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for strings and a bass (partially figured) for harpsichord, in score, by
Handel. Transcribed by Michael Rophino Lacy from the originals at
Buckingham Palace.

1. " Agrippina condotta a morire," beg.
" Dunque sara pur vero." f. 157.

2. "Pensieri notturni di Filli," beg.
"Nel dolce del oblio"; with flute
obbligato. f . 172.

3. " Spande ancor a mio dispetto."
f. 178.

4. " Un' alma in[n]amorata." f. 186.
6. " Figlio d' alte speranze." f. 196.



6. " Alpestre monte." f.204.

7. "Ah, crudel, nel pianto mio " ; with
oboes, etc. f. 208.

8. "Mi palpita il cor"; with oboe
obbligato. f . 252.

9. " Cuopre tal volta il cielo nube."
f. 259.

10. "Tufedel." f . 268.



Additional 31573, ff. 57-84 passim.
Paper ; 19th cent. Quarto and oblong folio, etc. See also vol. i, p. 386.

Cantatas, for a single voice, with Italian, French, Spanish, or
English words, and a few other songs — many of them only fragments
— with a bass (generally figured). Unless the contrary is stated, they
are by Handel, chiefly transcribed from the originals at Buckingham
Palace and elsewhere by Michael Rophino Lacy.



1. "No se emendera jamas"; with
guitar accompaniment, ff. 57-60, 81.



r orme fugaci " ; with accompani-
ments for strings, f. 61b (reversed).



2. "Armidaabbandonata,"beg. "Dietro 3. " Usignuol, che tra le fronde."
II 2 T



642



VOCAL MUSIC —SECULAR.



Apparently unpublished. Copied at
the British Museum [? from Add.
14207] in 1858. fi. 62-63b.

4. "Delbelidolomio." Folio. f!.64-66b.

6. " Clori, degli occhi miei." f. 67.

6. "Stand round, my brave boys":
Song with chorus, made for the
Gentlemen- Volunteers of the City of
London, 1745. f. 69.

7. " Phillis the lovely" ; from " [George]
Bickham's coll[ectio]n " [sc. The
Musical Entertainer, published in
1734, etc.). Adapted from a minuet
of Handel's, f. 69b.

8. " Fuggite, ah si " : Recitative "found
after ' Volea pur'" (?) in a volume
of cantatas at Buckingham Palace.
Apparently unpublished, f. 70.

9. "Look down, harmonious saint":
Cantata for a tenor voice, in honour



of St. Cecilia. Published with instru-
ments by the Handel-Gesellschaft
(vol. liia). f. 70.

10. " Lungi dal mio bel nume" : the
first of the two cantatas of that
name published by the same society
(vol. 1). f. 72.

11. Recit., " L' insatiabil fantasia,"
and aria, " Troppo audace"; with
string accompaniments. Apparently
unpublished, f . 73.

12. " Vous qui m' aviez procure." f. 74.

13. "Sans y penser a Tirsis j'ai s(?eu
plaire " : Chanson, f. 79.

14. " S'il ne failloit (sic) que bien
aimer." f. 79b.

15. " Long live the Queen " : an
adaption by Lacy of no. 6 (above).
f.84.



Additional 32314, fF. 8-25b.

Paper ; 19th cent. Oblong folio. See also vol. i, p. 136.

Three Italian Cantatas, the first two for a soprano, the last for a
tenor, with symphonies and accompaniments for strings (and, in the
case of no. 3, a figured bass for harpsichord), in score, by K. H. Graun.



1. " Tirsi, povero Tirsi." f. 8.

2. "Apollo amante di Daphne," beg.
" Ferma, Dafne crudel." f. 13.



3. "La Gelosia,"
Cruccio." f. 19.



beg. " Ahi, qual



Additional 32394, flf. 1-23.

Paper ; 19th cent. Large quarto. See also vol. i, p. 228.

" La Cassandra " : Cantata, for an alto voice, with bass for harp-
sichord, in score, by Benedetto Marcello. Transcribed from the
original at Vienna, apparently for Otto Jahn (see f. 1).



Egerton 2422.

Paper ; ff. 219. 19th cent. Folio.

Alphabetical inde.x to the first lines of 7442 English songs and
other compositions for 2 or 3 voices, chiefly of the 17th and 18th
centuries, written on as many slips of paper and pasted down. In the
hand of Thomas Oliphant.



( 643 )



SECTIOIvr XVIII.— TABLE-ENTEETAINMENTS/



Additional 30950, f. 135b.

Paper ; about 1769. Quarto. See also above, p. 373.

Fragment of the air, " The Thrasher" [beg. " Can any king be half
so great"; composed in 1769, and introduced into "Rent-day," in
1808]. By Charles Dibdin. Autograph.

Additional 30956, ff. 27, 72.

Paper ; about 1790. Oblong quarto. See also above, p. 378.

Songs from " The Oddities " (see Add. 25073, below), by Charles
Dibdin. Autograph.

1. "Crown me, Bacchus"; without
accompaniment. A Sketch, f. 27.



2. " A Sailor's life " ; with bass. f. 72.



Additional 25073, ff. 8b-17 ; 25076, f. 12b.

Paper ; about 1791. Oblong folio. See also above, p. 322.

Songs, with a bass for harpsichord or pianoforte, in score, by
[Charles] Dibdin. Where not otherwise described, they are from " The
Oddities," first produced in 1789 and revived in 1790. No. 4 must
have been written for a still later revival, if it alludes, as is supposed,
to the inundation of February, 1791.

25073. 1. "The Watery Grave," beg. i 6. "Of the ancients its speaking, my
"Would you hear a sad story." i soul, you'd be after." f. 13b.



[Prom " The Wags," 1790.] f. 8b.

2. " The Lamplighter," beg. " I'm jolly
Dick." f.9b.

3. "Poor Tom [Bowling]," beg. "Here
a sheer hulk." f. 10b.

4. " ' Wigs,' or ' The Inundation,' " beg.
"Good people, attend to my lay."
f. lib.

5. "The Greenwich Pensioner," beg.
" 'Twas in the good ship Rover."
f. 12b.



7. " The Flowing Can," beg. "A
Sailor's life." f. 14b.

8. "Partrick (sic) Row." [From "The
Wags."] f. 15b.

9. "Death or Victory," beg. "Hark,
the din of distant war." f. 16b.

25076. "Poor Jack," beg. "Go, patter
to lubbers." [From "The Whim of
the Moment," 1789.] f. 12b.



Additional 27932, f. 29.

Paper ; late 18th cent. Octavo. See also above, p. 281.

Melody of " Sweet Willi' O." [From " The Jubilee," by Charles
Dibdin, 1769.]

* As performed in England by Charles Dibdin.

2 T 2



644



VOCAL MUSIC— SECULAR.



Additional 30951-30955, passim.

Paper ; 18th-19th cent. Quarto. See also above, p. 373.

Songs, etc., from Table-Entertainments, by Charles Dibclin. Auto-
graph. The accompaniments are for pianoforte, violin, and two flutes,
in most cases, in score. Many of them ai'e imperfect. In five
volumes.



30951. 1." Old Mary." [From "A Tour
to the Laud's End," 1798.] f. 7.

2. " Their risible muscles." [From
"The Sphinx," 1797-1798.] f. 19.

3. " Though mountains high the
billows roll." [From the same.] f . 20.

4. " Mat Mudge." [From " The Cake-
house," 1800.] f. 88.

5. "Why, Jack, my fine fellow." [From
" The Sphinx."] f. 52.

6. "Jack dances and sings"; with a
flute part. [From "The Wags."]
f.59.

7. " When Winifred 's gone far away " ;
without flutes. [From " The
Quizzes," 1791.] f. 71.

8. " Since united we are." From
" Britons, strike home " [1803].
Followed by the printed libretto,
f. 73.

9. "Of all the lives that ever was
lived." [From "Tom Wilkins," 1799.]
f. 101.

10. "Britannia's name"; with piano-
forte only. [From " Rent-day,"
1808.] f. 104b.

11. " 'Tis allowed the world over."
[From "The Professional Volun-
teers," 1808.] f. 106.

12. "If the good old maxim['s] true."
[From "The Cake-house."] f. 107b.

13. "An Irishman's tongue." [From
" Tom Wilkins."] f. 111.

14. "Did you ever hear of Captain
Wattle." [From " The Sphinx."]
f . 117.

15. " Say, Soldier, which of Glory's
charms"; without flutes. [From
" Great News," 1795.] f. 127.

16. " The Christmas Gambols " [1795] :
finale (sung by three performers),
beg. " Come, all who love" ; without
flutes, f. 130.

17. " Elfin Filma, hither trip." [From
" Datchet Mead," 1797.] f. 154.



18. " Ingenious bards." [From " Tom
Wilkins."] f. 160.

19. ' ' Don't you know that Pythagoras."
f . 166.

20. " Again the willing trump of fame."
[From " The Sphinx."] f. 168.

21. "The wind blew hard"; with
2 flutes or violins and guitar. [From
" The Oddities."] f. 174.

22. "What victims are lovers"; with
pianoforte only. [From " Heads or
Tails," 1805.] f. 176b.

23. "Farmer Sod." f. 180b.

24. "Mother were dead." [From "A
Frisk," 1801.] f . 182.

25. " Says my father, says he." [From
" Castles in the air," 1793.] f. 183.

26. " What charm adds sweetest
grace " ; without flutes. [From
" The Cake-house."] f. 185.

27. " All ye who Britons bear the
name." [From " The Sphinx."] f. 192.

30952. 1. " It blew great guns." [From
" Professional Volunteers."] f. lb.

2. " Adieu, sweet home." f. 5.

3. " 'Twas one morning in May " ;
without flutes. [From "King and
Queen," 1799.] f. 13.

4. " Hark, hark, of War the dreadful
clangour." [From " Tom Wilkins."]
f.21.

5. " Scarce come to London." [From
" The Cake-house."] f . 36.

6. "Be it known to all"; without
flutes. [From " The Whim of the
Moment."] f. 41b.

7. " Say, as her grief thou bid'st her
dry": Recitative and Air, without
flutes, f . 44.

8. "Armed with Jav'lin"; without
flutes. [From "The Whim of the
Moment."] f . 69.

9. "Ah, when will, alas, my poor
bosom be calm." f. 73b.



TABLE-ENTERTAIISrMENTS.



645



10. "I lov3 to be good": words of
verse 2 of a song, with the accom-
paniment, f. 81.

11. " In this house they are talking
from morning to night " ; without
flutes. [From " A Frisk."] f.83b.

12. " Mighty love, our hopes be-
guiling"; without flutes, f . 86b.

13. " A splinter queer'd my

larboard gum." f. 114.

14. " We tars are all for fun." [From
" The Cake-house."] f. 115b.

15. "At Wapping I landed." [From
"A Frisk."] f . 116.

16. " If ever a sailor was fond of good
sport." [From " Castles in the air."]
f. 119.

17. " I'm jolly Dick, the Lamplighter " ;
with guitar and flute. [From " The
Oddities."] f. 123b.

18. " To prove pleasure but pain."
[From "The Tour to the Land's
End."] f. 128.

19. "I shew, you see, the sl[e]ight of
hand"; with bass only. [From
"TomWilkins."] f. 132.

20. "Let others drain the flowing
bowl." f. 134.

21. "Her form was celestial" ; without
flutes. [From " A Frisk."] f. 139.

22. "A woman grown." [From "The
Cake-house."] f. 146b.

23. "The Poet says that love's like
fire." [From " The Will o' the Wisp,"
1795.] f . 148.

24. " 'Tis said that love." [From "The
Sphinx."] f. 150.

25. 26. "Thou knowest, my dear Lum-
kin," and "Oh, to hand, reef and
steer." [From " Professional Volun-
teers."] ff. 151b, 153b.

27. "Madam Vandercrout." [From
"TomWilkins."] f . 155.

28. ' ' When once the din of war 's be-
gun"; without flutes. [From " The
Tour to the Land's End."] f. 158.

29. 30. "Ye maids and ye bachelors"
(without flutes), and "Noted for
lasses, kind and sweet." [From "The
Sphinx."] n. 164, 169.

31. "Two real Tars." [From "The
Wags."] f. 175.

32. "My love's a vessel, trim and
gay." [From "The Cake-house."]
f . 180.



33. "You ask how it comes." [From
"The Tour to the Land's End."]

. f. 184.

34. "Mayhap you have heard." [From
" The Sphinx."] f. 188.

35. "Though pleasure 's easily defin'd."
[From " Castles in the air."] f. 190.

36. "Let swabs with their wows."
[From " Tom Wilkins."] f. 192.

30953. 1. "WhyI'msingingofFrench."
[From "Tom Wilkins."] f. 1.

2. "I say, my heart, why, here's your
works." [From "The Tour to the
Land's End."] f . 7.

3. " The world's a good thing." [From
" Castles in the air."] f . 16.

4. "I forget what Sterne says in his
chapter of noses." [From "Rent-
Day."] Two copies, the first with
orchestral, the second with pianoforte,
accompaniment, ff . 20, 22.

5. "Now let the Joy's {sic) our hearts
expand" : finale [to "The Professional
Volunteers"]. Treble part only. f. 25.

6. "Patrick O'Row " ; with flute and
guitar. [Prom " The Wags."] f. 71.

7. "You've heard of Venus." [From
" Heads or Tails."] f . 82.

8. "Celia, eighteen her next birthday."
[From "The Cake-house."] f. 84.

9. "Tell me not of men's follies."
[Prom "Great News."] f. 87.

10. "From prudence let my joys take
birth." [From "The Whim of the.
Moment."] f . 90b.

11. "My lyre once again." [Introduced
in " The Frolic," 1804.] f. 94.

12. "Go, patter to lubbers"; with a
bass only. [From "The Whim of
the Moment."] f. 98.

13. "Man, poor forked animal." [From
"TomWilkins."] f. 103.

.14. " They tell me I'm mad " ; without
flutes. [From "The Oddities."] f . 107.

15. " Come, join me, fellow subjects " ;
without flutes. Two copies, ff. 108,
109b.

16. "Says the Parson of the Parish."
[From ' 'Valentine's Day," 1804.] f . 113.

17. "TheSquirrel that jingles his bells."
[Prom " Great News."] f. 115.

18. "Young Shenkin." [From "The
Wags."] f. 127.

I 19. " Since love is the Hero's first



646



VOCAL MUSIC— SECULAR.



duty"; without flutes. [From " The
Tour."] f.l31.

20. "Come round me, ye husbands."
[From " The Sphinx."] f. 141.

21. "The weather, the land and all
those that dwell in it." [From " The
Oddities."] f . 142.

22. "A Sailor is the Soldier's friend."
[From "Britons, strike home."]
f. 147.

23. " Some say topers should never get
meUow." [From "The Sphinx."]
f. 149.

24. "Sure, don't they call me Straw-
berry Pat." [From "The Tour."]
f . 155.

25. " Sweet is the dew-drop." [From
" The Oddities."] f. 157b.

26. "Like Etna's dread Volcano";
without flutes. [From ' ' The Tour."]
f. 164.

27. " I go in London about the street."
[From the same work.] f. 172.

28. "I've oftentimes thought it a won-
dersome thing." [From "The Pro-
fessional Volunteers."] f . 174.

29. "Love's a flame." [From "Tom
Wilkins."] f. 175.

30. 31. "The war's begun," and "Come,
brother soldiers " ; with orchestral
accompaniments. [From "Britons,
strike home."] fi. 178, 187.

32. " Since fate of Sailors hourly
varies." [From "The Cake-house."
f. 193.

33. "Like other lubbers " ; with orche-
stral accompaniments. [From ' ' Rent-
day."] f. 198.

34. "From the Lark's playful notes" ;
with pianoforte. [From the same.]
f. 200.

35,36. "Dick Hopeful," and "Why,
Measter, damn tha." [From "The
Tour."] ff. 204, 208.

37. "Now we're all met"; without
flutes. [From "The Sphinx."] f. 210.

30954. 1. " What song shall I chant."
[From " The Wags."] f. 1.

2. " The friendly party now a[r]rive."
[From " Rent-day."] f . 3.

3. "Of all heaven gave to comfort man."
[From "King and Queen."] f. 10.

4. "A Gard'ner I be." [From "The
Sphinx."] f. 12.



5. "I'm what the world calls, Sir, a
general lover." [From "Britons,
strike home."] f. 14.

6. "An Englishman's courage." [From
"The General Election," 1796.]
f.20.

7. " 'Twas in the good ship Rover";
without flutes. [From "The
Oddities."] f . 24.

8. "The French are all coming."
[From "King and Queen."] f. 84.

9. "Sure, en't I the Drummer." [From
" Tom Wilkins."] f. 36.

10. "Oh, to hand, reef and steer."
[From "Professional Volunteers."]
f. 46b.

11. "I am a jolly fisherman " ; without
flutes. [From "The Whim of the
Moment."] f. 48b.

12. 13. "Though, ladies, to you I my
verses inscribe," and "The Plough-
man whistles o'er the furrow." [From
" The Sphinx."] ff . 50, 52.

14. " Slipt from her mother's apron-
string." [From "Tom Wilkins."]
f.54.

15. "The spangled green"; without
flutes. [From "The Whim."] ff. 57b,
59b.

16. "As pensive one night in my garret
I sate." [From " Tom Wilkins."]
f. 61.

17. "We're all of us labourers " ; with-
out flutes. [From "Rent-day."]
f . 65b.

18. "Up from a loblolly boy." [From
"The Frisk."] f. 68.

19. "Thou think'st thou'rt mighty
witty"; without flutes. [From
"Rent-day."] f . 76b.

20. "Long by some fair one was I
tricked." [From "King and Queen."]
f. 82.

21. "I that once was a ploughman."
[From "Private Theatricals," 1791.]
f.83.

22. " Now that war has in human
distress done its best." [From "The
Frisk."] f. 85.

23. "The grey-eyed Aurora " ; without
flutes. [From "The Whim of the
Moment."] f. 89b.

24. "One Negro and his Banjer."
[From " The Wags."] f. 111.

25. "Shoes, hat[s] and old Cloaths."



TABLE-ENTERTAINMENTS.



647



[From "Tom Wilkins."] Words
only. f. 113b.

26. "The beacon's fired." [From "Pro-
fessional Volunteers."] f. 116b.

27. "We poets with more in the head
than the pm-se." [From "The Cake
House."] f. 118b.

28. "Hence, fell discontent." [From
" Tom Wilkins."] f. 122.

29. "Ye Britons, rejoice " ; with a bass
only. [From " Rent-day."] f. 126.

30. " See the shore lined with gazers."
[From " Tom Wilkins."] f. 129b.

31. "Smiling grog"; without flutes.
[From "The Whim of the Moment."]
f. 148.

32. "Come, listen to a seaman's ditty."
[From "Britons, strike home."]
f. 150.

33. "Inspired by so grateful a duty."
[From "Great News."] f. 158.

34. 35. "Of all sensations pity brings,"
and ' ' What though from Venus Cupid
sprung " ; without flutes. [From
" The Whim of the Moment."] ff. 160,
161.

36. " Cosmelia the fair." [From " The
Cake-house."] f. 166.

37. "Jack Binacle." [From "King
and Queen."] f. 167.

38. "On Olympus' blue summit."
[From "The Will o' the Wisp."]
f. 169.

39. "When to man the distinguishing
form." [From " Castles in the air."]
f. 171.

40. "The Telegraphe," beg. "If you'll
only just promise." [From "The
Coalition," 1792.] f . 173.

41. "The Titans are conquer'd." [From
"The Tour to the Land's End."]
f . 176.

42. "The breeze was fresh." [From
" Castles in the air."] f. 179b.



43. "You've all of you heard about
Bayes's eclipse." [From "Rent-
day."] f. 181b.

44. " Come, join every heart." [From
" The Cake-house."] f. 183.

45. "Yanko, he tell"; without flutes.
[From " The Whim of the Moment."]
f . 187.

46. "A voyage at sea." [From " The
Frisk."] f. 189.

47. "A Watchman I am"; without
flutes. [From " Castles in the air."]
f. 193.

48. "Walk in, walk in." [From " A
Tour to the Land's End."] f. 197.

49. "I am the World's Epitome";
without flutes. [From " The Whim
of the Moment."] f. 199.

30955. 1 . " Tho' doubts and fears alter-
nate rise." f. 4.

2. "I went to sea all so fearlessly."
[From "The Sphinx."] f. 19.

3. "Tom Transom." From "The
Frolic." f. 23.

4. " Why, what's that to you." [From
"The Tour."] f . 30.

5. "True Friendship." [From "The
Sphinx."] f. 34.

6. "When Dry den wrote"; followed
by a march for horns, clarinets,
bassoons, etc. [From ' ' Britons, strike
home."] f.46.

7. " As wit and beauty." [From "The
Quizzes."] f . 107.

8. " 'Tis said, we venturous die-hards."
[From " The Whim."] f. 115.

9. " An ignorant peasant called Murdoch
Macmora." [From " Heads or Tails."]
f.l23.

10. " My name, dye see, 's Tom Tough."
[From " The Tour."] f. 133.

11. "... . bad off as we." Imperfect
at the beginning, f. 173.



Additional 30958-30967, passim.

Paper ; 18th-19th cent. Octavo, etc.

Words of Table-Entertainments by Charles Dibdin. Mostly auto-
grapli. The titles or initial words of the principal ones are given in
Index I of the present Catalogue.



648 VOCAL MUSIC— SECULAR.

Additional 30967, ff. 30, 67.
Paper ; about 1808. Oblong folio. See also above, p. 112.

Glees for 3 voices, in score. [From " Rent-Day," by Charles
Dibdin.]



1. " Here 's a health to good Sir
Thomas " ; with a bass. f. 30.



2. " The Ploughman makes the fur-
rows." f . 67.



SECTION XIX.— TEIOS.*



Additional 36929, £. 59.



Vellum; 13th cent. 7 x 5| in. For a description of the MS., see Catalogue
of Additions, 1900-1905.

" CoRMACDS scripsit hoc psalterium ; ora pro eo. Qui legis hec, ora
pro sese qualibet hora " : colophon at the end of part i of a Psalter
written in an Irish hand, accompanied by musical notes for 3 voices,
represented by neums on staves of 4 red lines with the B quadratum
signature. The bars roughly scored through the music are probably of
a rather later date.



Additional 31432, tf. 7b-39b passim.

Paper ; first half of 17th cent. Folio. See also above, p. 473.

Compositions for 3 voices, with a bass for harpsichord, in score, by
William Lawes.

1. " A hall, a hall." f.7b. | 5. "The Catts, as other Creatures."

2. " When each Lyne 's a faithfull
drinker." f. 15.

3. " What hoe, wee come to be merry."
f. 18b.

4. " A Health, a health ... to the
no[r]therne Lasse." f . 21b.



f. 22b.
6. A " Trialogue " (Alecto, Orpheus, and
Euridice),beg. " Orpheus, Orpheus,
gently touch thy Lesbyan Lyre."
f . 39b.



Additional 11608, ff. 67b, 81.

Paper ; a.d. 1656-1659. Oblong folio. See also above, p. 474.

Compositions for 3 voices, by Englishmen of the 17th century.

1. "Tyrant Cupid, I'le appeale from j 2. "Beauties, have yee scene a Toy
thee": trio, in parts. "Dr. John called Love"; in score. By Henry

Wilson." f . 67b. ! Lawes [1655]. f. 81.



* Possibly a few of the earlier imaccompanied compositions described under
this heading were intended as Part-songs, and a few of the accompanied ones as
Choruses.



TRIOS. 649

Additional 10338, f. 24b.

Paper ; after 1669. Small folio. See also vol. i, p. 283.

" MusiCK, thou Queen of soules " ; for 3 voices, with a bass, in
score, in the hand of George Jeffreys, who is presumably the composer.

Additional 29396, f. 18.

Paper ; about 1678-1682. Folio. See also under Songs (above, p. 478).

" Gather y"" (sic) rosebuds, while you may " ; for 3 voices, in
score, by William Lawes [1652]. For the basso continuo part, see
Add. a0827, f. 10b (below, p. 651) ; see also Add. 31432, f. 33b (under
Songs, above, p. 473), for the original setting.

Additional 30930, f. 6.

Paper ; about 1680. Folio. See also under Anthems, in vol. i, p. 27.

" When on my sick bed I languish " ; for 3 voices, in score, by
Henry Purcell. Autograph.

Additional 33234, f. 151.
Paper; a.d. 1680-1682. Folio. See also under Songs, above, p. 480.

Another copy of the preceding Trio ; with a bass for harpsichord,
in score.

Additional 19759, f. 8.

Paper ; about 1681. Small folio. See also under Songs (above, p. 482).

" Fly, boy, fly " ; for 3 voices, with a bass. [By Simon Ives, in
Select Ayres and Dialogues, 1659.] Treble only.

Additional 22100, ff. 87, 94, 98b.

Paper ; about 1682. Folio. See also vol. i, p. 28.
Trios, in score, by [William] Turner.



1. " See, where she sitts " ; with bass
solo in the middle, f. 87.

2. " Farwell, farwell, fair Saint ; " with



accompaniments for flutes, etc. f . 94.
3. " See, see, how y* flowrs adorn y=
spring." f.98b.



Additional 29397, f. 74 (reversed).

Paper ; about 1682-1690 (?). Narrow oblong duodecimo. See also under
Songs (above, p. 484).

" Ecco r alba " ; for 3 voices, in score, by Carissimi.



650 VOCAL MUSIC— SECULAR.

Additional 31440, ff. 100b-145b passm.

Paper ; before 1685 (?). Polio. See also vol. i, p. 287.

Trios, with a bass for harpsichord, in score, by Pietro Reggio
(?;. f. 157). Autograph (1).



1. " Sempre terro memoria." f . 100b.

2. " II crudo amore." f. 113b.

3. " E cosi pur languendo." f. 126b.



4. "Id rido, amanti." f. 142b.

5. " Taci, Armelin." f, 144b.

6. " Da[l]le piume, amorosetta." f.l45b.



Harley 1267, ff. 1, 6b.

Paper ; late 17tb cent. Narrow oblong octavo. See also above, p. 234,
Trios, with a bass, in score. Anonymous.
1. "Con vn sospir." f. 1. | 2. " Tutto e gioja." f . 6b.

Additional 29481, ff. 39b, 44.

Paper ; late 17tb cent. Small oblong folio. See also vol. i, p. 40.

Portions of two vocal compositions, appai'ently taken from Select
Ayres and Dialogues, 1659, where they are described as " Glees" ; they
are, however, intended to be accompanied by the bass-viol.



1. " Bring out the cold chine." Only
first three bars of treble. By Dr. J.
Wilson. See also Add. 19269, f.202,
for the words, f. 39b.



2. "Fly, boy, to the cellers (sic)."
Treble and bass parts only. By S,
Ives. f. 44 (reversed).



Additional 33236, f. 14b.

Paper ; late 17th cent. Folio. See also vol. i, p. 38.

" When on my sick-bed " ; for 3 voices, with a bass for harpsichord,
in score, by Henry Purcell. Corrected by Dr. Philip Hayes from the
original MS. (now Add. 30930 ; see above, p. 649).

Additional 33287, f. 8b.

Paper ; late 17th cent. Large folio. See also above, p. 212.

" Farewell, fair saint " ; with accompaniments for strings, in score.
By William Turner.

Egerton 2013, ff. 66-68.

Paper ; 17th-18th cent. Folio. See also above, p. 476.

Dialogue between Venus, Adonis, and a Messenger, beg. "Awake,
fair Venus " ; with a figured bass for harpsichord, in score. By
John Lenton.



TRIOS.



651



Additional 14229, ff. 129-1 38b.
Paper ; 17th-18th cent. Oblong folio. See also above, p. 514.

Trios, with a bass for harpsichord or violoncello, in score.

1. "Chi piu sa." " [Giacomo] Caris- ' " Mario Sauioni." f. 132b.
s[i]mi." f.l29. [ 3. " Con piede lento." " Carlo [Cesa-

2. " Soffra pur un cor Amante." j rini] del Violino." f. 13-ib.



Additional 30826, f. lib; 30827, 30828, f. 10b.

Paper ; 17th-18tli cent. Oblong duodecimo. See also under String Quintets
(early 17th cent.), in vol. iii.

Compositions for 3 voices [from The Second Boohe of Ayres ....
for three Voyces with a thoroio Basse, 1652].

1. "I wish no more." 1st and 2nd 2. "Gather your rosebuds." Basso



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