." f. 117b.



Additional 29397, passim.

Paper ; about 1682-1690 (see f. 2b). Narrow oblong duodecimo. Book-plate of
Ralph Sympsun. The MS. also contains an Anthem (vol. i, p. 29), a sacred Song
(ib., p. 429), and other compositions described in the present volume.

Songs for the most part unaccompanied, but occasionally with a
bass for harpsichord, in score. Many are taken from John Playford's
Choice Ayres and Dialogues, 1673-1683, the Tlieatre of Music, 1685,
and other collections of that period. See indices by Thomas Oliphant
at the beginning and end of the volume.



1. " The bright Clarinda " ; with bass.
" Capt. Paoke." fi.4, 5b.

2. "How long do'e mean to torture
me." Anonymous, f . 4b.

3. "High states and honurs"; on a
ground. " Jo" Abell." f . 8b.

4. "How bonny and brisk"; with a
bass. " [Robert] Smith." f. lib.

5. " Mine own Sabina " ; with a bass.
"Char. Wren." f. 15b.

6. "I am a wretched lover"; with a
bass. Anonymous, f. 17b.

7. "Whilst on Septimius' panting
brest." Anonymous, f. 22.

8. "Let y" trumpet sound." By J.
Reading (?). f.24b.

9. "Love you by all that's good";
with a bass. Anonymous, fi. 29, 30.

10. "Iris on y" Banke of Thames";
with a bass. " T. Tudway." f. 29b.

11. "How delightfuU's y° life of an



innocent swain " ; with 2-part chorus
and bass. " H. Pur[ceU]." f . 31b.

12. "Ye cruel Gods"; with a bass.
"W. G." {sc. W. Gregory or W.
Gorton?), f . 33.

13. " Awake, faire goddess " ; with
3-part chorus. " Tho. Kingsley."
f . 38b.

14. "The Hermit," beg. "Hence, ye
vain mortals"; with 3-part chorus
and bass. By the same, f . 40b.

15. " Why is your faithful! slave dis-
dain'd"; with bass. " Courtevill."
f. 41b.

16. " Coelia once as mild as fair";
with bass. By the same. f. 42b.

Reversing the MS.

17. " The great Augustus " ; with 2-part
chorus and bass. " Dr. Blow." f. 85b.

18. "Arise, yee subteranean winds";



SONGS.



485



with phonetic spelling, apparently
for the use of a foreigner. "Pedro
[Reggio]." f. 78b.

19. " Bel tempo che vola " : ■with2-part
chorus. Anonymous, f. 76.

20. "Bess of Bedlem," beg. "From
silent shades." " H. Purs[ell]."
f.71.

21. " She loves and she confesses too."
By the same. f. 68b.

22. "Would you be a man in fashion."
" Capt. Peck " (sc. Pack), f. 66b.

23. "Alexis, dear Alexis"; withfigured
bass. "Dr. Blow." f. 66.

24. "Old Chyron." "Dr. Hens-
[tridge]." f. 58.



25. " Amonte, fougete " (sc. "Amanti,
fuggite," in Anglo-Italian spelling) ;
on a ground. Anonymous, f. 56b.

26. "Phillis,be gentler" ; with a bass.
"To. Tud[way]." f. 54b.

27. "Come, all yee tender Nymphs " ;
with a bass. By the same. f. 53b.

28. "0, quench these flames"; with
2-part chorus. Anonymous, f . 52b.

29. "State and ambition." Anony-
mous, f. 51.

30. " Why should Clausa " ; with a
bass. "Snow." f.45b.

31. "Beauty's crown"; with a bass.
"King" [G. Finger in the index].
f.45.



Additional 14218, ff. 1-117.



Paper ; a.d. 1083 (?).
cent.), below.



Oblong folio. See also under Songs (1st half of 18th



Italian Cantatas (in which many of the airs have a second verse)
and Arias, with a bass (occasionally figured) for harpsichord, in score.
On f. 1 is written " Anonimo, 1683 " {cf. i. 116b). They are all, with
the exception of no. 34, in the same hand ; and at the end of three
(fi". 86b, 109b, 110b) occur the initials A. N. (?) L., possibly those of
Antimo Liberati, who wrote music of this description, and who
published some of his compositions in the above year.



1. " Occhi belli, s' io v' adoro." f. 1.

2. "Mentre che in grembo." f. 5.

3. " Non si uanti." f . 10b.

4. " Confuso un di Fileno." f. 15b.

5. " Sopra d' un duro scoglio." f. 20b.

6. "Due pupille che son ridenti."
f.27.

7. " Su la spiaggia deserta." f. 33.

8. " Su la rota d'un pensiero." f. 38b.

9. " Hor che restita a bruno." f. 44.

10. " L' innamorato Aminta." f. 49b.

11. " Dentro una Torre." f. 54b.

12. "Poiche da lacci auuinto," f. 60.

13. " Con tributi di pianto." f. 64.

14. " 0, che strana armonia." f. 67b.

15. "Son ferita." f . 71.

16. " Che volete di piu, stelle." f. 72b.

17. " Nella selua d' un bel crine." f. 74.



18. "Placidi Zefiri." f . 76.

19. " Che piu sperate." f. 82b.

20. " Rendimi la mia pace." f . 84.

21. "Lusingami speranza." f. 85.

22. " Armati di coraggio." f. 87.

23. " L' astuto Amor." f. 92.

24. " Bella costanza." f.93b.

25. " Se volete che un fido v'
(sic). f.95b.

26. " Chi non tace." f . 96.

27. " Fra le porpore vezzose."

28. " Bionda chioma." f.lOOb

29. " Su, miei spirti." f. 102b.

30. " Mia speranza fuggitiua."

31. "La speranza mi tradisce."

32. "Ah, crudele, chi ripose."



adore



f. 99.



f. 104.
f. 107.
f. 108.



33. " Bellezza che s' ama."

34. "Riedi, amico." f. Ill



f. 109b.



486



VOCAL MUSIC— SECULAR.



Egerton 1527, fF. 56-58b passim.

Paper; about 1683-1684. Duodecimo.

Words and melodies of three songs, taken from the journal of
[James Scott] D[iike] of Monmouth, in whose hand they are (as
attested on f . lb by his uncle, James II.).



1. " With joie we do leave thee." The
" Tedington," suggested in the margin
as an alternative reading, is evidently
Toddington, co. Bedford (c/. f. 84),
where the Duke visited Lady Went-
worth on more than one occasion



(Diet. Nat. Biography, vol. Ix, p. 257).
ff. 56, 58.

2. " how blest and how in[n]ocent."
fE. 56b, 58.

3. " All ye Gods that ar above." &. 57,
58.



Additional 31440, ff. l-50b passim.
Paper ; before 1685 (?). Folio. See also under Motets (vol. i, p. 287).



a



f.lb.



Songs, with
Autograph {?).

1. " Lasciatemi qui solo."

2. "La gran Balena." f. 2b.

3. " Faretrato arcier." ib.

4. " Non u6 pill seguire." f. 3b.

5. "Se mille tormenti." f. 4b.

6. " Non andara cosi." ib.

7. "Chesofiri." f.5b.

8. " Tempo gia fu." ib.

9. " schiere d' amanti." f. 6b.

10. " Voi vedet' il mio mal." ib.

11. " Ecco ch' io verso il sangue." f. 7b.

12. " Aure placide." ib.

13. " Ascoltate i miei crucci." f. 8b.

14. " Piu non sento." f. 9b.

15. " Doppo un lungo seruire." ib.

16. "Non ui dolete." f. 10b.

17. " Mi convien di partir." f. lib.

18. " Non sei piu bella." Iviperfect at
the end. ib.

19. 20. Two songs, of which the first
lines are lost. f. 12.

21. "Cor mio, se questa fera."

22. " Perche, mio tesoro." ib.

23. "In bel seno." ff. 13, 17b.

24. " Fuggi, crudele." f. 13b.

25. " Ardo misero." f. 14b.

26. " Chiudete 1' orecchi." f. 17.

27. " Augelletti canori." f. 17b.

28. "Io v6 peuar." f . 18b.

29. "Fiumi e fonti." ib.

30. " Seguir piu non voglio."

31. " Non voglio amare." ib.
82. " Vdite, amanti." f . 20b.



bass for harpsichord, in score, by P. Reggio.



f. 12b.



f. 19b.



33. " Alle gioje"; with sinfonia for
lute. ib.

34. " Fuggi te gli inganni." f. 28b.

35. "Senti, Tirsi." ib.

36. "Cruda signora " ; with five
different modi (or variations), the
first of which, a chaconne, is
repeated as a ritournelle at the end
of each variation, f . 29b.

37. " Questa crudel." f . 30b.

38. " Bella Filli." f . 31b.

39. "Fillidemia." ib.

40. " Occhi soli d' Amore." f. 32b.

41. " Crud' Amarilli." f . 33b.

42. "Intenerite voi, lagrime mie."
f . 36b.

43. " Soccorso, oim^." f. 37b.

44. " Sciogli, ardito nocchier." f. 38b.

45. " dolce anima mia." f . 39b.

46. "Fill', il bel volto tuo." f. 40b.

47. "Bel Rusignuol." f. 41b.

48. "0 del silenzio figlio." f. 42b.

49. "Parlo miser'." f . 48b.

50. " che felice gioruo." f. 44b.

51. " Voglio morir." f. 45.



Online LibraryBritish Museum. Dept. of ManuscriptsCatalogue of manuscript music in the British museum (Volume 2) → online text (page 54 of 120)